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Encyclopedia > Chicago 'L'
The 'L'
Locale Chicago, Illinois
Transit type Rapid transit
Began operation 1892
System length 106.1 mi (170.6 km)
No. of lines 8
No. of stations 144
Daily ridership 658,524 (avg. weekday, 2006)
Track gauge 1,435 mm (4 ft 8½ in) (standard gauge)
Operator Chicago Transit Authority (CTA)

The 'L'[1], variously, if perhaps incorrectly, styled "L," El, EL, or L, is the rapid transit system that serves Chicago, Illinois in the United States. Image File history File links Chicago_Transit_Authority_Logo. ... Flag Seal Nickname: The Windy City Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location Location in Chicagoland and northern Illinois Coordinates , Government Country State Counties United States Illinois Cook, DuPage Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 606. ... Skytrain Bangkok. ... A rapid transit, underground, subway, tube, elevated, or metro(politan) system is a railway—usually in an urban area—with a high capacity and frequency of service, and grade separation from other traffic. ... 1892 (MDCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... A mile is a unit of length, usually used to measure distance, in a number of different systems, including Imperial units, United States customary units and Norwegian/Swedish mil. ... km redirects here. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... The dominant rail gauge in each country shown Rail gauge is the distance between the inner sides of the two parallel rails that make up a railway track. ... A millimetre (American spelling: millimeter, symbol mm) is an SI unit of length that is equal to one thousandth of a metre. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... An inch (plural: inches; symbol or abbreviation: in or, sometimes, ″ - a double prime) is the name of a unit of length in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... As railways developed and expanded one of the key issues to be decided was that of the rail gauge (the distance between the two rails of the track) which should be used. ... Chicago Transit Authority, also known as CTA, is the operator of mass transit within the City of Chicago, Illinois. ... The L[1], variously, if perhaps incorrectly, styled L, El, EL, or L, is the rapid transit system that serves Chicago, Illinois in the United States. ... A rapid transit, underground, subway, tube, elevated, or metro(politan) system is a railway—usually in an urban area—with a high capacity and frequency of service, and grade separation from other traffic. ... Flag Seal Nickname: The Windy City Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location Location in Chicagoland and northern Illinois Coordinates , Government Country State Counties United States Illinois Cook, DuPage Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 606. ...


It is operated by the Chicago Transit Authority (CTA). It has been credited with helping create the densely built-up downtown that is one of Chicago's distinguishing features.[2] Chicago Transit Authority, also known as CTA, is the operator of mass transit within the City of Chicago, Illinois. ...

Contents

Description

The 'L' consists of a network of eight heavy rail lines totalling 106.1 route miles (57.1 miles elevated, 36.9 miles surface, and 12.1 miles subway) on over 242.6 miles of double-track rail line with 144 stations. The oldest section dates from 1892. The 'L' primarily serves the city proper plus eight close-in suburbs; service to more distant suburbs is provided by the Metra and South Shore Line (NICTD) commuter rail systems. Seventeen stations, mainly newer or at outlying locations, include park and ride facilities with a total of more than 6,600 parking spaces. About 15% of the total track length is underground. The term heavy rail is often used for regular railways, to distinguish from systems such as trams/light rail and metro. ... Housing subdivision near Union, Kentucky, a suburb of Cincinnati, Ohio. ... Metra (officially the Northeast Illinois Regional Commuter Railroad Corporation) is Chicagolands commuter rail system, serving over 200 stations on 11 lines across the Regional Transportation Authoritys six-county service area (Cook, DuPage, Kane, Lake, McHenry and Will Counties) providing over 67 million rides annually. ... The South Shore Line is an electrically powered interurban streetcar line operated by the Northern Indiana Commuter Transportation District (NICTD) between Randolph Street Terminal in downtown Chicago, Illinois and the South Bend Regional Airport in South Bend, Indiana. ... a park-and-ride bus in Oxford Park and ride terminals are public transport stations that allow commuters to drive short distances in their personal automobiles to catch a ride on a bus or railroad system (usually classified as light rail or the heavier commuter rail). ...


The 'L' is the third busiest rail mass transit system in the United States, behind New York City's and Washington, D.C.'s; and by age is the second oldest rapid transit system in the Americas after Boston. [3] World map showing the Americas CIA political map of the Americas The Americas are the lands of the Western hemisphere or New World consisting of the continents of North America[1] and South America with their associated islands and regions. ...


It is one of the few rapid transit systems in North America providing 24-hour service, though only on the two busiest lines.[4] On average 658,524 people ride the 'L' each weekday, 419,258 each Saturday, and 315,240 each Sunday.[5] Annual ridership for 2006 was 195.2 million, the highest since 1993.[6].[7] Weekdays are the days of the week which are not part of the weekend, i. ...


Although the 'L' gained its nickname because large parts of the system are elevated,[8] the Red and Blue lines traverse the downtown area in subways, and also have long sections in the medians of expressways that lead into and out of Chicago. Chicago pioneered the use of the expressway median for rail lines in the 1950s. There are also open-cut and/or grade-level portions (with street crossings) on some parts of the system. A rapid transit, underground, subway, tube, elevated, or metro(politan) system is a railway—usually in an urban area—with a high capacity and frequency of service, and grade separation from other traffic. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ...


Noisy and at times slow and overwhelmingly crowded, the 'L' has nonetheless become one of the symbols of the city it serves. In a 2005 poll, Chicago Tribune readers voted it one of the "seven wonders of Chicago," [9] behind the lakefront and Wrigley Field but ahead of Sears Tower, the Water Tower, the University of Chicago, and the Museum of Science and Industry. Lake Michigan is one of the five Great Lakes of North America, and the only one in the group located entirely within the United States. ... Wrigley Field is a baseball stadium in Chicago that has served as the home ballpark of the Chicago Cubs since 1916. ... This article or section cites very few or no references or sources. ... The 1866 pumping station located across Michigan Avenue from the Water Tower. ... The University of Chicago is a private university located principally in the Hyde Park neighborhood of Chicago. ... The Museum of Science and Industry is housed in the only surviving building from the 1893 World Columbian Exposition and is a National Historic Landmark. ...


Lines

Map of the Chicago 'L'.
Map of the Chicago 'L'.
Main article: List of stations on the 'L'

Chicago's rapid transit system currently consists of eight principal routes. Since 1993 'L' lines have been identified by color,[10] although older route names survive to some extent in CTA publications and popular usage to distinguish branches of longer lines: Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (830x1290, 34 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Chicago L ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (830x1290, 34 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Chicago L ... This is a list of stations on the L. Each route (Red, Blue, etc. ...


Red Line

 Red Line, consisting of the Howard and Dan Ryan branches The Red Line (Howard-Dan Ryan Service) is a heavy rail line in Chicago, run by the Chicago Transit Authority (CTA) as part of the Chicago L system. ...

The Red Line is the busiest 'L' route, serving approximately 230,434 passengers each weekday.[11] It includes 34 stations on its 21.8 mile route, traveling from Howard Street terminal on the city's northern border with Evanston, through downtown Chicago via the State Street subway, then down the Dan Ryan Expressway median to 95th Street on the Far South Side. Despite its length, the Red Line stops five miles short of the city's southern border and there are intermittent pleas to extend it. The Red Line is one of two 'L' lines operating 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Howard is a station on the Chicago L system, located at 1649 West Howard Street in Chicago, Illinois (directional coordinates 7600 north, 1700 west). ... Incorporated City in 1872. ... The Dan Ryan Expressway in 1970. ... The 95/Dan Ryan station is currently the southern terminus of the Chicago Transit Authoritys Red Line and is one of the busiest stops in the system. ... Roseland, located on the far south side of the city, is one of the 77 official community areas of Chicago, Illinois. ...

Blue Line

 Blue Line, consisting of the O'Hare, Congress, and Douglas branches This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...

The Blue Line extends from O'Hare International Airport through the Loop via the Milwaukee-Dearborn-Congress subway to the West Side. Most Blue Line trains travel to Des Plaines Avenue in Forest Park via the Eisenhower Expressway median, but during rush hour some trains operate between O'Hare and 54/Cermak in Cicero via the Douglas branch. (Most service to 54/Cermak is provided by the Pink Line; see below.) The route from O'Hare to Des Plaines Avenue is 26.93 miles long, and the route from O'Hare to 54th St. is 24.23 miles long. The combined number of stations is 44. Until 1970 the northern section of the Blue Line terminated at Logan Square, during which time it was called the Milwaukee route after the parallel street; in that year service was extended to Jefferson Park via the Kennedy Expressway median, and in 1984 to O'Hare. The Blue Line is the CTA's second busiest, with 128,343 weekday boardings. It operates 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

ORD redirects here. ... The Loop is what locals call the historical center of downtown Chicago. ... Incorporated Village in 1907. ... Interstate 290 (abbreviated I-290) is the main Interstate highway due westward from the Chicago Loop. ... Incorporated Town in 1869. ... Pink Line (Douglas-Loop Service) is the name of a new rapid transit service to be operated by the Chicago Transit Authority in Chicago, Illinois for a trial period of 180 days. ... The Kennedy Expressway is a 16 mile (26 km) long highway that travels northwest from the Chicago loop to OHare Airport. ...

Brown Line

 Brown Line, or Ravenswood The Brown Line (Ravenswood Service) of the Chicago Transit Authority Chicago L rapid transit system, is a 11. ...

The Brown Line follows an 11.4 mile route, with 19 stations between Kimball Avenue in Albany Park and downtown Chicago. The Brown Line has an average weekday ridership of 66,000. [12]

Albany Park is a residential and commercial neighborhood on the Northwest Side of Chicago, and one of the most diverse in the United States. ... The Loop is what locals call the historical center of downtown Chicago. ...

Green Line

 Green Line, consisting of the Lake Street and Englewood-Jackson Park branches The Green Line, formerly the Lake-Englewood/Jackson Park line, of the Chicago Transit Authority runs entirely above ground. ...

A completely elevated route utilizing the system's oldest segments (dating back to 1892), the Green Line extends 20.8 miles with 29 stops between Forest Park and Oak Park (Harlem/Lake), through Chicago's Loop, to the South Side. South of the Garfield station the line branches, with trains alternately heading to Ashland/63rd in Englewood and Cottage Grove/63rd in Woodlawn. The East 63rd branch formerly extended to Jackson Park, but the portion east of Cottage Grove, which ran above 63rd Street, was demolished in stages in the 1980s and 1990s due to structural problems and then not replaced due to community demands. The average number of weekday boardings is 39,685.

1892 (MDCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Incorporated Village in 1907. ... Downtown (Oak Park Avenue) Ernest Hemingway Museum Oak Park, Illinois Lake Theater and shops along Lake Street. ... Flag Seal Nickname: The Windy City Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location Location in Chicagoland and northern Illinois Coordinates , Government Country State Counties United States Illinois Cook, DuPage Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 606. ... The Loop is what locals call the historical center of downtown Chicago. ... Englewood is a neighbourhood of Chicago, Illinois with some 3,000 inhabitants. ... Woodlawn is a neighborhood on the south side of Chicago, USA bounded by Jackson Park to the east, the University of Chicago (and Hyde Park generally) to the north, Martin Luther King Drive to the west, and, mostly, 67th to the south. ... Jackson Park or Jackson Park Highlands is a 500 acre (2 km²) park on Chicagos South Side located in the South Shore community area, bordering Lake Michigan and the neighborhoods of Hyde Park and Woodlawn. ...

Orange Line

 Orange Line or Midway The Orange Line , also called the Midway Line, is a heavy rail line in Chicago, Illinois run by the Chicago Transit Authority as part of the el system. ...

The 13 mile long Orange Line was constructed in the early 1990s on existing railroad embankments and new concrete and steel elevated structure. It runs from Chicago Midway International Airport on the Southwest Side to the Loop in downtown Chicago. Average weekday ridership is 30,111.

The Greater-Chicago Area featuring Chicago-Midway Airport and Chicago-OHare International Airport Chicago Midway International Airport (IATA: MDW, ICAO: KMDW, FAA LID: MDW), also known simply as Midway Airport, is an airport in Chicago, Illinois, located on the citys southwest side, eight miles from Chicagos Loop. ... The Loop is what locals call the historical center of downtown Chicago. ...

Pink Line

 Pink Line Pink Line (Douglas-Loop Service) is the name of a new rapid transit service to be operated by the Chicago Transit Authority in Chicago, Illinois for a trial period of 180 days. ...

The Pink Line is an 11.2 mile trial rerouting of former Blue Line Douglas Park branch trains from Cicero (54/Cermak) via the previously non-revenue Paulina Connector and the Green Line on Lake Street to the Loop. Its average weekday ridership is 13,461.

This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Incorporated Town in 1869. ... The Green Line, formerly the Lake-Englewood/Jackson Park line, of the Chicago Transit Authority runs entirely above ground. ...

Purple Line

 Purple Line, or Evanston, Evanston Express The Purple Line primarily serves Evanston and Wilmette, running express services to downtown Chicago, sometimes via Wrigley Field in Lake View East. ...

The Purple Line is a 3.9 mile branch serving north suburban Evanston and Wilmette with express service to the Loop during rush hour. The local service operates from the Wilmette terminal at Linden Avenue through Evanston to the Howard Street terminal where it connects with the Red and Yellow lines. The rush hour express service continues from Howard to the Loop, running nonstop on the four-track line used by the Red Line to Belmont station, then serving all Brown Line stops to the Loop. Average weekday ridership is 9,956, although this does not count boardings from Belmont south, which are included in Red and Brown line statistics. The stops from Belmont to Chicago Avenue were added in the 1990s to relieve crowding on the Red and Brown lines.[13]

The Loop is what locals call the historical center of downtown Chicago. ... US Baháí House of Worship in Wilmette Wilmette is a village in New Trier Township, Cook County, Illinois, United States. ... Linden is a station on the Chicago Transit Authoritys L system, on the Purple Line at 349 Linden Avenue in Wilmette, Illinois (directional coordinates 500 north, 400 west). ... Incorporated City in 1872. ... Howard is a station on the Chicago L system, located at 1649 West Howard Street in Chicago, Illinois (directional coordinates 7600 north, 1700 west). ... Belmont is a station on the Chicago Transit Authoritys L system, located in the neighborhood of Lakeview at 945 West Belmont Avenue in Chicago, Illinois (directional coordinates 3200 north, 1000 west). ... Chicago is an elevated station on the Chicago Transit Authoritys L system, located in the Near North Side at 300 West Chicago Avenue in Chicago, Illinois (directional coordinates 800 north, 300 west). ...

Yellow Line

 Yellow Line, or Skokie Swift The Yellow Line, formerly known as the Skokie Swift, is a Chicago Transit Authority (CTA) rapid transit line running from the Howard Street terminal on the northern city limits of Chicago to Skokie station at Dempster Street in Skokie. ...

The Yellow Line is a 4.7 mile nonstop shuttle that runs from the Howard Street terminal to Dempster Street terminal in suburban Skokie. The Yellow Line is the only 'L' route that does not provide direct service to the Loop or run on weekends. This line was originally part of the North Shore Electric commuter rail service, and was acquired by the CTA in the 1960's. There are currently plans to construct an infill station at Oakton Street to serve downtown Skokie. Upon completion (expected in 2008 or 2009), this will signal the end of over 40 years of the Skokie Swift operating as a non-stop shuttle. At present, its average weekday ridership is 2,651.

Howard is a station on the Chicago L system, located at 1649 West Howard Street in Chicago, Illinois (directional coordinates 7600 north, 1700 west). ... Skokie destination sign For other stations on the CTA system named Dempster, see Dempster (CTA). ... Incorporated Village in 1888. ...

Circle Line (Proposed)

The Circle Line is a proposed addition to the CTA rail system that would form an outer circle or loop around the downtown area, making 'L' connections easier further outside the original downtown core, creating more connections with Metra commuter trains, and decreasing travel times throughout the system. Several routes have been proposed, and the planning committee has not yet decided if the Circle Line should even be a train line, as opposed to bus rapid transit.[14] There is a large number of public transport systems in European towns that fulfill several of the BRT criteria given above, but they are rarely designated as BRT. Bus lanes and exclusive use of key city-centre streets is commonplace, and bus priority on approach to traffic lights is quite...


In September 2006, the CTA narrowed the possible train routes to two, called Ashland and Ashland-Ogden, both of which rely largely on existing track.[15] The two are quite similar, differing only in the northwest section of the circle. Both would begin at the current Clark/Division Red Line stop, following the State Street subway south to the Roosevelt stop, then transferring to the Orange Line's rails. Both would follow the Orange Line to its Ashland stop, with a new station at Ashland that would connect with Metra's Heritage Line. They would then both depart along new elevated rail to connect with the Douglas Branch of the Pink and Blue Lines, with a new stop created at Cermak. Both would follow the Pink Line north, with a new station connecting the Circle Line to Metra's Burlington Northern Santa Fe Line. They would continue to the Green Line's Ashland stop via the Paulina Connector, with new stations at Roosevelt Road and the United Center. After they reach the Green Line, the two plans diverge. Roosevelt Road, sometimes called 12th Street, is a major east-west thoroughfare in the city of Chicago and its western suburbs. ...


Ashland would follow Ashland Avenue north to North Avenue, with a new stop at Chicago, a connection to the Division stop of the Blue Line's O'Hare Branch, and a new stop at North Avenue with a connection to the Clybourn stop on Metra's Union Pacific-North and Union Pacific-Northwest Lines. After the North Avenue stop, the Circle Line would proceed to the North/Clybourn Red Line subway stop and follow the Red Line to Clark and Division, with a new connection to the Brown and Purple Lines at Division/Orleans.


Ashland-Ogden would follow Ashland Avenue north to Grand Avenue, then follow Grand to Ogden Avenue. It would follow Ogden Avenue Northeast, connecting with the Chicago stop of the Blue Line's O'Hare Branch. It would continue along Ogden to Division, then connect to the Red Line subway at Division and Orleans, with a new station there connecting those lines to the Brown and Purple Lines.


Current plans call for both of these proposed final legs to run entirely underground.[16]


Mid-City Line (Proposed)

The Mid-City Line (or Mid-City Transitway) is another proposed line that would run along a route similar to the failed Crosstown Expressway, though primarily on existing railroad right of way. The route would link various points in the city from the northwest, west & southwest sides outside of the downtown area & their existing transit lines. The north-south part of the route would be 4 miles west of the Circle Line's. It has been suggested that Mid-City Transitway be merged into this article or section. ...


The line would run mostly on existing Union Pacific and Belt Railway right of way and, unlike existing Chicago Transit Authority routes that radiate from the Loop, would connect city neighborhoods on the Northwest, West and South Sides. Chicago Transit Authority, also known as CTA, is the operator of mass transit within the City of Chicago, Illinois. ...


Beginning approximately at the location of the Jefferson Park station on the Blue Line, it would head south paralleling Cicero Avenue (the planned corridor for the original Crosstown), past Midway Airport before curving east along 75th Street, eventually terminating at 87th Street and the Dan Ryan Expressway.


The Mid-City route would intersect with the CTA's Green, Orange, Pink and Red Lines, as well as all three branches of the Blue Line. It would also allow for faster transit between Chicago's two airports.


The Mid-City Line, along with the Circle Line, would greatly improve transit in Chicago by linking the different spokes of the present rail lines together. Both plans are pending further studies and funding. If Chicago wins the bid for the 2016 Olympics, the odds of one or even both of the currently proposed plans finally becoming reality would greatly increase, since Federal funding would be more easily secured. The 2016 Summer Olympics, formally called the Games of the XXXI Olympiad, will be an international athletic event that has yet to be organized by the International Olympic Committee. ...


History

The 'L' in 1921
The 'L' in 1921

The first 'L' began revenue service on June 6, 1892, when a small steam locomotive pulling four wooden coaches with 30 passengers left the 39th Street station of the Chicago & South Side Rapid Transit Railroad and arrived at Congress Street 14 minutes later over tracks still used today by the Green Line.[17] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3029x2550, 5833 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Chicago L Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3029x2550, 5833 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Chicago L Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to...


The following year service was extended to 63rd Street and Stony Island Avenue, then the entrance to the popular World's Columbian Exposition in Jackson Park. Later in 1893 trains began running on the Lake Street Elevated and in 1895 on the Metropolitan West Side Elevated, which consisted of the Douglas Park, Garfield Park (since replaced), Humboldt Park (since demolished), and Milwaukee lines (see map). The Metropolitan was the world's first non-exhibition rapid transit system powered by electric traction motors, a technology whose practicality had been previously demonstrated on the "intramural railway" at the world's fair. Stony Island Avenue is a major thoroughfare in the city of Chicago, designated 1600 E in Chicagos street numbering system. ... One-third scale replica of Daniel Chester Frenchs Republic, which stood in the great basin at the exposition, Chicago, 2004 The Worlds Columbian Exposition (also called The Chicago Worlds Fair), a Worlds Fair, was held in Chicago in 1893, to celebrate the 400th anniversary of Christopher... Jackson Park or Jackson Park Highlands is a 500 acre (2 km²) park on Chicagos South Side located in the South Shore community area, bordering Lake Michigan and the neighborhoods of Hyde Park and Woodlawn. ...


Two years later the South Side 'L' introduced multiple-unit control, in which several or all the cars in a train are motorized and under the control of the operator, not just the lead unit. Electrification and m.u. control remain standard features of most of the world's rapid transit systems. Multiple-unit train control sometimes referred to simply as multiple-unit or MU, is a method of simultaneously controlling all the motors in a train including a number of self-powered cars from a single operating location. ...


A drawback of early 'L' service was that none of the lines entered the central business district. Instead trains dropped passengers at stub terminals on the periphery due to a state law requiring approval by neighboring property owners for tracks built over public streets, something not easily obtained downtown.


This obstacle was overcome by the legendary traction magnate Charles Tyson Yerkes, who went on to play a pivotal role in the development of the London Underground and was immortalized by Theodore Dreiser as the ruthless schemer Frank Cowperwood in The Titan (1914) and other novels. Yerkes, who controlled much of the city's streetcar system, obtained the necessary signatures through cash and guile —– at one point he secured a franchise to build a mile-long 'L' over Van Buren Street from Wabash Avenue to Halsted Street, extracting the requisite majority from the pliable owners on the western half of the route, then building tracks chiefly over the eastern half, where property owners had opposed him. Charles Tyson Yerkes (June 25, 1837 – December 29, 1905) was an American financier, born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... The London Underground is an electric railway system that covers much of Greater London and some neighbouring areas. ... Theodore Dreiser, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1933 Theodore Herman Albert Dreiser (August 27, 1871 – December 28, 1945) was an American naturalist author known for dealing with the gritty reality of life. ... The Titan is a novel written by Theodore Dreiser in 1914. ... a historic postcard showing electric trolley-powered streetcars in Richmond, Virginia, where Frank J. Sprague successfully demonstrated his new system on the hills in 1888 A streetcar is a railway vehicle designed to carry passengers on tracks, usually laid in city streets. ...


The Union Loop opened in 1897, greatly increasing the rapid transit system's convenience but at the cost of noisy, obstructed streets, a fact of life in downtown Chicago to this day. Operation on the Yerkes-owned Northwestern Elevated, which built the North Side 'L' lines, began three years later, essentially completing the elevated infrastructure in the urban core although extensions and branches continued to be constructed in outlying areas through the 1920s.

Red Line at Belmont

Rarely profitable, the 'L' lines after 1911 came under the control of Samuel Insull, president of the Chicago Edison electric utility (now Commonwealth Edison), whose interest stemmed initially from the fact that the trains were the city's largest consumer of electricity. Insull instituted many improvements, including free transfers and through routing, although he did not formally combine the original firms into the Chicago Rapid Transit Company until 1924. He also bought three other Chicago electrified railroads, the North Shore, Aurora and Elgin, and South Shore interurban lines, and ran the trains of the first two into downtown Chicago via the 'L' tracks. This period of relative prosperity ended when Insull's empire collapsed in 1932, but later in the decade the city with the help of the federal government accumulated sufficient funds to begin construction of two subway lines to supplement and, some hoped, permit eventual replacement of the Loop elevated. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 549 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The L at Belmont February 07, L.Shay I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 549 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The L at Belmont February 07, L.Shay I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Samuel Insull (November 11, 1859 - July 16, 1938) was an investor in Chicago who was known for purchasing utilities and railroads. ... Commonwealth Edison (usually called Com Ed by Chicagoans) is an electric company in Illinois owned by Exelon Corporation. ... The Chicago Rapid Transit Company (CRT) was a privately-owned firm providing rapid transit rail service in Chicago, Illinois and several adjacent communities between the years 1924 and 1947. ... The Chicago North Shore and Milwaukee Railroad, often called the North Shore Line, was an interurban railroad that operated commuter and passenger trains between Chicago, Illinois, and Milwaukee, Wisconsin. ... CA&E public timetable dated February 2, 1936. ... // The line was operated as the Chicago South Shore and South Bend Railroad (CSS&SB) until it went bankrupt in 1989, when the NICTD, formed in 1977 to help fund the line, took over operations. ... An interurban, also called a radial railway in parts of Canada, is a streetcar line running between urban areas or from urban to rural areas. ...



The State Street subway was completed in 1943; the Dearborn subway, work on which was suspended during World War II, opened in 1951. The subways bypassed a number of tight curves and circuitous routings on the original elevated lines (Milwaukee trains, for example, originated on Chicago's northwest side but entered the Loop at the southwest corner), speeding service for many riders.


By the 1940s the financial condition of the 'L,' and of Chicago mass transit in general, had become too precarious to permit continued private operation, and the necessary steps were taken to enable public takeover. In 1947 the Chicago Transit Authority acquired the assets of the Chicago Rapid Transit Company and the Chicago Surface Lines, operator of the city's streetcars. Over the next few years the CTA modernized the 'L,' replacing antiquated wooden cars with new steel ones and closing lightly used branch lines and stations, many of which had been spaced only a quarter mile apart. The Chicago Surface Lines (CSL) was operator of the street railway system of Chicago, Illinois from the years 1913 to 1947. ...


The first air-conditioned cars were introduced in 1964 and the last pre-World War II cars retired in 1973. New lines were built in expressway medians, the Congress branch replacing the Garfield Park 'L' in 1958 and the Dan Ryan branch opening in 1969, followed by the first Kennedy Expressway extension in 1970.


The 'L' today

Jackson/State street stop on the Red Line.
A train runs through the loop.

'L' ridership has increased steadily in recent years after catastrophic losses in the late 1980s and early 1990s. Ridership had been remarkably stable for nearly 40 years after the CTA takeover despite declining mass transit usage nationwide, with an average of 594,000 riders boarding each weekday in 1960[18] and 577,000 in 1985. Thereafter, however, ridership dropped sharply, bottoming out at 418,000 in 1992,[19] when the Loop Flood forced the CTA to suspend operation for several weeks in the State and Dearborn subways, used by the most heavily traveled lines. Image File history File linksMetadata Jackson_stop. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Jackson_stop. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1024x768, 294 KB) Chicago El. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1024x768, 294 KB) Chicago El. ... The Chicago Flood began on April 13, 1992 when a hole was punched through the bottom of the Chicago River into abandoned utility tunnels causing a leak which eventually flooded basements and underground facilities in much of the Chicago Loop. ...


Overall traffic volume has since recovered, although growth has not been uniformly distributed, with usage of North Side lines generally up, often dramatically so, while that of West and South Side lines is flat or declining. Ridership on the Brown Line, for instance, has increased 83% since 1979, necessitating the station reconstruction project currently underway to accommodate longer trains.[20]


Annual traffic on the Howard branch of the Red Line, which reached 35 million in 2005, is approaching the 1927 prewar peak of 38.5 million.[21] The section of the Blue Line between the Loop and Logan Square, which serves once-neglected but now bustling neighborhoods such as Wicker Park, Bucktown, and Palmer Square, has seen a 54% increase in weekday riders since 1992. On the other hand, weekday ridership on the South Side portion of the Green Line, which closed for two years for reconstruction starting in 1994, was 50,400 in 1978 but only 13,000 in 2006. Boardings at the 95/Dan Ryan stop on the Red Line, though still the system's busiest at 14,100 riders per weekday, are a little over half the peak volume in the 1980s. In 1976, three North Side 'L' branches - what were then known as the Howard, Milwaukee, and Ravenswood lines − accounted for 42% of non-downtown boardings. Today (with the help of the Blue Line extension to O'Hare), they account for 58%. Logan Square is a community area located on the northwest side of Chicago. ... West Town is a community area located on the west side of Chicago, Illinois. ... Logan Square is a community area located on the northwest side of Chicago. ... Logan Square is a community area located on the northwest side of Chicago. ... ORD redirects here. ...


The North Side (which has historically been the highest density area of the city) skew no doubt reflects the Chicago building boom of the past decade, which has focused primarily on North Side neighborhoods and downtown[22]. It may ease somewhat in the wake of the current high level of residential construction along the south lakefront. For example, ridership at the linked Roosevelt stops on the Green, Orange, and Red Lines,[23] which serve the burgeoning South Loop neighborhood, has tripled since 1992, with an average of 8,000 boardings per weekday. Patronage at the Cermak-Chinatown stop on the Red Line (4,000 weekday boardings) is at the highest level since the station opened in 1969. The 2003 Chicago Central Area Plan has proposed construction of a Green Line station at Cermak, midway between Chinatown and the McCormick Place convention center, in expectation of continued growth in the vicinity. The Near South Side is an officially designated community area (neighborhood) in Chicago, Illinois, USA located just south of the downtown central business district, the Loop, which is itself a community area. ... The Chinatown Gate in Chinatown, Chicago, Illinois. ... McCormick Place is an enormous exposition complex located in Chicago, Illinois. ...


Iconic of Chicago though it may be, the 'L' is not the city's predominant form of mass transit. As of mid-2006 it accounted for just 36% of the CTA's 1.48 million weekday riders, the remainder traveling on the agency's extensive bus network. The rail system's rider share has increased over time, however. In 1926, the year of peak prewar rail usage, the 'L' carried 229 million passengers – seemingly a formidable number, but less than 20% of the 1.16 billion Chicago transit patrons that year, most of whom rode streetcars.[24] The shift to rail has continued in recent times. Since its low point in 1992 (due to the Chicago Flood that closed subway tunnels in the downtown area), weekday 'L' ridership has increased about 25%, while bus ridership has decreased by roughly a sixth.[25] The Chicago Flood began on April 13, 1992 when a hole was punched through the bottom of the Chicago River into abandoned utility tunnels causing a leak which eventually flooded basements and underground facilities in much of the Chicago Loop. ...


Rolling stock

The Chicago Transit Authority owns 1190 train cars, permanently coupled into 595 married pairs. Cars are assigned to different lines, and each line contains at most two different series of train cars. The oldest cars in the 'L', the 2200 series, were built in 1969, and the newest, the 3200 series, were built in 1992. The newest series of train cars, the 5000 series[26] , are expected to begin service sometime in 2010. All cars on the system utilize 600 volt direct current power delivered through a third rail, though plans are in the works to convert the system to alternating current. The rolling stock of the Chicago L heavy rail system consists of 1190 train cars (all permanently coupled into 595 married pairs) dating from 1969, delivered in four series. ... On railroads, a married pair is a set of two railroad cars which are permanently coupled and treated as if they were a single unit. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Josephson junction array chip developed by NIST as a standard volt. ... Direct current (DC or continuous current) is the continuous flow of electricity through a conductor such as a wire from high to low potential. ... Third rail at the West Falls Church Metro stop in Washington, D.C., electrified to 750 volts. ... City lights viewed in a motion blurred exposure. ...


Renovation and expansion plans

A westbound 'L' train crosses the south branch of the Chicago River.
A westbound 'L' train crosses the south branch of the Chicago River.

Keeping a century-old rail system in good repair has proven to be a daunting task. Some of the oldest sections of the 'L' have required wholesale reconstruction at great expense, with accompanying service disruptions and ridership losses that have yet to be recouped. In 1994 the CTA closed the Green Line for a two-year rebuilding program that ultimately cost $406 million, arguing that a shutdown would save time and money. Ten years after reopening the line has not regained the low level of ridership it had in 1992, with 13 of the 23 non-downtown stations serving fewer than 1,500 riders per weekday.[27] The CTA kept trains running during the $482 million rehabilitation of the Douglas branch of the Blue Line (now the Pink Line), but ridership dropped substantially during the 40-month project, which was completed in 2005. Traffic remains low (although climbing) today, with six of the 11 stations boarding fewer than 1,000 passengers per weekday. A westbound Chicago L train crosses the south fork of the Chicago River, 2004, by Rick Dikeman File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... A westbound Chicago L train crosses the south fork of the Chicago River, 2004, by Rick Dikeman File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ...


More difficulties lie ahead. As of August 2006, 18% of 'L' trackage lay in "slow zones," in which trains must operate at reduced speed due to deteriorated track, structure, or other problems.[28] The line in worst condition is the busiest, the Red Line, with 36% in slow zones, including nearly half of the State Street subway. Trains on the Blue Line, the second busiest route, must operate at reduced speed for 25% of the line's length.


Red & Brown Line Renovations

Two major rehabilitation projects are currently underway – a $283 million renovation of the Dan Ryan branch of the Red Line, including station renewal, trackwork and other system upgrades;[29] and a $530 million rehabilitation and capacity-expansion program for the Brown Line, which has been largely untouched since the first decade of the twentieth century. The Brown Line Capacity Expansion plan will extend station platform lengths to support 8-car trains and make all stations fully accessible. Work on the Brown Line project began on February 20, 2006 and is scheduled to be completed in 2009.[30] The Red Line (Howard-Dan Ryan Service) is a heavy rail line in Chicago, run by the Chicago Transit Authority (CTA) as part of the Chicago L system. ... The Brown Line (Ravenswood Service) of the Chicago Transit Authority Chicago L rapid transit system, is a 11. ... February 20 is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... 2009 (MMIX) will be a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Circle Line

Current event marker This article or section contains information about a planned or expected public transportation infrastructure.
It may contain information of a speculative nature and the content may change dramatically as the construction and/or completion of the infrastructure approaches, and more information becomes available.
Railway station

Notwithstanding the challenges it faces in keeping the existing 'L' system running, the CTA is exploring opportunities for new service. The most ambitious project is the Circle Line, a new 'L' route that would form a large circle around the Loop and connect various other CTA and Metra rail lines.[31] The Circle Line project is currently undergoing a federally mandated Alternatives Analysis Study. Image File history File links Current_event_marker. ... A taxi serving as a bus Public transport comprises all transport systems in which the passengers do not travel in their own vehicles. ... Image File history File links 25_railtransportation_trans. ... Metra (officially the Northeast Illinois Regional Commuter Railroad Corporation) is Chicagolands commuter rail system, serving over 200 stations on 11 lines across the Regional Transportation Authoritys six-county service area (Cook, DuPage, Kane, Lake, McHenry and Will Counties) providing over 67 million rides annually. ...


However, if one looks at past plans for the Circle Line, the CTA has already completed what was earlier referred to as Phase I. This was the upgrading of the Paulina Connector which was done during the renovation of the Pink Line (nee Blue Line Cermak Branch). Given Chicago's history, this may be the City's way of signalling that it will bend the Alternatives Analysis to yield their desired outcome -- and proceed with the earlier Circle Line plans. Either way, numerous polls indicate that Chicagoans are mostly in favor of some form of a circular line covering an area larger than the Loop.


Other Expansion

Other possible future expansions, identified in the "Destination 2020" Regional Transportation Plan,[32] include:

  • New express service to O'Hare and Midway airports from a downtown terminal on State Street. A business plan prepared for the CTA calls for a private firm to manage the venture with service starting in 2008.[33] The project has been criticized as a boondoggle.[34] The custom-equipped, premium-fare trains would be nonstop but no faster than current service since the Blue and Orange lines lack passing tracks; construction of such tracks could cost more than $1.5 billion. The CTA has already pledged $130 million and the city of Chicago $42 million toward the cost of the downtown station.[35] In comments posted to her blog in 2006, CTA chair Carole Brown said, "I would support premium rail service only if it brought significant new operating dollars, capital funding, or other efficiencies to CTA … The most compelling reason to proceed with the project is the opportunity to connect the Blue and Red subway tunnels," which are one block apart downtown.[36] Meanwhile, Metra runs trains to O'Hare airport at faster speeds than the CTA proposal would achieve. Unfortunately, Metra only runs a few trains per day (currently).
  • Yellow Line extension to Westfield Shoppingtown Old Orchard with possible intermediate stations.
  • Orange Line extension to its originally-planned terminus at Ford City Shopping Center. The destination signs on Orange Line trains already indicate this as a possible endpoint[37].
  • Red Line extension from 95th Street to either Pullman or 130th Street in Riverdale via the Bishop Ford Expressway median. "CTA has clearly demonstrated its commitment to building an extension of the Red Line to 130th Street and has been advancing the project," a CTA spokesperson said in 2006. This project is currently undergoing an Alternatives Analysis as required by the Federal New Starts process. At present, the possible alignments for the extension have been narrowed to Halsted Street, Michigan Ave., and the Union Pacific Railroad.[38]
  • Mid-City Transitway running around, rather than through the Chicago Loop. The line would follow the Cicero Avenue/Belt Line corridor (former Crosstown Expressway alignment) between the O'Hare branch of the Blue Line at Montrose and the Dan Ryan branch of the Red Line at 87th Street. It would not necessarily be an 'L' line; a busway and other options are being considered.
Two 'L' trains approach the T-junction at the southeast corner of The Loop.
Two 'L' trains approach the T-junction at the southeast corner of The Loop.

Numerous plans have been advanced over the years to reorganize downtown Chicago rapid transit service, originally with the intention of replacing the Loop elevated, which was long seen as a blight. That goal has been largely abandoned, but there have been continued calls to improve transit within the city's greatly enlarged core. At present the 'L' does not provide direct service between the Metra commuter rail terminals in the West Loop and Michigan Avenue, the principal shopping district, nor does it offer convenient access to popular downtown destinations such as Navy Pier, Soldier Field, and McCormick Place. Plans for the Central Area Circulator, a $700 million downtown light rail system meant to remedy these failings, were shelved for lack of funding in 1995. Recognizing the difficulty of implementing an all-rail solution, the Chicago Central Area Plan[39] advocated a mix of rail and bus improvements, the centerpiece of which was the West Loop Transportation Center, a multi-level subway to be constructed under Clinton Street from Congress to Lake streets. The top level would be a pedestrian mezzanine, buses would operate in the second level, rapid transit trains in the third level, and commuter and intercity trains in the bottom level. The rapid transit level would connect to the existing Blue Line subway at its north and south ends, making possible the "Blue Line loop," envisioned as an underground counterpart to the Loop elevated. Among other advantages the West Loop Transportation Center would provide a direct link between the 'L' and the city's two busiest commuter rail terminals, Ogilvie Transportation Center and Union Station. The plan also proposed transitways along Carroll Avenue, a former rail right-of-way north of the main branch of the Chicago River, and under Monroe Street in the Loop, which earlier transit schemes had proposed as rail routes. The Carroll Avenue route would provide faster bus service between the commuter stations and the rapidly redeveloping Near North Side, with possible rail service later. ORD redirects here. ... The Greater-Chicago Area featuring Chicago-Midway Airport and Chicago-OHare International Airport Chicago Midway International Airport (IATA: MDW, ICAO: KMDW, FAA LID: MDW), also known simply as Midway Airport, is an airport in Chicago, Illinois, located on the citys southwest side, eight miles from Chicagos Loop. ... State Street is a common American street name. ... The Yellow Line, formerly known as the Skokie Swift, is a Chicago Transit Authority (CTA) rapid transit line running from the Howard Street terminal on the northern city limits of Chicago to Skokie station at Dempster Street in Skokie. ... The Orange Line , also called the Midway Line, is a heavy rail line in Chicago, Illinois run by the Chicago Transit Authority as part of the el system. ... The Red Line (Howard-Dan Ryan Service) is a heavy rail line in Chicago, run by the Chicago Transit Authority (CTA) as part of the Chicago L system. ... Pullman is a neighborhood on the south side of Chicago, twelve miles from the Loop by Lake Calumet. ... Riverdale, one of the 77 official community areas of Chicago, Illinois, is located on the citys far south side. ... The Bishop Ford Expressway, formerly known as the Calumet Expressway, is a portion of Interstate 94 in northeastern Illinois, south of downtown Chicago. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Crosstown Expressway (Interstate 494). ... The Loop is what locals call the historical center of downtown Chicago. ... It has been suggested that Mid-City Transitway be merged into this article or section. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1000x625, 189 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Chicago L ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1000x625, 189 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Chicago L ... // History Throughout its entire life, the two-mile, double track Union Loop Elevated line in Chicagos Central Area has coexisted with strong pressures, political and civic, to do away with in favor of new downtown subways. ... Metra (officially the Northeast Illinois Regional Commuter Railroad Corporation) is Chicagolands commuter rail system, serving over 200 stations on 11 lines across the Regional Transportation Authoritys six-county service area (Cook, DuPage, Kane, Lake, McHenry and Will Counties) providing over 67 million rides annually. ... The Michigan Avenue Bridge across the Chicago River. ... The Navy Pier seen from the John Hancock Center Navy Pier is a 3,000 foot long pier on the Chicago shoreline of Lake Michigan. ... Soldier Field is located on Lake Shore Drive in Chicago, Illinois, and is currently home to the NFLs Chicago Bears. ... McCormick Place is an enormous exposition complex located in Chicago, Illinois. ... // History Throughout its entire life, the two-mile, double track Union Loop Elevated line in Chicagos Central Area has coexisted with strong pressures, political and civic, to do away with in favor of new downtown subways. ... This article is about light rail systems in general. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The Loop is what locals call the historical center of downtown Chicago. ... Modern Ogilvie Transportation Center Ogilvie Transportation Center (formally, the Richard B. Ogilvie Transportation Center) is a Chicago, Illinois train station which was in built 1911. ... Union Station is a Chicago train station that opened in 1925, replacing an earlier 1881 station, and is now the only intercity rail terminal in Chicago. ... The Loop is what locals call the historical center of downtown Chicago. ... The Near North Side is the part of Chicago, Illinois just north of the downtown central business district (the Loop). ...


Pink Line

The CTA inaugurated a new route without building any new tracks or stations when Pink Line service began on June 25, 2006. The Pink Line travels from the 54/Cermak terminal in Cicero via the Douglas branch to the Polk-Medical Center station in Chicago. At this point, instead of joining the Congress (Forest Park) branch of the Blue Line, Pink Line trains proceed via the Paulina Street Connector to the Lake Street branch of the Green Line and then clockwise around the Loop elevated via Lake-Wabash-Van Buren-Wells. The routing isn't really new, since Douglas trains followed the same path between April 4, 1954 and June 22, 1958 after the old West Side 'L' line to which the Douglas branch had connected was demolished to make way for the Eisenhower Expressway. (The demolished line, known as the Garfield Park 'L', was eventually replaced by the Congress line, which runs down the expressway median.)[40] The new route, which serves 22 stations, offers more frequent service for riders on both the Congress and Douglas branches. O'Hare trains are no longer evenly split between the Forest Park and 54/Cermak terminals; instead, most O'Hare trains terminate in Forest Park, while Pink Line trains can be scheduled independently - rush hour trains run every 7½ minutes rather than every 10-15 minutes under the old routing.[41] June 25 is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 189 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... Incorporated Town in 1869. ... April 4 is the 94th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (95th in leap years). ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... June 22 is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Dwight D. Eisenhower Expressway, formerly called Congress Parkway, is the main Interstate highway west from the Chicago Loop. ...


Getting around on the 'L'

The O'Hare terminal on the Blue Line was designed by Chicago architect Helmut Jahn.

Prior to color coding, CTA rail line names were based on neighborhood or town served (Ravenswood, Englewood, Evanston, Skokie Swift), endpoint (Howard, Jackson Park, Midway, O'Hare), parallel streets (Congress, Lake), or even a city park the line traveled past (Douglas). As part of the effort to make the 'L' easier to navigate, train signs now indicate the destination terminal:[42] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2592x1944, 2554 KB) Source: http://www. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2592x1944, 2554 KB) Source: http://www. ... An illuminated, suspended, oval roof covers the 102m span of the central Forum of the Sony Center, Berlin. ...

  • Blue Line trains display "Forest Park" signs when traveling southeast/west, "O'Hare" when traveling east/northwest. Blue Line rush-hour trains terminating in Cicero display "54/Cermak."
  • Brown Line trains display "Loop" signs inbound, "Kimball" outbound. Late-night Brown Line shuttle service terminates at Belmont southbound; these trains display "Belmont."
  • Green Line trains display "Harlem/Lake" when north/westbound, "Ashland/63" or "East 63rd" when east/southbound.
  • Orange Line trains display "Loop" inbound, "Midway" outbound.
  • Pink Line trains display "Loop" inbound, "54/Cermak" outbound.
  • Purple Line local shuttles display "Howard" southbound, "Linden" northbound. Rush-hour Purple Line Express trains display "Loop" inbound, "Linden" outbound.
  • Red Line trains display "Howard" northbound, "95/Dan Ryan" southbound. Some southbound trains display "Roosevelt" during the overnight hours and cease service there, rather than making the complete 95/Dan Ryan run.
  • Yellow Line trains display "Howard" inbound, "Skokie" outbound.

These changes do not eliminate all potential confusion, however. Visitors to the city should be aware that, since 'L' stations typically are named after the principal intersecting street, and Chicago streets tend to be long and straight, many stations on different lines have the same name. For example, there are four stations named Pulaski and five named Kedzie. It should also be noted that none of the three stations named Chicago lie in the Chicago Loop, as one might suppose; rather, the stations take their names from Chicago Avenue, which lies six city blocks (3/4 mile) north of the northern boundary of the Loop. Pulaski can refer to: Pulaski (CTA Blue Line), on the Blue Lines Forest Park branch. ... Kedzie is the name of five stations on the Chicago Transit Authoritys L system: Kedzie (CTA Brown Line) on the Brown Line Kedzie (CTA Green Line) on the Green Line Kedzie-Homan (CTA) on the Blue Line Kedzie (CTA Pink Line) on the Pink Line and the 54/Cermak... Chicago is the name of several stations on the Chicago Transit Authoritys L system: Chicago (CTA Brown Line) Chicago (CTA Red Line) Chicago (CTA Blue Line) Categories: | ... The Loop is what locals call the historical center of downtown Chicago. ...


The Loop

Brown, Green, Orange, Pink, and Purple Line Express trains serve downtown Chicago via the Loop elevated. The Loop's nine stations average 64,800 weekday boardings. The Loop is what locals call the historical center of downtown Chicago. ...


The Orange Line and the Pink Line run clockwise, the Brown Line and Purple Line run counter-clockwise and the Green Line is the Loop's only through service; the other four lines circle the Loop and return to their starting points. The Loop forms a rectangle roughly 0.4 miles (650m long) east-to-west and 0.6 miles (960m) long north-to-south.


While many believe that the city's central business district was named after this section of the "L," the term actually predates the "L" and refers to a now-retired circular routing of streetcars through downtown, which followed the same basic route as the present day elevated tracks.


Making connections

The 'L' serves both Chicago airports but does not connect directly to any of the commuter rail, intercity rail, or intercity bus stations in or near the Loop. Metra, Amtrak, and Greyhound stations, and their locations relative to 'L' stops are: Metra (officially the Northeast Illinois Regional Commuter Railroad Corporation) is Chicagolands commuter rail system, serving over 200 stations on 11 lines across the Regional Transportation Authoritys six-county service area (Cook, DuPage, Kane, Lake, McHenry and Will Counties) providing over 67 million rides annually. ... Acela Express in West Windsor, NJ Amtrak Cascades service with tilting Talgo trainsets in Seattle, Washington Amtrak train in downtown Orlando, Florida For other uses, see Amtrak (disambiguation). ... Greyhound Lines is the largest inter-city common carrier of passengers by bus in North America, serving 2,200 destinations in the United States. ...

  • Chicago Union Station, terminal for all Amtrak and HC, BNSF, MD-W, MD-N, SWS, and NCS Metra trains, is 2 blocks north of Clinton (Blue Line) station and 3 blocks west of Quincy (Loop Brown, Orange, Purple, Pink Lines) station.
  • Chicago Ogilvie Transportation Center (formerly North Western Station), terminal for UP-N, UP-NW, and UP-W Metra trains, is 2 blocks south of Clinton (Green, Pink Lines) station and 3 blocks west of the Washington/Wells (Loop Brown, Orange, Purple, Pink Lines) station.
  • Chicago Millennium Station (formerly Randolph Station), terminal for Metra Electric Line and South Shore Line trains, is 2 blocks east of Randolph/Wabash (Loop Brown, Orange, Green, Purple, Pink Lines) station and is accessible through the Chicago Pedway.
  • Chicago LaSalle Street Station, terminal for RI Metra trains, is less than a block from both LaSalle (Blue Line) and LaSalle (Loop Brown, Orange, Purple, Pink Lines) stations.
  • The downtown Chicago Greyhound bus terminal is 2 blocks southwest of Clinton (Blue Line) station.
  • The "L" directly serves both O'Hare Airport (Blue Line) and Midway Airport (Orange Line).
The Purple Line serves Evanston and Wilmette, with rush-hour express service to downtown Chicago.

Outlying transfer points between 'L' trains and Metra: Union Station is a Chicago train station that opened in 1925, replacing an earlier 1881 station, and is now the only intercity rail terminal in Chicago. ... Acela Express in West Windsor, NJ Amtrak Cascades service with tilting Talgo trainsets in Seattle, Washington Amtrak train in downtown Orlando, Florida For other uses, see Amtrak (disambiguation). ... The Heritage Corridor (HC) is a commuter rail line provided and operated by Metra in Chicago, Illinois and its surrounding suburbs. ... The BNSF Railway Line is a commuter rail line provided by Metra and operated by the BNSF Railway in Chicago, Illinois and its surrounding suburbs. ... The Milwaukee District/West (MD-W) is a commuter rail line provided and operated by Metra in Chicago, Illinois and its surrounding suburbs. ... The Milwaukee District/North (MD-N) is a commuter rail line provided and operated by Metra in Chicago, Illinois and its surrounding suburbs. ... The SouthWest Service (SWS) is a commuter rail line owned and operated by Metra, running southwest from Union Station in downtown Chicago, Illinois to Orland Park. ... The North Central Service (NCS) is a commuter rail line provided and operated by Metra in Chicago, Illinois and its surrounding suburbs. ... Metra (officially the Northeast Illinois Regional Commuter Railroad Corporation) is Chicagolands commuter rail system, serving over 200 stations on 11 lines across the Regional Transportation Authoritys six-county service area (Cook, DuPage, Kane, Lake, McHenry and Will Counties) providing over 67 million rides annually. ... Modern Ogilvie Transportation Center Ogilvie Transportation Center (formally, the Richard B. Ogilvie Transportation Center) is a Chicago, Illinois train station which was in built 1911. ... The Union Pacific/North (UP-N) is a commuter rail line provided by Metra and operated by the Union Pacific Railroad in Chicago, Illinois and its surrounding suburbs. ... The Union Pacific/Northwest (UP-NW) is a commuter rail line provided by Metra and operated by the Union Pacific Railroad in Chicago, Illinois and its surrounding suburbs. ... The Union Pacific/West (UP-W) is a commuter rail line provided by Metra and operated by the Union Pacific Railroad in Chicago, Illinois and its surrounding suburbs. ... The Randolph Street Terminal (sometimes called the Randolph Street Station or the Randolph-South Water Street Station) is a major commuter rail terminal in downtown Chicago that serves the Metra Electric Lines to University Park, Blue Island, and South Chicago; and the South Shore Line to South Bend, Indiana. ... The Metra Electric Line (ME) is an electrified commuter rail line owned and operated by Metra, connecting Randolph Street Station in downtown Chicago, Illinois with its southern suburbs. ... The South Shore Line is an electrically powered interurban streetcar line operated by the Northern Indiana Commuter Transportation District (NICTD) between Randolph Street Terminal in downtown Chicago, Illinois and the South Bend Regional Airport in South Bend, Indiana. ... The Chicago Pedway, covering over 40 blocks of downtown Chicago, Illinois, helps pedestrians traverse this area city during inclement weather. ... LaSalle Street Station is a commuter rail terminal in downtown Chicago, Illinois, serving Metras Rock Island District. ... The Rock Island District (RI) is a commuter rail line operated by Metra from Chicago, Illinois southwest to Joliet. ... Greyhound Lines is the largest inter-city common carrier of passengers by bus in North America, serving 2,200 destinations in the United States. ... ORD redirects here. ... The Greater-Chicago Area featuring Chicago-Midway Airport and Chicago-OHare International Airport Chicago Midway International Airport (IATA: MDW, ICAO: KMDW, FAA LID: MDW), also known simply as Midway Airport, is an airport in Chicago, Illinois, located on the citys southwest side, eight miles from Chicagos Loop. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2048x1536, 555 KB) Summary Photo by Gerald Farinas of the Central Street CTA station in Evanston, Illinois taken on July 9, 2006. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2048x1536, 555 KB) Summary Photo by Gerald Farinas of the Central Street CTA station in Evanston, Illinois taken on July 9, 2006. ... Metra (officially the Northeast Illinois Regional Commuter Railroad Corporation) is Chicagolands commuter rail system, serving over 200 stations on 11 lines across the Regional Transportation Authoritys six-county service area (Cook, DuPage, Kane, Lake, McHenry and Will Counties) providing over 67 million rides annually. ...

  • Main Street, Purple Line / Main Street, Metra UP-N
  • Davis Street, Purple Line / Davis Street, Metra UP-N
  • Irving Park, Blue Line / Irving Park, UP-NW
  • Montrose, Blue Line / Mayfair, Metra MD-N
  • Jefferson Park, Blue Line / Jefferson Park, UP-NW
  • Kedzie, Green Line / Kedzie, UP-W
  • Harlem, Green Line / Oak Park, UP-W
  • Western, Pink Line, Blue Line (54/Cermak Branch) / Western Avenue, BNSF
  • Damen, Brown Line / Ravenswood, Metra UP-N

Outlying transfer points between 'L' trains and Greyhound Lines bus service: Irving Park is a neighborhood located on the northwest side of Chicago, Illinois. ... Jefferson Park is the Polish neighborhood of Chicago. ...

  • Chicago 95th and Dan Ryan destination is directly above the 95th/Dan Ryan (Red Line) station.
  • Cumberland destination is the Cumberland (Blue Line) station/CTA and PACE bus terminal.
  • Skokie destination is near the Skokie (Yellow Line) station.

Slow Zones

CTA Slow Zones By Line

  • Purple: 26 percent
  • Red: 24 percent
  • Blue: 22 percent
  • Green: 5 percent
  • Yellow: 5 percent
  • Brown: 1 percent
  • Orange: 0 percent
  • Pink: 0 percent

'L' or El?

The Chicago rapid-transit system is officially nicknamed the 'L.' This registered, trademarked name for the CTA rail system applies to the whole system, as well as its elevated, subway, at-grade and open-cut segments.


In discussing various stylings of "Loop" and "L" in Destination Loop: The Story of Rapid Transit Railroading in and around Chicago (1982), author Brian J. Cudahy quotes a passage from The Neon Wilderness (1949) by Chicago author Nelson Algren: "beneath the curved steel of the El, beneath the endless ties." Cudahy then comments, "Note that in the quotation above ... it says 'El' to mean "elevated rapid transit railroad.' We trust that this usage can be ascribed to a publisher's editor in New York or some other east coast city; in Chicago the same expression is routinely rendered 'L.' "


While this is broadly true, it is not hard to find exceptions, such as the magazine Time Out Chicago, which refers to the system as the El and once responded to a letter on the subject by explaining that it chose "El" stylistically because it would be easier for people originally from outside of Chicago to decipher. However, Time Out, whose London, England-based publishing company started the Chicago edition in 2005, has a highly idiosyncratic style common throughout its worldwide publications, which also includes such practices as designating locations with often-obscure side-street names instead of the local custom of Chicago grid system street numbers. Time-out can mean: sport time-out, a break in play that may be called by a side to formulate strategy or respond to an players injury. ... London — containing the City of London — is the capital of the United Kingdom and of England and a major world city. With over seven million inhabitants (Londoners) in Greater London area, it is amongst the most densely populated areas in Western Europe. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Night view of the tollbooths as you enter Chicago from the Chicago Skyway // Chicagos streets primarily follow the grid system established by the Chicago Board of Aldermen in 1908 and implemented on September 1, 1909. ...


As used by the CTA, the name is rendered as the capital letter "L", in quotation marks. "L" (with double quotation marks) was often used by CTA predecessors such as the Chicago Rapid Transit Company; however, the CTA uses single quotation marks (') on some printed materials and signs rather than double, and it seems safe to say there is no firm policy other than use of quotation marks of some kind. Lest one imagine a consensus has emerged among the cognoscenti on this point, however, historian Cudahy in his book routinely refers to the system as the L, without quotation marks. The Chicago Rapid Transit Company (CRT) was a privately-owned firm providing rapid transit rail service in Chicago, Illinois and several adjacent communities between the years 1924 and 1947. ...


There does seem to be wide agreement that the rail system's name is to be capitalized; purists no doubt would insist that lower-case "el" or el is a generic term for any rapid transit line elevated above surrounding streets, such as may be found in Boston, New York, and Philadelphia in addition to Chicago.


"Subway" in Chicago usage is limited to sections of the 'L' that are underground and is not applied to the system as a whole, and Chicagoans typically refer to the 'L' even when they mean the below-ground parts.


See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Chicago 'L'

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... The Wikimedia Commons (also called Wikicommons) is a repository of free content images, sound and other multimedia files. ... The rolling stock of the Chicago L heavy rail system consists of 1190 train cars (all permanently coupled into 595 married pairs) dating from 1969, delivered in four series. ... This is an alphabetical list of cities worldwide that have a rapid transit system, or a light-rail system with some elements of rapid transit. ... This page is about Chicago mass transit. ...

References and notes

  1. ^ The CTA website says "CTA’s train system is called the ‘L’, short for elevated.'"
  2. ^ Cudahy, Brian J., Destination Loop: The Story of Rapid Transit Railroading in and around Chicago, 1982
  3. ^ MBTA rail ridership for FY04 was 625,300 if Green Line light rail ridership is aggregated with heavy rail [1].
  4. ^ "Owl" service on other lines was discontinued in the 1990s for budgetary reasons. (Other U.S. rapid transit systems providing 24-hour service include the New York City subway, the New York-New Jersey PATH system, and Philadelphia's PATCO Speedline.)
  5. ^ Chicago Transit Authority, "Rail Ridership by Branch and Entrance," July 2006, [2], accessed October 14, 2006
  6. ^ Chicago Transit Authority, "Rail Ridership by Branch and Entrance," December 2005, [3], accessed Sept. 1, 2006
  7. ^ Chicago Transit Authority, "Rail System: Annual Traffic, 1979 to present," SDP-x93028, 7-27-93; Chicago Transit Authority, "Rail System: Annual Traffic, 1986 to 2000," PSP-x01010, 8/7/01
  8. ^ Garfield, Graham, Frequently Asked Questions. Chicago-L.org (URL accessed 22 August 2006); McClendon, Dennis, "L", Encyclopedia of Chicago, accessed Aug. 22, 2006
  9. ^ Leroux, Charles, "The People Have Spoken: Here Are the 7 Wonders of Chicago," Chicago Tribune, Sept. 15, 2005 [4]
  10. ^ Chicago "L".org, "Chronologies - Chicago Transit Authority (CTA) (1947-present)" [5]
  11. ^ Current ridership figures drawn from Chicago Transit Authority, "Rail Ridership by Branch and Entrance," September 2006 [6]
  12. ^ Ridership figures reported for the Brown Line and other lines reaching downtown Chicago via the Loop elevated (Green, Orange, and Pink lines; Purple Line express trains) do not fully reflect usage since Loop boardings are reported separately. Although the figure cited above is from the CTA's June 2006 rail ridership report, the CTA elsewhere has claimed Brown Line ridership of 66,000,[7] presumably arrived at by pro rata distribution of Loop boardings.
  13. ^ http://ctabrownline.com/about.html
  14. ^ Circle Line Alternatives Analysis Study - Screen 2 Analysis, Accessed 02-16-2007[8]
  15. ^ Circle Line Alternatives Analysis Study - Screen 2 Step 3, Accessed 02-16-2007[9]
  16. ^ Circle Line Alternatives Analysis Study - Screen 2 Preliminary Findings, Accessed 04-12-2007[10]
  17. ^ These and other historical details drawn from Cudahy, op.cit.
  18. ^ Chicago Transit Authority, "Rail System - Nov. 1980 traffic," Table V, OP-x81085, 5-22-81
  19. ^ Chicago Transit Authority, "Rail System - Weekday Entering Traffic Trends," PSP-x01013, 8-16-01
  20. ^ Chicago Transit Authority, "Countdown to a New Brown - About the Brown Line" [11], accessed Sept. 5, 2006.
  21. ^ Chicago Transit Authority, "Rail System - Annual Traffic: Originating passengers only," OP-x79231, 10-01-79
  22. ^ http://www.northshoremag.com/cgi-bin/ns-article?article=/homegarden/06-03-movin.html
  23. ^ The Roosevelt elevated stop on the Orange and Green Lines, which opened in 1994, is connected to the Roosevelt Red Line subway stop by a pedestrian passage, so the CTA reports the two as a single station. Ridership in 1992 is for the subway stop only.
  24. ^ Condit, Carl W., Chicago 1930-70: Building, Planning, and Urban Technology (1974), Table 7
  25. ^ 1992 figures from Chicago Transit Authority, "1992 Ridership Review," Technical Report SP93-05; November 2005 figures from CTA website previously cited. Comparison may not be precise; 1992 figures were an annual average, while November 2005 reflected a single month, though one often used as a benchmark by CTA.
  26. ^ Chicago Transit Authority, "5000 Series Railcars" [12], accessed March 27, 2007.
  27. ^ Total weekday ridership at the 23 non-Loop stations now comprising the Green Line was 37,500 in 1992, 36,360 now.
  28. ^ http://www.transitchicago.com/news/motion/board/slzn200608b.pdf
  29. ^ http://www.transitchicago.com/news/motion/red/danryan/ transitchicago.org: Dan Ryan Red Line Rehabilitation Project
  30. ^ http://ctabrownline.com/ ctabrownline.com: The Brownline Capacity Expansion Project
  31. ^ http://www.chicago-l.org/plans/CircleLine.html Chicago-L.org: Circle Line Plans
  32. ^ http://www.chicago-l.org/plans/2020plan.html chicago-l.org: Destination 2020
  33. ^ PB Consult, Inc., Express Airport Train Service – Business Plan, Final Report, Sept. 22, 2006[13]
  34. ^ Hinz, Greg, "CTA's money pit: Big bucks, small bang for agency's planned express line to O'Hare," Crain's Chicago Business,[14] Aug. 1, 2005
  35. ^ Hilkevitch, Jon, "Want a 1st-class ticket to airport? CTA plan would let private company run premium – and eventually express – rail service to O'Hare and Midway," Chicago Tribune, Oct. 4, 2006
  36. ^ Brown, Carole, Ask Carole, "Subway tunnel connections and airport service," Oct. 5, 2006, accessed Oct. 7, 2006. For illustration of Red-Blue line tunnel connection, see Chicago Transit Authority, Transit at a Crossroads: President's 2007 Budget Recommendations, p. 14, accessed Oct. 16, 2006[15]
  37. ^ Jon Hilkevitch. Signs mark growth of CTA. Chicago Tribune, 30 October 2006.
  38. ^ Kyles, Kyra, "CTA South Side shaft," Chicago Tribune (Red Eye edition), May 9, 2006
  39. ^ City of Chicago, "Chicago Central Area Plan: Preparing the Central City for the 21st Century - Draft Final Report to the Chicago Plan Commission," May 2003, [16], accessed Sept. 1, 2006. For West Loop Transportation Center details, see pp. 61ff. [17]
  40. ^ http://www.chicago-l.org/history/chron_CTA.html Chicago-L.org: Chronologies, accessed Sept. 5, 2006
  41. ^ http://www.transitchicago.com/news/motion/pinklink/ transitchicago.com: West Side/West Suburban Corridor Service Enhancements, accessed Sept. 5, 2006
  42. ^ Chicago Transit Authority, "Riding CTA Trains," [18]', accessed Sept. 1, 2006

The New York City Subway is a rapid transit system owned by the City of New York and leased to the New York City Transit Authority, an affiliate of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority as MTA New York City Transit. ... Hoboken- and Newark-bound platform at Exchange Place station in Jersey City. ... A Philadelphia-bound PATCO train arrives at Woodcrest Station. ... October 14 is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... August 22 is the 234th day of the year (235th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... The southeastern corner of The Loop The Loop (historically Union Loop) is the name given to the two mile circuit of elevated railroad that forms the hub of the L rapid transit system in Chicago, Illinois. ... October 30 is the 303rd day of the year (304th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 62 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ...

External links


The term heavy rail is often used for regular railways, to distinguish from systems such as trams/light rail and metro. ... A rapid transit, underground, subway, tube, elevated, or metro(politan) system is a railway—usually in an urban area—with a high capacity and frequency of service, and grade separation from other traffic. ... The Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA) is a body politic and corporate, and a political subdivision of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts [3] formed in 1964 to finance and operate most bus, subway, commuter rail and ferry systems in the greater Boston, Massachusetts, USA area. ... A Blue Line train at the recently rebuilt Logan Airport station. ... The Orange Line is one of the four subway lines of the MBTA. It extends from Forest Hills in Jamaica Plain, Boston in the south to Oak Grove in Malden, Massachusetts in the north. ... View of Boston from the Red Line An MBTA Red Line train leaving Charles/MGH station bound for Alewife. ... The Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) is a public benefit corporation responsible for public transportation in the State of New York. ... The New York City Subway is a rapid transit system owned by the City of New York and leased to the New York City Transit Authority, an affiliate of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority as MTA New York City Transit. ... Staten Island Railway (SIR, formerly SIRT) is a rapid transit line operating in the Borough of Staten Island, New York City, USA. Like the BMT lines to Coney Island, it began as a normal railway but was later converted to R44 subway cars . ... Hoboken- and Newark-bound platform at Exchange Place station in Jersey City. ... SEPTA redirects here. ... Market-Frankford Line Map ©SEPTA 2004 The Market-Frankford Line (MFL) (also called the Market-Frankford Subway-Elevated Line (MFSE), El or Blue Line) is a transit line in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, run by SEPTA. It begins at 69th Street Terminal just west of the city line in Upper Darby and... The Broad Street Line (BSL) (also known as the Broad Street Subway (BSS) or Orange Line) is a rapid transit line operated by the Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority that runs from Fern Rock Transportation Center in northern Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to Pattison Avenue in South Philadelphia, adjacent to several stadiums. ... Port Authority Transit Corporation operates the PATCO Speedline between Philadelphia, PA and Camden County, NJ in the United States. ... The Metro Subway[1] is a single-line rapid transit system serving the greater Baltimore, Maryland, United States area and operated by the Maryland Transit Administration. ... The Washington Metro, or simply Metro, is the rapid transit system of Washington, D.C., and neighboring communities in Maryland and Virginia, both inside and outside the Capital Beltway. ... MARTA rail car at North Avenue station The Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority, more commonly called MARTA, is the largest public rapid-transit system (in both size and ridership) in the Atlanta metropolitan area, and the ninth largest in the United States. ... Northbound train at Government Center changeover station, circa 1999. ... San Juans Tren Urbano – Phase I Service Route and Stations. ... RTA Rapid Transit (generally known as The Rapid) is a rapid transit and light rail system in Cleveland, Ohio, owned by the Greater Cleveland Regional Transit Authority (known as RTA). The system is made of three lines - the Red Line (heavy rail) and Blue and Green Lines (light rail). ... The Red Line (Route 66X) is a rapid transit line of the RTA Rapid Transit in Cleveland, Ohio, running from Hopkins International Airport northeast to Tower City in downtown Cleveland, then east and northeast to Windermere. ... A westbound BART train with aerodynamic design A car in downtown San Francisco. ... The Los Angeles County Metro Rail is the current mass transit rail system operating in Los Angeles. ... Metro rail lines on the Westside of Los Angeles including lines under construction and the Purple Line including extension to Fairfax Avenue The Purple Line is the vestige of the Red Line subway which was originally envisioned running from Union Station along Wilshire to Santa Monica. ... The Metro Red Line of the Los Angeles County Metro Rail is a heavy rail metro line in Los Angeles. ...

Rapid transit and Commuter rail in Chicago, Illinois:
Operating

Metra | The 'L' | South Shore Line | Metra Electric Line A rapid transit, underground, subway, tube, elevated, or metro(politan) system is a railway—usually in an urban area—with a high capacity and frequency of service, and grade separation from other traffic. ... A Connex commuter train stands by the platform in Melbourne, Australia Regional rail systems, or commuter rail systems, usually provide a rail service through a central business district area into suburbs or other locations that draw large numbers of people on a daily basis. ... Flag Seal Nickname: The Windy City Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location Location in Chicagoland and northern Illinois Coordinates , Government Country State Counties United States Illinois Cook, DuPage Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 606. ... Metra (officially the Northeast Illinois Regional Commuter Railroad Corporation) is Chicagolands commuter rail system, serving over 200 stations on 11 lines across the Regional Transportation Authoritys six-county service area (Cook, DuPage, Kane, Lake, McHenry and Will Counties) providing over 67 million rides annually. ... The South Shore Line is an electrically powered interurban streetcar line operated by the Northern Indiana Commuter Transportation District (NICTD) between Randolph Street Terminal in downtown Chicago, Illinois and the South Bend Regional Airport in South Bend, Indiana. ... The Metra Electric Line (ME) is an electrified commuter rail line owned and operated by Metra, connecting Randolph Street Station in downtown Chicago, Illinois with its southern suburbs. ...

Defunct

Chicago Surface Lines | Chicago Aurora and Elgin Railroad | Chicago North Shore and Milwaukee Railroad | Chicago City Railway The Chicago Surface Lines (CSL) was operator of the street railway system of Chicago, Illinois from the years 1913 to 1947. ... CA&E public timetable dated February 2, 1936. ... The Chicago North Shore and Milwaukee Railroad, often called the North Shore Line, was an interurban railroad that operated commuter and passenger trains between Chicago, Illinois, and Milwaukee, Wisconsin. ... The Chicago City Railway was a cable car system, designed by William Eppelsheimer and opened in Chicago in 1882. ...

Funding Agency

Regional Transportation Authority The RTA Logo The Regional Transportation Authority (RTA) is the financial and oversight body for the three transit agencies in northeastern Illinois--the Chicago Transit Authority, Metra, and Pace--which are called Service Boards in the RTA Act. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
America on the Move | Chicago’s L (532 words)
By World War II, the L was an integral part of the city’s enormous network of rapid-transit trains, streetcars, and buses.
In the 1950s, Chicago’s buses and streetcars and elevated, subway, and commuter trains carried 80 percent of downtown workers in and out of the Loop, Chicago’s central business district.
Chicago’s city planners pioneered the use of median-strip rapid transit.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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