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Encyclopedia > Chewing

Chewing is the process by which food is torn and/or crushed by teeth. It's the first step of digestion. Through chewing, the food is made softer and warmer and the enzymes in saliva begin to break down carbohydrates in the food.


After chewing, the food (now called a bolus) is swallowed. It enters the esophagus and continues on to the stomach, where the next step of digestion occurs.


Chewing is not solely for feeding. For example, among humans, chewing gum or tobacco is common.


Some animals, called ruminants, chew food more than once. These animals, such as cows, chew their food more than once for the extra nutrients in it. This food is called "cud".


Chewing is sometimes called mastication.


  Results from FactBites:
 
Mastication - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (301 words)
Mastication or chewing is the process by which food is torn and/or crushed by teeth.
Through chewing, the food is made softer and warmer and the enzymes in saliva begin to break down carbohydrates in the food.
Chewing food is a complex technique, muscles need to be powerful enough to break tough portions of food, yet have enough dexterity to not injure the tongue, and to clear the mouth completely.
Benjamin Chew - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (453 words)
Benjamin Chew (November 19, 1722 - January 20, 1810) was the Chief Justice of colonial Pennsylvania.
Chew was the son of a doctor, Samuel Chew, and Mary Galloway Chew (1697-1734).
After independence, Chew was the President of Pennsylvania's Court of Appeals from 1791 until he retired in 1806.
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