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Encyclopedia > Chet Atkins
Chet Atkins

Chet Atkins
Background information
Birth name Chester Burton Atkins
Also known as Mr. Guitar
The Country Gentleman
Born June 20, 1924(1924-06-20)
Luttrell, Tennessee, USA
Died June 30, 2001 (aged 77)
Genre(s) Country, Classical, Folk, Jazz
Occupation(s) Musician, Songwriter, Producer
Instrument(s) Guitar
Years active 1942 - 2001
Label(s) RCA Records
Columbia Records
Website Official Website
Notable instrument(s)
Country Gentleman
Tennessean
6120

Chester Burton "Chet" Atkins (June 20, 1924June 30, 2001) was an influential guitarist and record producer. His picking style, inspired by Merle Travis, Django Reinhardt, George Barnes and Les Paul, brought him admirers both within and outside the country scene, both in the U.S.A. and internationally. Atkins produced records for Perry Como, Elvis Presley, Eddy Arnold, Don Gibson, Jim Reeves, Jerry Reed, Skeeter Davis, Connie Smith, Waylon Jennings, and others. He created, along with Owen Bradley, the smoother country music style known as the Nashville sound, which expanded country music's appeal to include adult pop music fans as well. Chester Greenough Atkins is a former member of the United States House of Representatives. ... This image is a book cover. ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the rap album, see 1924 (album). ... Luttrell is a town in Union County, Tennessee, United States, with a population of 915 as of the 2000 U.S. census. ... is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Country music is a blend of popular musical forms originally found in the Southern United States and the Appalachian Mountains. ... This article is about Western art music from 1000 AD to the present. ... Folk song redirects here. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... For the popular-music magazine, see Musician (magazine). ... A songwriter is someone who writes the lyrics to songs, the musical composition or melody to songs, or both. ... In the music industry, a record producer (or music producer) has many roles, among them controlling the recording sessions, coaching and guiding the musicians, organizing and scheduling production budget and resources, and supervising the recording, mixing and mastering processes. ... A musical instrument is a device constructed or modified for the purpose of making music. ... For other uses, see Guitar (disambiguation). ... In the music industry, a record label can be a brand and a trademark associated with the marketing of music recordings and music videos. ... RCA Records is one of the flagship labels of Sony BMG Music Entertainment. ... Columbia Records is the oldest brand name in recorded sound, dating back to 1888, and was the first record company to produce pre-recorded records as opposed to blank cylinders. ... Gretsch is a U.S. musical instrument manufacturer currently being distributed by guitar company Fender and drum craft company Kaman. ... Gretsch is a U.S. musical instrument manufacturer currently being distributed by guitar company Fender and drum craft company Kaman. ... Gretsch is a U.S. musical instrument manufacturer currently being distributed by guitar company Fender and drum craft company Kaman. ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the rap album, see 1924 (album). ... is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... For the UK magazine, see Guitarist (magazine). ... In the music industry, a record producer (or music producer) has many roles, among them controlling the recording sessions, coaching and guiding the musicians, organizing and scheduling production budget and resources, and supervising the recording, mixing and mastering processes. ... Merle Travis (November 29, 1917 - October 20, 1983) is an American country and western singer, songwriter, and musician. ... Jean-Baptiste Django Reinhardt (January 23, 1910 – May 16, 1953) was a Belgian Sinto Gypsy jazz guitarist. ... Sir George Barnes (1904-1960) was a British broadcasting executive, who was a station Controller of both BBC Radio and later BBC Television in the 1940s and 1950s. ... This article is about the musician. ... For other uses, see United States (disambiguation) and US (disambiguation). ... Pierino Ronald Como (May 18, 1912 – May 12, 2001) was an American crooner. ... Elvis redirects here. ... Eddy Arnold (May 15, 1918) is an American country music singer. ... Donald Eugene Gibson (April 3, 1928 – November 17, 2003) was an American country musician. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Jerry Reed Hubbard (born March 20, 1937) is an American country music singer, country guitarist, songwriter, and actor. ... Skeeter Davis (born Mary Frances Penick December 30, 1931 – September 19, 2004) was an American Country Music Singer, who was best known for crossover Pop music songs of the early 1960s. ... Connie Smith (born Constance June Meador 14 August 1941, in Elkhart, Indiana) is an American country music singer. ... Waylon Arnold Jennings (June 15, 1937 – February 13, 2002) was a respected and influential American country music singer and musician. ... The cover of Bradleys biggest single as a performer, Big Guitar. ... Country music is a blend of popular musical forms originally found in the Southern United States and the Appalachian Mountains. ... The Nashville Sound (often known as Countrypolitan) arose during the late 1950s as a sub-genre of American country music, replacing the chart dominance of the Honky Tonk sound which was most popular in the 1940s and 1950s. ...

Contents

Biography

Chet was born on June 20, 1924, in Luttrell, Tennessee, near the Clinch Mountains, and grew up with his mother and two brothers and a sister, he being the youngest. His parents divorced when he was six. He started out on the ukulele, later moving on to the fiddle, but traded his brother Lowell an old pistol and some chores for a guitar when he was nine.[1] Forced to relocate to Georgia to live with his father due to a near-fatal asthma condition, Chet was a sensitive youth who made music his obsession. Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the rap album, see 1924 (album). ... Luttrell is a town in Union County, Tennessee, United States, with a population of 915 as of the 2000 U.S. census. ... The ukulele (from Hawaiian: , pronounced ), variantly spelled ukelele (particularly in the UK), or alternately abbreviated uke, is a chordophone classified as a plucked lute; it is a subset of the guitar family of instruments, generally with four strings or four courses of strings. ...


Stories have been told about the very young Chet who, when a relative would come to visit, and if that relative played a guitar, would crowd in and put his ear so very close to the instrument that it became difficult for that person to play.[citation needed] This was an early demonstration of his affinity for the instrument that would later become his life, and that he would take around the world, stunning packed concert halls from Nashville to the Boston Pops.


Atkins became an accomplished guitarist while he was in high school.[1] He would use the restroom in the school to practice, because it gave better acoustics.[citation needed] His first guitar had a nail for a nut and was so bowed that only the first few frets could be used. He later purchased a semi-acoustic electric guitar and amp, but he had to travel many miles to find an electrical outlet since his home had no electricity.


He played golf with a range of people including a Certified Public Accountant (CPA). Later in life he lightheartedly gave himself (along with John Knowles, Tommy Emmanuel, Steve Wariner and Jerry Reed) the honorary degree CGP, standing for "Certified Guitar Player". His half-brother Jim was a successful guitarist who worked with the Les Paul Trio in New York. Certified Accountant redirects here. ... Tommy Emmanuel, CGP (born May 31, 1955) is an Australian guitarist, best known for his fingerpicking style. ... Steve Wariner Steve Wariner (born December 25, 1954 in Noblesville, Indiana) is a American country music singer, guitarist and songwriter. ... Jerry Reed Hubbard (born March 20, 1937) is an American country music singer, country guitarist, songwriter, and actor. ... This article is about the musician. ...


Atkins did not have a strong style of his own until 1939 when (while still living in Georgia) he heard Merle Travis picking over WLW radio. This early influence dramatically shaped his unique playing style. Whereas Travis's right hand utilized his index finger for the melody and thumb for bass notes, Atkins expanded his right hand style to include picking with his first three fingers, with the thumb on bass. The result was a clarity and complexity that became his unmistakable sound. Merle Travis (November 29, 1917 - October 20, 1983) is an American country and western singer, songwriter, and musician. ... For the California airport with this IATA airport code, see Willows-Glenn County Airport. ...


Career

Early career

After dropping out of high school in 1942, he landed a job at WNOX radio in Knoxville. There he played fiddle and guitar with singer Bill Carlisle and comic Archie Campbell as well as becoming a member of the station's "Dixieland Swingsters," a small swing instrumental combo. WNML and WNRX (branded as The Sports Animal) are sports radio stations serving the Knoxville area. ... Knoxville redirects here. ... Archie Campbell (born November 7, 1914 in Bulls Gap, Tennessee, died August 29, 1987 in Knoxville, Tennessee) was a writer and star of Hee Haw, a popular long-running country-flavored television variety show. ...


After three years, he moved to WLW in Cincinnati, Ohio, where Merle Travis had formerly worked. After six months he moved to Raleigh and worked with Johnnie and Jack before heading for Richmond, Virginia, where he performed with Sunshine Sue Workman. Atkins's shy personality worked against him, as did the fact that his sophisticated style led many to doubt he was truly "country." He was fired often but was soon able to land another job at another radio station due to his unique playing ability. For the California airport with this IATA airport code, see Willows-Glenn County Airport. ... Cincinnati redirects here. ... Nickname: Motto: Sic Itur Ad Astra (Thus do we reach the stars) Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia Coordinates: , Country State Government  - Mayor L. Douglas Wilder (I) Area  - City 62. ...


Traveling to Chicago, he auditioned for Red Foley, who was leaving his star position at the WLS National Barn Dance to join the Grand Ole Opry. [2] Atkins made his first appearance at the Grand Ole Opry in 1946 as a member of Foley's band. He also recorded a single for Nashville-based Bullet Records that year. That single, "Guitar Blues," was fairly progressive, including as it did, a clarinet solo by Nashville dance band musician Dutch McMillan with Owen Bradley on piano. He had a solo spot on the Opry for a while but when that was cut Atkins moved on to KWTO in Springfield, Missouri, and despite the support of executive Si Siman, soon was fired for not sounding country enough. Clyde Julian Red Foley ( June 17, 1910 - September 19, 1968) was a country music singer. ... WLS (Worlds Largest Store) is the callsign two broadcast stations in Chicago: radio station WLS AM 890 TV station WLS-TV 7 (DTV 52) WLS (Weight Loss Surgery) see Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery   This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might... The National Barn Dance was a country music radio program first heard on WLS (AM) in Chicago, Illinois and later on NBC. It was a precursor to many similar programs, in part because the clear channel signal of WLS was audible throughout most of the Midwest and even beyond in... The Grand Ole Opry is a weekly Saturday night country music radio program broadcast live on WSM radio in Nashville, Tennessee, and televised on Great American Country network. ... The Grand Ole Opry is a weekly Saturday night country music radio program broadcast live on WSM radio in Nashville, Tennessee, and televised on Great American Country network. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The cover of Bradleys biggest single as a performer, Big Guitar. ... KWTO refers to two radio stations in Springfield, Missouri, USA. On AM, KWTO can be found at 560 kHz, where it airs a news/talk format. ... Springfield is a city in Christian and Greene Counties in the U.S. state of Missouri. ...


RCA Victor signs Atkins

While working with a Western Band in Denver, Colorado, Atkins came to the attention of RCA Victor. Si Siman had been encouraging Steve Sholes to sign Atkins, as his style (with the success of Merle Travis as a hit recording artist) was suddenly in vogue. Sholes, A&R director of country music at RCA, tracked Atkins down to Denver. He made his first RCA recordings in Chicago in 1947. They did not sell. He did some studio work for RCA that year but had relocated to Knoxville again where he worked with Homer and Jethro on WNOX's new Saturday night radio show the Tennessee Barn Dance and the popular Midday Merry Go Round. Still, it was a hard way to make a living for a family man for by then he had a wife and daughter. He even contemplated tuning pianos as a sideline. In 1949 he left WNOX to join Mother Maybelle and the Carter Sisters back at KWTO. This incarnation of the old Carter Family featured Maybelle Carter and daughters June, Helen and Anita. Their work soon attracted attention from the Opry. The group relocated to Nashville in mid-1950. Atkins began working on recording sessions, performing on WSM and the Opry. Nickname: Location of Denver in the State of Colorado Location of Colorado in the United States Coordinates: , Country United States State State of Colorado City and County Denver[1] Founded 1858-11-22, as Denver City, K.T.[2] Incorporated 1861-11-07, as Denver City, C.T.[3] Consolidated... Sony BMG Music Entertainment is the result of a 50/50 joint venture between Sony Music Entertainment (part of Sony) and BMG Entertainment (part of Bertelsmann AG) completed in August 2004. ... Stephen H. Sholes (February 12, 1911 – April 22, 1968) was a prominent recording executive with RCA Victor. ... Merle Travis (November 29, 1917 - October 20, 1983) is an American country and western singer, songwriter, and musician. ... Homer and Jethro were an American country music team with a long career from the 1940s through the 1960s, sometimes known as the thinking mans hillbillies, specializing in comedy records and satirical versions of popular songs. ... Valerie June Carter Cash (June 23, 1929 – May 15, 2003) was a singer, songwriter, actress and comedian and was a member of the Carter Family, and the second wife of singer Johnny Cash. ... Maybelle, A.P. and Sara The Carter Family was a country music group that performed and recorded between 1927 and 1943. ... For other cities named Nashville, see Nashville (disambiguation). ... WSM may refer to one of the following: AM radio station WSM in Nashville, Tennessee, USA FM radio station WSM-FM, also in Nashville Web-based System Manager, an IBM management software for administering AIX 5L host on RS/6000 systems. ...


While he hadn't yet had a hit record on RCA his stature was growing. He began assisting Sholes as a Session Leader when the New York-based producer needed help organizing Nashville sessions for RCA artists. Atkins's first hit single was "Mr. Sandman," followed by "Silver Bell," which he did as a duet with Hank Snow. His albums also became more popular. In addition to recording, Atkins became a design consultant for Gretsch, who manufactured a popular Chet Atkins line of electric guitars from 1955-1980. Atkins also became manager of RCA's Nashville studio eventually inspiring and seeing the completion of the legendary Studio 'B'. This studio was the first studio built specifically for the purpose of recording on the now famous 'Music Row'. For other uses, see Sandman (disambiguation). ... Clarence Eugene Snow (May 9, 1914 – December 20, 1999), better known as Hank Snow, was a Hall of Fame country music singer and songwriter. ... Gretsch is a U.S. musical instrument manufacturer currently being distributed by guitar company Fender and drum craft company Kaman. ...


Performer and manager

When Sholes took over pop production in 1957 — a result of his success with Elvis Presley — he put Atkins in charge of RCA's Nashville division. With country music record sales in tatters as rock and roll took over, Atkins and Bob Ferguson took their cue from Owen Bradley and eliminated fiddles and steel guitar as a means of making country singers appeal to pop fans. This became known as 'The Nashville Sound' which Chet said was a label created by the media attached to a style of recording done during that period in an effort to keep country (and their jobs) viable. Atkins used the Jordanaires and a rhythm section on hits like Jim Reeves' "Four Walls" and "He'll Have to Go" and Don Gibson's "Oh Lonesome Me" and "Blue Blue Day." The once rare phenomenon of having a country hit "cross over" to pop success became more common. He and Bradley had essentially put the producer in the driver's seat, guiding an artist's choice of material and the musical background. Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... Elvis redirects here. ... Bob Ferguson Robert Bruce Bob Ferguson Sr (December 30, 1927 – July 22, 2001) was an American songwriter, record producer, and historian. ... The cover of Bradleys biggest single as a performer, Big Guitar. ... The Nashville Sound (often known as Countrypolitan) arose during the late 1950s as a sub-genre of American country music, replacing the chart dominance of the Honky Tonk sound which was most popular in the 1940s and 1950s. ... The Jordanaires are an American singing group formed in 1948 in Springfield, Missouri. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Donald Eugene Gibson (April 3, 1928 – November 17, 2003) was an American country musician. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Atkins made his own records, which usually visited pop standards and jazz, in a sophisticated home studio, often recording the rhythm tracks at RCA but adding his solo parts at home, refining it all until the result satisfied him. Guitarists of all styles came to admire various Atkins albums for their unique musical ideas and in some cases experimental electronic ideas. In this period he became known internationally as Mister Guitar (also the name of one of Atkins's albums). His trademark "Atkins Style" of playing, which was and is very difficult for a guitarist to master, uses the thumb and first two — sometimes three — fingers of the right hand. He developed this style from listening to Merle Travis occasionally on a primitive radio. He was sure no one could play that articulately with just the thumb and index finger (which actually was exactly how Travis played) and he assumed it required the thumb and two fingers — and that was the style he pioneered and mastered. He enjoyed jamming with fellow studio musicians which led to them being asked to perform at the Newport Jazz Festival in 1960. That performance was canceled, however, due to rioting. Atkins performed by invitation at the White House for presidents Kennedy through George H. W. Bush. For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... The Newport Jazz Festival is a music festival held every August in Newport, Rhode Island. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see White House (disambiguation). ...


Before his mentor Sholes died in 1968, Atkins had become vice president of RCA's country division. He had brought Waylon Jennings, Willie Nelson, Connie Smith, Bobby Bare, Dolly Parton, Jerry Reed and John Hartford to the label in the 1960s and inspired and helped countless others.[3] He took a considerable risk during the mid-1960s, when the Civil Rights Movement sparked violence throughout the South by signing country music's first African-American singer Charley Pride, who sang rawer country than the smoother music Atkins had pioneered. But Atkins's hunch paid off. Ironically, some of Pride's biggest fans were from the most conservative country fans, many of whom didn't care for the pop stylings Atkins had added. Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Waylon Arnold Jennings (June 15, 1937 – February 13, 2002) was a respected and influential American country music singer and musician. ... Willie Hugh Nelson (born April 30, 1933) is an American singer-songwriter and actor. ... Connie Smith (born Constance June Meador 14 August 1941, in Elkhart, Indiana) is an American country music singer. ... Bobby Bare Bobby Bare (born Robert Joseph Bare on April 7, 1935 in Ironton, Ohio) is an American country music singer and songwriter. ... Dolly Rebecca Parton (born January 19, 1946) is a Grammy Award-winning country music singer/songwriter, author, actress and philanthropist. ... Jerry Reed Hubbard (born March 20, 1937) is an American country music singer, country guitarist, songwriter, and actor. ... John Cowan Hartford (December 30, 1937– June 4, 2001) was an American bluegrass composer and musician known for his mastery of the fiddle and banjo, as well as for his witty lyrics and unique vocal style. ... Historically, the civil rights movement was a concentrated period of time around the world of approximately one generation (1960-1980) wherein there was much worldwide civil unrest and popular rebellion. ... Charley Frank Pride (born March 18, 1938) is a country music artist. ...


Atkins's own biggest hit single came in 1965, with "Yakety Axe," an adaptation of his friend saxophonist Boots Randolph's "Yakety Sax". He rarely performed in those days, and eventually had to hire other RCA producers like Bob Ferguson and Felton Jarvis to alleviate his workload. Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... Homer Louis Boots Randolph III (June 3, 1927 – July 3, 2007) was an American musician best known for his 1963 saxophone hit, Yakety Sax. Randolph was a major part of the Nashville Sound for most of his professional career. ... Yakety Sax is a 1961 45 rpm single record by saxophonist Boots Randolph. ... Bob Ferguson Robert Bruce Bob Ferguson Sr (December 30, 1927 – July 22, 2001) was an American songwriter, record producer, and historian. ...


Atkins retires from management

In the 1970s, Atkins became increasingly stressed by his executive duties. He produced fewer records but could still turn out hits such as Perry Como's pop hit "And I Love You So." He recorded extensively with close friend and fellow picker Jerry Reed, who'd become a hit artist in his own right. A 1973 bout of colon cancer, however, led Atkins to redefine his role at RCA, to allow others to handle administration while he went back to his first love, the guitar, often recording with Reed or even Homer & Jethro's Jethro Burns (Atkins's brother-in-law) after Homer died in 1971. The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... Pierino Ronald Como (May 18, 1912 – May 12, 2001) was an American crooner. ... Jerry Reed Hubbard (born March 20, 1937) is an American country music singer, country guitarist, songwriter, and actor. ... Colorectal cancer, also called colon cancer or bowel cancer, includes cancerous growths in the colon, rectum and appendix. ... Jerry Reed Hubbard (born March 20, 1937) is an American country music singer, country guitarist, songwriter, and actor. ... Homer & Jethro were a country band with two members, Henry D. Haynes (Homer): July 27, 1920 - August 7, 1971 and Kenneth Burns (Jethro): March 10, 1920 - February 4, 1989 Link error in previous sentence: Link from Kenneth Burns points to Kenneth L Burns. ...


By the end of the '70s, Atkins's time had passed as a producer. New executives at RCA had different ideas. He first retired from his position in the company, and then began to feel stifled as an artist because RCA would not let him branch out into jazz. At the same time he grew dissatisfied with the direction Gretsch (no longer family-owned) was going and withdrew his authorization for them to use his name and began designing guitars with Gibson. He left RCA in 1982 and signed with Columbia Records, for whom he produced a debut album in 1983.[2] While he was with Columbia, he showed his creativity and taste in jazz guitar, and in various other contexts. Jazz had always been a strong love of his, and often in his career he was criticized by "pure" country musicians for his jazz influences. He also said on many occasions that he did not like being called a "country guitarist", insisting that he was a guitarist, period. Although he played 'by ear' and was a masterful improviser he was able to read music and even performed some classical guitar pieces with taste and distinction. When Roger C. Field, a friend (in Atkins' book "Me and My Guitars"), suggested to him in 1991 that he record and perform with a female singer he did so with Suzy Bogguss. He did return to his country roots for albums he recorded with Mark Knopfler and Jerry Reed. On being asked to name the ten most influential guitarists of the 20th century, he named Django Reinhardt to the first position on the list, and placed himself at fifth position.[4] For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... The Gibson Guitar Corporation, of Nashville, Tennessee, USA, is a manufacturer of acoustic and electric guitars. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... Columbia Records is the oldest brand name in recorded sound, dating back to 1888, and was the first record company to produce pre-recorded records as opposed to blank cylinders. ... For the Jimi Hendrix song, see 1983. ... Suzy Bogguss (born December 30, 1956) is an American country music singer and one of the most acclaimed female country singers of the 1980s and 90s. ... Mark Freuder Knopfler OBE (born August 12, 1949, Glasgow, Scotland) is an English guitarist, singer, songwriter, and film score composer. ... Jerry Reed Hubbard (born March 20, 1937) is an American country music singer, country guitarist, songwriter, and actor. ... Jean-Baptiste Django Reinhardt (January 23, 1910 – May 16, 1953) was a Belgian Sinto Gypsy jazz guitarist. ...


In later years he even went back to radio, appearing on Garrison Keillor's Prairie Home Companion, and even picking up a fiddle from time to time. A Prairie Home Companion is a live radio variety show created and hosted by Garrison Keillor. ...


Legacy

Atkins received numerous awards, including fourteen Grammy Awards (including a Lifetime Achievement Award in 1993), and nine Country Music Association Instrumentalist of the Year awards.[2] Billboard magazine awarded him their Century Award, their "highest honor for distinguished creative achievement", in December 1997. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award is awarded by the Recording Academy to performers who, during their lifetimes, have made creative contributions of outstanding artistic significance to the field of recording [1]. This award is distinct from the Grammy Hall of Fame Award, which honors specific recordings rather than individuals, and... The Country Music Association (CMA) was founded in 1958 in Nashville, Tennessee. ... It has been suggested that Billboard be merged into this article or section. ...


Atkins expanded the universe for guitarists — and lovers of guitar music — in a way no one did before. His love for numerous styles of music can be traced from his early recording of stride-pianist James P. Johnson's "Johnson Rag," all the way to the rock stylings of Eric Johnson, an invited guest on Atkins's recording sessions who, when Chet attempted to copy his influential rocker "Cliffs of Dover," led to Atkins's creation of a unique arrangement of "Londonderry Air (Danny Boy)." James Price Johnson (February 1, 1894 - November 17, 1955) was a pianist and composer. ... For other persons named Eric Johnson, see Eric Johnson (disambiguation). ...


Chet's recordings of "Malaguena" inspired a new generation of Flamenco guitarists; the countless classical guitar selections peppering almost all his albums were, for many American artists working in the field today, the first classical guitar they ever heard. He could certainly play as jazzy or bluesy as he wanted, even recording smooth jazz guitar still played on American airwaves today. Flamenco is a Spanish musical genre with strong, rhythmic undertones and is often accompanied with a similarly impassioned style of dance characterized by its powerful yet graceful execution, as well as its intricate hand and footwork. ... Smooth Jazz, also sometimes referred to as new adult contemporary music,[1] is generally described as a genre of music that utilizes instruments (and, at times, improvisation) traditionally associated with jazz and stylistic influences drawn from mostly R&B, but also funk and pop. ...


While he did more performing in the 1990s his health grew frail as the cancer returned and worsened. He died on June 30, 2001 at his home in Nashville.


Atkins was quoted many times throughout his career, and of his own legacy he once said:

Years from now, after I'm gone, someone will listen to what I've done and know I was here. They may not know or care who I was, but they'll hear my guitars speaking for me.

A stretch of Interstate 185 in southwest Georgia (between LaGrange and Columbus) is named "Chet Atkins Parkway". This article is about Interstate 185 in Georgia. ... LaGrange is a city in Troup County, Georgia, United States. ... Columbus is a city in Muscogee County, Georgia, United States. ...


In 2002, Atkins was posthumously inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.[3] His award was presented by Marty Stuart and Brian Setzer and accepted by Atkin's grandson, Jonathan Russell. The following year, Atkins ranked #28 in CMT's 40 Greatest Men of Country Music. Also see: 2002 (number). ... The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame at sunset. ... Marty Stuart (born John Marty Stuart September 30, 1958 in Philadelphia, Mississippi) is an American country music singer, known for both his traditional style, and eclectic merging of rockabilly, honky tonk, and traditional country music. ... Brian Setzer (born April 10, 1959, Massapequa, New York) is an American guitarist, singer and songwriter. ... CMT can refer to: Cadmium Mercury Telluride Canal Metropolitano Televisión Catalog Management Table Certified Market Technician Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease Childrens Musical Theatreworks of Fresno, California Chip Multi Threading Comision del Mercado de las Telecommunicaciones, the Spanish communications industry regulator. ... The 40 Greatest Men of Country Music is a three hour television special held in 2003 by CMT. The special counted down the men who have made the greatest contribution to the genre, as well as leaving behind the greatest impact. ...


Discography

Further information: Chet Atkins discography

References

  • Kienzle, Rich. (1998). "Chet Atkins". In The Encyclopedia of Country Music. Paul Kingsbury, Editor. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 26-7.

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Chet Atkins: Mister Guitar - Biographies (949 words)
However, Chet was still attracted to the guitar and at the age of nine, he traded a pistol for a guitar.
Atkins also began making regular performances on the WRVA radio station in Richmond, VA, but he was repeatedly fired because his musical arrangements differed from the expectations of the station's executives.
Atkins continued to record for RCA throughout the '70s, although he was creatively stifled by the label by the end of the decade.
Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Chet Atkins (548 words)
Atkins was born in Luttrell, Tennessee, and grew up with his mother and siblings after the divorce of his parents.
Atkins was self-taught, and later on in life gave himself (and a few others) the honorary degree "CGP", standing for "Certified Guitar Player".
Atkin's last major hit single came in 1969, and in the 1970s, he worked mostly in trio with Homer and Jethro, and then with Jethro (his brother-in-law) after Homer died.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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