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Encyclopedia > Chernyakhov culture
Chernyakhiv culture is shown in orange, the third-century Wielbark Culture in red. Gotland is dark pink and the traditional extent of Götaland is in green. The Roman Empire is purple.
Chernyakhiv culture is shown in orange, the third-century Wielbark Culture in red. Gotland is dark pink and the traditional extent of Götaland is in green. The Roman Empire is purple.

The Chernyakhiv culture (also known as Cherniakhov culture) (second century to fifth century) was a material culture, the distribution of which corresponded roughly to Ukraine and parts of Belarus. The term came from the site where the first burial ground of this culture was found, the village of Cherniakhiv in Ukraine's Kiev Oblast (Chernyakhov in Russian). Around the year 300, the same culture extended into Romania where, for political reasons, it is called the Sântana de Mureş culture. It is attested to in thousands of sites. Image File history File links my own map, based on User:Dbachmanns blank map. ... Image File history File links my own map, based on User:Dbachmanns blank map. ... (2nd century - 3rd century - 4th century - other centuries) Events The Sassanid dynasty of Persia launches a war to reconquer lost lands in the Roman east. ... Areas in the first half of the 3rd century: Wielbark culture (red) , Przeworsk culture (green), a Baltic culture (Aesti?, yellow), DÄ™bczyn culture (pink) and the Roman Empire (purple) Wielbark culture (German: , Polish: , Ukrainian Ukrainian: ) was an archaeological culture identified with the Goths which appeared during the first half of...   is a county and province of Sweden and the largest island in the Baltic Sea. ... Götaland Maps of Swedens historical three lands, and Österland in Finland. ... The Roman Empire is the name given to both the imperial domain developed by the city-state of Rome and also the corresponding phase of that civilization, characterized by an autocratic form of government. ... ( 1st century - 2nd century - 3rd century - other centuries) Events Roman Empire governed by the Five Good Emperors ( 96– 180) – Nerva, Trajan, Hadrian, Antoninus Pius, Marcus Aurelius. ... (4th century - 5th century - 6th century - other centuries) Events Rome sacked by Visigoths in 410. ... Kiev Oblast (also Kyiv Oblast, Ukrainian: ) is an oblast (province) in central Ukraine. ... Events Romano-Celtic temple-mausoleum complex is constructed in Lullingstone, and also in Anderida (approximate date). ...

Contents

Formation

The archaeological record shows that the population of the Wielbark culture had settled in the area and mixed with the previous populations of the Zarubintsy culture. This cultural movement is widely accepted as the migration of the Goths from Gothiscandza to Oium, under the leadership of Filimer, of which the Goth scholar Jordanes wrote in the sixth century. Areas in the first half of the 3rd century: Wielbark culture (red) , Przeworsk culture (green), a Baltic culture (Aesti?, yellow), DÄ™bczyn culture (pink) and the Roman Empire (purple) Wielbark culture (German: , Polish: , Ukrainian Ukrainian: ) was an archaeological culture identified with the Goths which appeared during the first half of... The Zarubintsy culture was one of the major archaeological cultures which flourished in the area north of the Black Sea along the upper Dnieper and Pripyat Rivers, stretching west towards the Vistula Basin from the 3rd or 2nd centuries BC until the 2nd century AD. It was identified ca 1899... Invasion of the Goths: a late 19th century painting by O. Fritsche, is a highly romanticized portrait of the Goths as cavalrymen. ... Gothiscandza was according to the 6th century Goth scholar Jordanes, the first settlement of the Goths after their migration from Scandinavia (Scandza). ... Oium (from Aujom, meaning in the waterlands in Gothic) was according to Jordanes, a name for Scythia, where the Goths settled after leaving Gothiscandza. ... The red area is Gothiscandza (the Wielbark culture), and the orange area is the extent of Oium (the Chernyakhov Culture). ... (5th century — 6th century — 7th century — other centuries) Events The first academy of the east the Academy of Gundeshapur founded in Persia by the Persian Shah Khosrau I. Irish colonists and invaders, the Scots, began migrating to Caledonia (later known as Scotland) Glendalough monastery, Wicklow Ireland founded...


In the last decades of the second century, the Goths appear to have settled in Masovia, Podlachia and Volynia regions, but some of them moved to the area just north-west of the Black Sea. Historical division of Masovia Masovia (Polish: Mazowsze) is a geographical and historical region situated in central Poland with its capital at Warsaw. ... Old chapel Krzna river Potockis Palace i MiÄ™dzyrzec Podlaski Podlachia, Podlesia, or Podlasie is a historical region in eastern part of Poland and western Belarus. ... Volhynia (Wołyń in Polish; Волинь, Volyn’ in Ukrainian; also called Volynia, Volyň in Czech) comprises the historic region in western Ukraine located between the rivers Pripyat and Western Bug. ... Map of the Black Sea. ...


A second wave of Germanic migrants arrived in the mid-third century, and most of them settled between the Dniester and the lower Dnieper, including the Cherniakhiv area. (2nd century - 3rd century - 4th century - other centuries) Events The Sassanid dynasty of Persia launches a war to reconquer lost lands in the Roman east. ... The Dniester (Polish Dniestr, Ukrainian Дністер (Dnister), Romanian Nistru, Russian Днестр (Dnestr), Yiddish‫נעסטער ‬ (nester), Serbian (Dnjester) and during antiquity was called Tyras in Latin) is a river in Eastern Europe. ... This article is about the river. ...


Most of the population appears to have been Sarmatians who lived between the lower Danube and the Sea of Azov, as well as Slavs. In the west, there were some Dacians and Getae. The Sarmatians practiced inhumation while those deriving from the north, i.e., elements descended from the Zarubintsy culture, continued their urnfield practices. Sarmatian Cataphract Sarmatians, Sarmatae or Sauromatae (the second form is mostly used by the earlier Greek writers, the other by the later Greeks and the Romans) were a people whom Herodotus (4. ... The Danube (ancient Danuvius, ancient Greek Istros) is the longest river of the European Union and Europes second-longest[3] (after the Volga). ... The shallow Sea of Azov is clearly distinguished from the deeper Black Sea. ... Countries inhabited predominantly by Slavic peoples The Slavic peoples are a linguistic and ethnic branch of Indo-European peoples, living mainly in Eastern Europe. ... Dacian kingdom during the reign of Burebista, 82 BC The Dacians (Lat. ... The Getae was the name by which the pre-Roman ancient writers reffered to the tribes that will become the later Dacians. ... By other animals Humans are not the only species to bury their dead. ... The Zarubintsy culture was one of the major archaeological cultures which flourished in the area north of the Black Sea along the upper Dnieper and Pripyat Rivers, stretching west towards the Vistula Basin from the 3rd or 2nd centuries BC until the 2nd century AD. It was identified ca 1899... The Urnfield culture of central European culture is dated roughly between 1300 BC and 750 BC. The name describes the custom of cremating the dead and placing them in cemeteries. ...


In linguistic terms, it is said that this is the time and place where Slavic and Iranian borrowed lexical items from each other, and where Slavic picked up many of its Germanic loanwords. Linguistics is the scientific study of language. ... Proto-Slavic is the proto-language from which Old Church Slavonic and other Slavic languages later emerged. ...


Finds

Archaeologists have found fibulas, combs and amulets showing contacts with not only Scandinavia, but also with Central Europe. For other uses see fibula (disambiguation) The fibula or calf bone is a bone placed on the lateral side of the tibia, with which it is connected above and below. ... A comb A comb for people with hair loss. ... Scandinavia is a region in Northern Europe. ...


References

  • James P. Mallory, "Chernoles Culture", Encyclopedia of Indo-European Culture, Fitzroy Dearborn, 1997.

JP Mallory is the nom-de-plume of Irish-American archaeologist and Indo-Europeanist Prof. ...

External links

  • A Russian archaeology article

 
 

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