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Encyclopedia > Chef Boyardee
Chef Boyardee in an early television commercial.

Ettore Boiardi (October 22, 1897 - June 21, 1985), better known as "Chef Boyardee," was an Italian-born chef who became famous for his eponymous brand of food products. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (598x670, 56 KB)Chef Boyardee commercial, taken by me via digital camera from my television. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (598x670, 56 KB)Chef Boyardee commercial, taken by me via digital camera from my television. ... is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1897 (MDCCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1985 (MCMLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays 1985 Gregorian calendar). ... An eponym is the name of a person, whether real or fictitious, who has (or is thought to have) given rise to the name of a particular place, tribe, discovery, or other item. ... A brand is a name, logo, slogan, and/or design scheme associated with a product or service. ...


Boiardi was born in Piacenza, Italy. Ettore (Hector) Boiardi, at age 16, arrived at Ellis Island on 9 May 1914 aboard the La Lorraine out of Havre. His cooking skills became noted with his rise to prominence as the Highest immigrant Chef in New York City, becoming the head Chef at the Plaza Hotel. In 1915, he directed the catering for the reception of Woodrow Wilson's second marriage.[1] His entrepreneurial skill became notable when he opened his first restaurant, Il Giardino d'Italia, in Cleveland, Ohio in 1926. Patrons asked for multiple servings of his spaghetti sauce, which he would give to the customers in old milk bottles. Piacenza (Placentia in Latin and old-fashioned English, Piasëinsa in the local dialect of Emiliano-Romagnolo) is a city in the Emilia-Romagna region of northern Italy. ... Ellis Island, at the mouth of the Hudson River in New York Harbor, was at one time the main entry facility for immigrants entering the United States from January 1, 1892 until November 12, 1954. ... is the 129th day of the year (130th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... See Havre, Montana See Havre de Grace, Maryland See Havre, farm, Norway Havre Aubert, Magdalen Islands, Quebec Canada Havre Boucher, Nova Scotia See Le Havre, France. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... The Plaza Hotel as seen from the corner of 5th Avenue and 59th Street in Manhattan For the music festival PlazAid, click here The Plaza Hotel in New York City is a landmark 19-story luxury hotel on the corner of Fifth Avenue and Central Park South in Manhattan, currently... Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856 – February 3, 1924), was the 28th President of the United States. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... Year 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Cooked spaghetti in a bowl. ... A glass of cows milk. ...


Demand grew, so much so, in fact, that he had to employ the use of a tiny factory in 1928, to keep up with orders. It was at this time that he set his sights on selling his product nationally, first priding his spaghetti products on being inexpensive and thus a good meal choice to serve to the entire family. The factory was moved to Milton, Pennsylvania in 1938, where Boiardi had close control of all of the ingredients placed into his products. He even grew mushrooms in the basement of the factory to be used in his creations. Boiardi was quite proud of his Italian heritage. He sold his products under the brand name Chef Boy-Ar-Dee, allowing his American customers to pronounce his name properly.[1] Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Milton is a borough in Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, on the Susquehanna River, 50 miles (80 km) north of Harrisburg. ... Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ...


Later, he sold his brand to American Home Foods (later International Home Foods) for around 6 million US dollars after family concerns about the company's internal growth and struggling cashflow around growing a small company so rapidly. Hector then took his money and invested a substantial portion into Steel mills, which then helped produce war goods needed for the Korean war effort. Boiardi's company made and prepared millions of rations for the American and other allied troops during World War Two, and for his efforts he was awarded a Gold Star order of Excellence from the United States War Department. He then helped make new Italian food products for the American market until his death. ConAgra acquired International Home Foods in 2000 and continues to use his likeness on Chef Boyardee brand products. ConAgra Foods, Inc. ... 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

In the last two decades, rumors have abounded that Chef Boyardee was not a real person, but merely a fictional character created to sell foodstuffs, like Aunt Jemima. This stems from the fact that he was less active in later life. He appeared in many of his company's television commercials for his brand in the 1950s and 1960s. Image File history File links Chef_Boyardee_logo. ... Aunt Jemima is a trademark for pancake flour, syrup, and other breakfast foods. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from January 1, 1960 to December 31, 1969, inclusive. ...


Boiardi died in Parma, Ohio, on June 21, 1985 at the age of 87.[1] At the time of his death, Chef Boy-ar-dee products brought in US$500 million per year. Hector was married to Helen Boiardi, who died in 1995. At the time of her death, they were survived by their only child, Mario, two grandchildren, and five great-grandchildren.[2] Parma is a city in Cuyahoga County, Ohio and is the largest suburb of Cleveland. ... Official language(s) None Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Largest metro area Cleveland Area  Ranked 34th  - Total 44,825 sq mi (116,096 km²)  - Width 220 miles (355 km)  - Length 220 miles (355 km)  - % water 8. ...


References

  1. ^ a b c UPI story (June 23, 1985), "Hector Boiardi Is Dead: Began Chef Boy-ar-dee", The New York Times: Late City Final Edition, Section 1, Page 28, Column 4. Retrieved on 2007-07-11 “Hector Boiardi, founder of Chef Boy-ar-dee Foods, one of the first packaged Italian food businesses in the nation, died Friday night after a short illness. He was 87 years old.” “His company was first called Chef Boiardi, but Mr. Boiardi found that customers and salesmen had difficulty pronouncing his name, so he changed the brand name to the phonetic spelling, ‘Boy-ar-dee.’” “He came to the United States in 1917 and worked at hotels in New York and Greenbrier, W.Va., where he directed the catering at the reception for President Woodrow Wilson's second marriage.”
  2. ^ Anonymous (July 7, 1995), "Helen J. Boiardi, 90; Started Line of Pasta", The New York Times. Retrieved on 2007-07-11 “Mrs. Boiardi is survived by a son, Mario, of Queenstown, Md.; two sisters, a brother, two grandchildren and five great-grandchildren.”

Front of UPI Headquarters, Washington, D.C. “UPI” redirects here. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City by Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City by Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr. ...

External links

  • Official site

  Results from FactBites:
 
Chef Boyardee - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (376 words)
Parma, Ohio, June 1985), better known as "Chef Boyardee" was an Italian-born chef who became famous for his eponymous franchise of food products.
In the last two decades, rumors have abounded that Chef Boyardee was not a real person, but merely a fictional icon created to sell foodstuffs.
The Chef Boyardee company refused to allow the sitcom Seinfeld to use its brand name "Beef-a-Roni" in a famous 1996 episode ("The Rye") in which Kramer feeds the product to a horse, causing flatulence.
Urban Legends Reference Pages: Business (Chef Boyardee) (440 words)
Chef Boyardee was a fictional creation whose name was taken from the given names of the company's three founders: Boyd, Art, and Dennis.
Chef Boyardee's name is a combination of the names of the three founders of the company: Boyd, Art, and Dennis.
But Chef Boyardee was not, as commonly believed, a fictional creation whose name was formed from the given names (Boyd, Art, and Dennis) of the men who created him.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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