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Encyclopedia > Cheerleading
Youth Cheerleaders during a football halftime show. Youth Cheer - high school ages and younger - make up the vast majority of cheerleaders and cheer teams.

Cheerleading is a sport[1][2][3][4] that uses organized routines made from elements of some tumbling, dance, jumps and stunting to direct the event's spectators to cheer on sports teams at games and matches and/or compete at cheerleading competitions. The athlete involved is called a cheerleader. With an estimated 1.5 million participants in allstar cheerleading (not including the millions more in high school, college or little league participants) in the United States alone, cheerleading is, according to Newsweek's Arian Campo-Flores, "the most quintessential of American sports."[1] The growing presentation of the sport to a global audience has been led by the 1997 start of broadcasts of cheerleading competition by ESPN International and the worldwide release of the 2000 film Bring it On. Due in part to this recent exposure, there are now an estimated 100,000 participants scattered around the rest of the world in countries including Australia, China, Colombia, France, Germany, Japan,[5] the Netherlands, New Zealand, Sweden and the United Kingdom. [1] Image File history File links Unbalanced_scales. ... Image File history File links YouthCheerleadingPompons. ... Image File history File links YouthCheerleadingPompons. ... A halftime show is a performance given between the first and second halves or the 2nd and 3rd quarters of a sporting event. ... For other uses, see High school (disambiguation). ... Tumbling can have several meanings: Tumbling is floor gymnastics, similar to somersault, backhandsprings, and cartwheels. ... For other uses, see Dance (disambiguation). ... . ... The Newsweek logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and internationally. ... ESPN, formerly an acronym for Entertainment and Sports Programming Network, is an American cable television network dedicated to broadcasting and producing sports-related programming 24 hours a day. ... Bring It On may refer to: Bring It On, a 2000 film which has become a franchise with three follow-up movies: Bring It On Again 2003 direct to video release Bring It On: All or Nothing 2006 direct to video release Bring It On: In It to Win It...

Contents

History

Minnesota Gopher cheerleader Johnny Campbell

Cheerleading first appeared in the United States in the late 1880s with the crowd chanting as a way to encourage school spirit at athletic events. The first organized, recorded cheer was yelled "Ray, Ray, Ray! TIGER, TIGER, SIS, SIS, SIS! BOOM, BOOM, BOOM! Aaaaah! PRINCETON, PRINCETON, PRINCETON!" at Princeton University in 1884.[6] A few years later, Princeton graduate, Thomas Peebles introduced the idea of organized crowd cheering at football games to the University of Minnesota. However, it was not until 1898 that University of Minnesota student Johnny Campbell directed a crowd in cheering "Rah, Rah, Rah! Sku-u-mar, Hoo-Rah! Hoo-Rah! Varsity! Varsity! Varsity, Minn-e-So-Tah!”, making Campbell the very first cheerleader and November 2, 1898 the official birth date of organized cheerleading. Soon after, the University of Minnesota organized a "yell leader" squad of 6 male students, who still use Campbell's original cheer today[6] In 1903 the first cheerleading fraternity, Gamma Sigma was founded.[7] Cheerleading started out as an all-male activity, but females began participating in 1923, due to limited availability of female collegiate sports. At this time, gymnastics, tumbling, and megaphones were incorporated into popular cheers.[7] Today it is estimated that 97% of cheerleading participants overall are female, but males still make up 50% of cheering squads at the collegiate level. [8] Image File history File links Jcampbell. ... Image File history File links Jcampbell. ... Minnesota Golden Gophers Spirit Squads at the Minnesota State Fair The University of Minnesota Golden Gophers Spirit Squads comprise the cheerleading organization at the Twin Cities campus of the University of Minnesota. ... Princeton University is a private coeducational research university located in Princeton, New Jersey. ... Year 1884 (MDCCCLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The University of Minnesotas college football program has a long history including national championships, conference titles, and many legendary All-American and Hall of Fame players and coaches. ... Minnesota Golden Gophers Spirit Squads at the Minnesota State Fair The University of Minnesota Golden Gophers Spirit Squads comprise the cheerleading organization at the Twin Cities campus of the University of Minnesota. ... Minnesota Golden Gophers Spirit Squads at the Minnesota State Fair The University of Minnesota Golden Gophers Spirit Squads comprise the cheerleading organization at the Twin Cities campus of the University of Minnesota. ... is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1898 (MDCCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Minnesota Golden Gophers Spirit Squads at the Minnesota State Fair The University of Minnesota Golden Gophers Spirit Squads comprise the cheerleading organization at the Twin Cities campus of the University of Minnesota. ... The terms fraternity and sorority (from the Latin words and , meaning brother and sister respectively) may be used to describe many social and charitable organizations, for example the Lions Club, Epsilon Sigma Alpha, Rotary International, Optimist International, or the Shriners. ...

Cornell University cheerleader on a 1906 postcard

In 1948, Lawrence "Herkie" Herkimer, of Dallas, TX and a former cheerleader at Southern Methodist University formed the National Cheerleaders Association (NCA) as a way to hold cheerleading clinics. In 1949, The NCA held its first clinic in Huntsville, TX with 52 girls in attendance.[8] "Herkie" contributed many "firsts" to the sport including the founding of Cheerleader & Danz Team uniform supply company, inventing the herkie, (where one leg is bent towards the ground and the other is out to the side as high as it will stretch in the toe touch position)[9] and creating the "Spirit Stick".[7] By the 1960s, college cheerleaders began hosting workshops across the nation, teaching fundamental cheer skills to eager high school age girls. In 1965, Fred Gastoff invented the vinyl pom-pon and it was introduced into competitions by the International Cheerleading Foundation (now the World Cheerleading Association or WCA). Organized cheerleading competitions began to pop up with the first ranking of the "Top Ten College Cheerleading Squads" and "Cheerleader All America" awards given out by the International Cheerleading Foundation in 1967. In 1978, America was introduced to competitive cheerleading by the first broadcast of Collegiate Cheerleading Championships on CBS[6][7] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Cornell redirects here. ... Dallas Hall at Dedman College at SMU The Laura Lee Blanton Hall during a rare snow storm Southern Methodist University (commonly SMU) is a nationally recognized, private, coeducational university in University Park, Texas (an enclave of Dallas). ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Pom-pons, implements used generally by cheerleaders during cheer routines and sideline crowd-leading. ... The National Collegiate Cheerleading Championships were first introduced in 1978 on CBS Sports. ... This article is about the broadcast network. ...


In the 1960's National Football League (NFL) teams began to organize professional cheerleading teams. The Baltimore Colts (now the Indianapolis Colts) was the first NFL team to have an organized cheerleading squad.[10] It was the Dallas Cowboys Cheerleaders who gained the spotlight with their revealing outfits and sophisticated dance moves, which debuted in the 1972-1973 season, but were first seen widely in Super Bowl X (1976). This caused the image of cheerleaders to permanently change, with many other NFL teams emulating them. Most of the professional teams' cheerleading squads would more accurately be described as dance teams by today's standards; as they rarely, if ever, actively encourage crowd noise or perform modern cheerleading moves. NFL redirects here. ... League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1953–present) Western Conference (1953-1969) Coastal Division (1967-1969) American Football Conference (1970-present) AFC East (1970-2001) AFC South (2002-present) Current uniform Team colors Royal Blue, White Mascot Blue Personnel Owner Jim Irsay General Manager Bill Polian Head Coach Tony Dungy... League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1953–present) Western Conference (1953-1969) Coastal Division (1967-1969) American Football Conference (1970-present) AFC East (1970-2001) AFC South (2002-present) Current uniform Team colors Royal Blue, White Mascot Blue Personnel Owner Jim Irsay General Manager Bill Polian Head Coach Tony Dungy... The DCC on board the USS Harry S Truman on December 16, 2000 The DCC visit U.S. sailors on board the USS Nimitz on June 19, 2003 The Dallas Cowboys Cheerleaders (DCC), a National Football League cheerleading squad from Texas, are one of the most famous cheerleading organizations in... Date January 18, 1976 Stadium Miami Orange Bowl City Miami, Florida MVP Lynn Swann, Wide Receiver Favorite Steelers by 6 National anthem Tom Sullivan Coin toss Norm Schachter Referee Norm Schachter Halftime show Up with People presents 200 Years and Just a Baby: Tribute to Americas Bicentennial Attendance 80...

Cheerleaders warming up for competition

The 1980s saw the onset of modern cheerleading with more difficult stunt sequences and gymnastics being incorporated into routines. ESPN first broadcasted the National High School Cheerleading Competition nationwide in 1983. Cheerleading organizations such as the American Association of Cheerleading Coaches and Advisors (AACCA) started applying universal safety standards to decrease the number of injuries and prevent dangerous stunts, pyramids and tumbling passes from being included in routines. [11] In 2003, the National Council for Spirit Safety and Education (NCSSE) was formed to offer safety training for youth, school, all star and college coaches. The NCAA requires college cheer coaches to successfully complete a nationally recognized safety-training program. The NCSSE or AACCA certification programs are both recognized by the NCAA. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (533x800, 389 KB) Summary Subject: Cheerleading Photographer: Lance Cpl. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (533x800, 389 KB) Summary Subject: Cheerleading Photographer: Lance Cpl. ...


Today, cheerleading is most closely associated with American football and basketball. Sports such as soccer, ice hockey, volleyball, baseball, and wrestling sometimes sponsor cheerleading squads. The ICC Twenty20 Cricket World Cup in South Africa in 2007 was the first international cricket event to have cheerleaders. The Florida Marlins were the first Major League Baseball team to have cheerleaders. Debuting in 2003, the "Marlin Mermaids" gained national exposure and have influenced other MLB teams to develop their own cheer/dance squads. United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... This article is about the sport. ... Soccer redirects here. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... For the ball used in this sport, see Volleyball (ball). ... This article is about the sport. ... Ancient Greek wrestlers (Pankratiasts) Wrestling is the act of physical engagement between two unarmed persons, in which each wrestler strives to get an advantage over or control of their opponent. ... Major league affiliations National League (1993–present) East Division (1993–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 5, 42 Name Florida Marlins (1993–present) Other nicknames The Fish Ballpark Dolphin Stadium (1993–present) a. ... Major Leagues redirects here. ...


Types of teams

School-sponsored

Most American high schools and colleges have organized cheerleading squads made up solely of students. Several colleges that compete at cheerleading competitions offer cheerleading scholarships. Some military academies use their drill team or color guard team instead of a cheersquad at athletic events, but some military academies have traditional cheerleading squads just like other everyday universities. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 482 pixelsFull resolution (3038 × 1832 pixel, file size: 3. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 482 pixelsFull resolution (3038 × 1832 pixel, file size: 3. ... The Georgia Institute of Technology, commonly known as Georgia Tech, is a public, coeducational research university, part of the University System of Georgia, and located in Atlanta, Georgia, USA, with satellite campuses in Savannah, Georgia, Metz, France, Shanghai, China, and Singapore. ... The Yellow Jackets is the name used for all of the intercollegiate athletic teams that play for the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta, Georgia. ... Game between Illinois State Redbirds & Ball State Cardinals, February 17, 2007 in an ESPN Bracketbuster contest. ... There are three types of military academies: High school level institutions (up to age 19), university level institutions, and those only serving to prepare officer cadets for commissioning into the armed services of a state ( such as RMA Sandhurst ). United States usage The term Military School primarily refers to (middle... A drill team is a marching unit that performs military style maneuvers in parades, at air shows, football half-time shows, and other public venues. ... United States Federal Protective Service color guard. ... There are three types of military academies: High school level institutions (up to age 19), university level institutions, and those only serving to prepare officer cadets for commissioning into the armed services of a state ( such as RMA Sandhurst ). United States usage The term Military School primarily refers to (middle... A university is an institution of higher education and of research, which grants academic degrees. ...


Youth league

Many organisations that sponsor youth league football or basketball sponsor cheerleading squads as well. Pop Warner organizations are an example of this. United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... This article is about the sport. ... The current official logo of the Pop Warner Little Scholars. ...


All-Star cheerleading

In the early 1980s, cheerleading squads not associated with a schools or sports leagues, whose main objective was competition, began to emerge. The first organization to call themselves all stars and go to competitions were the Q94 Rockers from Richmond, Virginia, founded in 1982 by Hilda McDaniel.[12] All-star teams competing prior to 1987 were place into the same divisions as teams that represented schools and sports leagues. In 1986 National Cheerleaders Association (NCA) decided to address this situation by creating a separate division for these teams lacking a sponsoring school or athletic association, calling it the 'All-Star Division' and debuting it at their 1987 competitions. As the popularity of these types of teams grew, more and more of them were formed, attending competitions sponsored by many different types of organizations and companies, all using their own set of rules, regulations and divisions. This situation became one of the chief concerns of gym owners. These inconsistencies caused coaches to keep their routines in a constant state of flux, detracting from time that should be utilized to develop skills and provide personal attention to their athletes. More importantly, because the various companies were constantly vying for the competitive edge, safety standards had becoming more and more lax. In some cases, unqualified coaches and inexperienced squads are attempting dangerous stunts as a result of these “expanded” sets of rules.[13] Nickname: Motto: Sic Itur Ad Astra (Thus do we reach the stars) Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia Coordinates: , Country State Government  - Mayor L. Douglas Wilder (I) Area  - City 62. ...


The USASF was formed in 2003 by these various competition companies to act as the national governing body for all star cheerleading and to create a standard set of rules and judging standards to be followed by all competitions sanctioned by the Federation and ultimately leading to the Cheerleading Worlds. The USASF hosted the first Cheerleading Worlds on Saturday, April 24, 2004.[13] At the same time, cheerleading coaches from all over the country organize themselves for the same rule making purpose, calling themselves the National All Star Cheerleading Coaches Congress (NACCC). In 2005, the NACCC was absorbed by the USASF to become their rule making body.[12] By late 2006, the USASF was ready to expand its reach even further, by facilitating the creation of the International All-Star Federation (IASF), the first international governing body for the sport of cheerleading. [14] The United States All Star Federation or USASF was founded in December, 2003 by cheerleading competition sponsors Universal Cheerleaders Association, Universal Dance Association, Cheersport, America’s Best with the goal of uniting to promote the safe and healthy participation in all star cheerleading for the maximum number of participants by...


Currently all-star cheerleading as sanctioned by the USASF involves a squad of 6-36 females and/or males. The squad prepares year-round for many different competition appearances, but they only actually perform for up to 2½ minutes during their routines. The numbers of competitions a team participates in varies from team to team, but generally, most teams tend to participate in eight-twelve competitions a year. These competitions include locals, which are normally taken place in school gymnasiums, nationals, hosted in big arenas all around the U.S. with national champions, and worlds, taken place all around the world. During a competition routine, a squad performs carefully choreographed stunting, tumbling, jumping and dancing to their own custom music. Teams create their routines to an eight-count system and apply that to the music so the team members execute the elements with precise timing and synchronization.


Judges at the competition watch for illegal moves from the group or any individual member. Here, an illegal move is something that is not allowed in that division due to difficulty and safety restrictions. More generally, judges look at the difficulty and execution of jumps, stunts and tumbling, synchronization, creativity, the sharpness of the motions, showmanship, and overall routine execution.


All-star cheerleaders are placed into divisions, which are grouped based upon age, size of the team, gender of participants, and ability level. The age levels vary from under 4 year of age to 18 years and over. The divisions used by the USASF/IASF are currently Tiny, Mini, Youth, Junior, Junior International, Junior Coed,Senior, Senior coed, Open International and Open.[15] The United States All Star Federation or USASF was founded in December, 2003 by cheerleading competition sponsors Universal Cheerleaders Association, Universal Dance Association, Cheersport, America’s Best with the goal of uniting to promote the safe and healthy participation in all star cheerleading for the maximum number of participants by...


If a team places high enough at selected USASF/IASF sanctioned national competitions, they could be included in the Cheerleading Worlds and compete against teams from all over the world. Also they could get money for placing.[1] The United States All Star Federation or USASF was founded in December, 2003 by cheerleading competition sponsors Universal Cheerleaders Association, Universal Dance Association, Cheersport, America’s Best with the goal of uniting to promote the safe and healthy participation in all star cheerleading for the maximum number of participants by... The United States All Star Federation or USASF was founded in December, 2003 by cheerleading competition sponsors Universal Cheerleaders Association, Universal Dance Association, Cheersport, America’s Best with the goal of uniting to promote the safe and healthy participation in all star cheerleading for the maximum number of participants by...


Cheerleaders

See also: list of cheerleaders

This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

Famous ex-cheerleaders

Many prominent people have been cheerleaders, including:

This article is about the American entertainer. ... Paula Julie Abdul is an American, multi-platinum selling, Grammy Award-winning singer, dancer, television personality, jewelry designer, actress, and Emmy Award-winning choreographer. ... Reagan redirects here. ... FDR redirects here. ... Dwight David Eisenhower, born David Dwight Eisenhower (October 14, 1890 – March 28, 1969), nicknamed Ike, was a five-star General in the United States Army and U.S. politician, who served as the thirty-fourth President of the United States (1953–1961). ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... Mary Louise Meryl Streep (born June 22, 1949) is a two-time Academy Award, Cannes Best Actress, Berlin Best Actress winning American actress who has worked in theatre, television, and film. ... For other uses, see Steve Martin (disambiguation). ... Halle Maria Berry (IPA: ; born August 14, 1966[1]) is an American actress, former fashion model and beauty queen. ... Teri Lynn Hatcher (born December 8, 1964) is an Emmy-nominated and Golden Globe Award-winning American actress and author as well. ... Sandra Annette Bullock (born July 26, 1964) is a German-American film actress. ... Cameron Michelle Diaz (born August 30, 1972) is an American actress and former fashion model. ... Laura Jeanne Reese Witherspoon[1] (born March 22, 1976) is an Academy Award-winning American actress. ... Hilarie Ross Burton (born July 1, 1982) is an American actress. ...

Cheerleading in popular culture

Movies and television

Also see List of cheerleaders in fiction This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Cheerleading's increasing popularity in recent decades has made it a prominent feature in high-school themed movies and television shows. The 2000 film Bring It On, about a San Diego high school cheerleading squad called "The Toros", starring real-life former cheerleader Kirsten Dunst. Bring It On was a surprise hit and earned nearly $70 million domestically. It spawned two direct-to-video sequels (Bring It On Again in 2003 and Bring It On: All or Nothing in 2006). The fourth film in the franchise, Bring It On: In It to Win It, was released on December 18, 2007. Bring It On was followed in 2001 by another teen cheerleading comedy, Sugar & Spice. In 1993, The Positively True Adventures of the Alleged Texas Cheerleader-Murdering Mom was an acclaimed TV movie which told the true story of Wanda Holloway, the Texas mother whose obsession with her daughter's cheerleading career made headline news. Bring It On (2000) is a film about a high school cheerleading squad, starring Kirsten Dunst, Eliza Dushku and Gabrielle Union. ... Flag Seal Nickname: Americas Finest City Location Location of San Diego within San Diego County Coordinates , Government County San Diego Mayor City Attorney         City Council District One District Two District Three District Four District Five District Six District Seven District Eight Jerry Sanders (R) Michael Aguirre Scott Peters Kevin... Kirsten[1] Caroline Dunst (born April 30, 1982) is an American actress, known for her roles in Interview with the Vampire (for which she received a Golden Globe nomination), The Virgin Suicides, Marie Antoinette, and Bring It On, as well as for her portrayal of Mary Jane Watson in the... A sequel is a work of fiction (e. ... Bring It On Again (2004) is a cheerleading comedy film starring Anne Judson-Yager and Bree Turner, directed by Damon Santostefano and written by Claudia Grazioso, Brian Gunn and Mark Gunn. ... Sugar & Spice is a 2001 film directed by Francine McDougall. ... The Positively True Adventures of the Alleged Texas Cheerleader-Murdering Mom is a 1993 comedy TV movie produced by and for HBO. It was directed by Michael Ritchie and starred Holly Hunter, Swoozie Kurtz and Beau Bridges. ... A television movie (also TV movie, TV-movie, made-for-TV movie, etc. ... Wanda Holloway is a woman from Texas, known for hiring a hit man to kill the mother of her daughters cheerleading rival. ...


In 2006, Hayden Panettiere, star of Bring It On: All or Nothing, took another cheerleading role as Claire Bennet, the cheerleader with an accelarated healing factor on NBC's hit sci-fi TV series Heroes, launching cheerleading back into the limelight of pop culture. Claire was the main focus of the show's first story arc, featuring the popular catchphrase, "Save the cheerleader, save the world." Claire demonstrates a sensitive and caring persona atypical of the archetypal cheerleader. Her prominent, protagonist role in Heroes was supported by a strong fan-base and provided a positive image for high school cheerleading. Hayden Leslie Panettiere (born August 21, 1989)[1] is an American actress, singer, and Grammy Award nominee. ... Claire Bennet, portrayed by Hayden Panettiere, is a fictional character on the NBC science fiction drama series Heroes. ... A healing factor is a term used to describe the ability of some characters in fiction to recover from bodily injuries or disease at a superhuman rate. ... This article is about the television network. ... Sci-fi is an abbreviation for science fiction. ... A television program is the content of television broadcasting. ... Heroes is an American science fiction serial drama television series created by Tim Kring, which premiered on NBC on September 25, 2006. ...


Video games

Nintendo has released a pair of video games in Japan for the Nintendo DS, Osu! Tatakae! Ouendan and its sequel Moero! Nekketsu Rhythm Damashii that star teams of male cheer squads, or Ouendan that practice a form of cheerleading unique to Japanese culture. Each of the games' most difficult modes replaces the male characters with female cheer squads that dress in western cheerleading uniforms. The games task the cheer squads with assisting people in desperate need of help by cheering them on and giving them the motivation to succeed. The Nintendo DS (sometimes abbreviated NDS or more commonly DS) is a handheld game console developed and manufactured by Nintendo. ... Osu! Tatakae! Ouendan , lit. ... Moero! Nekketsu Rhythm Damashii Osu! Tatakae! Ouendan 2 , lit. ... Osu! Tatakae! Ouendan (押忍!戦え!応援団 Go! Fight! Cheer Squad), often informally referred to as Ouendan, is a Japanese rhythm video game for the Nintendo DS. The player controls a troupe of motivational cheerleaders by providing them rhythm through the Nintendo DSs touch screen. ...


Sport debate

Cheerleading among others has had debate on whether or not it truly is a sport. Supporters consider cheerleading as a whole as a sport citing the heavy use of athletic talents[citation needed] while critics do not see it as deserving of that status since sport implies a competition among squads and not all squads compete along with subjectivity of competitions.[17][18]


Dangers of cheerleading

There have been injuries associated with cheerleading. One of the most notable in recent years was that of Kristi Yamaoka, a cheerleader at Southern Illinois University. On March 5, 2006, she fell off of a human pyramid during a cheerleading performance at a basketball game between Southern Illinois University and Bradley University at the Scottrade Center (then known as the Savvis Center) in St. Louis. Yamaoka leaned backward and fell off the third tier of a pyramid. Her performance from the stretcher as she was carried off the court was nationwide news. She suffered a fractured thoracic vertebra[19], concussion, and bruised lung, and has since made a full recovery. Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Kristi Yamaoka (born 1987) is an American cheerleader and current student at Southern Illinois University from Springfield, Illinois. ... This article is about the day. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Geometric shape created by connecting a polygonal base to an apex A pyramid is a geometric shape formed by connecting a polygonal base and a point, called the apex, by triangular faces. ... Southern Illinois University is a university in southern Illinois with two institutions and multiple campuses. ... Bradley University is a private, co-educational university located in Peoria, Illinois ( , , ). It is a medium sized institution with an enrollment of approximately 6,100 undergraduate and postgraduate students. ... Scottrade Center Scottrade Center (formerly Kiel Center and Savvis Center) is an arena located in downtown St. ... St. ...


As a result of the fall, the Missouri Valley Conference banned tossing or launching of cheerleaders, and no pyramid could be higher than two levels during that conference's women's basketball tournament. Additionally, the American Association of Cheerleading Coaches and Administrators recommended banning basket tosses and high pyramids without mats. Though the group has no authority to prevent such routines, the NCAA requires cheerleading squads to conform to the group's requirements. The AACCA rules committee made the bans permanent on July 11, 2006.[20] NCAA redirects here. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


See also

Artificial noise in the context of sports is the use of sound-making or amplifying devices. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This is a list of cheerleading jumps. ... . ... For many NFL teams, their franchise also includes a cheerleading squad. ... Osu! Tatakae! Ouendan An Ōendan ), literally cheering squad or cheering section,[1] is a Japanese sports rallying team similar in purpose to a cheerleading squad in the United States,[2] but relies more on making a lot of noise with taiko drums, blowing horns and anything else that makes noise... Pom-pons, implements used generally by cheerleaders during cheer routines and sideline crowd-leading. ... The annual UAAP Cheerdance Competition (CDC) is held at the Araneta Coliseum in Quezon City, Philippines The UAAP Cheerdance Competition is an annual one-day event of the University Athletic Association of the Philippines for cheerleading. ... ‹ The template below (Expand) is being considered for deletion. ...

References

  1. ^ a b c d Campo-Flores, Arian (2007-05-14). "A World of Cheer!". Newsweek. Retrieved on 2007-05-17. 
  2. ^ Schoenberger, Chana R. (2006-11-16). "The Most Dangerous Sports". Forbes. Retrieved on 2007-06-29. 
  3. ^ CBS/AP. "Cheerleading Injuries Increasing", The Early Show, CBS Broadcasting Inc., 2006-01-03. Retrieved on 2007-06-29. 
  4. ^ IASF home page. Retrieved on 2007-06-29.
  5. ^ Japan Echo, Inc. "Three Cheers for the Champions!", Web Japan, 2005-05-30. Retrieved on 2007-09-22. 
  6. ^ a b c Neil, Randy L. & Hart, Elaine (1986), The Official Cheerleader's Handbook (Revised Fireside Edition 1986 ed.), Simon & Schuster, ISBN 0-671-61210-7 
  7. ^ a b c d Walker, Marisa (February 2005), “Cheer Milestones”, American Cheerleader 11 (1): 41-43, ISSN 1079-9885 
  8. ^ a b c Balthaser, Joel D. (2005-01-06). Cheerleading – Oh How far it has come!. Pop Warner. Retrieved on 2007-01-11.
  9. ^ Cheerleading Jump Herkie. Retrieved on 2007-08-06.
  10. ^ Indianapolis Colts - www.football.com. Retrieved on 2007-11-04.
  11. ^ About the AACCA. Retrieved on 2007-01-11.
  12. ^ a b Smith, Jennifer Renèe (February 2007), “The All-Star Chronicles”, American Cheerleader 13 (1): 40-42, ISSN 1079-9885 
  13. ^ a b The Cheerleading Worlds Administered by the USASF. Varsity Brands, Inc.. Retrieved on 2007-09-20.
  14. ^ USASF Insider (pdf). Retrieved on 2007-09-15.
  15. ^ USASF All-Star Cheer Divisions for 2007-2008 (pdf). Retrieved on 2007-06-29.
  16. ^ CNN report with picture of future President Bush as a cheerleader
  17. ^ "Sport, not a sport: consider Dan the expert" (2004-9-29). The Stanford Daily. Retrieved on 2007-12-15. 
  18. ^ "No, Cheerleading is not a Sport" (2004-9-29). SFU Cheer Resources. Retrieved on 2007-12-15. 
  19. ^ Cheerleader worried for team, not herself. Retrieved on 2007-09-29.
  20. ^ CHEERLEADING PROGRAMS GOING ALL-OUT FOR SAFETY. Retrieved on 2006-12-19.

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Cheerleaders
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  Results from FactBites:
 
ukathletics.com - The University of Kentucky Cheerleading Squad (482 words)
The UK Cheer Program is recognized in cheerleading circles as perhaps the finest cheer program in America as the squad has placed first 16 times and placed second four times in the National Championships.
The cheerleaders have performed at the half time of the Denver Nuggets (coached by UK graduate, Dan Issel) and the Miami Heat (formerly coached by UK graduate, Pat Riley) game and then appeared at the Denver UK Alumni Club function.
On the UK campus, UK cheerleaders are recognized as some of the finest athletes in the University's sports programs, as intelligent and outgoing students in the classroom, and as public relations ambassadors of the University of Kentucky and the entire Commonwealth of Kentucky.
Cheerleading < Waldorf Athletics (226 words)
The Warrior Cheerleaders are an all-girl squad and feel that they have many advantages by being an all-girl squad.
They have qualified for, and competed in, many national cheerleading competitions, and were even selected from thousands of applicants, to become Varsity.com’s featured squad of the month by UCA.
Cheerleading try-outs will be held on Sunday, June 1st from Noon to 6 pm.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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