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Encyclopedia > Che Guevara
  Ernesto Guevara de la Serna Lynch

Che Guevara at the La Coubre memorial service.

Photo taken by Alberto Korda on March 5, 1960 Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Argentina. ... Smoke rises over Havana harbor following the explosion People near the docks run from the blast At 3:10 p. ... Alberto Kordas photograph of Che Guevara Alberto Kordas famous photograph of Che Guevara was taken on March 5, 1960 at a Cuban funeral service for victims of the La Coubre explosion,[1] but was published seven years later. ... Alberto Díaz Gutiérrez, better known as Alberto Korda (September 14, 1928 – May 25, 2001) was a photographer, famous for his photo of Che Guevara. ... This article is about the day. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Alternate name(s): Che
Date of birth: May 14, 1928
Place of birth: Rosario, Argentina
Date of death: October 9, 1967 (aged 39)
Place of death: La Higuera, Bolivia
Major organizations: 26th of July Movement

Ernesto Guevara de la Serna Lynch (May 14, 1928October 9, 1967), commonly known as Che Guevara, el Che, or simply Che, was an Argentine Marxist revolutionary, political figure, author, military theorist, and leader of Cuban and internationalist guerrillas. His stylized image also later morphed into a ubiquitous worldwide countercultural symbol. May 14 is the 134th day of the year (135th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Rosario is the largest city in the province of Santa Fe, Argentina. ... is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... The El Che monument La Higuera (Spanish: The Fig Tree) is a small village in Bolivia located in the Department of Santa Cruz, some 150 km (bee-line) southwest of Santa Cruz de la Sierra. ... The 26th of July Movement (Spanish: Movimiento 26 de Julio; M-26-7) was the revolutionary organization planned and led by Fidel Castro that in 1959 overthrew the Fulgencio Batista government in Cuba. ... May 14 is the 134th day of the year (135th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... Marxism is the political practice and social theory based on the works of Karl Marx, a 19th century philosopher, economist, journalist, and revolutionary, along with Friedrich Engels. ... Revolutionary, when used as a noun, is a person who either advocates or actively engages in some kind of revolution. ... The foco theory of communist revolution by way of guerrilla warfare, also known as focalism (Spanish language: foquismo), was developed by Ernesto Che Guevara, based upon his experiences surrounding Fidel Castros 1959 victory in the Cuban Revolution. ... In sociology, counterculture is a term used to describe a cultural group whose values and norms are at odds with those of the social mainstream. ...


As a young medical student, Guevara embarked on a journey throughout Latin America and was transformed by the endemic poverty he witnessed. His experiences and observations during these trips led him to the conclusion that the region's socio-economic inequalities were an insidious result of capitalism, neo-colonialism, and imperialism, with the only remedy being world revolution. This belief prompted his involvement in Guatemala's social revolution under President Jacobo Arbenz Guzmán, whose eventual CIA-assisted overthrow solidified Guevara’s radical ideology. Latin America consists of the countries of South America and some of North America (including Central America and some the islands of the Caribbean) whose inhabitants mostly speak Romance languages, although Native American languages are also spoken. ... A boy from an East Cipinang trash dump slum in Jakarta, Indonesia shows what he found. ... Socioeconomics or Socio-economics is the study of the relationship between economic activity and social life. ... For other uses, see Capitalism (disambiguation). ... Neo Colonialism is the belife that former colonies of European powers have never recieved economic freedom from their former rulers. ... Cecil Rhodes: Cape-Cairo railway project. ... World revolution is a Marxist concept of a violent overthrow of capitalism that would take place in all countries, although not necessarily simultaneously. ... Colonel Jacobo Árbenz Guzmán (September 14, 1913 – January 27, 1971) was the president of Guatemala from 1951 to 1954, when he was ousted in a coup détat organized by the US Central Intelligence Agency, known as Operation PBSUCCESS, and was replaced by a military junta, headed by Colonel... Former president Jacobo Arbenz Guzmán on the cover of TIME magazine in June 1954 after his overthrow Operation PBSUCCESS was a CIA-organized covert operation that overthrew the democratically-elected President of Guatemala, Jacobo Arbenz Guzmán in 1954. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ...


Later while in Mexico he joined and was promoted to commander in Fidel Castro’s 26th of July Movement, playing a pivotal role, while being viewed as "Castro's brain", in the successful guerrilla campaign to overthrow the U.S.-backed Cuban dictator Fulgencio Batista.[1] After the Cuban revolution, Guevara served in many prominent governmental positions, including President of the National Bank and “supreme prosecutor” over the revolutionary tribunals and executions of suspected war criminals from the previous regime. Along with traveling around the world meeting important leaders on behalf of Cuban socialism, he was a prolific author of an assortment of books, including a classic manual on the theory and practice of guerrilla warfare. Guevara left Cuba in 1965 to incite revolutions first in an unsuccessful attempt in Congo-Kinshasa and ultimately in Bolivia, where he was captured with help of the CIA and executed. Fidel Alejandro Castro Ruz (born on August 13, 1926) is the current President of Cuba but on indefinite medical hiatus. ... The 26th of July Movement (Spanish: Movimiento 26 de Julio; M-26-7) was the revolutionary organization planned and led by Fidel Castro that in 1959 overthrew the Fulgencio Batista government in Cuba. ... The Battle of Santa Clara was a series of events in late December 1958 that led to the capture of Santa Clara, Cuba by revolutionaries under the command of Che Guevara. ... General Fulgencio Batista (pronounced or ) y Zaldívar (January 16, 1901 – August 6, 1973) was a Cuban military officer and politician. ... Belligerents 26th of July Movement Cuba Commanders Fidel Castro Che Guevara Raul Castro Fulgencio Batista The Cuban Revolution refers to the revolution that led to the overthrow of General Fulgencio Batistas regime on January 1, 1959 by the 26th of July Movement and other revolutionary elements within the country. ... Guerrilla Warfare published by Ocean Books 2006. ... Guerrilla redirects here. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The CIA Seal The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) is an American intelligence agency, responsible for obtaining and analyzing information about foreign governments, corporations, and individuals, and reporting such information to the various branches of the U.S. Government. ...


Both notorious for his disciplined brutality and revered for his unwavering dedication to his revolutionary doctrines, Guevara remains a controversial and significant historical figure. Because of his death, invocation to armed class struggle, and romantic visage; Guevara became an inspirational icon of leftist revolutionary movements worldwide, as well as a global merchandising sensation. He has since been venerated and reviled in dozens of biographies, memoirs, books, essays, documentaries, songs, and films. Time Magazine professed him to be one of the 100 most influential people of the 20th century,[2] while an Alberto Korda photo of him (shown) has been declared "the most famous photograph in the world."[3] The South African Police Crush Another Demonstration by the Shack dwellers Movement Abahlali baseMjondolo, 28 September, 2007 Class struggle is the active expression of class conflict looked at from any kind of socialist perspective. ... Left wing redirects here. ... (Clockwise from upper left) Time magazine covers from May 7, 1945; July 25, 1969; December 31, 1999; September 14, 2001; and April 21, 2003. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999 in the... Alberto Díaz Gutiérrez, better known as Alberto Korda (September 14, 1928 – May 25, 2001) was a photographer, famous for his photo of Che Guevara. ... Alberto Kordas photograph of Che Guevara Alberto Kordas famous photograph of Che Guevara was taken on March 5, 1960 at a Cuban funeral service for victims of the La Coubre explosion,[1] but was published seven years later. ...

Contents

Early life

Birthplace home of Ernesto "Che" Guevara in Rosario, Argentina.       Other view.
A teenage Ernesto (left) with his parents and siblings, ca.1944. Seated beside him, from left to right: Celia (mother), Celia (sister), Roberto, Juan Martín, Ernesto (father) and Ana María.

Ernesto Guevara de la Serna was born[›] on May 14, 1928 in Rosario, Argentina, the eldest of five children in a family of Basque and Irish descent. His mother was of Basque[›] ancestry, while his father had Irish[›] roots. After Guevara's eventual death, Che's father would reminisce "The first thing to note is that in my son's veins flowed the blood of the Irish rebels."[4] Growing up in a family with leftist leanings, Guevara became known for his radical perspective even as a boy, idolizing Francisco Pizarro while yearning to have been one of his soldiers. Though suffering from the crippling bouts of asthma that were to afflict him throughout his life, he excelled as an athlete. He was an avid rugby union player and earned himself the nickname "Fuser"—a contraction of "El Furibundo" (raging) and his second surname "Serna"—for his aggressive style of play. Ernesto was also nicknamed "Chancho" (pig) by his schoolmates, because he rarely bathed, and proudly wore a "weekly shirt". Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2304x1728, 984 KB) Summary The building where Che Guevara lived during his first years, on 480 Entre Ríos St. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2304x1728, 984 KB) Summary The building where Che Guevara lived during his first years, on 480 Entre Ríos St. ... Rosario is the largest city of the province of Santa Fe, Argentina. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... May 14 is the 134th day of the year (135th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Rosario is the largest city of the province of Santa Fe, Argentina. ... Language(s) Basque - few monoglots Spanish - 1,525,000 monoglots French - 150,000 monoglots Basque-Spanish - 600,000 speakers Basque-French - 76,000 speakers [4] other native languages Religion(s) Traditionally Roman Catholic The Basques (Basque: ) are an indigenous people[5] who inhabit parts of north-central Spain and southwestern... In politics, left-wing, political left, leftism, or simply the left, are terms which refer (with no particular precision) to the segment of the political spectrum typically associated with any of several strains of socialism, social democracy, or liberalism (especially in the American sense of the word), or with opposition... Francisco Pizarro Francisco Pizarro González should not be confused with another Francisco Pizarro who joined Hernán Cortés to conquer the Aztecs. ... For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ...


Guevara learned chess from his father and began participating in local tournaments by the age of 12. During his adolescence, he became passionate about poetry, especially that of Pablo Neruda, John Keats, and Sara De Ibáñez. It is also said that he memorized Kipling's "If" by heart. The Guevara home contained more than 3,000 books which allowed Guevara to be an enthusiastic and eclectic reader, with interests including Aristotle, Kant, Marx, Gide and Faulkner. He also enjoyed adventure classics by Jack London, Emilio Salgari, and Jules Verne as well as essays by Sigmund Freud and Bertrand Russell.[citation needed] This article is about the Western board game. ... Pablo Neruda (July 12, 1904 – September 23, 1973) was the penname and, later, legal name of the Chilean writer and communist politician Ricardo Eliecer Neftalí Reyes Basoalto. ... Keats redirects here. ... This article is about the British author. ... If— is a notable poem by Rudyard Kipling. ... For other uses, see Aristotle (disambiguation). ... Kant redirects here. ... Karl Heinrich Marx (May 5, 1818 – March 14, 1883) was a 19th century philosopher, political economist, and revolutionary. ... Gide redirects here. ... William Cuthbert Faulkner (born William Falkner), (September 25, 1897–July 6, 1962) was an American author. ... For other persons named Jack London, see Jack London (disambiguation). ... Emilio Salgari. ... This article is about the French author. ... Sigmund Freud (IPA: ), born Sigismund Schlomo Freud (May 6, 1856 – September 23, 1939), was an Austrian neurologist and psychiatrist who founded the psychoanalytic school of psychology. ... Bertrand Arthur William Russell, 3rd Earl Russell, OM, FRS, (18 May 1872 – 2 February 1970), was a British philosopher, logician, mathematician, advocate for social reform, and pacifist. ...


In 1948 Guevara entered the University of Buenos Aires to study medicine and fell in love with 16-year-old Maria del Carmen Ferreyra.[5] In 1951, Guevara took a year off from his medical studies to embark on a trip traversing South America with his friend, Alberto Granado, on a motorcycle to spend a few weeks volunteering at the San Pablo Leper colony in Peru on the banks of the Amazon River. Guevara used notes taken during this trip to write an account entitled The Motorcycle Diaries. The Universidad de Buenos Aires (UBA) is the largest university in Argentina, founded on August 12, 1821 in the city of Buenos Aires. ... South America South America is a continent crossed by the equator, with most of its area in the Southern Hemisphere. ... Alberto Granado (born on August 8, 1922 in Hernando, Córdoba, Argentina) was the travelling companion of Che Guevara during their trip around Latin America, and founder of the Santiago School of Medicine in Cuba. ... For other uses, see Motorcycle (disambiguation). ... A leper colony is a place to quarantine people with leprosy from the rest of the population. ... This article is about the river. ... Map of Guevaras trip with Alberto Granado. ...


Witnessing the widespread poverty, oppression and disenfranchisement throughout Latin America, and influenced by his readings of Marxist literature, Guevara began to view armed revolution as the solution to social inequality. By trip's end, he also viewed Latin America not as separate nations, but as a single entity requiring a continent-wide liberation strategy. His conception of a borderless, united Hispanic America sharing a common 'mestizo' cultureHispanic America[›] was a theme that prominently recurred during his later revolutionary activities. Upon returning to Argentina, he completed his medical studies and received the diploma accrediting him as a medic on June 12, 1953.Diploma[›] For other uses, see Oppression (disambiguation). ... Marxism is the political practice and social theory based on the works of Karl Marx, a 19th century philosopher, economist, journalist, and revolutionary, along with Friedrich Engels. ... Hispanic America (Hispanoamérica in Spanish) refers to those parts of the Americas inhabited by Spanish-speaking peoples. ... Mestizo is a Spanish term that was formerly used in the Spanish Empire to designate people of mixed European (Spaniard) and Amerindian ancestry living in the region of Latin America. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Guatemala

On July 7, 1953, Guevara set out on a trip through Bolivia, Peru, Ecuador, Panama, Costa Rica, Nicaragua, Honduras and El Salvador. In December 1953 he arrived in Guatemala where President Jacobo Arbenz Guzmán headed a democratically elected government that, through land reform and other initiatives, was attempting to end the U.S.-dominated latifundia system. Guevara decided to settle down in Guatemala so as to "perfect [him]self and accomplish whatever may be necessary in order to become a true revolutionary".Perfeccionaré[›] is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Colonel Jacobo Árbenz Guzmán (September 14, 1913 – January 27, 1971) was the president of Guatemala from 1951 to 1954, when he was ousted in a coup détat organized by the US Central Intelligence Agency, known as Operation PBSUCCESS, and was replaced by a military junta, headed by Colonel... -1... Latifundia are pieces of landed property covering tremendous areas. ...

A map showing Che Guevara's movements between 1953 and 1956; including his trip north to Guatemala, his stay in Mexico and his journey east by boat to Cuba with Fidel Castro and other revolutionaries.

In Guatemala City, Guevara sought out Hilda Gadea Acosta, a Peruvian economist who was well-connected politically as a member of the socialist American Popular Revolutionary Alliance (APRA) led by Víctor Raúl Haya de la Torre. She introduced Guevara to a number of high-level officials in the Arbenz government. Guevara also established contact with a group of Cuban exiles linked to Fidel Castro through the attack on the Moncada Barracks in Santiago de Cuba.[6] During this period he acquired his famous nickname, "Che", due to his frequent use of the Argentine interjection Che (pronounced [tʃe]), which is used in much the same way as "hey", "pal", "eh", or "mate." Image File history File links Size of this preview: 443 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (483 × 654 pixel, file size: 256 KB, MIME type: image/png) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Che Guevara ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 443 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (483 × 654 pixel, file size: 256 KB, MIME type: image/png) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Che Guevara ... Fidel Alejandro Castro Ruz (born on August 13, 1926) is the current President of Cuba but on indefinite medical hiatus. ... The American Popular Revolutionary Alliance (APRA) also known as the Partido Aprista Peruano (Peruvian Aprista Party) is a Peruvian left-wing social democratic political party. ... Víctor Raúl Haya de la Torre (22 February 1895 – 2 August 1979) was a Peruvian political leader who founded the American Popular Revolutionary Alliance (APRA) political movement. ... Jacobo Arbenz Guzmán was the democratically-elected, left-wing reformist President of Guatemala. ... Fidel Alejandro Castro Ruz (born on August 13, 1926) is the current President of Cuba but on indefinite medical hiatus. ... The factual accuracy of this article is disputed. ... Santiago de Cuba is the capital city of Santiago de Cuba Province in the south-eastern area of the island nation of Cuba, some 540 miles (869 km) east south-east of the Cuban capital of Havana. ... Look up eh in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Guevara's attempts to obtain a medical internship were unsuccessful and his economic situation was often precarious. On May 15, 1954 a shipment of Škoda infantry and light artillery weapons was sent from Communist Czechoslovakia for the Arbenz Government and arrived in Puerto Barrios,[7][8] prompting a CIA-sponsored coup attempt.[7] Guevara was eager to fight on behalf of Arbenz and joined an armed militia organized by the Communist Youth for that purpose, but frustrated with the group's inaction, he soon returned to medical duties. Following the coup, he again volunteered to fight, but soon after, Arbenz took refuge in the Mexican Embassy and told his foreign supporters to leave the country. After Hilda Gadea was arrested, Guevara sought protection inside the Argentine consulate, where he remained until he received a safe-conduct pass some weeks later and made his way to Mexico.[9] is the 135th day of the year (136th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1954 Gregorian calendar). ... Å koda Works (Czech: Å kodovy závody; today Å koda Holding, a. ... This article is about communism as a form of society and as a political movement. ... Puerto Barrios, city (1994 est. ... Lebanese Kataeb militia The term Militia is commonly used today to refer to a military force composed of ordinary [1] citizens to provide defense, emergency, law enforcement, or paramilitary service, and those engaged in such activity, without being paid a regular salary or committed to a fixed term of service. ... The rule of Napoleon Bonaparte after his coup detat in France had conducted the manners of French governmant under dictatorship and in a consulate. ...


The overthrow of the Arbenz regime by a coup d'état backed by the Central Intelligence Agency cemented Guevara's view of the United States as an imperialist power that would oppose and attempt to destroy any government that sought to redress the socioeconomic inequality endemic to Latin America and other developing countries. This strengthened his conviction that Marxism achieved through armed struggle and defended by an armed populace was the only way to rectify such conditions. Cecil Rhodes: Cape-Cairo railway project. ...


Cuba

Further information: Che Guevara's involvement in the Cuban Revolution
Riding a mule in Las Villas province, Cuba, November 1958
In his trademark olive green military fatigues, June 2, 1959

Guevara arrived in Mexico City in early September 1954, and renewed his friendship with the other Cuban exiles whom he had known in Guatemala. In June 1955, López introduced him to Raúl Castro who later introduced him to his older brother, Fidel Castro, the revolutionary leader who had formed the 26th of July Movement (M-26-7) and was now plotting to overthrow the dictatorship of Fulgencio Batista in what became the Cuban Revolution. Guevara recognized at once that Castro was the cause for which he had been searching. Main article: Che Guevara Che Guevara was a key figure in the Cuban Revolution, an uprising that removed the government of General Fulgencio Batista over the island. ... The Battle of Santa Clara was a series of events in late December 1958 that led to the capture of Santa Clara, Cuba by revolutionaries under the command of Che Guevara. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 153rd day of the year (154th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Nickname: Location of Mexico City Coordinates: , Country Federal entity Boroughs The 16 delegaciones Founded c. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1954 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the Cuban politician. ... Fidel Alejandro Castro Ruz (born on August 13, 1926) is the current President of Cuba but on indefinite medical hiatus. ... The 26th of July Movement (Spanish: Movimiento 26 de Julio; M-26-7) was the revolutionary organization planned and led by Fidel Castro that in 1959 overthrew the Fulgencio Batista government in Cuba. ... General Fulgencio Batista (pronounced or ) y Zaldívar (January 16, 1901 – August 6, 1973) was a Cuban military officer and politician. ... Belligerents 26th of July Movement Cuba Commanders Fidel Castro Che Guevara Raul Castro Fulgencio Batista The Cuban Revolution refers to the revolution that led to the overthrow of General Fulgencio Batistas regime on January 1, 1959 by the 26th of July Movement and other revolutionary elements within the country. ...


Although he planned to be the group's medic, Guevara participated in the military training with the members of the Movement, and, at the end of the course, was called "the best guerrilla of them all" by their instructor, Colonel Alberto Bayo.[10] The first step in Castro's revolutionary plan was an assault on Cuba from Mexico via the Granma, an old, leaky cabin cruiser. They set out for Cuba on November 25, 1956. Attacked by Batista's military soon after landing, most of the 82 men were either killed in the attack or executed upon capture. Guevara wrote that it was during this bloody confrontation that he laid down his medical supplies and picked up a box of ammunition dropped by a fleeing comrade, finalizing his symbolic transition from physician to combatant. Alberto Bayo y Giroud (1892, Camagüey—1967, Havana) was a Cuban military leader of the defeated left-wing Loyalists in the Spanish Civil War. ... Granma is the yacht that was used to transport the fighters of the Cuban Revolution to Cuba in 1956. ... is the 329th day of the year (330th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A car from 1956 Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Only a small band of revolutionaries survived to re-group as a bedraggled fighting force deep in the Sierra Maestra mountains, where they received support from the urban guerrilla network of Frank País, the 26th of July Movement, and local country folk. With the group withdrawn to the Sierra, the world wondered whether Castro was alive or dead until early 1957 when the interview by Herbert Matthews appeared in The New York Times. The article presented a lasting, almost mythical image for Castro and the guerrillas. Guevara was not present for the interview, but in the coming months he began to realize the importance of the media in their struggle. Meanwhile, as supplies and morale grew low, Guevara considered these "the most painful days of the war."[11] Sierra Maestra is a mountain range that runs westward across the south of the old Oriente Province from what is now Guantánamo Province to Niquero [1] in southeast Cuba, rising abruptly from the coast. ... Urban guerrilla refers to someone who fights a government or dictatorship using unconventional warfare in an urban environment (see: guerrilla tactics). ... Frank Pais was born on December 7, 1934 and was a Cuban revolutionary. ... Herbert Matthews Herbert Lionel Matthews (1900-1977) was a reporter [1] for the New York Times said to be the first to report Fidel Castro was alive in the Sierra Maestra [2]. And also a reporter partial to the Republic side in (The Spanish Civil War (1961) Hugh Thomas) and... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ...


At this point Castro promoted Guevara to comandante of a second army column. However, Guevara's first idea to hit an enemy garrison at Bueuycito did not go as planned. When his men were late to arrive, he began the attack without them. He told a sentry to halt, but when the sentry moved, Guevara decided to shoot. However, his gun jammed as did the gun of the young rebel who was with him. Guevara fled under a hail of bullets, which in turn brought a hail of bullets from the rebels in the hills, and the barracks surrendered before Guevara repaired his tommy gun. As Guevara said, "My survival instincts took over."[12]


As Guevara reconsidered his tactics, he imposed even more ruthless treatment as a strict disciplinarian whose harsh methods were already notorious among the rebel fighters. Deserters were severely punished as traitors, and Guevara was known to send execution squads to hunt down deserters seeking to escape.[13] As a result, Guevara became feared for his brutality and ruthlessness.[14] During the guerrilla campaign, Guevara was also responsible for the execution of a number of men accused of being informers, deserters or spies.[15] Execution is a synonym for the actioning of something, of putting something into effect. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses of Desertion, see Abandonment. ... Spy and Secret agent redirect here. ...


In late July of 1958 Guevara would play a critical role in the Battle of Las Mercedes by using his column to halt a force of 1,500 men called up by Batista's General Cantillo in a plan to encircle and destroy Castro's forces. Years later in 1984, USMC Major Larry Bockman, would analyze and describe Che's tactical appreciation of this battle as "brilliant".[16] As the war extended, Guevara led a new column of fighters dispatched westward for the final push towards Havana. In the closing days of December 1958, Guevara directed his "suicide squad" in the attack on Santa Clara, that became the final decisive military victory of the revolution.[17][18] Batista, upon learning that his generals were negotiating a separate peace with the rebel leader, fled to the Dominican Republic the next day on January 1, 1959. Jan. ... Combatants Cuban Revolutionaries Cuban Government, Batista Commanders Fidel Castro General Eulogio Cantillo Strength 300 3,000 Casualties 70 70 ? The Battle of Las Mercedes was the last battle of Operation Verano, the summer offensive of 1958 launched by the Batistia government during the Cuban Revolution. ... United States Marine Corps Emblem The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is the second smallest of the five branches of the United States armed forces, with 170,000 active and 40,000 reserve Marines as of 2002. ... This article is about the capital of Cuba. ... Jan. ... The Battle of Santa Clara was a series of events in late December 1958 that led to the capture of Santa Clara, Cuba by revolutionaries under the command of Che Guevara. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


On January 8, 1959, Castro's army rolled victoriously into Havana.[19] On February 7, 1959, the government proclaimed Guevara "a Cuban citizen by birth" in recognition of his role in the triumph of the revolutionary forces. Shortly thereafter, he divorced Hilda Gadea, who was still in Mexico. On June 2, 1959, he married Aleida March,Children[›] a Cuban-born member of the 26th of July movement with whom he had been living since late 1958. is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 38th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 153rd day of the year (154th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


During the rebellion against Batista's dictatorship, the general command of the rebel army, led by Fidel Castro, introduced into the liberated territories the 19th-century penal law commonly known as the Ley de la Sierra.Ley de la Sierra[›] This law included the death penalty for extremely serious crimes, whether perpetrated by the dictatorship or by supporters of the revolution. In 1959, the revolutionary government extended its application to the whole of the republic and to war criminals captured and tried after the revolution. This latter extension, supported by the majority of the population, followed the same procedure as those seen in the Nuremberg Trials held by the Allies after World War II.[20] To implement this plan, Castro named Guevara commander of the La Cabaña Fortress prison, for a five-month tenure (January 2 through June 12, 1959).[21] Guevara was charged with purging the Batista army and consolidating victory by exacting "revolutionary justice" against traitors, chivatos, and Batista's war criminals.[22] Serving in the post as "supreme prosecutor" on the appellate bench, Guevara oversaw the trials and executions of those convicted by revolutionary tribunal. The justification for the executions was the hope of preventing the people themselves from taking justice into their own hands, as happened during the chaos of the anti-Machado rebellion.[23] It is estimated that several hundred people were executed on Guevara's extra-judicial orders during this time.executions[›] For the 1947 Soviet film about the trials, see Nuremberg Trials (film). ... This article is about the independent states that comprised the Allies. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... A Spanish-era military base overlooking Havana harbor. ... is the 2nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

(right to left) Rebel leader Camilo Cienfuegos, Cuban President Manuel Urrutia, and Guevara. January 1959.
Meeting with French philosophers Jean-Paul Sartre and Simone de Beauvoir in 1960. Guevara was also fluent in French. [24]

On June 12, 1959, as soon as Guevara returned to Havana, Castro sent him out on a three-month tour of fourteen countries, most of them Bandung Pact members in Africa and Asia. Sending Guevara from Havana also allowed Castro to appear to be distancing himself from Guevara and his Marxist sympathies, that troubled both the United States and some of Castro's M-26-7 members.[25] He spent twelve days in Japan (July 15–27), participating in negotiations aimed at expanding Cuba's trade relations with that nation. During this visit Guevara also secretly[›] visited the city of Hiroshima, where the American military had detonated an atom-bomb fourteen years earlier. Guevara was "really shocked" at what he witnessed and by his visit to a hospital where A-bomb survivors were being treated.[26] Cuban poster showing Camilo Cienfuegos. ... Manuel Urrutia Lleó (1901 - 1981) was a Cuban political figure. ... Jean-Paul Charles Aymard Sartre (June 21, 1905 – April 15, 1980), normally known simply as Jean-Paul Sartre (pronounced: ), was a French existentialist philosopher and pioneer, dramatist and screenwriter, novelist and critic. ... La Beauvoir redirects here; also see: Beauvoir (disambiguation). ... French (français, langue française) is one of the most important Romance languages, outnumbered in speakers only by Spanish and Portuguese. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Asian-African Conference was a meeting of Asian and African states, most of which were newly independent, organized by Egypt, Indonesia, Burma, Ceylon (Sri Lanka), India, and Pakistan. ... Marxism is the political practice and social theory based on the works of Karl Marx, a 19th century philosopher, economist, journalist, and revolutionary, along with Friedrich Engels. ... The 26th of July Movement (Spanish: Movimiento 26 de Julio; M-26-7) was the revolutionary organization planned and led by Fidel Castro that in 1959 overthrew the Fulgencio Batista government in Cuba. ... For other uses, see Hiroshima (disambiguation). ... The mushroom cloud over Hiroshima after the dropping of Little Boy. ... Little Boy was the codename of the atomic bomb which was dropped on Hiroshima, on August 6, 1945 by the 12-man crew of the B-29 Superfortress Enola Gay, piloted by Colonel Paul Tibbets (Tibbets, age 92, died Nov. ...


Upon returning to Cuba in September 1959, it was evident that Castro now had more political power. The government had begun land seizures included in the agrarian reform law, but was hedging on compensation offers to landowners, instead offering low interest "bonds", which put the U.S. on alert. At this point the affected wealthy cattlemen of Camagüey mounted a campaign against the land redistributions, and enlisted the newly disaffected rebel leader Huber Matos, who along with the anti-Communist wing of the M-26-7, joined them in denouncing the "Communist encroachment."[27] During this time Dominican dictator Rafael Trujillo was offering assistance to the "Anti-Communist Legion of the Caribbean" who was training in the Dominican Republic. This multi-national force comprised mostly of Spaniards and Cubans, but also of Croatians, Germans, Greeks, and right-wing mercenaries, were plotting to topple Fidel Castro.[28] Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see United States (disambiguation) and US (disambiguation). ... Camagüey (founded as Santa María del Puerto del Príncipe around 1515) is a city in central Cuba and is the nations third largest city. ... Huber Matos was a Cuban revolutionary who successfully overthrew the dictatorship of General Fulgencio Batista along with Fidel Castro, Che Guevara, Camilo Cienfuegos, Raul Castro and others. ... The 26th of July Movement (Spanish: Movimiento 26 de Julio; M-26-7) was the revolutionary organization planned and led by Fidel Castro that in 1959 overthrew the Fulgencio Batista government in Cuba. ... Rafael Trujillo Rafael Leonidas Trujillo Molina (October 24, 1891–May 30, 1961) ruled the Dominican Republic from 1930 until his assassination in 1961. ... The Spanish people or Spaniards are an ethnic group native to Spain, in southwestern Europe, who are primarily descended from the autochthonous pre-Indo-European Euskaldunak, Latin, Visigothic, Celtic and Moorish peoples. ...


These developments prompted Castro to further clean house of "counter-revolutionaries", and appoint Guevara chief official at the National Institute of Agrarian Reform INRA[›] and later President of the National Bank of Cuba BNC[›], while allowing him to retain his military rank. Although seeming to be a strange choice for the important position, Guevara had been promoting the creation of self-sufficient industries since his days in the Sierra Maestra. Guevara was expecting the U.S. to invade, and the Cuban population to then leave the cities and fight as guerrillas, although Guevara's hopes for armed uprisings elsewhere were failing.[29]


In 1960 Guevara provided first aid to victims when the freighter La Coubre, a French vessel carrying munitions from the port of Antwerp, exploded twice while it was being unloaded in Havana harbor, resulting in well over a hundred dead.[30] It was at the memorial service for the victims of this explosion that Alberto Korda took the most famous photograph of him, "Guerrillero Heroico". Smoke rises over Havana harbor following the explosion People near the docks run from the blast At 3:10 p. ... Alberto Díaz Gutiérrez, better known as Alberto Korda (September 14, 1928 – May 25, 2001) was a photographer, famous for his photo of Che Guevara. ... Alberto Kordas photograph of Che Guevara Alberto Kordas famous photograph of Che Guevara was taken on March 5, 1960 at a Cuban funeral service for victims of the La Coubre explosion,[1] but was published seven years later. ...


Guevara later served as Minister of Industries, a post in which he helped formulate Cuban socialism, and became one of the country's most prominent figures. He called for the diversification of the Cuban economy, and for the elimination of material incentives. He believed that volunteer work and dedication of workers would drive economic growth and that all that was needed was will. To display this, Guevara led by example, working endlessly at his ministry job, in construction, and even cutting sugar cane, as did Castro.[31] During this time he also wrote several publications advocating a replication of the Cuban revolutionary model, promoting small rural guerrilla groups (foco theory) as an alternative to massive armed insurrection. Religious socialism Key Issues People and organizations Related subjects Socialism refers to a broad array of ideologies and political movements with the goal of a socio-economic system in which property and the distribution of wealth are subject to control by the community. ... Guevara teaching guerrilla tactics to Congolese forces. ...


Guevara did not participate in the fighting of the 1961 Bay of Pigs Invasion, having been ordered by Castro to a secretly prearranged command post in Cuba's western Pinar del Río province where he fended off a decoy force.[32] He suffered a bullet grazing to the cheek during this deployment however, when his pistol fell out its holster and accidentally discharged.[33] Belligerents Cuban Revolutionary Armed Forces Cuban exiles trained by the United States Commanders Fidel Castro José Ramón Fernández Ernesto Che Guevara Francisco Ciutat de Miguel John F. Kennedy Grayston Lynch Pepe San Roman Erneido Oliva Strength 15,000 1,511 Cuban exiles 2 CIA agents Casualties and losses... Pinar del Río is one of the provinces of Cuba. ...


Guevara played a key role in bringing to Cuba the Soviet nuclear-armed ballistic missiles that precipitated the Cuban Missile Crisis in October 1962. During an interview with the British newspaper Daily Worker a few weeks after the crisis, Guevara angrily stated that "if the missiles had been under Cuban control, they would have fired them off." Sam Russell, the British correspondent who spoke to Guevara at the time came away with "mixed feelings", calling him "a warm character" and "clearly a man of great intelligence", but "crackers from the way he went on about the missiles."[34] Diagram of V-2, the first ballistic missile. ... For the video game based on the possible outcomes of this event, see Cuban Missile Crisis: The Aftermath. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Daily Worker was a newspaper published by the Communist Party USA, a Comintern affiliated organization in New York, beginning in 1924. ...


Disappearance from Cuba

Walking through Red Square in Moscow, November 1964

In December 1964 Che Guevara traveled to New York City as head of the Cuban delegation to speak at the U.N. He also appeared on the CBS Sunday news program Face the Nation[35] and met with a gamut of people and groups including U.S. Senator Eugene McCarthy,[citation needed] several associates of Malcolm X,[citation needed] and Canadian radical Michelle Duclos[citation needed]. On December 17, he left for Paris and embarked on a three-month international tour to the People's Republic of China, the United Arab Republic (Egypt), Algeria, Ghana, Guinea, Mali, Dahomey, Congo-Brazzaville and Tanzania, with stops in Ireland and Prague. In Algiers on February 24, 1965, he made what turned out to be his last public appearance on the international stage when he delivered a speech at an economic seminar on Afro-Asian solidarity.[36][37] He specified the moral duty of the socialist countries, accusing them of tacit complicity with the exploiting Western countries. He proceeded to outline a number of measures which he said the communist-bloc countries must implement in order to accomplish the defeat of imperialism.[38][39] Having criticized the Soviet Union (the primary financial backer of Cuba) in such a public manner, he returned to Cuba on March 14 to a solemn reception by Fidel and Raúl Castro, Osvaldo Dorticós and Carlos Rafael Rodríguez at the Havana airport. Image File history File links Che-onu-1964. ... Image File history File links Che-onu-1964. ... The United Nations General Assembly (GA, UNGA) is one of the five principal organs of the United Nations and the only one in which all member nations have equal representation. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... is the 345th day of the year (346th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... For other uses, see Red Square (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Moscow (disambiguation). ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... This article is about the broadcast network. ... Face The Nation logo, used until 2002. ... Not to be confused with the anti-Communist senator Joseph Raymond McCarthy. ... Malcolm X, born Malcolm Little, also known as Detroit Red and Al-Hajj Malik El-Shabazz (Omaha, Nebraska, May 19, 1925 – February 21, 1965 in New York City) was a Muslim Minister and National Spokesman for the Nation of Islam. ... Michelle Duclos is a Canadian terrorist who supports the Quebec sovereignty movement which desires the seperation of Quebec from the rest of Canada. ... December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Not to be confused with the Kingdom of Benin, now the Benin region of Nigeria, or Benin City in that region. ... For other uses, see Prague (disambiguation). ... This article is about the capital of Algeria. ... is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 73rd day of the year (74th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Two weeks later, in 1965 Guevara dropped out of public life and then vanished altogether. His whereabouts were a great mystery in Cuba, as he was generally regarded as second in power to Castro himself. His disappearance was variously attributed to the failure of the industrialization scheme he had advocated while minister of industry, to pressure exerted on Castro by Soviet officials disapproving of Guevara's pro-Chinese Communist stance on the Sino-Soviet split, and to serious differences between Guevara and the pragmatic Castro regarding Cuba's economic development and ideological line. Castro had grown increasingly wary of Guevara's popularity and considered him a potential threat. Castro's critics sometimes say his explanations for Guevara's disappearance have always been suspect. Industrialisation (or industrialization) or an industrial revolution (in general, with lowercase letters) is a process of social and economic change whereby a human society is transformed from a pre-industrial to an industrial state . ... The Communist Party of China (CPC) (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ), also known as the Chinese Communist Party (CCP), is the ruling political party of the Peoples Republic of China and also the worlds largest political party. ... The Sino-Soviet split was a major diplomatic conflict between the Peoples Republic of China (PRC) and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR), beginning in the late 1950s, reaching a peak in 1969 and continuing in various ways until the late 1980s. ...


The coincidence of Guevara's views with those expounded by the Chinese Communist leadership was increasingly problematic for Cuba as the nation's economy became more and more dependent on the Soviet Union. Since the early days of the Cuban revolution, Guevara had been considered by many an advocate of Maoist strategy in Latin America and the originator of a plan for the rapid industrialization of Cuba which was frequently compared to China's "Great Leap Forward". According to Western observers of the Cuban situation, the fact that Guevara was opposed to Soviet conditions and recommendations that Castro pragmatically saw as necessary, may have been the reason for his disappearance. However, both Guevara and Castro were supportive publicly on the idea of a united front. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Great Leap Forward (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ) of the Peoples Republic of China (PRC) was an economic and social plan used from 1958 to 1960 which aimed to use Chinas vast population to rapidly transform mainland China from a primarily agrarian economy dominated by peasant farmers...


Following the Cuban Missile Crisis and what Guevara perceived as a Soviet betrayal when Khrushchev withdrew the missiles from Cuban territory, Guevara had grown more skeptical of the Soviet Union. As revealed in his last speech in Algiers, he had come to view the Northern Hemisphere, led by the U.S. in the West and the Soviet Union in the East, as the exploiter of the Southern Hemisphere. He strongly supported Communist North Vietnam in the Vietnam War, and urged the peoples of other developing countries to take up arms and create "many Vietnams".[40] Nikita Khrushchev in 1962 Nikita Sergeyevich Khrushchev (Russian: Ники́та Серге́евич Хрущёв) (nih-KEE-tah khroo-SHCHYOFF) (April 17, 1894 – September 11, 1971) was the leader of the Soviet Union after the death of Joseph Stalin. ... Northern hemisphere highlighted in yellow. ... southern hemisphere highlighted in yellow (Antarctica not depicted). ... The Communist Party of Vietnam (Đảng Cá»™ng sản Việt Nam) is the currently ruling, as well as the only legal political party in Vietnam. ... Anthem Tiến Quân Ca (Army March) Location of North Vietnam Capital Hanoi Language(s) Vietnamese Government Socialist republic First president Ho Chi Minh Historical era Cold War  - Independence proclaimed (from Japan) September 2, 1945  - Recognized 1954  - Disestablished July 2, 1976 Area 157,880 km² Population  -  est. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000...


Pressed by international speculation regarding Guevara's fate, Castro stated on June 16, 1965 that the people would be informed about Guevara when Guevara himself wished to let them know. Numerous rumors about his disappearance spread both inside and outside Cuba. On October 3 of that year, Castro revealed an undated letter purportedly written to him by Guevara some months earlier, in it Guevara reaffirmed his enduring solidarity with the Cuban Revolution, but declared his intention to leave Cuba to fight abroad for the revolutionary cause. Additionally, he resigned from all his positions in the government and party, while renouncing his honorary Cuban citizenship.[41] Guevara's movements continued to be a closely held secret for the next two years. is the 167th day of the year (168th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Listening to a Zenith Trans-Oceanic shortwave receiver are (seated from the left) Rogelio Oliva, José María Martínez Tamayo (known as "Mbili" in the Congo and "Ricardo" in Bolivia), and Guevara. Standing behind them is Roberto Sánchez ("Lawton" in Cuba and "Changa" in the Congo).

Image File history File links Cheguevaracongo. ... Image File history File links Cheguevaracongo. ... The Trans-Oceanic was the name given to a series of portable radios produced from 1942 to 1981 by Zenith Radio. ...

Congo

With his whereabouts unknown, in 1965 Guevara decided to venture to Africa and offer his knowledge and experience as a guerrilla to the ongoing war in the Congo. According to Algerian President Ahmed Ben Bella, Guevara thought that Africa was imperialism's weak link and therefore had enormous revolutionary potential.[42][43] Guevara led the Cuban operation into the Congo in support of the Marxist Simba movement in the Congo-Kinshasa (currently the Democratic Republic of the Congo). Guevara, his second-in-command Victor Dreke, and twelve other Cuban expeditionaries arrived in the Congo on April 24, 1965 with a contingent of approximately 100 Afro-Cubans joining them soon afterward.[44][45] They collaborated for a time with guerrilla leader Laurent-Désiré Kabila, who had previously helped supporters of the slain Patrice Lumumba lead an unsuccessful revolt months earlier. Disillusioned with the discipline of Kabila's troops, Guevara would dismiss him, stating "nothing leads me to believe he is the man of the hour."[46] Ahmed Ben Bella Mohamed Ahmed Ben Bella (Muhammad Ahmad Bin Balla) (Arabic: ) (born December 25, 1918?, Maghnia, Algeria) was the first President of Algeria, and seen by many as the Father of the Nation. ... Combatants Congo ONUC Cuba Belgium Katanga South Kasai CIA Commanders Patrice Lumumba Pierre Mulele Laurent-Désiré Kabila Johnson Aguiyi-Ironsi Che Guevara Moise Tshombe Joseph Mobutu Mike Hoare Charles Laurent Albert Kalonji Early history Migration & states Colonization Stanley (1867–1885) Congo Free State Leopold II (1885–1908) Belgian Congo... Víctor Emilio Dreke Cruz (born 1937) is a Cuban Communist leader and a General in the Revolutionary Armed Forces. ... is the 114th day of the year (115th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... Cuban boys playing in Trinidad, Cuba The term Afro-Cuban refers to Cubans of African ancestry, and to historical or cultural elements in Cuba thought to emanate from this community. ... Laurent-Désiré Kabila (November 27, 1939 – January 16, 2001) was President of the Democratic Republic of the Congo from May 1997, when he overthrew longtime dictator Mobutu Sese Seko after 32 years of ruling Zaire until his assassination in January 2001, succeeded by his son Joseph. ... Patrice Émery Lumumba (2 July 1925 – 17 January 1961) was an African anti-colonial leader and the first legally elected Prime Minister of the Republic of the Congo after he helped to win its independence from Belgium in June 1960. ...

Guevara teaching guerrilla tactics to Congolese forces. To his left is Santiago Terry (codename: "Aly"), to his right, Angel Felipe Hernández ("Sitaini").

South African mercenaries led by Mike Hoare in concert with Cuban exiles and the CIA, worked with the Congolese army to thwart Guevara. They were able to monitor his communications, in order to arrange ambushes whenever they attempted to attack, and to interdict Guevara's supply lines. Despite the fact that Guevara sought to conceal his presence in the Congo, the U.S. government was aware of his location and activities: The National Security Agency (NSA) was intercepting all of his incoming and outgoing transmissions via equipment aboard the USNS Valdez, a floating listening post which continuously cruised the Indian Ocean off Dar es Salaam for that purpose.NSA[›] Image File history File links CheInCongo. ... Image File history File links CheInCongo. ... Thomas Michael Hoare 1920- is a mercenary leader known for his exploits in Africa and the Indian Ocean. ... “NSA” redirects here. ... Dar es Salaam (دار السلام), formerly Mzizima, is the largest city (pop. ...


Guevara's aim was to export the Cuban Revolution by instructing local Simba fighters in Marxist ideology and foco theory strategies of guerrilla warfare. In his Congo Diary, he cites the incompetence, intransigence and infighting of the local Congolese forces as key reasons for the revolt's failure.[47] Later that year, ill with dysentery, suffering from asthma, and disheartened after seven months of frustrations, Guevara left the Congo with the Cuban survivors. (Six members of his column had died.) At one point Guevara considered sending the wounded back to Cuba, and fighting alone until the end in the Congo, as a revolutionary example; however, after being urged by his comrades and pressed by two emissaries sent by Castro, at the last moment he reluctantly agreed to retreat. A few weeks later, when writing the preface to the diary he kept during the Congo venture, he began: "This is the history of a failure."[48] Marxism is the political practice and social theory based on the works of Karl Marx, a 19th century philosopher, economist, journalist, and revolutionary, along with Friedrich Engels. ... Guevara teaching guerrilla tactics to Congolese forces. ... Guerrilla redirects here. ...


Guevara was reluctant to return to Cuba, because Castro had made public Guevara's "farewell letter" —a letter intended to only be revealed in the case of his death—wherein he severed all ties in order to devote himself to revolution throughout the world.[49] As a result, Guevara spent the next six months living clandestinely in Dar es Salaam and Prague. During this time he compiled his memoirs of the Congo experience, and wrote drafts of two more books, one on philosophy[50] and the other on economics.[51] He also visited several countries in Western Europe to test the documentation of a new false identity created for him by Cuban Intelligence, intended for his later travels to South America. Throughout this period Castro continued to importune his return to Cuba, but Guevara only agreed to do so, under the basis of preparing a revolutionary effort somewhere in Latin America, and that his presence on the island would be secret. The Cuban General Intelligence Directorate (Dirección General de Inteligencia), or DGI, was established under the Cuban Ministry of the Interior in late 1961 shortly after Fidel Castro took power in 1959. ...


Bolivia

In rural Bolivia shortly before his death, 1967.

Guevara's location was still unknown. Representatives of the independence movement of Mozambique, the FRELIMO, reported that they met with Guevara in late 1966 or early 1967 in Dar es Salaam regarding his offer to aid in their revolutionary project, which they ultimately rejected.[52] In a speech at the 1967 May Day rally in Havana, the Acting Minister of the armed forces, Major Juan Almeida, announced that Guevara was "serving the revolution somewhere in Latin America". The persistent reports that he was leading the guerrillas in Bolivia were eventually shown to be true. The Mozambican Liberation Front (FRELIMO, pronounced fray-LEE-moo; Portuguese: Frente de Libertação de Moçambique) is a political party that has ruled Mozambique since independence in 1975. ... This article is about the holidays celebrated on May 1. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...


At Castro's behest, a parcel of jungle land in the remote Ñancahuazú region had been purchased by native Bolivian Communists for Guevara to use as a training area and base camp.


Training at this camp in the Ñancahuazú valley proved to be more hazardous than combat to Guevara and the Cubans accompanying him. Little was accomplished in the way of building a guerrilla army. Former Stasi operative Haydée Tamara Bunke Bider, better known by her nom de guerre "Tania", who had been installed as his primary agent in La Paz, was reportedly also working for the KGB and is widely inferred to have unwittingly served Soviet interests by leading Bolivian authorities to Guevara's trail.[53][54] Logo of East Germanys Ministerium für Staatssicherheit (MfS or Stasi) / Ministry for State Security This article is about Stasi, the secret police of East Germany. ... Haydée Tamara Bunke Bider (November 19, 1937 – August 31, 1967) was a communist revolutionary, better known as Tania or Tania the Guerrillera, was a spy who played a prominent role in the Cuban Revolution and in other Latin American revolutionary movements. ... A pseudonym or allonym is a name (sometimes legally adopted, sometimes purely fictitious) used by an individual as an alternative to their birth name. ... Motto: Los discordes en concordia, en paz y amor se juntaron y pueblo de paz fundaron para perpetua memoria Location of La Paz within Bolivia Coordinates: , Country Departament Province Pedro Domingo Murillo Province Founded October 20, 1548 Incorporated (El Alto) 20th century Government  - Mayor Juan Del Granado Area  - Total 470... This article is about the KGB of the Soviet Union. ...

Map of Bolivia showing location of Vallegrande.

Guevara's guerrilla force, numbering about 50 and operating as the ELN (Ejército de Liberación Nacional de Bolivia; "National Liberation Army of Bolivia"), was well equipped and scored a number of early successes against Bolivian regulars in the difficult terrain of the mountainous Camiri region. In September, however, the Army managed to eliminate two guerrilla groups in a violent battle, reportedly killing one of the leaders. Image File history File links Vallegrande_location. ... Image File history File links Vallegrande_location. ... Vallegrande is the capital of the Vallegrande Province in the Santa Cruz Department of Bolivia. ... The National Liberation Army (Spanish: Ejército de Liberación Nacional) was a Marxist-Leninist guerrilla organization that operated in Bolivia during the 1960s and 1970s. ... Camiri, Camirimanta, Camirito, La Bomba, Choreti, Capital Petrolera de Bolivia. ...


Guevara's plan for fomenting revolution in Bolivia appears to have been unsuccessful because it was based upon three primary misconceptions:

  • He had expected to deal only with the Bolivian military, who were poorly trained and equipped. However, Guevara was unaware that the U.S. government had sent the CIA and other operatives into Bolivia to aid the anti-insurrection effort. The Bolivian Army would also be trained, advised, and supplied by U.S. Army Special ForcesUSMilitary[›] including a recently organized elite battalion of Rangers trained in jungle warfare that set up camp in La Esperanza, a small settlement close to the location of Guevara's guerrillas.[55][56]
  • Guevara had expected assistance and cooperation from the local dissidents which he did not receive, nor did he receive support from Bolivia's Communist Party, under the leadership of Mario Monje, which was oriented toward Moscow rather than Havana.
  • He had expected to remain in radio contact with Havana. However, the two shortwave transmitters provided to him by Cuba were faulty; thus the guerrillas were unable to communicate with and be resupplied, leaving them isolated and stranded.

In addition, Guevara's known preference for confrontation rather than compromise, which had previously surfaced during his guerrilla warfare campaign in Cuba, contributed to his inability to develop successful working relationships with local leaders in Bolivia, just as it had in the Congo.[57] This tendency had existed in Cuba, but had been kept in check by the timely interventions and guidance of Fidel Castro.[58] This article is about the U.S. Special Operations Force. ... The 75th Ranger Regiment—also known as the United States Army Rangers—is an elite light infantry special operations force of the United States Army Special Operations Command (USASOC) headquartered in Fort Benning, Georgia. ... Jungle warfare is a term used to cover the special techniques needed for military units to survive and fight in jungle terrain. ... La Esperanza is a town in northern Ecuador in the Imbabura province. ... Mario Monje was the Secretary-General of the PCB (Partida Comunista Boliviana), and after its split into two wings: the pro-Soviet wing and the pro-Peking wing, was leader of the pro-Soviet wing. ...


Capture and execution

Executed, Guevara's body was lashed to the landing skids of a helicopter and flown from La Higuera to neighboring Vallegrande.
           Before tying      His self-made shoes
Guevara's corpse was displayed to the World press in the laundry house of the Vallegrande hospital.
    Different angle    From above     Face

The hunt for Guevara in Bolivia was headed by Félix Rodríguez, a CIA operative.[59] On October 7, an informant apprised the Bolivian Special Forces of the location of Guevara's guerrilla encampment in the Yuro ravine. They encircled the area, and Guevara was wounded and taken prisoner while leading a detachment with Simeón Cuba Sarabia. According to Bolivan Sergeant Bernardino Huanca who was present at the capture, a twice wounded Guevara whose gun had been shot and rendered useless, allegedly shouted "Do not shoot! I am Che Guevara and worth more to you alive than dead."[60] The El Che monument La Higuera (Spanish: The Fig Tree) is a small village in Bolivia located in the Department of Santa Cruz, some 150 km (bee-line) southwest of Santa Cruz de la Sierra. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Vallegrande is the capital of the Vallegrande Province in the Santa Cruz Department of Bolivia. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Felix Rodriguez with the captured Che Guevara. ... The CIA Seal The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) is an American intelligence agency, responsible for obtaining and analyzing information about foreign governments, corporations, and individuals, and reporting such information to the various branches of the U.S. Government. ... is the 280th day of the year (281st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Simeon Cuba Sarabia (Willy), ca. ...


Guevara was tied up and taken to a dilapidated schoolhouse in the nearby village of La Higuera. Early on October 9, the day after his capture, Barrientos ordered that he be killed.Barrientos[›] The executioner was Mario Terán, a sergeant in the Bolivian army who had drawn a short straw after arguments over who would get the honor of shooting Guevara broke out among the soldiers. To make the bullet wounds appear consistent with the story the government planned to release to the public, Félix Rodríguez ordered Terán to aim carefully to make it appear that Guevara had been killed in action during a clash with the Bolivian army.[61] The El Che monument La Higuera (Spanish: The Fig Tree) is a small village in Bolivia located in the Department of Santa Cruz, some 150 km (bee-line) southwest of Santa Cruz de la Sierra. ... René Barrientos Ortuño (born on May 30, 1919; died on April 27, 1969) was a former Vice-President (1964) and President of Bolivia (1964-66 and 1966-69). ... Mario Terán was the Bolivian Army sergeant who executed revolutionary Che Guevara as a young man on October 9, 1967. ...


Moments before Guevara was executed he was asked if he was thinking about his own immortality. "No," he replied, "I'm thinking about the immortality of the revolution."[62] Che Guevara also allegedly said to his executioner, "I know you've come to kill me. Shoot coward, you are only going to kill a man."[63] Terán hesitated, then pulled the trigger of his semiautomatic rifle, hitting Che in the arms and legs. Then as Guevara writhed on the ground, apparently biting one of his wrists to avoid crying out, Terán unleashed another burst of gunfire. The fatal bullet entered through the thorax, filling Guevara's lungs with blood. On October 9, 1967, at the age of thirty-nine, Che Guevara was dead. According to Félix Rodríguez, the fatal shots rang out at about 1:10 pm. is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ...


His body was then lashed to the landing skids of a helicopter and flown to neighboring Vallegrande where photographs were taken, showing a figure described by some as "Christ-like" lying on a concrete slab in the laundry room of the Nuestra Señora de Malta hospital.[64][65] Vallegrande is the capital of the Vallegrande Province in the Santa Cruz Department of Bolivia. ...


A declassified memorandum dated October 11, 1967 to President Lyndon B. Johnson from his senior adviser, Walt Rostow, called the decision to kill Guevara “stupid” but “understandable from a Bolivian standpoint.”[66] After the execution, Rodríguez took personal items of Guevara's, including a watch[›] which he still wears today, often showing them to reporters during the ensuing years. Today, some of these belongings, including his flashlight, are on display at the CIA.[67] After a military doctor amputated his hands, Bolivian army officers transferred Guevara's cadaver to an undisclosed location and refused to reveal whether his remains had been buried or cremated. The hands were preserved in formaldehyde to be sent to Buenos Aires for fingerprint identification. (His fingerprints were on file with the Argentine police.) They were later sent to Cuba.Amputation[›] On October 15, Castro acknowledged that Guevara was dead and proclaimed three days of public mourning throughout the island. is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... LBJ redirects here. ... Walt Whitman Rostow (also known as Walt Rostow or W.W. Rostow) (October 7, 1916 - February 13, 2003) was an American economist and political thinker prominent for his staunch opposition to Communism and belief in the efficacy of capitalism and free enterprise. ... R-phrases , , , S-phrases , , , , , Flash point -53 °C Related Compounds Related aldehydes acetaldehyde benzaldehyde Related compounds ketones carboxylic acids Except where noted otherwise, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 Â°C, 100 kPa) Infobox disclaimer and references Formaldehyde (methanal) is the chemical compound with the formula... is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Che Guevara's Monument and Mausoleum in Santa Clara, Cuba.

While researching his definitive biography Che Guevara: A Revolutionary Life, author Jon Lee Anderson happened to discover the hidden location of Guevara's burial. Thus in 1997, the skeletal remains of a handless body were exhumed from beneath an air strip near Vallegrande, identified as those of Guevara by a Cuban forensic team at the scene, and returned to Cuba. On October 17, 1997, his remains, with those of six of his fellow combatants, were laid to rest with military honors in a specially built mausoleumMausoleum[›] in the city of Santa Clara, where he had won the decisive battle of the Cuban Revolution. Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 652 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 652 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Jon Lee Anderson is a staff writer for The New Yorker, reporting from warzone locales such as Afghanistan, Iraq, and Lebanon and also writing stories from other Middle Eastern nations like Iran. ... is the 290th day of the year (291st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ...


Also removed when Guevara was captured was his diary, which documented events of the guerrilla campaign in Bolivia.[68] The first entry is on November 7, 1966 shortly after his arrival at the farm in Ñancahuazú, and the last entry is on October 7, 1967, the day before his capture. The diary tells how the guerrillas were forced to begin operations prematurely due to discovery by the Bolivian Army, explains Guevara's decision to divide the column into two units that were subsequently unable to re-establish contact, and describes their overall unsuccessful venture. It also records the rift between Guevara and the Bolivian Communist Party that resulted in Guevara having significantly fewer soldiers than originally expected and shows that Guevara had a great deal of difficulty recruiting from the local populace, due in part to the fact that the guerrilla group had learned Quechua, unaware that the local language was actually Tupí-Guaraní. As the campaign drew to an unexpected close, Guevara became increasingly ill. He suffered from ever-worsening bouts of asthma, and most of his last offensives were carried out in an attempt to obtain medicine. is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 280th day of the year (281st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Quechuan languages. ... Tupí-Guaraní is the name of the most important subfamily of the Tupí languages of South America. ...


The Bolivian Diary was quickly and crudely translated by Ramparts magazine and circulated around the world. There are at least four additional diaries in existence—those of Israel Reyes Zayas (Alias "Braulio"), Harry Villegas Tamayo ("Pombo"), Eliseo Reyes Rodriguez ("Rolando")[69] and Dariel Alarcón Ramírez ("Benigno")[70] — each of which reveals additional aspects of the events in question. Ramparts was an American political and literary magazine, published from 1962 through 1975. ...


Legacy

Main article: Legacy of Che Guevara

Some view Che Guevara as a hero. Nelson Mandela, for example, referred to him as "an inspiration for every human being who loves freedom" and Jean-Paul Sartre described him as "not only an intellectual but also the most complete human being of our age."[71] Guevara remains a beloved national hero to many in Cuba, where school children begin each morning by pledging "We will be like Che."[72] Moreover, Guevara has been sanctified by some Bolivian campesinos as "Saint Ernesto", whom they pray to for assistance.[73] For other people named Mandela, or other uses, see Mandela. ... Jean-Paul Charles Aymard Sartre (June 21, 1905 – April 15, 1980), normally known simply as Jean-Paul Sartre (pronounced: ), was a French existentialist philosopher and pioneer, dramatist and screenwriter, novelist and critic. ... Sanctification or in its verb form, sanctify, literally means to set apart for special use or purpose, that is to make holy or sacred (compare Latin sanctus holy). Therefore sanctification refers to the state or process of being set apart, i. ... Campesino means simple farmer in Spanish. ...


Conversely, others view him as a spokesman for a failed ideology and as a ruthless executioner. Johann Hari, for example, wrote that "...Che Guevara is not a free-floating icon of rebellion. He was an actual person who supported an actual system of tyranny."[74] Detractors have also theorized that in much of Latin America, Che-inspired revolutions had the practical result of reinforcing brutal militarism for many years.[75] He also remains a hated figure amongst some in the Cuban exile community, who view him with animosity as "the butcher of La Cabaña."[76] Johann Hari (born January 21, 1979) is a British journalist and writer. ... Cuba is 90 miles (145 kilometres) south of Florida in the US The term Cuban exile refers to the many Cubans who have sought alternative political or economic conditions outside the island, dating back to the Ten Years War and the struggle for Cuban independence during the 19th century. ...


Ironically, a monochrome graphic of Alberto Korda's photograph has become one of the World's most universally merchandized images[77] and can now be seen on an endless array of items, including t-shirts, hats, posters, tattoos, and even bikinis.[78] Yet, Guevara also remains an iconic figure both in specifically political contexts[79] and as a wide-ranging popular icon of youthful rebellion.[80] Ironic redirects here. ... A photograph of a sign in grayscale The same photograph in black and white Monochrome comes from the two Greek words mono (μωνο, meaning one), and chroma (χρωμα, meaning surface or the color of the skin). A monochromatic object has a single color. ... Alberto Kordas photograph of Che Guevara Alberto Kordas famous photograph of Che Guevara was taken on March 5, 1960 at a Cuban funeral service for victims of the La Coubre explosion,[1] but was published seven years later. ... A coffee mug bearing the logo of a company or organization is a common example of product merchandising. ... For other uses, see Logo (disambiguation). ...

Appearances of Che Guevara in popular culture are common in the Western World. ...

Timeline

Guevara's authored books

In English
  • Back on the Road: A Journey Through Latin America,   by Ernesto "Che" Guevara & Alberto Granado, Grove Press, 2002, ISBN 0802139426
  • Che Guevara, Cuba, and the Road to Socialism,   by Ernesto Guevara, Pathfinder Press, 1991, ISBN 0873486439
  • Che Guevara on Global Justice,   by Ernesto Guevara, Ocean Press (AU), 2002, ISBN 1876175451
  • Che Guevara: Radical Writings on Guerrilla Warfare, Politics and Revolution,   by Ernesto Che Guevara, Filiquarian Publishing, 2006, ISBN 1599869993
  • Che Guevara Speaks: Selected Speeches and Writings,   by Ernesto Guevara, Pathfinder Press (NY), 1980, ISBN 0873486021
  • Che Guevara Talks to Young People,   by Ernesto Guevara, Pathfinder, 2000, ISBN 087348911X
  • Che: The Photobiography of Che Guevara,   Thunder's Mouth Press, 1998, ISBN 1560251875
  • Colonialism is Doomed,   by Che Guevara, Ministry of External Relations: Republic of Cuba, 1964, ASIN B0010AAN1K
  • Critical Notes on Political Economy: A Revolutionary Humanist Approach to Marxist Economics,   by Ernesto Guevara, Ocean Press (AU), 2008, ISBN 1876175559
  • Episodes of the Cuban Revolutionary War, 1956–58,   by Ernesto Guevara, Pathfinder Press (NY), 1996, ISBN 0873488245
  • Guerrilla Warfare: Authorized Edition ,   by Ernesto Guevara, Ocean Press (AU), 2006, ISBN 1920888284
  • London Bulletin Number 7, Che's Diaries,   by Che Guevara, Bertrand Russell Peace Foundation, 1968, ASIN B000LARAC0
  • Marx & Engels: An Introduction,   by Che Guevara, Ocean Press, 2007, ISBN 1920888926
  • Our America And Theirs: Kennedy And The Alliance For Progress,   by Ernesto Guevara, Ocean Press, 2006, ISBN 1876175818
  • Reminiscences of the Cuban Revolutionary War: Authorized Edition,   by Ernesto "Che" Guevara, Ocean Press (AU), 2005, ISBN 1920888330
  • Self Portrait Che Guevara,   by Ernesto Guevara & Victor Casaus, Ocean Press (AU), 2004, ISBN 1876175826
  • Socialism and Man in Cuba,   by Ernesto Guevara & Fidel Castro, Pathfinder Press (NY), 1989, ISBN 0873485777
  • The African Dream: The diaries of the Revolutionary War in the Congo,   by Ernesto "Che" Guevara, Grove Press, 2001, ISBN 0802138349
  • The Argentine,   by Ernesto Guevara, Ocean Press (AU), 2008, ISBN 1920888934
  • The Bolivian Diary of Ernesto Che Guevara,   by Ernesto "Che" Guevara, Pathfinder Press, 1994, ISBN 0873487664
  • The Che Guevara Reader,   by Ernesto Guevara, Ocean Press (AU), 2003, ISBN 1876175699
  • The Diary of Che Guevara: Bolivia: November 7, 1966–October 7, 1967,   by Che Guevara, Bantam Extra, 1968, ASIN B000BD037G
  • The Diary of Che Guevara: The Secret Papers of a Revolutionary,   by Che Guevara, Amereon Ltd, ISBN 0891902244
  • The Great Debate on Political Economy,   by Che Guevara, Ocean Press, 2006, ISBN 1876175540
  • The Motorcycle Diaries: A Journey Around South America,   by Ernesto Che Guevara, Verso, 1996, ISBN 1857023994
  • The Role of Foreign Aid in the Development of Cuba,   by Che Guevara, Editorial en Marcha, 1962, ASIN B001159NRO
  • To Speak the Truth: Why Washington's "Cold War" Against Cuba Doesn't End,   by Ernesto Guevara & Fidel Castro, Pathfinder, 1993, ISBN 0873486331

Image File history File links Books-aj. ... Guerrilla Warfare published by Ocean Books 2006. ... The Argentine is a film about Che Guevara directed by Steven Soderbergh. ... Map of Guevaras trip with Alberto Granado. ...

Supplementary resources

  • List of additional literary and media-related materials
  • Archival footage of Che Guevara
  • Photos and interactive media on Che Guevara

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

Content notes

  • ^ Born:  However, his birth certificate was dated one month later: June 14, 1928. [81]
  • ^ Basque: Che's maternal last name "Guevara" derives from the Castilianized form of the Basque "Gebara", a habitational name from the province of Álava.
  • ^ Irish: The "Lynch"  family (Che's paternal last name), was one of the famous 14 Tribes of Galway. Patrick / Patricio (Guevara's distant 18th century grand father), was born in Lydican Castle, Claregalway, and travelled extensively around South America before finally settling in Argentina where he became a prosperous merchant.[82]
  • ^ Diploma: Although commonly referred to as a doctor, the medical degree conferred was of a medic.[83]
  • ^ Ibero-America: Guevara gave a brief speech at the San Pablo leprosarium in Peru on the occasion of his 24th birthday.[84]
  • ^ Perfeccionaré: Che Guevara's father quotes him, "En Guatemala me perfeccionaré y lograré lo que me falta para ser un revolucionario auténtico." (Guevara Lynch 2000, p. 26.)
  • ^ Children: 
With Hilda Gadea (married August 18, 1955; divorced May 22, 1959):
With Aleida March (married June 2, 1959):
With Lilia Rosa López (extramarital):
  • ^ INRA: Appointed Director of the Industrialization Department of the National Institute for Agrarian Reform on October 7, 1959.
  • ^ BNC: Appointed President of the National Bank of Cuba on November 26, 1959.
  • ^ Signature: "If my way of signing is not typical of bank presidents ... this does not signify, by any means, that I am minimizing the importance of the document—but that the revolutionary process is not yet over and, besides, that we must change our scale of values."—Ernesto Guevara[86]
  • ^ MININD: appointed Minister of Industries on February 23, 1961.
  • ^ Ley de la Sierra: The Penal Law of the War of Independence (July 28, 1896) was reinforced by Rule 1 of the Penal Regulations of the Rebel Army, approved in the Sierra Maestra February 21, 1958, and published in the army's official bulletin (Ley penal de Cuba en armas, 1959).
  • ^ Executions: Different sources cite different numbers of executions. Anderson (1997) states that "several hundred people were officially tried and executed across Cuba." (p. 387.) Lago gives the figure as 216 documented executions in two years. Others give far higher figures.
  • ^ Secretly: Guevara requested that the Japanese government arrange for him to visit Hiroshima. When they refused, he covertly left his Osaka hotel to visit Hiroshima by night train, along with his aide Omar Fernández.
  • ^ Algeria: On September 1962, Algeria asked Cuba for assistance when Morocco declared war over their dispute concerning the Spanish Sahara.[87]
  • ^ Kabila: In May 1997 Ultimately overthrew the government of Mobutu Sese Seko and became President of the DRC until his eventual assassination in January 2001.
  • ^ NSA: "The intercept operators knew that Dar-es-Salaam was serving as a communications center for the fighters, receiving messages from Castro in Cuba and relaying them on to the guerrillas deep in the bush.[88]
  • ^ Camp: The purchase of the acreage in the Ñancahuazú region was in direct contravention of Guevara's directive that the land for the camp should be purchased in the Alto Beni region.
  • ^ USMilitary: "U.S. military personnel in Bolivia never exceeded 53 advisors, including a sixteen-man Mobile Training Team (MTT) from the 8th Special Forces Group based at Fort Gulick, Panama Canal Zone."[89]
  • ^ Message: On August 31, 1967 Che wrote in his diary "There is a (coded radio) message from Manila (code name for Havana) but we couldn't copy it." The content of the message has never been revealed.
  • ^ Barrientos: Has never revealed his motives for ordering the summary execution of Guevara.
  • ^ Amputation: Guevara's severed hands, preserved in formaldehyde, turned up in the possession of Fidel Castro a few months later.
  • ^ Watch: After the revolution, seeing that Guevara had no watch, his friend Oscarito Fernández Mell gave him his own gold watch. Sometime later, Che handed him a piece of paper; a receipt from the National Bank declaring that Mell had "donated" his gold wristband to Cuba's gold reserve. Guevara was still wearing his watch, but it now had a leather wristband. [90]
  • ^ Mausoleum: On December 30, 1998 the remains of ten more guerrillas who had fought alongside Guevara in Bolivia and whose secret burial sites had been recently discovered by Cuban forensic investigators were placed inside the "Che Guevara Mausoleum" in Santa Clara.

is the 165th day of the year (166th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Spanish () or Castilian () is an Iberian Romance language. ... Basque (native name: euskara) is the language spoken by the Basque people who inhabit the Pyrenees in North-Central Spain and the adjoining region of South-Western France. ... Álava province Álava (Basque: Araba) is a province of northern Spain, in the southern part of the autonomous community of the Basque Country. ... The Tribes of Galway were fourteen merchant families who dominated the political commercial and social life in the town of Galway between the 13th and 16th centuries. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Irish Grid Reference M370324 Statistics Province: Connacht County: Elevation: 12 m Population (2002)  - Town:  - Rural:   562  1,635 Claregalway (Irish: ) is a village situated about 10km from the city of Galway in County Galway, Ireland. ... South America South America is a continent crossed by the equator, with most of its area in the Southern Hemisphere. ... is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 46th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... A car from 1956 Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Nickname: Location of Mexico City Coordinates: , Country Federal entity Boroughs The 16 delegaciones Founded c. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... This article is about the capital of Cuba. ... is the 153rd day of the year (154th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Aleida Guevara (born 1960 in Cuba) is the eldest daughter of Ernesto Che Guevara and his second wife, Aleida March. ... is the 328th day of the year (329th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 140th day of the year (141st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 165th day of the year (166th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1963 (disambiguation). ... is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 78th day of the year (79th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... is the 280th day of the year (281st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 330th day of the year (331st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 209th day of the year (210th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1896 (MDCCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display calendar). ... is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jan. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Western Sahara (Arabic: الصحراء الغربية; transliterated: ; Spanish: Sahara Occidental) is a territory of northwestern Africa, bordered by Morocco to the north, Algeria in the northeast, Mauritania to the east and south, and the Atlantic Ocean on the west. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... Mobutu Sese Seko Nkuku Ngbendu wa Za Banga (October 14, 1930 – September 7, 1997), known commonly as Mobutu, or Mobutu Sese Seko, born Joseph-Désiré Mobutu, was the President of Zaire (now the Democratic Republic of the Congo) for 32 years (1965–1997), in which he rose to power... Motto: Justice – Paix – Travail(French) Justice – Peace – Work Anthem: Debout Congolais Capital (and largest city) Kinshasaa Official languages French Recognised regional languages Lingala, Kongo/Kituba, Swahili, Tshiluba Demonym Congolese Government Semi-Presidential Republic  -  President Joseph Kabila  -  Prime Minister Antoine Gizenga Independence  -  from Belgium June 30, 1960  Area  -  Total 2,344... The 8th Special Forces Group was established in 1963 at Fort Gulick, Panama Canal Zone. ... is the 243rd day of the year (244th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... R-phrases , , , S-phrases , , , , , Flash point -53 °C Related Compounds Related aldehydes acetaldehyde benzaldehyde Related compounds ketones carboxylic acids Except where noted otherwise, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 Â°C, 100 kPa) Infobox disclaimer and references Formaldehyde (methanal) is the chemical compound with the formula... is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ...

Source notes

  1. ^ "Castro's Brain" 1960.
  2. ^ Dorfman 1999.
  3. ^ Maryland Institute of Art, referenced at BBC News 2001.
  4. ^ Che Guevara's Basque & Irish Roots by Seán Mac Mathúna, 2000
  5. ^ Anderson 1997, pp. 66–67.
  6. ^ Radio Cadena Agramonte 2006.
  7. ^ a b U.S. Department of State 2008.
  8. ^ Anderson 1997, p. 144.
  9. ^ Taibo 1999, p. 74.
  10. ^ Anderson 1997, p. 194.
  11. ^ DePalma 2006, pp. 110–111.
  12. ^ Guevara 1996, Attack on Bueycito.
  13. ^ Anderson 1997, pp. 269–270.
  14. ^ Castañeda 1998, pp. 105, 119.
  15. ^ Anderson 1997, pp. 269–270, 277–278.
  16. ^ Bockman 1984.
  17. ^ Castro 1972, pp. 439–442.
  18. ^ Dorschner 1980, pp. 41–47, 81–87.
  19. ^ BBC News 2000.
  20. ^ Treto 1991, pp. 114–125 (pg 115–116).
  21. ^ Anderson 1997, pp. 372, 425.
  22. ^ Anderson 1997, p. 376.
  23. ^ Treto 1991, pp. 114–125 (pg 116).
  24. ^ Dumur 1964 shows Che Guevara speaking French.
  25. ^ Anderson 1997, p. 423.
  26. ^ Niwata 2007.
  27. ^ Anderson 1997, p. 435.
  28. ^ Anderson 1997, p. 435.
  29. ^ Anderson 1997, pp. 438–439.
  30. ^ Cuban Information Archives.
  31. ^ PBS: Che Guevara, Popular but Ineffective
  32. ^ Anderson 1997, p. 506.
  33. ^ Anderson 1997, p. 507.
  34. ^ Anderson 1997, p. 545.
  35. ^ Snow 2007.
  36. ^ Guevara 1969, p. 350.
  37. ^ Ernesto Che Guevara, "English Translation of Complete Text of Algiers Speech", Online at Sozialistische Klassiker, accessed January 4, 2006.
  38. ^ Ernesto Che Guevara, (editors Rolando E. Bonachea and Nelson P. Valdés), Che: Selected Works of Ernesto Guevara, Cambridge, MA: 1969, pp. 352–59.
  39. ^ Ernesto Che Guevara, "English Translation of Complete Text of Algiers Speech", Online at Sozialistische Klassiker, accessed January 4, 2006.
  40. ^ Ernesto Che Guevara, "English Translation of Complete Text of his Message to the Tricontinental", or see Original Spanish text at Wikisource .
  41. ^ Ernesto Che Guevara, "Che Guevara's Farewell Letter", 1965. English translation of complete text: Che Guevara's Farewell Letter at Wikisource.
  42. ^ Ben Bella, Ahmed. Che as I knew him, by Ahmed Ben Bella. mondediplo.com. Retrieved on 2008-02-28.
  43. ^ Heikal's account of Guevara's conversations with Nasser in February and March of 1965 lends further credence to this interpretation. See Heikal, Mohamed Hassanein. The Cairo Documents, pp 347–357.
  44. ^ Gálvez, William. Che in Africa: Che Guevara's Congo Diary, Melbourne, 1999: Ocean Press, p 62.
  45. ^ Gott, Richard. Cuba: A new history, Yale University Press 2004, p219.
  46. ^ BBC News, "Profile: Laurent Kabila", May 26, 2001. Online at BBC News, accessed January 5, 2006.
  47. ^ Ireland's Own, "From Cuba to Congo, Dream to Disaster for Che Guevara". Online at irelandsown.net, accessed January 11, 2006.
  48. ^ Ernesto Che Guevara, translated from the Spanish by Patrick Camiller, The African Dream, New York: Grove Publishers, 2000, p.1.
  49. ^ Castañeda, Jorge G., Che Guevara: Compañero, New York: 1998, Random House, p 316.
  50. ^ Ernesto Che Guevara, Apuntes Filosóficos, draft.
  51. ^ Ernesto Che Guevara, Notas Económicas, draft.
  52. ^ Mittleman, James H. Underdevelopment and the Transition to Socialism – Mozambique and Tanzania, New York: 1981, Academic Press, p. 38.
  53. ^ Major Donald R. Selvage – USMC, "Che Guevara in Bolivia", April 1, 1985. Online at GlobalSecurity.org, accessed January 5, 2006.
  54. ^ Anderson, Jon Lee (1997), Che Guevara: A Revolutionary Life, New York: Grove Press, p. 693, ISBN 0-8021-1600-0
  55. ^ U.S. Army, "Memorandum of Understanding Concerning the Activation, Organization and Training of the 2d Ranger Battalion – Bolivian Army (April 28, 1967)". Accessed June 19, 2006.
  56. ^ Ryan, Henry Butterfield. The Fall of Che Guevara: A Story of Soldiers, Spies, and Diplomats, New York, 1998: Oxford University Press, p 82–102, inter alia.
  57. ^ Ernesto Che Guevara, "Excerpt from Pasajes de la guerra revolucionaria:Congo",Online at Cold War International History Project, accessed April 26, 2006.
  58. ^ Castañeda, Jorge G. Che Guevara: Compañero, New York: 1998, Random House, pp 107–112; 131–132.
  59. ^ Rodríguez, Félix I. and John Weisman. Shadow Warrior/the CIA Hero of a Hundred Unknown Battles (Hardcover), New York: 1989, Publisher: Simon & Schuster.
  60. ^ Anderson, Jon Lee. Che Guevara: A Revolutionary Life, New York: 1997, Grove Press, p.733.
  61. ^ Grant, Will. CIA man recounts Che Guevara's death. news.bbc.co.uk. Retrieved on 2008-02-29..
  62. ^ "Che: A Myth Embalmed in a Matrix of Ignorance", Time Magazine, October 12, 1970
  63. ^ Anderson, Jon Lee. Che Guevara: A Revolutionary Life. New York: Grove Press, 1997, page 739.
  64. ^ Bolivia marks capture, execution of 'Che' Guevara 40 years ago, SF Chronicle, October 9 2007
  65. ^ Richard Gott, "Bolivia on the Day of the Death of Che Guevara".Online at Mindfully.org, accessed February 26, 2006.
  66. ^ Lone Bidder Buys Strands of Che’s Hair at U.S. Auction, by Marc Lacey, October 26, 2007, NY Times
  67. ^ National Security Archive. Electronic Briefing Book No. 5 Online, accessed March 25, 2007.
  68. ^ Ernesto Che Guevara, "Diario (Bolivia)". Online, accessed February 26, 2006.
  69. ^ Major Donald R. Selvage – USMC, "Che Guevara in Bolivia", April 1, 1985. Online at GlobalSecurity.org, accessed January 5, 2006;
  70. ^ Alarcón Ramírez, Dariel dit "Benigno". Le Che en Bolivie, Paris: 1997, Éditions du Rocher
  71. ^ Michael Moynihan, "Neutering Sartre at Dagens Nyheter". Online at Stockholm Spectator. Accessed February 26, 2006.
  72. ^ 'Che Guevara remains a hero to Cubans', People's Weekly World, October 2, 2004
  73. ^ "The Final Triumph of Saint Che", by Andres Schipani in La Higuera Bolivia, The Observer, September 23 2007
  74. ^ Johann Hari: Should Che be an icon? No October 6, 2007, The Independent
  75. ^ The Killing Machine: Che Guevara, from Communist Firebrand to Capitalist Brand. The Independent Institute. online. Accessed November 10, 2006.
  76. ^ Paquito D'Rivera, "Open letter to Carlos Santana by Paquito D'Rivera in Latin Beat Magazine", March 25, 2005. Find Articles Online, accessed June 18, 2006.
  77. ^ BBC News, "Che Guevara photographer dies", May 26, 2001. Online at BBC News, accessed January 4, 2006.
  78. ^ A Revolutionary Icon, and Now, a Bikini By Marc Lacey, The New York Times, October 9 2007
  79. ^ Cuba pays tribute to Che Guevara, October 9, 2007, BBC
  80. ^ The Guardian. "Just a pretty face?" Online, accessed October 25, 2006.
  81. ^ Anderson 1997, p. 3.
  82. ^ For more information, see Dictionary of Irish Latin American Biography Guevara, Ernesto [Che (1928–1967)]
  83. ^ Ernesto Che Guevara: Mito Y Realidad, by Enrique Ros (ISBN 0897299884)
  84. ^ Guevara, Ernesto Che, Motorcycle Diaries, London: Verso Books, 1995, p.135.
  85. ^ Castañeda, Jorge G. Che Guevara: Compañero, New York: 1998, Random House, pp 264–265.
  86. ^ Aleksandr Alexeiev in Cuba después del triunfo de la revolución ("Cuba after the triumph of the revolution")
  87. ^ Castañeda, pp. 244–245.
  88. ^ Bamford, James, Body of Secrets: Anatomy of the Ultra-Secret National Security Agency, New York: Anchor Books, 2002 (Reprint edition), p. 181.
  89. ^ Che Guevara in Bolivia by Major Donald R. Selvage.
  90. ^ Anderson, Jon Lee. Che Guevara: A Revolutionary Life, ISBN 0-8021-1600-0, New York: 1997, Grove Press, p. 503

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Persondata
NAME Guevara, Che
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Ernesto Guevara de la Serna, el Che
SHORT DESCRIPTION Argentine-born Marxist, politician, and leader of Cuban and internationalist guerrillas
DATE OF BIRTH May 14, 1928
PLACE OF BIRTH Rosario, Argentina
DATE OF DEATH October 9, 1967
PLACE OF DEATH La Higuera, Bolivia

is the 146th day of the year (147th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 135th day of the year (136th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 165th day of the year (166th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... is the 165th day of the year (166th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... “PDF” redirects here. ... A kibibyte (a contraction of kilo binary byte) is a unit of information or computer storage, commonly abbreviated KiB (never kiB). 1 kibibyte = 210 bytes = 1,024 bytes The kibibyte is closely related to the kilobyte, which can be used either as a synonym for kibibyte or to refer to... is the 56th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 220th day of the year (221st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... February 29 is a day added into a leap year of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Argentina. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Cuba. ... Image File history File links Red_flag. ... Former president Jacobo Arbenz Guzmán on the cover of TIME magazine in June 1954 after his overthrow Operation PBSUCCESS was a CIA-organized covert operation that overthrew the democratically-elected President of Guatemala, Jacobo Arbenz Guzmán in 1954. ... The 26th of July Movement (Spanish: Movimiento 26 de Julio; M-26-7) was the revolutionary organization planned and led by Fidel Castro that in 1959 overthrew the Fulgencio Batista government in Cuba. ... Granma is the yacht that was used to transport the fighters of the Cuban Revolution to Cuba in 1956. ... Main article: Che Guevara Che Guevara was a key figure in the Cuban Revolution, an uprising that removed the government of General Fulgencio Batista over the island. ... Combatants Cuban Revolutionaries Cuban Government, Batista Commanders Fidel Castro General Eulogio Cantillo Strength 300 3,000 Casualties 70 70 ? The Battle of Las Mercedes was the last battle of Operation Verano, the summer offensive of 1958 launched by the Batistia government during the Cuban Revolution. ... The Battle of Santa Clara was a series of events in late December 1958 that led to the capture of Santa Clara, Cuba by revolutionaries under the command of Che Guevara. ... Radio Rebelde is a Cuban Spanish language radio station. ... This 19th century map of Havana shows La Cabañas strategic location along the east side of the entrance to the citys harbor. ... Smoke rises over Havana harbor following the explosion People near the docks run from the blast At 3:10 p. ... Belligerents Cuban Revolutionary Armed Forces Cuban exiles trained by the United States Commanders Fidel Castro José Ramón Fernández Ernesto Che Guevara Francisco Ciutat de Miguel John F. Kennedy Grayston Lynch Pepe San Roman Erneido Oliva Strength 15,000 1,511 Cuban exiles 2 CIA agents Casualties and losses... For the video game based on the possible outcomes of this event, see Cuban Missile Crisis: The Aftermath. ... Alberto Granado (born on August 8, 1922 in Hernando, Córdoba, Argentina) was the travelling companion of Che Guevara during their trip around Latin America, and founder of the Santiago School of Medicine in Cuba. ... Colonel Jacobo Árbenz Guzmán (September 14, 1913 – January 27, 1971) was the president of Guatemala from 1951 to 1954, when he was ousted in a coup détat organized by the US Central Intelligence Agency, known as Operation PBSUCCESS, and was replaced by a military junta, headed by Colonel... General Fulgencio Batista (pronounced or ) y Zaldívar (January 16, 1901 – August 6, 1973) was a Cuban military officer and politician. ... This article is about the Cuban politician. ... Fidel Alejandro Castro Ruz (born on August 13, 1926) is the current President of Cuba but on indefinite medical hiatus. ... Cuban poster showing Camilo Cienfuegos. ... Haydée Tamara Bunke Bider (November 19, 1937 – August 31, 1967) was a communist revolutionary, better known as Tania or Tania the Guerrillera, was a spy who played a prominent role in the Cuban Revolution and in other Latin American revolutionary movements. ... Harry Pombo Villegas is a Cuban Communist revolutionary, who fought alongside Che Guevara in battles from the Sierra Maestra to Bolivia. ... Felix Rodriguez with the captured Che Guevara. ... Mario Terán was the Bolivian Army sergeant who executed revolutionary Che Guevara as a young man on October 9, 1967. ... Aleida Guevara (born 1960 in Cuba) is the eldest daughter of Ernesto Che Guevara and his second wife, Aleida March. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... The foco theory of communist revolution by way of guerrilla warfare, also known as focalism (Spanish language: foquismo), was developed by Ernesto Che Guevara, based upon his experiences surrounding Fidel Castros 1959 victory in the Cuban Revolution. ... Guevara teaching guerrilla tactics to Congolese forces. ... Guerrilla redirects here. ... Marxism is both the theory and the political practice (that is, the praxis) derived from the work of Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels. ... Religious socialism Key Issues People and organizations Related subjects Socialism refers to a broad array of ideologies and political movements with the goal of a socio-economic system in which property and the distribution of wealth are subject to control by the community. ... Neocolonialism is the term describing international economic arrangements wherein former colonial powers maintained control of colonies and dependencies after World War II. Neocolonialism can obfuscate the understanding of current colonialism, given that some colonial governments continue administrating foreign territories and their populations in violation of United Nations resolutions[1] and... Anti-imperialism, strictly speaking, is a term that may be applied to or movement opposed to some form of imperialism. ... This article lists ideologies opposed to capitalism and describes them briefly. ... Map of Guevaras trip with Alberto Granado. ... Guerrilla Warfare published by Ocean Books 2006. ... Pasajes de la guerra revolucionaria is an autobiographical book by Che Guevara about his experiences during the war to overthrow Batista. ... The Motorcycle Diaries (Spanish: Diarios de motocicleta) is a 2004 biographical film about the young man who would later become internationally known as Marxist revolutionary Che Guevara. ... The Argentine is a film about Che Guevara directed by Steven Soderbergh. ... Guerrilla is a film about Argentinean-born doctor and revolutionary leader Ernesto Che Guevara (1928-1967), most famous for leading Fidel Castros forces against Batista. ... Che is a semi-biographical account of Che Guevaras life. ... Che! (1969) is a film directed by Richard Fleischer. ... Appearances of Che Guevara in popular culture are common in the Western World. ... Alberto Kordas photograph of Che Guevara Alberto Kordas famous photograph of Che Guevara was taken on March 5, 1960 at a Cuban funeral service for victims of the La Coubre explosion,[1] but was published seven years later. ... Alberto Díaz Gutiérrez, better known as Alberto Korda (September 14, 1928 – May 25, 2001) was a photographer, famous for his photo of Che Guevara. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Jim Fitzpatricks version of Che Jim Fitzpatrick is an Irish artist famous for Irish folk art. ... Jean-Paul Charles Aymard Sartre (June 21, 1905 – April 15, 1980), normally known simply as Jean-Paul Sartre (pronounced: ), was a French existentialist philosopher and pioneer, dramatist and screenwriter, novelist and critic. ... The New Left is a term used in different countries to describe left-wing movements that occurred in the 1960s and 1970s. ... The El Che monument La Higuera (Spanish: The Fig Tree) is a small village in Bolivia located in the Department of Santa Cruz, some 150 km (bee-line) southwest of Santa Cruz de la Sierra. ... Che Guevaras Monument and Mausoleum The Mausoleo Che Guevara (Che Guevara Mausoleum) is a mausoleum in Santa Clara, Cuba. ... Image File history File links Wikiquote-logo. ... Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Image File history File links Wikibooks-logo. ... Image File history File links Ie7logo. ... Argentine redirects here. ... Marxism is both the theory and the political practice (that is, the praxis) derived from the work of Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A politician is an individual who is a formally recognized and active member of a government, or a person who influences the way a society is governed through an understanding of political power and group dynamics. ... Guerilla may refer to Guerrilla warfare. ... May 14 is the 134th day of the year (135th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Rosario is the largest city in the province of Santa Fe, Argentina. ... is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... The El Che monument La Higuera (Spanish: The Fig Tree) is a small village in Bolivia located in the Department of Santa Cruz, some 150 km (bee-line) southwest of Santa Cruz de la Sierra. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Che Guevara hero file (4002 words)
Guevara becomes Castro's chief lieutenant and distinguishes himself as a resourceful and ruthless tactician capable of ordering the execution of traitors and waverers but also deeply concerned for the welfare of his troops.
Guevara begins to travel widely and frequently, meeting with guerrilla and revolutionary groups and their supporters around the world and arranging the formation of the Organisation of Solidarity of the Peoples of Africa, Asia and Latin America (the 'Tricontinental Conference').
On 8 October Guevara is wounded in the foot and captured near Vallegrande, in the mountains of central Bolivia.
Che Guevara In Bolivia (18854 words)
Che also earned the same respect from his fellow students who characterized him as a "...brilliant leader and exceptional commander."7 Although the key to post World War II revolutionary movements is the marriage of techniques with ideology, evidence indicates that Fidel Castro did not indoctrinate his trainees with specific communist doctrine at this time.
Che's introduction to the rigors of mili- tary intervention first occurred aboard the Granma when he suffered severe asthma attacks; these were to regularly surface during per- iods of stress for the remainder of his life.
Che apparently was confident that he could unify the two factions once his insurgency gained popularity.22 Che's confidence was not deterred by the fact that Bolivian leftist groups had a history of failure whenever they attempted to promote armed revolt.23 Che's contempt for the Bolivian army was based upon its past performance and current appearance.
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