FACTOID # 19: Cheap sloppy joes: Looking for reduced-price lunches for schoolchildren? Head for Oklahoma!
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Chauvinism" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Chauvinism

Chauvinism (IPA:/'ʃoʊ.vəˌnɪzm̩/) is extreme and unreasoning partisanship on behalf of a group to which one belongs, especially when the partisanship includes malice and hatred towards a rival group. Jingoism is a similar term of British derivation. A frequent contemporary use of the term in English is male chauvinism, which refers to the belief that males are superior to females. A similar concept discussed by a few misandry researchers is female chauvinism, or the belief that females are superior to males. Articles with similar titles include the NATO phonetic alphabet, which has also informally been called the “International Phonetic Alphabet”. For information on how to read IPA transcriptions of English words, see IPA chart for English. ... Ten Thousand Miles From Tip to Tip, an 1898 political cartoon depicting the extension of the United States dominion Jingoism is chauvinistic patriotism, usually associated with a War Hawk political stance. ... Look up Misandry in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

Contents

Etymology

The term is derived from the undocumented Nicolas Chauvin, whose legend made him out to be a soldier under Napoleon Bonaparte. He served in the Wars of Revolution (1798-1800) and the Napoleonic Wars and was wounded seventeen times and severely disabled. Despite its unpopularity in Restoration France, he was an ardent Bonapartist and was often seen wearing a violet in his lapel, the symbol of his deposed Emperor. He remained fanatically loyal despite his poverty and disability and the abuse he suffered. Nicolas Chauvin (possibly b. ... For other uses, see Legend (disambiguation). ... Napoléon I, Emperor of the French (born Napoleone di Buonaparte, changed his name to Napoléon Bonaparte)[1] (15 August 1769; Ajaccio, Corsica – 5 May 1821; Saint Helena) was a general during the French Revolution, the ruler of France as First Consul (Premier Consul) of the French Republic from... Combatants Austria[1] Portugal Prussia[1] Russia[2] Sicily  Spain[3]  Sweden United Kingdom[4] French Empire Holland Italy Naples [5] Duchy of Warsaw Bavaria[6] Saxony[7] Denmark-Norway [8] Commanders Archduke Charles Prince Schwarzenberg Karl Mack von Leiberich João Francisco de Saldanha Oliveira e Daun Gebhard von...


Many writers and historians falsely attribute to Chauvin the exploits of other Bonapartists. It is claimed he served in the Old Guard at Waterloo (unlikely considering his age and the severity of his disabilities). When the Old Guard was surrounded and made its last stand at Le Belle Alliance, he supposedly shouted in defiance to a call for their honorable surrender: "The Old Guard dies but does not surrender!", implying blind and unquestioned zeal to one's country [or other group of reference]. {This apocriphal phrase is actually attributed to the Old Guard's commander, who was also supposed to have answered "Merde!" ("Shit!"). Recent historical research has revealed that the Old Guard were never asked by the British and Allied forces if they wanted to surrender and never asked for quarter, so both quotes are believed false.} Combatants First French Empire Seventh Coalition: United Kingdom Kingdom of Prussia Kingdom of the United Netherlands Kingdom of Hanover Duchy of Nassau Duchy of Brunswick Commanders Napoleon Bonaparte, Michel Ney Duke of Wellington, Gebhard von Blücher Prince William of Orange Strength 73,000 67,000 Coalition 60,000 Prussian... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


The origin and early usage indicate that chauvinisme was coined to describe excessive nationalism, and the original French term retains this meaning today. The term entered public use due to a satirical treatment of Chauvin in the French play La Cocarde Tricolore (The Tricolore Cockade). Eugène Delacroixs Liberty Leading the People, symbolising French nationalism during the July Revolution 1830. ... 1867 edition of the satirical magazine Punch, a British satirical magazine, ground-breaking on popular literature satire. ... For other uses, see Play (disambiguation). ...


Chauvinism as nationalism

In "Imperialism, Nationalism, Chauvinism", in The Review of Politics 7.4, (October 1945), p. 457, Hannah Arendt describes the concept: Hannah Arendt (October 14, 1906 – December 4, 1975) was a German Jewish political theorist. ...

Chauvinism is an almost natural product of the national concept insofar as it springs directly from the old idea of the "national mission." ... (A) nation's mission might be interpreted precisely as bringing its light to other, less fortunate peoples that, for whatever reason, have miraculously been left by history without a national mission. As long as this concept did not develop into the ideology of chauvinism and remained in the rather vague realm of national or even nationalistic pride, it frequently resulted in a high sense of responsibility for the welfare of backward peoples.

(See, for example, white man's burden.) The White Mans Burden is a Eurocentric view of the world used to encourage powerful nations to adopt an imperial role. ...


The word does not require a judgment that the chauvinist is right or wrong in his opinion, only that he is blind and unreasoning in coming to it, ignoring any facts which might temper his fervor. In modern use, however, it is often used pejoratively to imply that the chauvinist is both unreasoning and wrong.


Male chauvinism

Male chauvinism is a term used to describe the belief that males are superior to females. The word "chauvinist" was originally used to describe one who has a fanatical loyalty in one's country. The word was later applied by the "women's liberation movement" in the 1960s and used to describe men who believe women are inferior, speak to them as inferiors, or treat them negatively based solely upon their gender. The slur "chauvinist pig" has been reclaimed by some men as a jocular personal rebuttal or tolerance of such accusations. The shield and spear of the Roman god Mars, which is also the alchemical symbol for iron, represents the male sex. ... Look up Female in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... (UTC):This page is about loyalty as faithfulness to a cause. ... Feminism is a body of social theory and a political movement primarily based on, and motivated by, the experiences of women. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from January 1, 1960 to December 31, 1969, inclusive. ... Slur could mean: A Slur (music) is a symbol in Western musical notation indicating that the notes it embraces are to be played legato (smoothly). ... Jocular means with humour. For example, He was a jocular man, always laughing and joking with everyone! ...


Female chauvinism

Female chauvinism can refer to two things. It can be the belief that females are superior to males. It can also refer to women who replicate male chauvinism and sexist stereotypes. Look up Female in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The shield and spear of the Roman god Mars, which is also the alchemical symbol for iron, represents the male sex. ...


According to misandry researchers Nathanson and Young, what they see as 'ideological' feminism is chauvinistic as well as misandric. They assert that many so-called 'ideological' feminists have claimed that "women are psychologically, morally, spiritually, intellectually, and biologically superior to men"[1] . They also assert that these feminists consider knowledge created by women to be superior to that created by men.[2] Look up Misandry in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Authors Paul Nathanson and Katherine K. Young are collaborators on a series of books on the subject of misandry, which they consider to be a form of prejudice and discrimination that has become institutionalized in North American society. ...


So called "women's ways of knowing" which are said to rely on subjective intuition and emotional connection are considered superior to so-called "men's ways of knowing" which are said to be based upon objective evidence and reasonable contemplation.[3] Nathan and Young say, "in one way or another, feminist epistemologies are radically subjective. They refer to 'women's ways of knowing' as distinct and opposed to those of men."[citation needed]


Wendy McElroy claims that in some "gender feminist" views, all men are considered un-reformable rapists, wife-beating brutes and useless as partners or fathers to women[4]. McElroy and other authors such as Camille Paglia claim that gender feminists view women as innocent victims who never make irresponsible or morally questionable choices[5]. Other feminists such as Kate Fillion have started questioning the idea that women are always innocent victims of relationship problems and men always the guilty victimizers[6]. Wendy McElroy is a Canadian individualist anarchist and individualist feminist. ... Gender feminism is a phrase coined by Christina Hoff Sommers in her book Who Stole Feminism (Simon & Schuster, 1994) to critique the mainstream of the contemporary feminist movement, which she felt was unduly gynocentric. ...


Ariel Levy uses the term in another sense in the title of her book, Female Chauvinist Pigs. She claims that many young women in the United States are replicating male chauvinism and sexist stereotypes about women in their embrace of "raunch culture" and traditionally masculine attributes[7]. Ariel Levy is a contributing editor at New York magazine and author of the book Female Chauvinist Pigs: Women and the Rise of Raunch Culture. ... Female Chauvinist Pigs: Women and the Rise of Raunch Culture is a 2005 book by Ariel Levy which critiques modern feminist culture in America. ...


See also

Look up Chauvinism in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.

Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wiktionary (a portmanteau of wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 150 languages. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Internationalism is a political movement which advocates a greater economic and political cooperation between nations for the benefit of all. ... Ten Thousand Miles From Tip to Tip, an 1898 political cartoon depicting the extension of the United States dominion Jingoism is chauvinistic patriotism, usually associated with a War Hawk political stance. ... Misogyny (IPA: ) is hatred or strong prejudice against women; an antonym of philogyny. ... Look up Misandry in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Mosley is a family name. ... Alles went behalve een vent (One gets used to anything, except a guy) is a 1990 book by Yvonne Kroonenberg (ISBN 9025467806). ... Racism is a belief or concept that inherent differences between people, in particular those upon which the concept of race is based, significantly influence cultural or individual achievement, and may involve the idea that ones self-identified race or ethnic group or others race or ethnic group is superior. ... The sign of the headquarters of the National Association Opposed To Woman Suffrage Sexism is commonly considered to be discrimination and/or hatred against people based on their sex rather than their individual merits, but can also refer to any and all systemic differentiations based on the sex of the... Testosterone poisoning as a neologism refers not to actual poisoning, but refers to stereotypical aspects of male behavior. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ...

References

  1. ^ Paul Nathanson and Katherine K. Young, Spreading Misandry: The Teaching of Contempt for Men in Popular Culture p.[citation needed]
  2. ^ Paul Nathanson and Katherine K. Young, Legalizing Misandry: From Public Shame to Systemic Discrimination against Men p.[citation needed]
  3. ^ Daphne Patia and Noretta Koerge, Professing Feminism: Scholarship and Indoctrination in Women's Studies p. [citation needed]
  4. ^ Wendy McElroy, Sexual Correctness: The Gender-Feminist Attack on Women p.[citation needed]
  5. ^ Guests: Camille Paglia & Christina Hoff Sommers Has Feminism Gone Too Far? Think Tank™ With Ben Wattenberg - aired: 4 Nov 1994 accessed 6 Jan 2006
  6. ^ Kate Fillion, Lip Service: The Truth About Women's Darker Side in Love, Sex and Friendship
  7. ^ Female Chauvinist Pigs: Women and the Rise of Raunch Culture, Ariel Levy, 2006, ISBN 0743284283

Ariel Levy is a contributing editor at New York magazine and author of the book Female Chauvinist Pigs: Women and the Rise of Raunch Culture. ...

External links

Female Chauvinism

  Results from FactBites:
 
Chauvinism - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (314 words)
Chauvinism is extreme and unreasoning partisanship on behalf of a group to which one belongs, especially when the partisanship includes malice and hatred towards a rival group.
Chauvinism is an almost natural product of the national concept insofar as it springs directly from the old idea of the "national mission."...
As long as this concept did not develop into the ideology of chauvinism and remained in the rather vague realm of national or even nationalistic pride, it frequently resulted in a high sense of responsibility for the welfare of backward peoples.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m