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Encyclopedia > Charlottesville, Virginia
Charlottesville, Virginia
Nickname: C-Ville, Hoo-Ville
Motto: A great place to live for all of our citizens
Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia
Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia
Coordinates: 38°8′0″N 78°27′0″W / 38.13333, -78.45
Country United States
State Virginia
Founded 1762
Government
 - Mayor David E. Brown
Area
 - City 10.3 sq mi (26.6 km²)
 - Land 10.3 sq mi (26.6 km²)
 - Water 0 sq mi (0 km²)
Elevation 594 ft (181 m)
Population (2005)
 - City 40,437
 - Density 4,389.7/sq mi (1,695.3/km²)
 - Metro 190,278
Time zone EST (UTC-5)
 - Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP codes 22901-22908
Area code(s) 434
FIPS code 51-14968GR2
GNIS feature ID 1498463GR3
Website: http://www.charlottesville.org/

Charlottesville is an independent city located within the confines of Albemarle County in the Commonwealth of Virginia, United States, and named after Sophia Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, the queen consort of King George III of the United Kingdom. EXAMPLE:Laughbox,Blondie,BamBam,Pinkie,etc. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... Adapted from Wikipedias VA county maps by Seth Ilys. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This list of countries, arranged alphabetically, gives an overview of countries of the world. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The political units and divisions of the United States include: The 50 states... This article is about the U.S. state. ... 1762 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... David E. Brown is the mayor of Charlottesville, Virginia. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... For other uses, see City (disambiguation). ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... To help compare different orders of magnitude and geographical regions, we list here areas between 100 km² and 1000 km². See also areas of other orders of magnitude. ... Elevation histogram of the surface of the Earth – approximately 71% of the Earths surface is covered with water. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... For other uses, see City (disambiguation). ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... The Eastern Standard Time Zone is a geographic region that keeps time by subtracting five hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). ... -12 | -11 | -10 | -9:30 | -9 | -8 | -7 | -6 | -5 | -4 | -3:30 | -3 | -2:30 | -2 | -1 | -0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... Eastern Daylight Time or EDT is equal to: In North America, Eastern Standard Time + 1, or UTC − 4 hours. ... −12 | −11 | −10 | −9:30 | −9 | −8 | −7 | −6 | −5 | −4 | −3:30 | −3 | −2:30 | −2 | −1 | −0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Mr. ... The area colored red indicates the geographical region of Virginia served by area code 434 The 434 area code was created on June 1, 2001 as a split from the 804 area code. ... Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) are publicly announced standards developed by the U.S. Federal government for use by all (non-military) government agencies and by government contractors. ... GNIS (The Geographic Names Information System) contains name and locative information about almost two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its Territories. ... An independent city is a city that does not form part of another general-purpose local government entity. ... Albemarle County is a county located in the the Commonwealth of Virginia. ... This article or section may be confusing or unclear for some readers, and should be edited to rectify this. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Queen Charlotte, (née Duchess Sophia Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz; 19 May 1744 – 17 November 1818) was the queen consort of George III of the United Kingdom (1738–1820). ... Mecklenburg-Strelitz was a duchy in northern Germany, roughly consisting of the present day district of Mecklenburg-Strelitz (the historical Stargarder Land), bordering areas of modern-day Brandenburg with the town of Fürstenberg and the area around Ratzeburg in modern Schleswig-Holstein. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... George III redirects here. ...


As of the 2005 census update, the city proper had a population of 40,437. It is the county seat of Albemarle CountyGR6 though the two are separate legal entities. The Bureau of Economic Analysis combines the city of Charlottesville with Albemarle County for statistical purposes, bringing the total population to 118,398. The city is part of the Charlottesville, VA Metropolitan Statistical Area which includes Albemarle, Fluvanna, Greene and Nelson Counties. In 2004, Charlottesville was ranked the best place to live in the United States in the book Cities Ranked and Rated by Bert Sperling and Peter Sander. Sperling and Sander ranked the cities based on cost of living, climate, and quality of life. Charlottesville is best known as the home to three US Presidents, Jefferson, Madison and Monroe, as well as the home of the University of Virginia, founded by Thomas Jefferson. The city is also known for Jefferson's Monticello, his renowned mountain-top home which attracts tens of thousands of tourists every year. A county seat is a term for an administrative center for a county, primarily used in the United States. ... Albemarle County is a county located in the the Commonwealth of Virginia. ... The Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) is an agency in the United States Department of Commerce that provides a comprehensive statistical picture of the economy of the United States. ... Charlottesville, VA MSA is a U.S. Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) in Virginia as defined by the United States Office of Management and Budget (OMB) as of June, 2003. ... The University of Virginia (also called U.Va. ... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... This is about the Jefferson residence. ...

Contents

Geography and history

Charlottesville is located in the center of the Commonwealth of Virginia along the Rivanna River, a tributary of the James, just west of the Southwest Mountains which parallel the Blue Ridge about 20 miles to the West. It was formed by charter in 1762 along a trade route called Three Notched Road (present day US 250) which led from Richmond to the Great Valley. It was named for Queen Charlotte the queen consort of King George III of the United Kingdom. The Rivanna River is a tributary of the James River, about 50 mi (80 km) long, in central Virginia in the United States. ... The James River at Cartersville The James River in the U.S. state of Virginia is 660 km (410 miles) long including its Jackson River source and drains a watershed comprising 27,019 km² (10,432 square miles). ... Blue Ridge Mountains, Shining Rock Wilderness Area Appalachian Mountain system The Blue Ridge is a mountain chain in the eastern United States, part of the Appalachian Mountains, forming their eastern front from Georgia to Pennsylvania. ... U.S. Highway 250 is a spur of U.S. Highway 50. ... Nickname: Motto: Sic dic Itur Ad Astra (Thus do we reach the stars) Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia Coordinates: , Country State County Independent City Government  - Mayor L. Douglas Wilder (I) Area  - City 62. ... The Great Valley, also called the Great Appalachian Valley or Great Valley Region, is one of the major landform features of eastern North America. ... Queen Charlotte was the name of at least three women: Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, wife of King George III of the United Kingdom. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... George III redirects here. ...


During the American Revolutionary War the Convention Army was imprisoned in Charlottesville between 1779 and 1781 [1] at the Albemarle Barracks. On June 4, 1781, Jack Jouett warned the Virginia Legislature meeting at Monticello of an intended raid by Banastre Tarleton, allowing a narrow escape. This article is about military actions only. ... The Convention Army (1777-1783) were the British and allied troops captured after the Battle of Saratoga in the American Revolutionary War. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... is the 155th day of the year (156th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... John Jack Jouett, Jr. ... This is about the Jefferson residence. ... Lieutenant-Colonel Banastre Tarleton by Sir Joshua Reynolds General Sir Banastre Tarleton, 1st Baronet, GCB (21 August 1754 – 25 January 1833) was a British soldier and politician. ...


Unlike much of Virginia, Charlottesville was spared the brunt of the American Civil War. The only battle to take place in Charlottesville was the Skirmish at Rio Hill, in which George Armstrong Custer was repulsed by local Confederate militia. The city was later surrendered by the Mayor and others to spare the town from being burnt. The Charlottesville Factory, circa 1820/30, was accidentally burnt during General Sheridan's raid through the Shenandoah valley in 1865. This factory was sized by the confederacy and used to manufacture woolen soldiers wear. The mill ignited when coals were taken by union troops to burn a near-by railroad bridge. The factory was rebuilt immediately after and known then on as the Woolen Mills until its liquidation in 1962.[citation needed] Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... The Battle of Rio Hill was a battle in the American Civil War in which the Union raided a Confederate camp in Albemarle County, Virginia. ... Custer redirects here. ...


The first Black church in Charlottesville was established in 1864. Previously, it was illegal for African-Americans to have their own churches, though they could worship in white churches. A current predominately African-American church can trace its lineage to that first church. [2]


Charlottesville is the home of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory headquarters, the Leander McCormick Observatory and the CFA Institute. It is served by two area hospitals, the Martha Jefferson Hospital founded in 1903, and the UVA Hospital. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) is an institution set up by the United States government for the purpose of radio astronomy. ... Leander McCormick Observatory in 1890 The McCormick Observatory is one of the astronomical observatories operated by the Astronomy Department of the University of Virginia and is situated in Charlottesville, Virginia (USA). ... The CFA Institute, headquartered in the USA at Charlottesville, Virginia and formerly known as the Association for Investment Management and Research (AIMR), awards the prestigious Chartered Financial Analyst(CFA) designation. ...


According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 26.6 km² (10.3 mi²), all land.[3] The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... A square metre (US spelling: square meter) is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 metre long. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ...

The Rotunda at the University of Virginia. ... The Rotunda at the University of Virginia. ... Jeffersons Rotunda, University of Virginia. ... The University of Virginia (also called U.Va. ... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ...

Attractions & culture

Charlottesville has a large series of attractions and venues for its relatively small size. Visitors come to the area for wine tours, ballooning, hiking, and world-class entertainment. The area has played host to The Rolling Stones, Sting, Billy Joel, Bruce Springsteen, and Van Halen along with numerous smaller national acts that perform at one of the area's four larger venues. Sometimes referred to as the "city of the three presidents," the Charlottesville area was the home of Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, and James Monroe. Monticello, Jefferson's plantation manor, is located just a few miles from downtown. The home of James Monroe, Ash Lawn-Highland, is down the road from Monticello. About 25 miles northeast of Charlottesville lies the home of James and Dolley Madison, Montpelier. During the summer, Ash-Lawn Highland also serves as the home of the renowned Ash-Lawn Opera Festival. Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... James Madison (March 16, 1751 – June 28, 1836), was an American politician and the fourth President of the United States (1809–1817), and one of the Founding Fathers of the United States. ... For other persons named James Monroe, see James Monroe (disambiguation). ... This is about the Jefferson residence. ... For other persons named James Monroe, see James Monroe (disambiguation). ... Ash Lawn-Highland, located near Charlottesville, Virginia, and adjacent to Thomas Jeffersons Monticello, was the estate of James Monroe, fifth President of the United States. ... This is about the Jefferson residence. ... This article is about a U.S. First Lady (the wife of James Madison). ... Montpelier was the estate of James Madison, fourth President of the United States. ...


The nearby Shenandoah National Park offers great recreational activities and beautiful scenery. It is famous for its rolling mountains and many hiking trails. Skyline Drive is a well-known scenic drive that runs the length of the park, alternately winding through thick forest and emerging upon sweeping scenic overlooks. Shenandoah National Park encompasses part of the Blue Ridge Mountains in the Blue Ridge region of Virginia. ... Shenandoah National Park encompasses part of the Blue Ridge Mountains in the Piedmont region of Virginia. ...


Charlottesville's bustling downtown is the center of business for Albemarle County. It is home to the Downtown Mall, one of the longest outdoor pedestrian malls in the nation, with many stores, restaurants, and civic attractions. The newly renovated Paramount Theater hosts various events, including Broadway shows and concerts. Local theatrics are highlighted by Charlottesville's professional level community theater Live Arts. Also on the mall is the Virginia Discovery Museum, and a newly built 3500 seat outdoor amphitheater known as the Charlottesville Pavilion. Court Square, just a few blocks from the Downtown Mall, is the original center of Charlottesville and several of the historic buildings there date back to the city's founding in 1762. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Central business district. ... Albemarle County is a county located in the the Commonwealth of Virginia. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Live Arts is a professional level community theatre in Charlottesville, Virginia. ...


Charlottesville is also home to the University of Virginia. During the academic year, more than 20,000 students pour into Charlottesville to attend the university. UVA's main grounds are located west of the downtown area along University Avenue, an extension of West Main Street, forming a district known as The Corner. This area is full of college bars, eateries, and UVA merchandise stores, and is busy with student activity during the school year. Much of the University's Greek Life is located on Rugby Road. Thomas Jefferson's academical village, known as The Lawn, is the center of the grounds. The Academical Village is composed of a long esplanade crowned by two prominent structures, The Rotunda (designed by Thomas Jefferson) and Old Cabell Hall (designed by Stanford White). Along the long sides of The Lawn are dorms reserved for distinguished students. The University Programs Council is the university's student-run programming body that often provides concerts, comedy shows, speakers and other events open to the students of UVa and the community. The University of Virginia (also called U.Va. ... Rugby Road Rugby Road has historically been a staple of the University of Virginia landscape. ... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... Jeffersons Rotunda, University of Virginia. ... Stanford White (1853-1906) Washington Square Arch New York American on June 25, 1906 Stanford White (November 9, 1853 – June 25, 1906) was an American architect and partner in the architectural firm of McKim, Mead, and White, the frontrunner among Beaux-Arts firms. ...


Charlottesville is host to the annual Virginia Film Festival, in October, the Festival of the Photograph in July, and the Virginia Festival of the Book, in March. In addition, the Foxfield Races are a steeplechase race held in April and October of each year. A Fourth of July celebration, including a Naturalization Ceremony, is held annually at Monticello, and a First Night celebration has been held on the Downtown Mall since 1982. The Virginia Film Festival is a program of the College of Arts and Sciences at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, held usually in late October/ early November. ... A steeplechase race The steeplechase is a form of horse racing (primarily conducted in the United Kingdom, United States, and Ireland) and derives its name from early races in which orientation of the course was by reference to a church steeple, jumping fences and ditches and generally traversing the many... Fourth of July redirects here. ... A judge swears in a new citizen. ... An ice sculpture at First Night Boston First Night is an outdoor artistic and cultural celebration on New Years Eve, taking place from afternoon until midnight. ...


Common to many college towns, Charlottesville has a significant liberal community that coexists with the university students in creating art and music scene and an intellectual environment. The city is home to numerous music venues, bars, and coffee shops that cater to the various populations. Modern American liberalism is a form of liberalism that began in America in the last years of the 19th century and the early years of the 20th century. ...


The National Ground Intelligence Center (NGIC) is also located in the Charlottesville area. The National Ground Intelligence Center is part of the U.S. Army Intelligence and Security Command. ...


Sports

John Paul Jones Arena opened in Fall 2006

Charlottesville has no professional sports teams, but is home to the Virginia Cavaliers, who have a wide fan base throughout the region. The Cavaliers field teams in sports from soccer to basketball, and have modern facilities that draw spectators throughout the year. Cavalier football season draws the largest crowds during the academic year, with football games played in Scott Stadium, which has only hosted large concerts by the Dave Matthews Band and The Rolling Stones. Download high resolution version (610x846, 492 KB) This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Download high resolution version (610x846, 492 KB) This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ...   The John Paul Jones Arena, to be opened for the 2006-2007 basketball season, is located at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, Virginia. ... The Virginia Cavaliers are the athletics teams of the University of Virginia. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... The Carl Smith Center, Home of David A. Harrison III Field at Scott Stadium, located in Charlottesville, Virginia, is the home of the Virginia Cavaliers football team. ... Dave Matthews Band (also known by the acronym DMB) is a United States-based alternative rock band, originally formed in Charlottesville, Virginia, in 1991 by singer, songwriter, and guitarist Dave Matthews. ... Rolling Stones redirects here. ...


John Paul Jones Arena, which opened in 2006, is the home arena of the Virginia Cavaliers basketball teams, in addition to serving as a site for concerts and other events. The arena is one of the largest basketball venues in the Atlantic Coast Conference, being the biggest not located in a major metropolitan area. In its first season in the new arena concluded in March 2007, the Virginia men's basketball team tied with UNC for 1st in the ACC.   The John Paul Jones Arena, to be opened for the 2006-2007 basketball season, is located at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, Virginia. ... The Virginia Cavaliers are the athletics teams of the University of Virginia. ... Main article: Virginia Cavaliers John Paul Jones Arena University Hall The Virginia Cavaliers are NCAA Division I mens and womens college basketball programs and members of the Atlantic Coast Conference. ... The Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) is one of the oldest collegiate athletic leagues in the United States. ... March 2007 is the third month of the year. ... The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is a public, coeducational, research university located in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. ...


Both men's and women's lacrosse have become a significant part of the Charlottesville sports scene. The Virginia Men's team won their first NCAA Championship in 1972; in 2006, they won their fourth National Championship and became the first NCAA Men's lacrosse team to become undefeated Champions. Virginia's Women's team has three NCAA Championships to its credit, with wins in 1991, 1993, and 2004. The soccer program is also strong; the Men's team shared a national title with Santa Clara in 1989 and won an unprecedented four consecutive NCAA Division I Championships (1991-1994). Their coach during that period was Bruce Arena, who later won two MLS titles at D.C. United and coached the U.S. National Team during the 2002 and 2006 World Cups. For other uses, see Lacrosse (disambiguation). ... Each year, the NCAA Championship determines the top lacrosse team in the NCAA Division I, Division II, and Division III. Past Winners // Division I 1971 -- Cornell 12-6 Maryland 1972 -- Virginia 13-12 Johns Hopkins 1973 -- Maryland 10-9 (2 OT) Johns Hopkins 1974 -- Johns Hopkins 17-12 Maryland 1975... NCAA women Lacrosse champions. ... Bruce Arena (born September 21, 1951 in Brooklyn, New York) is an American soccer coach, former Head Coach and Sporting Director for Red Bull New York of Major League Soccer and the former coach of the United States mens national soccer team. ...


Charlottesville area high school sports have been prominent throughout the state. Charlottesville is a hotbed for lacrosse in the country, with teams such as St. Anne's-Belfield School and The Covenant School. St. Anne's-Belfield School won their fourth state championship in ten years in football in 2006. St. ... The Covenant School (TCS) is a private non-denominational Christian school. ...


Transportation

Charlottesville is served by Charlottesville-Albemarle Airport, the Charlottesville Amtrak Station, and a Greyhound Lines intercity bus terminal. Limited intercity bus service is also provide by the Starlight Express. The Charlottesville Transit Service provides area bus service, augmented by JAUNT, a regional paratransit van service. The highways passing through Charlottesville are I-64, its older parallel east-west route US 250, and the north-south US 29. Charlottesville-Albemarle Airport (IATA: CHO, ICAO: KCHO) is an airport located eight miles north of Charlottesville, Virginia. ... The Charlotesville Amtrak Station, located in Charlottesville, VA, is served by the Cardinal and Crescent passenger trains. ... Greyhound Lines is the largest inter-city common carrier of passengers by bus in North America , serving 2,200 destinations in the United States. ... Paratransit is an alternative mode of flexible passenger transportation that does not follow fixed routes or schedules. ... Interstate 64 is an interstate highway in the eastern United States. ... U.S. Highway 250 is a spur of U.S. Highway 50. ... United States Highway 29 is a north-south United States highway that runs for 1,036 miles (1,667 km) from the western suburbs of Baltimore to Pensacola, Florida. ...


Rail transportation

Amtrak, the national passenger rail service, provides service to Charlottesville with two routes: The Cardinal (operating NYC to Chicago via Washington DC through Virginia and West Virginia) and the Crescent (operating NYC to New Orleans via Washington DC and Atlanta). The Cardinal operates three times a week and the Crescent daily in both directions. The high-speed Acela Express in West Windsor, New Jersey. ... The Cardinal is a passenger train route operated by Amtrak in the Midwestern and Northeastern United States. ... The Crescent is a passenger train operated by Amtrak in the eastern part of the United States. ...


Charlottesville was once a major rail hub, at one time being served by multiple trains daily by both the C&O and Southern Railway Lines. The first train service to Charlottesville was by the Louisa Railroad Company, which later became the Central Virginia Railroad before becoming the Chesapeake and Ohio, and now referred to as the C&O. The Southern Railway started service to Charlottesville around the mid 1860s with a north-south route crossing the C&O east-west tracks. The new depot which sprang up at the crossing of the two tracks was called Union Station. In addition to this new rail line by Southern, they also located a major repair shop which produced competition between the two rail companies and bolstered the local economy. The Queen Charlotte hotel went up on West Main street along with multiple restaurants for the many new railroad workers. The Chesapeake and Ohio Railway (C&O) was a Class I railroad formed in 1869 in Virginia from many smaller railroads begun in the 19th century. ... The Southern Railway (AAR reporting mark SOU) was the product of nearly 150 predecessor lines that were combined, reorganized and recombined beginning in the 1830s, formally becoming the Southern Railway in 1894. ...


The former C&O station on East Water Street was turned into offices in the mid 1990s. Union Station, still a functional depot for Amtrak, is located on West Main street between 7th & 9th streets where the tracks of the former C&O Railway (now CSX) and Southern (now Norfolk Southern Railway) lines cross. Amtrak and the city of Charlottesville finished refurbishing the station just after the year 2000, upgrading the depot and adding a full service restaurant. Norfolk Southern has two north/south tracks crossing one CSX east/west track which follows U.S. Route 250 West. The CSX line rejoins the Norfolk Southern line near Orange, Virginia. Categories: Companies traded on NYSE | Railway companies of the United States | Alabama railroads | Connecticut railroads | Delaware railroads | Florida current railroads | Georgia railroads | Illinois railroads | Indiana railroads | Kentucky railroads | Louisiana railroads | Maryland railroads | Massachusetts railroads | Michigan railroads | Mississippi railroads | New Jersey railroads | New York railroads | North Carolina railroads | Ohio railroads | Pennsylvania... Norfolk Southern Headquarters Norfolk, Virginia. ... U.S. Highway 250 is a spur of U.S. Highway 50. ... Orange is a town located in Orange County, Virginia. ...


Amtrak Train 51, the westbound Cardinal, is scheduled to depart Charlottesville at 1:55pm on Sunday, Wednesday, and Friday with service to Staunton, Clifton Forge, White Sulphur Springs, Alderson, Hinton, Prince, Thurmond, Montgomery, Charleston, Huntington, Ashland, South Portsmouth, Maysville, Cincinnati, Connersville, Indianapolis, Crawfordsville, Lafayette, Rensselaer, Dyer, and Chicago. Amtrak Train 50, the eastbound Cardinal, is scheduled to depart Charlottesville at 2:47pm on Wednesday, Friday, and Sunday with service to Culpeper, Manassas, Alexandria, and Washington, DC, before continuing on to New York City. The Cardinal is a passenger train route operated by Amtrak in the Midwestern and Northeastern United States. ... Nickname: Home of Hospitality, The most northern city of the South and the most southern city of the North, Chemicalville, The Capitol City C-Town Location of Charleston in West Virginia. ... Cincinnati redirects here. ... Indianapolis redirects here. ... Union Station is a Chicago train station that opened in 1925, replacing an earlier 1881 station, and is now the only intercity rail terminal in Chicago. ... Burnhams Union Station: the central block of the immense front façade of Union Station Union Station is the grand ceremonial train station designed to be the entrance to Washington, DC when it opened in 1907. ... Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the most populous city in the state of New York and the entire United States. ...


The Crescent (Trains 19/20), formerly the Southern Crescent, runs from New Orleans, LA to New York Penn Station through Charlottesville. The train at one time was a dual route splitting at Charlottesville with the Cardinal going west while the Crescent headed south. The two trains now operate at different times. The Southern Crescent started in 1891 under the Richmond and Danville Railroad, and then by Southern Railway, and finally was joined with Amtrak in 1979. The Southern Crescent had a wonderful dining car with linen tablecloths, a real kitchen and excellent fried chicken. When the Crescent was converted to Amtrak, the chef of the dining car observed that they would have to "learn to talk like a Yankee and run a microwave oven."[cite this quote] The Crescent is a passenger train operated by Amtrak in the eastern part of the United States. ... New Orleans (French: Nouvelle-Orléans) is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ... Pennsylvania Station (commonly known as Penn Station) is the major intercity rail station and a major commuter rail hub in New York City. ...


Amtrak Train 19, the southbound Crescent, is scheduled to depart Charlottesville at 8:52pm daily with service to Lynchburg, Danville, Greensboro, High Point, Salisbury, Charlotte, Gastonia, Spartanburg, Greenville, Clemson, Toccoa, Gainesville, Atlanta, Anniston, Birmingham, Tuscaloosa, Meridian, Laurel, Hattiesburg, Picayune, Slidell, and New Orleans. Amtrak Train 20, the northbound Crescent, is scheduled to depart Charlottesville at 7:20am daily with service to Culpeper, Manassas, Alexandria, and Washington, DC, before continuing on to New York City. Greensboro redirects here. ... Charlotte (also known as candle stick) is a figure skating grace move - one of the spirals, where the skater is bended and glides on its one leg with the other one lifted to the air. ... This article is about the state capital of Georgia. ... Nickname: Location in Jefferson County in the state of Alabama Coordinates: , Country State Counties Jefferson, Shelby Incorporated December 19, 1871 Government  - Type Mayor - Council  - Mayor Bernard Kincaid (Current) Larry Langford (Mayor-Elect) Area  - City 151. ... New Orleans is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ... Burnhams Union Station: the central block of the immense front façade of Union Station Union Station is the grand ceremonial train station designed to be the entrance to Washington, DC when it opened in 1907. ... Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the most populous city in the state of New York and the entire United States. ...


Currently, there is talk of extending Virginia Railway Express, the commuter rail line connecting Northern Virginia to Washington, DC, to Charlottesville at least twice a day. [1] The Virginia Railway Express (VRE) is a commuter railroad service that connects the Northern Virginia area with Washington, DC. The VRE operates on two lines, the Fredericksburg line, which starts from Fredericksburg, Virginia and the Manassas line, which starts from Broad Run Airport in Bristow, Virginia. ... A Virginia Railway Express locomotive in push-pull commuter service (www. ... Map of Northern Virginia Northern Virginia (NoVA) consists of Arlington, Fairfax, Loudoun, and Prince William counties and the independent cities of Alexandria, Falls Church, Fairfax, Manassas, and Manassas Park. ... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United...


Media

Charlottesville has a main daily newspaper: The Daily Progress. Weekly publications include C-Ville Weekly and The Hook, along with the monthly magazines Blue Ridge Outdoors and Albemarle Magazine. A daily newspaper, The Cavalier Daily, is also published by an independent student group at UVa, as well as a monthly aromatheraphy/holistic paper called Echo. Charlottesville is served by most of the major national networks: WVIR 29 (NBC), WHTJ 41 (PBS), WCAV 19 (CBS), WAHU 27 (FOX), and WVAW 16 (ABC). News radio in Charlottesville can be heard on RadioIQ 89.7, WINA 1070, WCHV 1260, and WVAX 1450. There are also several community radio stations operated out of Charlottesville, including WNRN and WTJU. Notable among local blogs are cvillenews.com by Waldo Jaquith, theHook.net by the Hook weekly and cVillain.com by the community members. Charlottesville Blogs aggregates many area blogs. Charlottesville Tomorrow provides coverage of growth and development issues. The Cavalier Daily is the fully independent student-run newspaper at the University of Virginia, founded in 1890. ... WVIR-TV NBC 29 is a television station in Charlottesville, Virginia, broadcasting locally on channel 29 as an NBC affiliate. ... WCVE (WCVE-TV since WCVE-FM was added in 1988) is a public television station licensed to Richmond, Virginia. ... WCAV is the CBS-affiliated television station for Charlottesville, Virginia. ... WAHU-CA is the Class A, FOX-affiliated television station for Charlottesville, Virginia. ... WVAW-LP is the low-powered, ABC-affiliated television station for Charlottesville, Virginia. ... WNRN is a multi-format, non-commercial, public radio station in Charlottesville, Virginia, broadcasting on 91. ... This article belongs in one or more categories. ...


Education

Charlottesville is served by the Charlottesville City Public Schools. The school system operates six elementary schools, Buford Middle School, and Charlottesville High School. The area is also home to several private schools, including Charlottesville Catholic School, The Charlottesville Waldorf School, The Covenant School, The Miller School of Albemarle, The Montessori Community School The Peabody School, The Renaissance School, St. Anne's-Belfield School, The Tandem Friends School, and The Village School. The Albemarle County Public School System operates public education outside of the Charlottesville city limits. Buford Middle School is a school in Charlottesville, Virginia. ... Charlottesville High School, seen from its baseball field. ... Charlottesville Catholic School is a private school under the diocese of Richmond, Virginia. ... The Covenant School (TCS) is a private non-denominational Christian school. ... The Miller School of Albemarle is a coeducational day and boarding college preparatory school outside Charlottesville, Virginia for students in grades 8 - PG. It first opened its doors in 1878 with 33 students. ... St. ... The Tandem Friends School is a secondary school founded in 1970 in Charlottesville, Virginia by John Howard and Duncan Alling. ...


Demographics

As of the censusGR2 of 2000, there were 40,099 people, 16,851 households, and 7,633 families residing in the city. The metropolitan area population is 185,000. The population density was 1,695.3/km² (4,389.7/mi²). There were 17,591 housing units at an average density of 662.0/km² (1,714.1/mi²). The racial makeup of the city was 69.56% White, 22.22% Black or African American, 0.11% Native American, 4.93% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 1.02% from other races, and 2.13% from two or more races. 2.45% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.[4] Image:1870 census Lindauer Weber 01. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... Hispanic Americans (Spanish: Hispano Americano) are Americans of Hispanic ethnicity who largely identify with the Hispanic cultural heritage. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ...


There were 16,851 households out of which 20.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 29.2% were married couples living together, 13.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 54.7% were non-families. 34.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.27 and the average family size was 2.85.[4] Matrimony redirects here. ...


The age distribution, strongly influenced by the University of Virginia, is: 15.2% under the age of 18, 33.8% from 18 to 24, 25.8% from 25 to 44, 15.2% from 45 to 64, and 10.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 26 years. For every 100 females there were 87.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 84.6 males.[4] The University of Virginia (also called U.Va. ...


The median income for a household in the city was $31,007, and the median income for a family was $45,110. Males had a median income of $31,197 versus $26,458 for females. The per capita income for the city was $16,973. About 12.0% of families and 25.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 20.8% of those under age 18 and 7.2% of those age 65 or over.[4] The per capita income for a group of people may be defined as their total personal income, divided by the total population. ... Map of countries showing percentage of population who have an income below the national poverty line The poverty line is the level of income below which one cannot afford to purchase all the resources one requires to live. ...


Notable people of Charlottesville

  • Thomas Jefferson - The third President of the United States (1801–1809), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers.
  • Steven M. Greer - An ex-physician best known for founding the Disclosure Project.
  • Meriwether Lewis - American explorer, soldier, and public administrator, best known for his role as the leader of the Corps of Discovery, whose mission was to explore the territory of the Louisiana Purchase.
  • Alexander Vandergrift - the victor of Guadalcanal & Commandant of the USMC, was born in Charlottesville & attended the University of Virginia.
  • S. S. Van Dine - A U.S. art critic and author.
  • Edgar Allan Poe - Lived in the city while attending the University of Virginia.
  • Nicholas Philip Trist - Author of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, which ended the Mexican War
  • John Mosby - Also known as the "Gray Ghost," was a Confederate partisan Ranger (a partisan is similar to a guerrilla fighter) in the American Civil War.
  • William Faulkner - Writer in residence at the University of Virginia, to which he bequeathed all of his original manuscripts.
  • William McGuffey - Lived in Charlottesville while serving as a professor at the University and was buried nearby upon death.
  • Anna Anderson - A woman claiming to be the Grand Duchess Anastasia of Russia, lived out her final years in Charlottesville.
  • John Grisham - Novelist lives just outside of Charlottesville.
  • Dave Matthews - Bartender in a Charlottesville bar called Miller's when he formed the rock band Dave Matthews Band, and now divides his time between homes in Seattle and the Charlottesville area.
  • Boyd Tinsley - Violinist and one of the backup singers for the rock band Dave Matthews Band.
  • Carter Beauford - Percussionist (drummer) and founding member of the rock band Dave Matthews Band.
  • LeRoi Moore - Saxophonist for the rock band Dave Matthews Band.
  • Coran Capshaw - Manager for the rock band Dave Matthews Band (among others) and a real estate mogul responsible for significant development in the city.
  • Kathleen Clifford - Silent film, vaudeville and Broadway stage actress was born in Charlottesville.
  • Sissy Spacek - famous for her portrayal of tormented high schooler Carrie, lives just outside of Charlottesville, in Albemarle County.
  • Howie Long - TV sports personality and former defensive end for the Oakland Raiders, also lives in Charlottesville year-round.
  • John Kluge - Multi-billionaire and philanthropist, lived in Charlottesville for a number of years and built the large Albemarle House. Moved to Palm Beach.
  • Corey Harris - Blues and reggae musician and teacher. Winner of a MacArthur Fellowship in 2007.
  • Duane "The Rock" Johnson - Actor, entertainer, and wrestler owns a farm just outside of the city.
  • Notable homeowners - Actors Jessica Lange and Sam Shepard have maintained homes in the area moved out of the area.
  • Other music notables are - Bella Morte and Stephen Malkmus of rock band Pavement, David Berman of rock band Silver Jews lived for a time in and formed their respective bands while residing in the city. James McNew, currently a member of Yo La Tengo, is from Charlottesville and went to Albemarle High School. Other bands from Charlottesville include Rude Buddha, Insurgency, the Landlords, Happy Flowers, Skip Castro, and the Michael Guthrie Band.

Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... A declaration of independence is an assertion of the independence of an aspiring state or states. ... Scene at the Signing of the Constitution of the United States, by Howard Chandler Christy. ... Steven Macon Greer (June 28, 1955) is an American physician best known as a claimed contactee. ... The Disclosure Project is a not for profit orginization dedicated to disclosing, unclassifying, and conducting hearings related to Shadow Governments, U.F.O.s, extraterrestrial life, advanced technologies. ... Meriwether Lewis (August 18, 1774 – October 11, 1809) was an American explorer, soldier, and public administrator, best known for his role as the leader of the Corps of Discovery, whose mission was to explore the territory of the Louisiana Purchase. ... The Lewis and Clark expedition (1804-1806) was the first American overland expedition to the Pacific coast and back. ... For the musical, see Louisiana Purchase (musical) and Louisiana Purchase (film). ... Alexander Archer Vandegrift (March 13, 1887 – May 8, 1973) was a general in the United States Marine Corps. ... This article is about the island in the Pacific Ocean. ... S. S. Van Dine was the pseudonym of Willard Huntington Wright (October 15, 1888 - April 11, 1939), a U.S. art critic and author. ... Edgar Allan Poe (January 19, 1809 – October 7, 1849) was an American poet, short story writer, playwright, editor, literary critic, essayist and one of the leaders of the American Romantic Movement. ... Nicholas Philip Trist Nicholas Philip Trist (June 2, 1800 - February 11, 1874) was an American diplomat. ... The Mexican Cession (red) and the Gadsden Purchase (orange). ... Colonel John Singleton Mosby (December 6, 1833 - May 30, 1916), also known as the Gray Ghost, was a Confederate guerilla fighter in the American Civil War. ... William Cuthbert Faulkner (September 25, 1897 – July 6, 1962) was an American novelist and poet whose works feature his native state of Mississippi. ... William Holmes McGuffey (September 23, 1800 - May 4, 1873) was an American professor who created the McGuffey Readers, one of Americas first textbook. ... Anastasia Manahan, usually known as Anna Anderson [1] (c. ... Grisham redirects here. ... For other persons named David Matthews, see David Matthews (disambiguation). ... Dave Matthews Band (also known by the acronym DMB) is a United States-based alternative rock band, originally formed in Charlottesville, Virginia, in 1991 by singer, songwriter, and guitarist Dave Matthews. ... Boyd Tinsley (b. ... Dave Matthews Band (also known by the acronym DMB) is a United States-based alternative rock band, originally formed in Charlottesville, Virginia, in 1991 by singer, songwriter, and guitarist Dave Matthews. ... Carter Beauford (born November 2, 1957 in Charlottesville, Virginia) is a drummer and founding member of the Dave Matthews Band (DMB). ... Dave Matthews Band (also known by the acronym DMB) is a United States-based alternative rock band, originally formed in Charlottesville, Virginia, in 1991 by singer, songwriter, and guitarist Dave Matthews. ... LeRoi Moore is the saxophonist for the Dave Matthews Band. ... Dave Matthews Band (also known by the acronym DMB) is a United States-based alternative rock band, originally formed in Charlottesville, Virginia, in 1991 by singer, songwriter, and guitarist Dave Matthews. ... Coran Capshaw is the manager of the Dave Matthews Band, O.A.R., and Trey Anastasio, among others. ... Dave Matthews Band (also known by the acronym DMB) is a United States-based alternative rock band, originally formed in Charlottesville, Virginia, in 1991 by singer, songwriter, and guitarist Dave Matthews. ... Kathleen Clifford (February 16, 1887 - December 28, 1962) was an American vaudeville and Broadway stage and film actress of the early twentieth century. ... Mary Elizabeth Sissy Spacek (born December 25, 1949) is an Academy Award-winning American actress and singer. ... Howard Michael Howie Long (born January 6, 1960 in Somerville, Massachusetts) is a former American football player who played as a defensive end, and was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2000. ... John Werner Kluge (born September 21, 1914) is an entrepreneur who was born in Chemnitz, Germany, best known as a television industry mogul in the United States. ... Corey Harris (Born 1969 in Denver, Colorado) is a Bates College educated anthropologist and blues musician. ... The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation is a private, independent grantmaking institution. ... Jessica Phyllis Lange (born April 20, 1949) is a two-time Academy Award-winning American actress. ... Sam Shepard (born November 5, 1943) is a unique American artist whose talents have been expressed in many different areas. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Stephen Malkmus (born May 30, 1966 , Santa Monica, California) is an indie rock musician and a former member of the band Pavement. ... Silver Jews are an indie rock group, formed in 1989 by writer David Berman along with Pavements Stephen Malkmus and Bob Nastanovich. ... James McNew is the bass player for the rock band Yo La Tengo, and has been for most of its existence. ... Yo La Tengo is an American indie rock band, based in Hoboken, New Jersey. ... The musical group, Happy Flowers, was formed in Charlottesville, Virginia, United States, in 1983 by two former members of the Landlords, John Beers (Mr. ...

Sister cities

Charlottesville has four sister cities:[5] Sign denoting twin towns of Neckarsulm, Germany Town twinning is a concept whereby towns or cities in geographically and politically distinct areas are paired with the goal of fostering human contact and cultural links. ...

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... City flag City coat of arms Motto: Utinam (Latin: If God wills) Citadel Vauban of Besançon Location Time Zone CET (GMT +1) Coordinates Administration Country Region Franche-Comté Department Doubs (25) Intercommunality Grand Besançon Mayor Jean-Louis Fousseret (PS) (since 2001) City Statistics Land area¹ 65. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Bulgaria. ... Pleven (Bulgarian: Плевен , known as Plevna in English in some historical documents) is the seventh most populated town in Bulgaria. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... Poggio a Caiano is a town and commune in the Tuscan Province of Prato, Italy. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Long Beach is a city located in Pacific County, Washington. ...

References

  1. ^ John Hammond Moore, Albemarle: Jefferson's County, 1727 - 1976, Charlottesville,VA: Albemarle County Historical Society & U Press of Virginia, 1976.
  2. ^ http://www.mtziofabc.com/history.html
  3. ^ Data of the United States Census Bureau
  4. ^ a b c d "DP-1. Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000." U.S. Census Bureau. 2000. Retrieved on June 2, 2006.
  5. ^ Sister Cities designated by Sister Cities International, Inc.. Retrieved on June 2, 2006.

The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 153rd day of the year (154th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 153rd day of the year (154th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

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  • Official City Government website
  • Charlottesville, A Brief Urban History
  • Charlottesville, Virginia is at coordinates 38°02′04″N 78°29′11″W / 38.034506, -78.486474Coordinates: 38°02′04″N 78°29′11″W / 38.034506, -78.486474

 
 

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