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Encyclopedia > Charlie Rich

Charlie Rich (December 14, 1932 - July 25, 1995) was an American musician, songwriter, and pianist. A multi-Grammy Award winner, his eclectic-style of music was often hard to classify in a single genre, playing in the rockabilly, jazz, blues, country, and gospel genres. In the latter part of his life, Rich acquired the nickname The Silver Fox. He is perhaps best remembered for a pair of 1973 hits, "Behind Closed Doors" and "The Most Beautiful Girl in the World," both of which topped the U.S. country singles charts, the latter also topping the pop singles charts. Rich's son, Charlie Rich, Jr., is also a musician. December 14 is the 348th day of the year (349th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Year 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will take you to a full 1932 calendar). ... July 25 is the 206th day (207th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 159 days remaining. ... 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A musician is a person who plays or composes music. ... A songwriter is someone who writes the lyrics to songs, the musical composition or melody to songs, or both. ... Pianist Claudio Arrau, Carnegie Hall, 1954. ... Grammy Award The Grammy Awards (originally called the Gramophone Awards, commonly referred to as the Grammys) are presented annually by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences for outstanding achievements in the record industry. ... Rockabilly is one of the earliest and most important styles of rock n’ roll music to emerge during the 1950s. ... Jazz is a musical art form that originated in New Orleans at around the start of the 20th century. ... The blues is a vocal and instrumental form of music based on the use of the blue notes and a repetitive pattern that typically follows a twelve-bar structure. ... This article includes a list of works cited but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Gospel music may refer to the religious music that first came out of African-American churches in the first quarter of the twentieth century or, more loosely, to both black gospel music and to the religious music composed and sung by predominately white Southern Gospel artists. ... 1973 (MCMLXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday. ... Charlie Rich, Jr. ...

Contents

Early life

Rich was born in Colt, Arkansas to rural cotton farmers, beginning a professional musical career while in the U.S. Air Force in the early 1950s. His first musical group, called the Velvetones, played jazz and blues and featured his fiancée, Margaret Ann, on lead vocals. Rich left the military in 1956 and tried to farm five acres in Tennessee. He began performing clubs around the Memphis area, playing both jazz and R&B. It was during these hard times he began writing his own material. Colt is a city located in St. ... Cotton ready for harvest. ... Seal of the Air Force. ... Official language(s) English Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis Largest metro area Nashville Area  Ranked 36th  - Total 42,169 sq mi (109,247 km²)  - Width 120 miles (195 km)  - Length 440 miles (710 km)  - % water 2. ... City nickname: The River City or The Bluff City Location in the state of Tennessee County Shelby County, Tennessee Area  - Total  - Water 763. ... Rhythm and blues (or R & B) is a musical marketing term introduced in the United States in the late 1940s by Billboard magazine. ...


Early Recording Career

Rich was a session musician for Judd Records, which was owned by Judd Phillips, the brother of Sun Records founder Sam Phillips. After recording some demos for Sam Phillips at Sun Records that were considered too uncommercial and jazzy, legend has it that he was given a stack of Jerry Lee Lewis records and told: "come back when you get that bad." In 1958 Rich became a regular session musician for Sun Records playing on records by Lewis, Johnny Cash, Bill Justis, Warren Smith, Billy Lee Riley, Carl Mann, and Ray Smith. He also penned songs for Lewis, Cash, and others. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Sideman. ... Label of the fourth Sun Records Sun Records has been the name for four 20th century record labels. ... Sam Phillips, born Samuel Cornelius Phillips (January 5, 1923 – June 30, 2003), was a record producer who played an important role in the emergence of rock and roll as the major form of popular music in the 1950s. ... Jerry Lee Lewis (born September 29, 1935), also known by the nickname The Killer, is an American rock and roll and country music singer, songwriter, and pianist. ... Johnny Cash (born J. R. Cash, February 26, 1932 – September 12, 2003) was an influential American country and rock and roll singer and songwriter. ... William E. Bill Justis Jr. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... Dr. Ray F. Smith (1919 - 1999) was an American entomologist and educator. ...


His third single for the Sun subsidiary Phillips International Records was the 1960 Top 30 hit "Lonely Weekends," noted for its Elvis-like vocals. None of his seven follow-up singles were a success, though several of the songs became staples in his live set, including "Who Will the Next Fool Be," "Sittin' and Thinkin'," and "No Headstone on My Grave." These songs were often recorded by others to varying degrees of success, such as the Bobby Bland version of "Who Will the Next Fool Be." Phillips International Records is a sub-label of Sun Records started by Sam Phillips in October 1957. ... Bobby Blue Bland (born Robert Calvin Bland on January 27, 1930 in Rosemark, Tennessee) is an African-American singer, and was an original member of The Beale Streeters. ...


Rich's career stalled, he left the struggling Sun label in 1964, signing with a subsidiary of RCA. His first single for RCA, "Big Boss Man," was a minor hit, but again his Chet Atkins-produced follow-ups all stiffed. Rich moved to Smash Records early in 1965. Rich's new producer, Jerry Kennedy, encouraged the pianist to emphasize his country and rock & roll leanings, although Rich considered himself a jazz pianist and had not paid much attention to country music since his childhood. The first single for Smash was "Mohair Sam," an R&B-inflected novelty-rock number, and it became a Top 30 pop hit. Unfortunately again for Rich, none of his follow-up singles were successful. Rich was forced to change labels, moving over to Hi Records, where he recorded straight country, but none of his singles made a dent on the country charts. RCAs logo as seen today on many products. ... Chet Atkins Chester Burton Chet Atkins (June 20, 1924 – June 30, 2001) was an influential guitarist and record producer. ... 1980s Smash Records logo Smash Records is an American record label. ... Hi Records was a Memphis soul label started by Ray Harris in 1957. ...


Country superstardom

Despite Rich's lack of consistent commercial success, Epic Records signed Rich in 1967, mainly on the recommendation of producer Billy Sherrill. Sherrill helped Rich refashion himself as a Nashville Sound balladeer during an era when old rock n' rollers like Jerry Lee Lewis and Conway Twitty were finding a new musical home in the country and western format. This new "Countrypolitan" Rich sound paid off in the summer of 1972, when "I Take It on Home" went to number six in the country charts. The title track from his 1973 album, Behind Closed Doors, became a number one hit early in 1973, crossing over into the Top 20 on the pop charts. This time his follow-up did not fizzle as "The Most Beautiful Girl" spent three weeks at the top of the country charts and two weeks at the top of the pop charts. Now established as a country music star, Behind Closed Doors won three awards from the Country Music Association that year: Best Male Vocalist, Album of the Year, and Single of the Year. The album was also certified gold, Rich won a Grammy for Best Country Vocal Performance, Male, and he also took home four ACM awards. Epic Records is an American record label, and subsidiary of Sony BMG. // Epic was launched originally as a jazz and classical music label in 1953 by CBS. Its bright-yellow, black and blue logo became a familiar trademark for many jazz and classical releases. ... Billy Sherrill (born Campbell, Alabama, November 5, 1936) was a record producer and arranger who is most famous for his association with a number of country artists, most notably Tammy Wynette. ... The Nashville sound in country music arose during the 1950s in the United States. ... Conway Twitty Conway Twitty (born Harold Lloyd Jenkins on September 1, 1933 in Friars Point, Mississippi, died June 5, 1993, Missouri) was one of the United States most successful country music artists of the 20th century. ... The Nashville sound in country music arose during the 1950s in the United States. ... The Country Music Association (CMA) was founded in 1958 in Nashville, Tennessee. ... The description Gold Album is applied to recorded music albums that have sold a minimum number of copies (in the US, currently 500,000 sales). ... Grammy Award statuette The Grammy Awards, presented by the Recording Academy (an association of Americans professionally involved in the recorded music industry) for outstanding achievements in the recording industry, is one of four major music awards shows held annually in the United States (the Billboard Music Awards, the American Music... The Academy of Country Music (ACM) was founded in 1964 in Los Angeles, California. ...


After "The Most Beautiful Girl," number one hits came quickly as five songs topped the country charts in 1974 and crossed over to the pop charts. The songs were "There Won't Be Anymore," "A Very Special Love Song," "I Don't See Me In Your Eyes Anymore," "I Love My Friend," and "She Called Me Baby." Both RCA and Mercury (Smash was a subsidiary of Mercury which was absorbed into the main company in 1970) re-released his previously recorded material from the mid 1960s as well. All of this success led the CMA to name him Entertainer of the Year in 1974. Rich had three more top five hits in 1975, but even though he was at the peak of his popularity, Rich began to drink heavily, causing considerable problems off-stage. His destructive personal behavior famously culminated at the CMA awards ceremony for 1975, when he presented the award for Entertainer of the Year, while visibly drunk. Instead of reading the name of the winner, who happened to be John Denver, he set fire to the envelope with a cigarette lighter before announcing the award had gone to "My good buddy, John Denver." Some considered it an act of rebellion against the Music Row-controlled Nashville Sound. But many speculated that Rich's behavior was a protest against the award going to Denver, whose music Rich had considered too "pop," and not enough "country." Others, including industry insiders, were outraged and Rich had trouble having hits throughout 1976 and only had one top ten with "Since I Fell For You." Mercury Records was a record label founded in Chicago, Illinois in 1945 by Irving Green, Berle Adams and Arthur Talmadge. ... John Denver (December 31, 1943 – October 12, 1997), born Henry John Deutschendorf, Jr. ... Music Row is an area just to the southwest of Downtown Nashville, Tennessee that is home to hundreds of businesses related to the country music, gospel music, and Christian music industries. ... For popular music (music produced commercially rather than art or folk music), see Popular music. ...


The slump in his career was exacerbated by the fact that his records began to sound increasingly similar: pop-inflected country ballads with overdubbed strings and little of the jazz or blues Rich had performed his entire life. He did not have a top ten hit again until "Rollin' With the Flow" in 1977 went to number one. Early in 1978, he signed with United Artists and throughout that year had hits on both Epic and UA. His hits in 1978 included the top ten hits "Beautiful Woman," "Puttin' In Overtime At Home," and his last number one with "On My Knees," a duet with Janie Fricke. The current United Artists logo (a variant was used during the 1980s). ... Janie Fricke (born December 19, 1947) is an American country music singer-guitarist. ...


Reclusive era and death

Rich struggled throughout 1979 having hits with United Artists and Epic with his singles becoming moderate hits, the biggest of his hits that year on either UA and Epic was a version of "Spanish Eyes" which became a top 20 country hit. Rich appeared as himself in the 1979 Clint Eastwood movie Every Which Way But Loose where he performed the song "I'll Wake You Up When I Get Home." This song hit number three on the charts in 1979 and was his last top ten single. In 1980, he switched labels again to Elektra Records, and released a number twelve single "A Man Just Don't Know What a Woman Goes Through" in the fall of that year. One more Top 40 hit followed — the Gary Stewart penned "Are We Dreamin' the Same Dream" early in 1981 — but Rich decided to remove himself from the spotlight. For over a decade, Rich was silent, living off his investments in semi-retirement and only playing the occasional concert. The current United Artists logo (a variant was used during the 1980s). ... Epic Records is an American record label, and subsidiary of Sony BMG. // Epic was launched originally as a jazz and classical music label in 1953 by CBS. Its bright-yellow, black and blue logo became a familiar trademark for many jazz and classical releases. ... Clint Eastwood (born Clinton Eastwood, Jr. ... Every Which Way But Loose is a 1978 U.S. motion picture, released by Warner Brothers, produced by Robert Daley and directed by James Fargo. ... Elektra Records is an American record label owned by Warner Music Group, and today operates under Atlantic Records Group. ... Gary Stewart (May 28, 1945 - December 16, 2003). ...


In 1992 Rich released Pictures and Paintings, a jazzy record produced by journalist Peter Guralnick and released on Sire Records. Pictures and Paintings received positive critical reviews and restored Rich's reputation as a musician, but it would be his last record. One of his opening acts in these years was Tom Waits, who mentioned him in the song "Putnam County" from his album Nighthawks at the Diner with the lyric: "The radio's spitting out Charlie Rich... He sure can sing, that son of a bitch." Charlie Rich died in Hammond, Louisiana on July 25, 1995 at the age of 62 from a blood clot in his lung. He was interred in the Memorial Park Cemetery in Memphis, Tennessee. Sire Records Company is an American record label, owned by Warner Music Group and distributed through Warner Bros. ... Thomas Alan Waits (born December 7, 1949) is an American singer-songwriter, composer, and actor. ... Hammond is the largest city in Tangipahoa Parish, Louisiana. ... July 25 is the 206th day (207th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 159 days remaining. ... 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Memorial Park Cemetery, located at 5485 Hacks Cross Rd in Memphis, Tennessee, was founded in 1924 by E. Clovis Hinds. ... For other uses, see Memphis (disambiguation). ...


Awards

  • 1973 CMA Male Vocalist of the Year
  • 1973 CMA Album of the Year, Behind Closed Doors
  • 1973 Grammy Award - Best Country Vocal Performance
  • 1974 CMA Entertainer of the Year

Grammy Award The Grammy Awards (originally called the Gramophone Awards, commonly referred to as the Grammys) are presented annually by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences for outstanding achievements in the record industry. ...

External links

  • Charlie Rich's official website
  • All Music Guide
  • Biography on Charlie Rich, Jr.'s website
  • An early discography with sound checks

  Results from FactBites:
 
Charlie Rich - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (209 words)
Charlie Rich (December 14, 1932 - July 25, 1995) was an American country, jazz, and blues musician.
Rich was born in Colt, Arkansas to rural cotton farmers.
Charlie Rich died in Hammond, Louisiana in 1995 at the age of 62.
CMT.com : Charlie Rich : Biography (1316 words)
Charlie Rich was simultaneously one of the most critically acclaimed and most erratic country singers of post-World War II era.
Rich had all the elements of being one of the great country stars of the '60s and '70s, but his popularity never matched his critical notices.
Rich died from a blood clot in his lung in the summer of 1995, when he was travelling to Florida with his wife, Margaret Ann.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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