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Encyclopedia > Charlie Brown
Charlie Brown
Peanuts character
Image:CharlieBrown.jpg
Age 8½, started out as 4 in his debut
Gender Male
Family Sister Sally Brown and unnamed parents
Original voice actor Peter Robbins
Other voice actors Chad Allen, Erin Chase, Todd Barbee, Brad Kesten, Brett Johnson, Duncan Watson, Wesley Singerman, Anthony Rapp
Birthday October 30

Charles "Charlie" Brown is the main character in the comic strip Peanuts by Charles M. Schulz. For other uses, see Peanut (disambiguation). ... Charlie Brown, or Charles Brown is the name of several different people: Charlie Brown is the the lead character in the Peanuts comic strip. ... For other uses, see Peanut (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Charlie Brown File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Sally Brown is the younger sister of Charlie Brown in the comic strip Peanuts by Charles Schulz. ... Peter Robbins is a former child actor best known for his voice-over work as Charlie Brown in the 1960s. ... Chad Allen Chad Allen (born Chad Allen Lazzari on June 5, 1974) is an American actor. ... Wesley Singerman (born August 23, 1990) is an American voice actor. ... Anthony Dean Rapp (b. ... is the 303rd day of the year (304th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the comic strip, the sequential art form as published in newspapers and on the Internet. ... For other uses, see Peanut (disambiguation). ... Charles Monroe Schulz (November 26, 1922[1] – February 12, 2000) was a 20th-century American cartoonist best known worldwide for his Peanuts comic strip. ...

Contents

Character

Charlie Brown is a lovable loser,[1] a child possessed of endless determination and hope, but who is ultimately dominated by a "permanent case of bad luck", and is often dominated and taken advantage of by his peers. These traits are best-shown from his baseball team: Charlie Brown is the manager of the team and its pitcher, but the team consistently loses (their all-time record is said to be 2–930, and the two wins were only by forfeit when the opposing team's players were ill. However, it should be noted that the team is said to have won when Linus was pitching in Charlie Brown's absence.) Charlie Brown is constantly cursed as a pitcher, often giving up tremendous hits which either knock him off the mound or leave him with only his shorts on. The team itself is poor, with only Charlie Brown's dog Snoopy being particularly competent; however, most of the occasions when his team has won games have been when Charlie Brown is not playing, although Charlie Brown did help the team win with a home run on two occasions (the pitcher of the other team later admitted that she let him hit the home runs because she thought he looked cute standing at the plate). On the rare occasion that he does succeed at something, circumstances invariably arise to lessen his victory, such as when he wins a bowling trophy on which his surname is misspelled. Charlie Brown is also an avid kite-flyer, but a running joke is that his kites keep landing in a "Kite-Eating Tree" or suffering even worse fates. Once in 1958, he finally got the kite to fly before it spontaneously combusted in the air. However in the 13 July 1961 strip Charlie Brown not only gets his kite to fly, but to fly so high that he has to ask Lucy to tie on some extra string. The punch line is that Lucy does this in a huge bow. The kite is airborne through the four panels of the strip.[2] A Sunday episode showed that once Charlie Brown tried to fly his kite in winter - and it froze solid in the air. This article is about good and bad fortune. ... This article is about the sport. ... This article is about the player in baseball. ... A baseball pitcher delivers the ball to home plate In baseball, pitching is the act of throwing the baseball from the pitchers mound toward the catcher with the goal of retiring a batter who attempts to make contact with it, or draw a walk. ... Snoopy is a fictional character in the long-running comic strip Peanuts, by Charles M. Schulz. ... For other uses, see Kite (disambiguation). ... The running gag is a popular hallmark of comic and serious forms of entertainment. ... Charles Charlie Brown is the principal character in the comic strip Peanuts by Charles M. Schulz. ... is the 194th day of the year (195th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


He is often called "blockhead" by Lucy van Pelt, despite his rather round head. Every autumn Lucy promises to hold a football for Charlie Brown to kick, and every year she pulls it away as he follows through, causing him to fly in the air and land painfully on his back. He was never shown as succeeding in kicking the football in the comic strip. Book cover Lucy van Pelt is a character in the syndicated comic strip Peanuts, written and drawn by Charles Schulz. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ...


When Charlie Brown was ill in the hospital in A Charlie Brown Celebration, Lucy promised she would never pull the football away again. She did not pull the football away when Charlie Brown tried to kick it after he got well, but he missed the football and kicked her hand. He was depicted as kicking it in a 1981 TV special, It's Magic, Charlie Brown, in which he was invisible, but this is not considered canon. In 1999, Lucy delegated the task of holding the ball to her brother Rerun, but he did not reveal whether he pulled the ball away or not. A Charlie Brown Celebration is one of many prime-time animated TV specials based upon the popular comic strip Peanuts, by Charles M. Schulz. ... A television special is a television program, typically a short film or television movie, which interrupts or temporarily replaces programming normally scheduled for a given time slot. ... Its Magic, Charlie Brown is a 1981 Peanuts special directed by Phil Roman and of course, written by Charles M. Schulz, which earned him a nomination for an Emmy award. ... This article needs cleanup. ... Rerun on the back of his mothers bicycle. ...


Charlie Brown is drawn with only a small curl of hair at the front of his head, and a little in the back. Though this is often interpreted as him being bald, Charles Schulz has explained that he saw Charlie Brown as having hair that was so light, and cut so short, that it was not seen very well.[3] Charlie Brown has often mentioned getting a haircut, or his hair in general, throughout the strip's run. Snoopy thinks of his owner as "that round-headed kid". He almost always wears black shorts and a short-sleeved shirt, usually yellow, with a black zig-zag stripe around the middle. Bald redirects here; for other uses see Bald (disambiguation). ...


Charlie Brown often utters the catch phrase "Good grief!" when astonished or dismayed. In moments of extreme disappointment or despair he sometimes simply cries out, "I can't stand it!" Other times, he will exclaim 'Augh!' when particularly frustrated or surprised. A catch phrase is a phrase or expression that is popularized, usually through repeated use, by a real person or fictional character. ...


Peanuts Sunday strips were often (unofficially) titled Peanuts featuring Good Ol' Charlie Brown. Schulz later stated that he had wanted to name the strip Good Ol' Charlie Brown but that the name Peanuts was chosen by the cartoon syndicate instead; as a result, some people inferred that Charlie Brown's name was "Peanuts". Schulz suggested the Sunday title as a clarification device.


Names and nicknames

Charlie Brown is almost always addressed by his full name by other characters in the comic strip. Two of the exceptions to this are Peppermint Patty, who calls him "Chuck" most of the time, and her friend Marcie, who calls him "Charles" most of the time, and occasionally calls him "Chuck". Some readers interpret this as an indication of the portrayed crushes that both girls have on him, which they both admitted to each other in a comic from 1979 . His sister Sally usually calls him "Big Brother", however, even she calls him "Charlie Brown" from time to time. Snoopy is also known to refer to him as "The round-headed kid," but referred to him as Charlie Brown in both of the musical specials. The only other exceptions are Eudora, who also calls him "Charles", and a minor character named Peggy Jean in the early 1990s who called him "Brownie Charles", because Charlie Brown, in his typical nervous and awkward fashion, messed up his own name when he introduced himself and couldn't bring himself to correct the mistake when it turned out he liked when she called him that. It was eventually revealed that the first person to have called him "Charlie Brown" was Poochie, a blonde little girl who played with Snoopy as a pup, and who first appeared in the strip on January 7, 1973. This article is about the character from Peanuts. ... Marcie Marcie is a bespectacled fictional character featured in Charles M. Schulzs comic strip Peanuts. ... Sally Brown is the younger sister of Charlie Brown in the comic strip Peanuts by Charles Schulz. ... Eudora is a character in the comic strip Peanuts by Charles M. Schulz. ... Peggy Jean shows off her new pair of gloves. ... Poochie is a female character in the comic strip Peanuts who debuted on January 7, 1973. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ...


Umberto Eco has pointed out that the fact that Charlie Brown is invariably referred to by his full name follows a convention found in epic poetry giving Charlie Brown a sense of universal identification.[4] Umberto Eco (born January 5, 1932) is an Italian medievalist, semiotician, philosopher and novelist, best known for his novel The Name of the Rose (Il nome della rosa) and his many essays. ... The epic is a broadly defined genre of narrative poetry, characterized by great length, multiple settings, large numbers of characters, or long span of time involved. ...


History

First Comic and First of Charlie Brown 2 October, 1950
First Comic and First of Charlie Brown 2 October, 1950

Charlie Brown was one of the original cast members of Peanuts when it debuted in 1950, and the butt of the first joke in the strip. Aside from some stylistic differences in Schulz’s art style at the time, Charlie Brown looked much the same. He did, however, wear an unadorned T-shirt; the stripe was added within the first year of strips, in order to add more color to the strip. Charlie Brown stated in an early strip (November 3, 1950) that he was "only four years old", but he aged over the next two decades, being six years old as of November 17, 1957 and "eight-and-a-half years old" by July 11, 1979. Later references continue to peg Charlie Brown as being approximately eight years old.[3] Another early strip, on October 30, 1950, has Patty and Shermy wishing Charlie Brown a happy birthday on that day, although they are not sure they have the date right.[3] Allegedly, he was named for Schulz's love for Edgar Huntly. Image File history File links First_peanuts_comic. ... Image File history File links First_peanuts_comic. ... is the 275th day of the year (276th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... is the 303rd day of the year (304th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Initially, Charlie Brown was more assertive and playful than his character would later become: He would play tricks on other cast members, and some strips had romantic overtones between Charlie Brown and Patty and Violet. He would cause headaches for adults (knocking all the comic books off their stand at a newsstand, for instance), though he was from the start not especially competent at any skill. Romance is a general term that refers to an intimate and often sexual relationship between two people. ... Patty from a comic strip. ... Violet from a comic strip. ... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... A newsagent (British English), newsagency (Australian English) or newsstand (American English), is often a small business that sells newspapers, magazines, stationery, snacks and often items of local interest such as postcards and clothing emblazoned with sports team mascots. ...


Charlie Brown soon evolved into the Sad Sack character he's best known as: feeling enslaved to the care of Snoopy, beset by comments from everyone around him. Common approaches to the strip's storylines included Charlie Brown stubbornly refusing to give in even when all is lost from the outset (e.g., standing on the pitcher's mound alone on the ballfield, refusing to let a torrential downpour interrupt his beloved game), or suddenly displaying a skill and rising within a field, only to suffer a humiliating loss just when he's about to win it all (most famously, Charlie Brown's efforts to win the statewide spelling bee in the feature-length film A Boy Named Charlie Brown). Charlie Brown never receives Valentines or Christmas cards and only gets rocks when he goes trick or treating on Halloween but never loses hope that he will. His misfortunes garnered so much sympathy from the audience that many young viewers in North America of the Be My Valentine, Charlie Brown and It's the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown TV specials have sent Valentine cards and halloween candy respectively to the broadcasting television network in an effort to show Charlie Brown they cared for him. This also extended to protest letters when viewers felt the victimization of Charlie Brown went too far such as in It's Your First Kiss, Charlie Brown where Charlie Brown is publicly derided for making his football team lose when it is obvious that he is not at fault. Sad Sack was a cartoon character created by Sgt. ... For other uses, see Spelling bee (disambiguation). ... A Boy Named Charlie Brown is a 1969 animated film produced by Cinema Center Films and Lee Mendelson Films for National General Pictures, directed by Bill Melendez, and based on the Peanuts comic strip. ... St. ... Some christmas cards A Christmas card is a greeting card that is decorated in a manner that celebrates Christmas. ... This article is about the holiday. ... Be My Valentine, Charlie Brown is one of many prime-time animated TV specials based upon the popular comic strip Peanuts, by Charles M. Schulz. ... Its the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown is a critically-acclaimed and very popular animated television special based on the comic strip Peanuts by Charles M. Schulz. ... A television special is a television program, typically a short film or television movie, which interrupts or temporarily replaces programming normally scheduled for a given time slot. ... This article is about the broadcast network. ... Its Your First Kiss, Charlie Brown is one of many prime-time animated TV specials based upon the popular comic strip Peanuts, by Charles M. Schulz. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ...


Charlie Brown maintained this demeanor until the strip ended its run in 2000, and classic strips run in many newspapers today. He did have occasional victories, though, such as hitting a game-winning home run off a pitch by Roy Hobbs' great-granddaughter on March 30, 1993 (though she later admitted she let him hit the home runs) and soundly defeating "Joe Agate" in a game of marbles on 11 April, 1995. Usually, Charlie Brown was a representative for everyone going through a time when they feel like nothing ever goes right for them; however, Charlie Brown refuses to give up. In the final weeks of his strip, determined to finally have a winning baseball season at last, Charlie Brown tried to channel Joe Torre, which made his sister think he was cracking up. Homerun redirects here. ... The Natural is a 1952 novel about baseball written by Bernard Malamud. ... is the 89th day of the year (90th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... Hand-made marbles from West Africa Different glass marbles from a glass-mill For other uses, see Marbles (disambiguation). ... is the 101st day of the year (102nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Joseph Paul Torre (born July 18, 1940 in Brooklyn, New York) is a former Major League Baseball player and the current manager of the Los Angeles Dodgers. ...


Relationships

Despite all this, and despite the abuse he has often received, Charlie Brown has many friends, the best being Lucy's brother Linus, who may occasionally admonish Charlie Brown, but stands by him. Linus's brother, Rerun van Pelt, also seems to look up to and admire Charlie Brown; in one comic strip, he wanted to watch him pitch in a baseball game, thinking that he was a master at it. Linus awaits the Great Pumpkin. ... Rerun on the back of his mothers bicycle. ...


Charlie Brown's dog Snoopy seldom treats him with respect or affection except when Charlie Brown pleases him – preferably by feeding him. Snoopy often refers to him as "That Round-Headed Kid".


Linus initially appeared as an infant, but as he aged (and grew to a year or two younger than Charlie Brown) he became a profound philosopher and Charlie Brown's best friend, often supporting each other in small ways when the other's foibles had been painfully exposed (Schroeder and Lucy Van Pelt were also significantly younger than Charlie Brown when they first appeared, but they too aged where he did not, to the point where they became his peers.). Linus was himself a sort of loser like Charlie Brown, because of his inability to let go of his eccentricities (his security blanket, belief in the Great Pumpkin, paralyzing stage fright, etc.), so the two had much in common. For other uses, see Philosophy (disambiguation). ... Schroeder is a fictional character in the long-running comic strip Peanuts, created by Charles M. Schulz. ... Book cover Lucy van Pelt is a character in the syndicated comic strip Peanuts, written and drawn by Charles Schulz. ...


Lucy, along with early characters Violet, Patty, and sometimes Shermy, often attacked Charlie Brown physically or verbally. On one occasion when Lucy was little, she falsely claimed that Charlie Brown was about to hit her, and grinned in the background when Patty came to retaliate.[citation needed] Violet once hit Charlie Brown with her doll after he accidentally hit it with his tricycle. Shermy once sent Charlie Brown home because he allowed a goal during a hockey game. Although Charlie Brown had romantic occasions with Violet and Patty, the two clearly favored Shermy. Yet when Charlie Brown asked Lucy during their psychiatrist booth sessions why no one liked him, Lucy always laid the blame on Charlie Brown himself. Lucy often thinks ridiculous facts are true (i.e: there's a different sun every day, snow comes up out of the ground, birds can fly to the moon and back)and regards them as "little known facts", and thinks that true facts are silly, and laughs at Charlie's attempts to prove her wrong.


Like all adults in the strip, Charlie Brown's parents are never seen (nor "heard" in speech balloons, except in a few very early comics), but occasionally referenced. His father is a barber (as was Schulz’s). His mother is a housewife. A boy visiting a barber A barber (from the Latin barba, beard) is someone whose occupation is to cut any type of hair, give shaves, and trim beards. ... Two homemakers. ...


In 1959, Charlie Brown's sister was born, Sally, who resembled Charlie Brown in some ways, but with a shock of blonde hair. Like Linus, Lucy, and Schroeder, Sally began as an infant but soon became "mature" enough to interact with the other characters on a more-or-less equal basis. Initially Charlie Brown doted on her, though she too became a thorn in his side as she would pester him for help with her homework, and berate him for misunderstanding certain concepts (despite herself being the one in the wrong). Charlie Brown would stoically and guiltily bear this, although sometimes he was able to let Sally dig her own holes without pulling him in with her while very occasionally firmly putting his foot down on truly unacceptable behavior. Stoicism is a school of philosophy commonly associated with such Greek philosophers as Zeno of Citium, Cleanthes, or Chrysippus and with such later Romans as Cicero, Seneca, Marcus Aurelius, and Epictetus. ...


Charlie Brown has a pen pal, but because he uses a fountain pen (rather than ballpoint) and because he has less skill than others at keeping the ink flow under control, he resorts to graphite and starts off the letters, "Dear Pencil Pal". These correspondences, which began in the 25 August, 1958 strip, are usually one-way; but on 14 April, 1960, Charlie Brown read Lucy a letter he'd received from his Pen Pal. In the letter, the Pen Pal revealed that he or she had read Charlie Brown's latest letter to his/her class, and that they all agreed he must be a nice person and someone who is pleasant to know. In response to which, Charlie Brown uttered a vigorous "Ha!" to Lucy. In a strip series in 1994, the Pen Pal was revealed to be a girl in Scotland named Morag. Charlie Brown also fantasized about a future romance with Morag, but his plans were crushed when he learned Morag had 30 other Pen Pals. Pen pals (or penpals or pen friends) are people who regularly write each other, in particular in the case of snail mail. ... A fountain pen is a writing instrument, more specifically a pen, that contains a reservoir of water-based ink that is fed to a nib through a feed via a combination of gravity and capillary action. ... Ballpoint pen, disassembled (top) and complete (bottom) A ballpoint pen (also eponymously known in British English as a biro and pronounced bye-row in Britain but sometimes bee-row elsewhere), is a modern writing instrument. ... is the 237th day of the year (238th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 104th day of the year (105th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Charlie Brown is infatuated with an often unseen character known simply as "the Little Red-Haired Girl", (named "Heather" in the valentine special "It's Your First Kiss, Charlie Brown!") though he rarely has the courage to talk to her, and when he does (in encounters which always occur off-panel) it always goes badly. Because of his preoccupation with the Little Red-Haired Girl, he remains oblivious to the occasional attentions of Peppermint Patty and Marcie. In particular, he has a tendency to say the wrong thing at the wrong time, to both of them; Peppermint Patty when she seeks reassurance over her "big nose" and her femininity, and Marcie when she tries to show that she cares about him (once, when asking if Charlie Brown missed her while she was away, got the reply "my cereal's going soggy").Charlie Brown once had a brief flirtation with a minor character called Peggy Jean who he met at summer camp. Television shows and stage plays sometimes include continuing characters — characters who are currently in frequent interaction with the other characters and who influence current story events — who are never seen or heard by the audience and only described by other characters. ... The Little Red-Haired Girl is an unseen character in the Peanuts comic strip by Charles M. Schulz, and is a symbol of unrequited love. ...


Catch phrases

Charlie Brown has accumulated many memorable catch phrases and utterances: A catch phrase is a phrase or expression that is popularized, usually through repeated use, by a real person or fictional character. ...

  • "Good grief!"
  • "I (just) can't stand it."
  • "Why can't I have a normal [or an ordinary] dog like everyone else?"
  • "AAAAARRRRRRGH!"
  • "Rats!"
  • "Somehow, I never (quite) know what's going on"

Charlie Brown's most famous expression, "Good grief!" was ranked at #18 on the TV Land program The 100 Greatest TV Quotes and Catchphrases.[5] TV Land (originally Nick-at-Nites TV Land) is an American cable television network which first started transmissions on April 29, 1996. ...


Portrayals

  • 1960's child actor Peter Robbins first played Charlie Brown in A Charlie Brown Christmas in 1965. His last performance as Charlie Brown was in 1969. Since then various actors including Chad Allen played Charlie Brown. Erin Chase was the first girl to play Charlie Brown. She played him for the "This Is America, Charlie Brown" series.
  • In the off-Broadway musical You're a Good Man, Charlie Brown (1967), Charlie Brown was played by Gary Burghoff. In the 1998 Broadway revival, he was portrayed by Anthony Rapp.
  • Michael Mandy provided the voice of Charlie Brown for Life Is A Circus, Charlie Brown, It's Magic, Charlie Brown, The Fabulous Funnies opposite Loni Anderson, and A Charlie Brown Celebration. He also voiced the character in three commercials for Dolly Madison Cakes & Pies, and many Buena Vista 45rpm Read-Along-Books.

Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Peter Robbins is a former child actor best known for his voice-over work as Charlie Brown in the 1960s. ... For the album, see A Charlie Brown Christmas (album). ... This article is about the stage musical. ... Gary Burghoff as Walter Radar OReilly. ... Anthony Dean Rapp (b. ... A Charlie Brown Celebration is one of many prime-time animated TV specials based upon the popular comic strip Peanuts, by Charles M. Schulz. ... This article is about Namco, a Japanese leisure company and game developer. ... Snoopy Vs. ...

References

  1. ^ Mendelson, Lee (1970), Charlie Brown & Charlie Schulz, New York: World Publishing Company, LC 75-107642 The dust jacket describes the book as "The warmhearted biography of a wonderful man (real) and a wonderful boy (almost-as-real) who proved that being a loser could be the biggest success story of all."
  2. ^ |The Complete Peanuts 1961-1962 Fantagraphics Books
  3. ^ a b c Bang, Derrick (2006-11-12). Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) about Charles Schulz and his Peanuts cartoon strip (text). Peanuts Collectors Club. Retrieved on 2006-12-29.
  4. ^ Apocalypse Postponed Umberto Eco 1994 Indiana University Press (Bloomington, IN)
  5. ^ The 100 Greatest TV Quotes and Catchphrases. tvland.com. Viacom International Inc. (2006). Retrieved on 2006-12-15.

Lee Mendelson (born ca. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 316th day of the year (317th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 363rd day of the year (364th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Umberto Eco (born January 5, 1932) is an Italian medievalist, semiotician, philosopher and novelist, best known for his novel The Name of the Rose (Il nome della rosa) and his many essays. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
  • Charlie Brown at Snoopy.com
Peanuts
Characters
555 95472Charlotte Braun Charlie Brown Sally Brown Eudora Franklin Frieda The Great Pumpkin Kite-Eating Tree • Lila Little Red-Haired Girl • Marcie Miss Othmar Patty Peggy Jean Peppermint Patty José Peterson • Pig-Pen • Poochie Roy Schroeder Shermy Joe Shlabotnik Snoopy Snoopy's siblings Thibault Linus van Pelt Lucy van Pelt Rerun van Pelt Violet Woodstock
Films
A Boy Named Charlie BrownSnoopy, Come Home Race for Your Life, Charlie Brown Bon Voyage, Charlie Brown (and Don't Come Back!!)
Other Media
A Charlie Brown Christmas (album) • The Charlie Brown and Snoopy Show Linus and Lucy Snoopy!!! The Musical Snoopy's Silly Sports Spectacular This is America, Charlie Brown You're a Good Man, Charlie Brown Snoopy (computer game)
People
Charles M. SchulzBill Melendez • Lee Mendelson Vince Guaraldi • Charles M. Schulz Museum and Research Center
Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... For other uses, see Peanut (disambiguation). ... 555 5 95472 is a character in the comic strip Peanuts by Charles M. Schulz. ... Charlotte Braun is a long-forgotten character from Charles M. Schulzs comic strip Peanuts, who first appeared on November 30, 1954. ... Sally Brown is the younger sister of Charlie Brown in the comic strip Peanuts by Charles Schulz. ... Eudora is a character in the comic strip Peanuts by Charles M. Schulz. ... Franklins July 31, 1968 introduction in Peanuts. ... Friedas first appearance in Peanuts. ... Linus awaits the Great Pumpkin. ... Charles Charlie Brown is the principal character in the comic strip Peanuts by Charles M. Schulz. ... Lila was a minor character in the comic strip Peanuts, created by Charles M. Schulz. ... The Little Red-Haired Girl is an unseen character in the Peanuts comic strip by Charles M. Schulz, and is a symbol of unrequited love. ... “Marcie” redirects here. ... Miss Othmar is an unseen character in Charles M. Schulzs Peanuts comic strip. ... Patty from a comic strip. ... Peggy Jean shows off her new pair of gloves. ... This article is about the character from Peanuts. ... José Peterson is a minor character in the comic strip Peanuts created by Charles M. Schulz. ... Pig-Pen is a character in the comic strip Peanuts by Charles M. Schulz. ... Poochie is a female character in the comic strip Peanuts who debuted on January 7, 1973. ... Roy was a minor character in the comic strip Peanuts by Charles M. Schulz. ... Schroeder is a fictional character in the long-running comic strip Peanuts, created by Charles M. Schulz. ... Every Christmas its the same - I always end up playing a shepherd. ... Joe Shlabotnik was a fictional baseball player in the world of Charles Schulzs long-running comic strip, Peanuts. ... Snoopy is a fictional character in the long-running comic strip Peanuts, by Charles M. Schulz. ... In the comic strip, Peanuts by Charles M. Schulz, Snoopy was often stated to have seven siblings. ... Thibault (sometimes spelled Thiebault, and pronounced Tee-bo) is a minor character who first appeared in the Peanuts comic strip in 1970. ... Linus awaits the Great Pumpkin. ... Book cover Lucy van Pelt is a character in the syndicated comic strip Peanuts, written and drawn by Charles Schulz. ... Rerun on the back of his mothers bicycle. ... Violet from a comic strip. ... Woodstock is a fictional character in Charles M. Schulzs comic strip Peanuts. ... For the television documentary, see A Boy Named Charlie Brown (TV program). ... Snoopy, Come Home is an 1972 musical animated film, produced by Cinema Center Films and Lee Mendelson Films for National General Pictures, directed by Bill Melendez, and based on the Peanuts comic strip. ... Race For Your Life, Charlie Brown is a 1977 animated film produced by United Feature Syndicate for Paramount Pictures, directed by Bill Melendez and Phil Roman, and based on the Peanuts comic strip. ... Bon Voyage, Charlie Brown (and Dont Come Back!!) is a 1980 animated film produced by United Feature Syndicate for Paramount Pictures, directed by Bill Melendez. ... This is a list of adaptations in film, television and musical theater, based on characters from the Peanuts comic strip by Charles M. Schulz. ... There are at least two versions of the Christmas music album A Charlie Brown Christmas. ... The Charlie Brown and Snoopy Show is an animated television series featuring characters and storylines from the Charles M. Schulz comic strip Peanuts. ... Linus and Lucy is a jazz piano piece written by Vince Guaraldi and made popular in many of the Peanuts animated television specials. ... Snoopy!!! The Musical is a musical comedy by Larry Grossman and Hal Hackaday that was based on the Charles M. Schulz comic strip Peanuts. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This is America, Charlie Brown opening title sequence This is America, Charlie Brown was an eight-part animated TV mini-series, depicting events in American history with characters from the Charles M. Schulz comic strip Peanuts. ... This article is about the stage musical. ... Snoopy title screen. ... Charles Monroe Schulz (November 26, 1922[1] – February 12, 2000) was a 20th-century American cartoonist best known worldwide for his Peanuts comic strip. ... Bill Meléndez (born José Cuauhtemoc Meléndez on November 15, 1916 in Hermosillo, Mexico) is a Mexican-born American character animator, film director, and film producer, known for his cartoons for Warner Brothers and the Peanuts series. ... Lee Mendelson (born ca. ... Vince Guaraldi (July 17, 1928 - February 6, 1976) was an American jazz musician and pianist best known for composing music for animated adaptations of the Peanuts comic strip. ... The Charles M. Schulz Museum and Research Center is a museum dedicated to the works of Charles Schulz, creator of the Peanuts comic strip. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Charlie Brown - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2329 words)
Charlie Brown is a terrible pitcher, often giving up tremendous hits which either knock him off the mound or leave him with only his shorts on.
Charlie Brown is also in love with an often unseen character known simply as "the Little Red-Haired Girl", though he rarely has the courage to talk to her, and when he does (in encounters which always occur off-panel) it always goes badly.
Charlie Brown would stoically and guiltily bear this, although sometimes he was able to let Sally dig her own holes without pulling him in with her while very occasionally firmly putting his foot down on truly unacceptable behavior.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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