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Encyclopedia > Charleston, South Carolina
City of Charleston
The United States Custom House in Charleston

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Seal
Nickname: "The Holy City", "The Palmetto City", "Chucktown"
Motto: Aedes Mores Juraque Curat (She cares for her temples, customs, and rights)
Location of Charleston in South Carolina.
Coordinates: 32°47′00″N 79°56′00″W / 32.783333, -79.933333
Country United States
State South Carolina
Counties Charleston, Berkeley
Government
 - Mayor Joseph P. Riley, Jr.
Area
 - City 178.1 sq mi (376.5 km²)
 - Land 147.0 sq mi (361.2 km²)
 - Water 17.1 sq mi (44.3 km²)
Elevation 20 ft (4 m)
Population (2007)
 - City 118,492 (est.)
 - Density 996.5/sq mi (384.7/km²)
 - Metro 603,178
Time zone EST (UTC-5)
 - Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
Area code(s) 843
FIPS code 45-13330[1]
GNIS feature ID 1221516[2]
Website: http://www.charlestoncity.info/

Charleston is a city in Berkeley and Charleston counties in the U.S. state of South Carolina. It is the largest city and county seat of Charleston County.[3] The city was founded as Charlestown or Charles Towne, Carolina in 1670, and moved to its present location (Oyster Point) from a location on the west bank of the Ashley River in 1680; it adopted its present name in 1783. In 1690, Charleston was the fifth largest city in North America[4], and remained among the ten largest cities in the United States through the 1840 census.[5] Charleston is known as The Holy City due to the prominence of churches on the low-rise cityscape, particularly the numerous steeples which dot the city's skyline, and for the fact that it was the only city in the original thirteen colonies to provide religious tolerance to the French Huguenot Church.[citation needed] In fact, it is still the only city in the U.S. with such a church.[citation needed]Charleston was also one of the first colonial cities to allow Jews to practice their faith without restriction. Brith Shalom Beth Israel is the oldest Orthodox shul in the South, founded by Ashkenazic (German and central European) Jews in the mid 19th century. Kahal Kadosh Beth Elohim is Charleston's younger Reform synagogue. Image File history File links Us-sc-ch. ... Image File history File links CharlestonSCseal. ... // A nickname is a name of an entity or thing that is not its proper name. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... Adapted from Wikipedias SC county maps by Seth Ilys. ... Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude 78° 32′ W to 83... This list of countries, arranged alphabetically, gives an overview of countries of the world. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The political units and divisions of the United States include: The 50 states... Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude 78° 32′ W to 83... This is a list of the counties of South Carolina. ... Charleston County is a county located in the state of South Carolina. ... Berkeley County is a county in the U.S. state of South Carolina. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... Joseph P. Riley, Jr. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... For other uses, see City (disambiguation). ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... To help compare different orders of magnitude and geographical regions, we list here areas between 100 km² and 1000 km². See also areas of other orders of magnitude. ... Elevation histogram of the surface of the Earth – approximately 71% of the Earths surface is covered with water. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... For other uses, see City (disambiguation). ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... Metronome, a public art installation showing the time in New York City The Eastern Time Zone (ET) of the Western Hemisphere falls mostly along the east coast of Northern America and the west coast of South America. ... -12 | -11 | -10 | -9:30 | -9 | -8 | -7 | -6 | -5 | -4 | -3:30 | -3 | -2:30 | -2 | -1 | -0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... Eastern Daylight Time or EDT is equal to: In North America, Eastern Standard Time + 1, or UTC − 4 hours. ... −12 | −11 | −10 | −9:30 | −9 | −8 | −7 | −6 | −5 | −4 | −3:30 | −3 | −2:30 | −2 | −1 | −0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... A telephone numbering plan is a plan for allocating telephone number ranges to countries, regions, areas and exchanges and to non-fixed telephone networks such as mobile phone networks. ... Area Code 843 is an area code in South Carolina that covers Florence, Myrtle Beach, Charleston, Hiton Head Island and other parts of eastern South Carolina. ... Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) are publicly announced standards developed by the U.S. Federal government for use by all (non-military) government agencies and by government contractors. ... GNIS (The Geographic Names Information System) contains name and locative information about almost two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its Territories. ... Berkeley County is a county in the U.S. state of South Carolina. ... Charleston County is a county located in the state of South Carolina. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude 78° 32′ W to 83... A county seat is a term for an administrative center for a county, primarily used in the United States. ... The Carolina Colony grants Haystack of 1663 and 1665 The Province of Carolina from 1663 to 1729, was a North American British colony. ... North American redirects here. ... From the 16th to the 18th century the name Huguenot was applied to a member of the Protestant Reformed Church of France, historically known as the French Calvinists. ...


The population was estimated to be 118,492 in 2007, making it the second most populous city in South Carolina closely behind the state capital Columbia.[6] Current trends put Charleston as the fastest growing central city in South Carolina. The metropolitan area population of Charleston and North Charleston, which includes the entire populations of Charleston, Berkeley, and Dorchester counties, was estimated to be 603,178 in 2006.[7] This ranks Charleston-North Charleston as the second largest metropolitan statistical area in the state behind Columbia. Nearly 80% of the Charleston metro population lives inside the city and its surrounding urbanized area (2000 pop.: 423,410). In the United States, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) has produced a formal definition of metropolitan areas. ... Nickname: Coordinates: , Country State Counties Charleston, Dorchester Government  - Mayor R. Keith Summey Area  - City 62. ...


The city of Charleston is located just south of the mid-point of South Carolina's coastline, at the junction of the Ashley and Cooper Rivers. Charleston's name is derived from Charles Towne, named after King Charles II of England. Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude 78° 32′ W to 83... A coastal image featured on a United States postal stamp. ... The Ashley River is a river in South Carolina which meets with the Cooper River in Charleston before discharging into the Atlantic Ocean. ... The Cooper River is a river in the U.S. state of South Carolina. ... Charles II (29 May 1630 – 6 February 1685) was the King of England, Scotland, and Ireland. ...


America's most-published etiquette expert, Marjabelle Young Stewart, has recognized the city since 1995 as the "best-mannered" city in the U.S,[8] a claim lent credibility by the fact that it has the first established Livability Court in the country. It has been suggested that Office etiquette be merged into this article or section. ... Marjabelle Young Stewart (1924 - 3 March 2007) was an American writer and expert on etiquette. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... A Livability Court is a municipal court (or court of limited jurisdiction) focused on cases involving non-compliance with codes and standards about housing, waste, environment, noise, animal control, zoning, traffic and tourism. ...

Contents

History

A historic home in The Battery.

Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2560 × 1920 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2560 × 1920 pixel, file size: 1. ... For other uses, see Antique (disambiguation). ... The Battery, which includes a park known as White Point Gardens, is a landmark promenade in Charleston, South Carolina. ...

Early colonization

After Charles II of England (1630-1685) was restored to the British throne following Oliver Cromwell's Protectorate, he granted the chartered Carolina territory to eight of his loyal friends, known as the Lords Proprietor, in 1663. It took seven years before the Lords could arrange for settlement, the first being that of Charles Town. The community was established by English settlers in 1670 on the west bank of the Ashley River, a few miles northwest of the present city. It was soon chosen by Anthony Ashley-Cooper, one of the Lords Proprietor, to become a "great port towne", a destiny which the city fulfilled. By 1680, the settlement had grown, joined by others from England, Barbados, and Virginia, and relocated to its current peninsular location. The capital of the Carolina colony, Charleston was the center for further expansion and the southernmost point of English settlement during the late 1600s. Charles II (29 May 1630 – 6 February 1685) was the King of England, Scotland, and Ireland. ... Oliver Cromwell (25 April 1599 – 3 September 1658) was an English military and political leader best known for his involvement in making England into a republican Commonwealth and for his later role as Lord Protector of England, Scotland and Ireland. ... Events First Portuguese governor was appointed to Macau The Swedish city Karlskrona was founded as the Royal Swedish Navy relocated there. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... The Carolina Colony grants Haystack of 1663 and 1665 The Province of Carolina from 1663 to 1729, was a North American British colony. ... (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. ...


The settlement was often subject to attack from sea and from land. Periodic assaults from Spain and France, who still contested England's claims to the region, were combined with resistance from Native Americans, as well as pirate raids. Charleston's colonists erected a fortification wall around the small settlement to aid in its defense. Two buildings remain from the Walled City, the Powder Magazine, where the city's supply of gunpowder was stored, and the Pink House, believed to have been an old colonial tavern.[9] This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ... Look up pirate and piracy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The defensive wall of Braşov, Romania. ...


A 1680 plan for the new settlement, the Grand Modell, laid out "the model of an exact regular town," and the future for the growing community. Land surrounding the intersection of Meeting and Broad Streets was set aside for a Civic Square. Over time it became known as the Four Corners of the Law, referring to the various arms of governmental and religious law presiding over the square and the growing city. St. Michael's Episcopal Church, Charleston's oldest and most noted church, was built on the southeast corner in 1752. The following year the Capitol of the colony was erected across the square. Because of its prominent position within the city and its elegant architecture, the building signaled to Charleston's citizens and visitors its importance within the British colonies. Provincial court met on the ground floor, the Commons House of Assembly and the Royal Governor's Council Chamber met on the second floor. A town square is an open area commonly found in the heart of a traditional town used for community gatherings. ... Established in 1703, St. ... 1752 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...


Ethnic and religious diversity

While the earliest settlers primarily came from England, colonial Charleston was also home to a mixture of ethnic and religious groups. In colonial times, Boston, Massachusetts, and Charleston were sister cities, and people of means spent summers in Boston and winters in Charleston. There was a great deal of trade with Bermuda and the Caribbean, and some people came to live in Charleston from these areas. French, Scottish, Irish, and Germans migrated to the developing seacoast town, representing numerous Protestant denominations, as well as Roman Catholicism and Judaism. Sephardic Jews migrated to the city in such numbers that Charleston eventually was home to, by the beginning of the 19th Century and until about 1830, the largest and wealthiest Jewish community in North America[10][11] The Jewish Coming Street Cemetery, first established in 1762, attests to their long-standing presence in the community. The first Anglican church, St. Philip's Episcopal Church, was built in 1682, although later destroyed by fire and relocated to its current location. Slaves also comprised a major portion of the population, and were active in the city's religious community. Free black Charlestonians and slaves helped establish the Old Bethel United Methodist Church in 1797, and the congregation of the Emanuel A.M.E. Church stems from a religious group organized solely by African Americans, free and slave, in 1791. The first American museum opened to the public on January 12, 1773 in Charleston. From the mid-18th century a large amount of immigration was taking place in the upcountry of the Carolinas, some of it coming from abroad through Charleston, but also much of it a southward movement from Virginia, Maryland and Pennsylvania, until the upcountry population was larger than the coastal population. The Upcountry people were viewed by Charlestonians as being unpolished in many ways,[citation needed] and had different interests, setting the stage for several generations of conflicts between the Upcountry and the Charleston elite. Boston redirects here. ... For other uses, see Summer (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Winter (disambiguation). ... West Indies redirects here. ... This article is about the Scottish people as an ethnic group. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Sephardim (ספרדי, Standard Hebrew SÉ™fardi, Tiberian Hebrew ardî; plural Sephardim: ספרדים, Standard Hebrew Sfaradim, Tiberian Hebrew ) are a subgroup of Jews, generally defined in contrast to Ashkenazim and/or . ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... Liberty Leading the People by Eugène Delacroix commemorates the July Revolution 1830 (MDCCCXXX) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... North American redirects here. ... The Coming Street Cemetery is located at 189 Coming Street, in Charleston, South Carolina. ... 1762 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... There is a long history of Jews living in Charleston, South Carolina, USA. The charter of the Carolina Colony, drawn up by John Locke in 1669, granted liberty of conscience to all settlers, expressly mentioning Jews, heathens, and dissenters. ... The term Anglican describes those people and churches following the religious traditions of the Church of England, especially following the Reformation. ... Year 1682 (MDCLXXXII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Buxton Memorial Fountain, celebrating the emancipation of slaves in the British Empire in 1834, London. ... This article is about the current Christian denomination based in the United States. ... The African Methodist Episcopal Church, usually called the AME Church, is a Christian denomination founded by Bishop Richard Allen in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1816. ... 1791 (MDCCXCI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see Museum (disambiguation). ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1773 (MDCCLXXIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... The Carolinas is a term used in the United States to refer collectively to the states of North and South Carolina. ... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Largest metro area Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 101 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37° 53′ N to 39° 43′ N... This article is about the U.S. State. ...


Major Atlantic port

By the mid-18th century Charleston had become a bustling trade center, the hub of the Atlantic trade for the southern colonies, and the wealthiest and largest city south of Philadelphia. By 1770 it was the fourth largest port in the colonies, after only Boston, New York, and Philadelphia, with a population of 11,000, slightly more than half of that slaves. Rice and indigo had been successfully cultivated by slave-owning planters in the surrounding coastal low-country. Those and naval stores were exported in an extremely profitable shipping industry. It was the cultural and economic center of the South. For other uses, see Philadelphia (disambiguation) and Philly. ... For the village in Queensland, see 1770, Queensland. ... For other uses, see Rice (disambiguation). ... Indigo dye indigo molecule Indigo dye is an important dyestuff with a distinctive blue color (see indigo). ... ...


American Revolution

As the relationship between the colonists and England deteriorated, Charleston became a focal point in the ensuing American Revolution. In protest of the Tea Act of 1773, which embodied the concept of taxation without representation, Charlestonians confiscated tea and stored it in the Exchange and Custom House. Representatives from all over the colony came to the Exchange in 1774 to elect delegates to the Continental Congress, the group responsible for drafting the Declaration of Independence; and South Carolina declared its independence from the crown on the steps of the Exchange. Soon, the church steeples of Charleston, especially St. Michael's, became targets for British warships causing rebel forces to paint the steeples black to blend with the night sky. John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence, showing the five-man committee in charge of drafting the Declaration in 1776 as it presents its work to the Second Continental Congress in Philadelphia The American Revolution refers to the period during the last half of the 18th century in which the Thirteen... The Tea Act was an Act of the Parliament of Great Britain (13 Geo III c. ... Year 1773 (MDCCLXXIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... No taxation without representation was a rallying cry for advocates of American independence from Great Britain in the eighteenth century. ... For other uses, see Tea (disambiguation). ... Custom House is an area of the London Borough of Newham. ... Chesma Column in Tsarskoe Selo, commemorating the end of the Russo-Turkish War. ... The Continental Congress resulted from the American Revolution and was the de facto first national government of the United States. ... The United States Declaration of Independence was an act of the Second Continental Congress, adopted on July 4, 1776, which declared that the Thirteen Colonies in North America were Free and Independent States and that all political connection between them and the State of Great Britain, is and ought to...


It was twice the target of British attacks. At every stage the British strategy assumed a large base of Loyalist supporters who would rally to the King given some military support.[citation needed] On June 28, 1776 General Henry Henry Clinton with 2000 men and a naval squadron tried to seize Charleston, hoping for a simultaneous Loyalist uprising in South Carolina. It seemed a cheap way of waging the war but it failed as the naval force was defeated by the Continental Army, specifically the 2nd South Carolina Regiment at Fort Moultrie under the command of William Moultrie. When the fleet fired cannonballs, the explosives failed to penetrate the fort's unfinished, yet thick palmetto log walls. Additionally, no local Loyalists attacked the town from behind as the British had hoped. The loyalists were too poorly organized to be effective, but as late as 1780 senior officials in London, misled by Loyalist exiles, placed their confidence in their rising. Britannia offers solace and a promise of compensation for her exiled American born Loyalists. ... For other uses, see 1776 (disambiguation). ... The 2nd South Carolina Regiment was raised on June 6, 1775 at Charleston, South Carolina for service with the Continental Army. ... Fort Moultrie is the name of a series of forts on Sullivans Island, South Carolina, built to protect the city of Charleston, South Carolina. ... William Moultrie (pronounced Mool-tree), 1730—1805, American Revolutionary general, b. ... 1780 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...


Clinton returned in 1780 with 14,000 soldiers. American General Benjamin Lincoln was trapped and surrendered his entire 5400 men force after a long fight, and the Siege of Charleston was the greatest American defeat of the war (see Henry Clinton "Commander in Chief" section for more). Several Americans escaped the carnage, and joined up with several militias, including those of Francis Marion, the 'Swampfox,' and Andrew Pickens. These militias used Hit-and-run tactics. Eventually, Clinton returned to New York, leaving Charles Cornwallis with 8000 Redcoats to rally Loyalists, build forts across the state, and demand oaths of allegiance to the King. Many of these forts were taken over by the outnumbered guerrilla militias. The British retained control of the city until December 1782. After the British left the city's name was officially changed to Charleston in 1783. Benjamin Lincoln (1733–1810) was a major general in the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War. ... Combatants Kingdom of Great Britain United States Commanders Sir Henry Clinton and Mariot Arbuthnot Benjamin Lincoln Strength 14,000 troops 5,000 troops Casualties 76 killed, 182 wounded 92 killed, 148 wounded, 4,650 captured (see Trivia below) The Siege of Charleston was one of the major battles which took... General Sir Henry Clinton K.B. Commander-in-Chief of British troops in America. ... Lebanese Kataeb militia The term Militia is commonly used today to refer to a military force composed of ordinary [1] citizens to provide defense, emergency, law enforcement, or paramilitary service, and those engaged in such activity, without being paid a regular salary or committed to a fixed term of service. ... Francis Marion (February 26, 1732–February 27, 1795) was a lieutenant colonel in the Continental Army and later brigadier general in the South Carolina Militia during the American Revolutionary War. ... Andrew Pickens (September 13, 1739–August 11, 1817) was a militia leader in the Revolution and a U.S. Congressman from South Carolina. ... Hit-and-run tactics is a tactical doctrine where the purpose of the combat involved is not to seize control of territory, but to inflict damage on a target and immediately exit the area to avoid the enemys defense and/or retaliation. ... This article is about the state. ... Charles Cornwallis, 1st Marquess Cornwallis (December 31, 1738-October 5, British general and colonial governor. ... Scarlet is a color with a hue between red and orange. ... Guerrilla redirects here. ... 1782 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1783 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ...


Commerce and Expansion

By 1788, Carolinians were meeting at the Capitol building for the Constitutional Ratification Convention, and while there was support for the Federal Government, division arose over the location of the new State Capital. A suspicious fire broke out in the Capitol building during the Convention, after which the delegates removed to the Exchange and decreed Columbia the new state capital. By 1792, the Capitol had been rebuilt and became the Charleston County Courthouse. Upon its completion, the city possessed all the public buildings necessary to be transformed from a colonial capital to the center of the antebellum South. The grandeur and number of buildings erected in the following century reflect the optimism, pride, and civic destiny that many Charlestonians felt for their community. 1792 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... In most counties in the United States the local trial courts conduct their business in a centrally located courthouse which may also house the offices of the county treasurer, clerk and recorder and assessor. ... Antebellum is a Latin word meaning before war(ante means before and bellum is war). ... Historic Southern United States. ...


As Charleston grew, so did the community's cultural and social opportunities, especially for the elite merchants and planters. The first theater building in America was built in Charleston in 1736, but was later replaced by the 19th-century Planter's Hotel where wealthy planters stayed during Charleston's horse-racing season (now the Dock Street Theatre, known as the oldest active theatre in the United States[citation needed]). Benevolent societies were formed by several different ethnic groups: the South Carolina Society, founded by French Huguenots in 1737; the German Friendly Society, founded in 1766; and the Hibernian Society, founded by Irish immigrants in 1801. The Charleston Library Society was established in 1748 by some wealthy Charlestonians who wished to keep up with the scientific and philosophical issues of the day. This group also helped establish the College of Charleston in 1770, the oldest college in South Carolina and the 13th oldest in the United States. Events January 26 - Stanislaus I of Poland abdicates his throne. ... From the 16th to the 18th century the name Huguenot was applied to a member of the Protestant Reformed Church of France, historically known as the French Calvinists. ... Events 12 February — The San Carlo, the oldest working opera house in Europe, is inaugurated. ... 1766 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The Union Jack, flag of the newly formed United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... Year 1748 (MDCCXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... The College of Charleston (C of C) is a public university located in historic downtown Charleston, South Carolina. ... For the village in Queensland, see 1770, Queensland. ...


Charleston became more prosperous in the plantation-dominated economy of the post-Revolutionary years. The invention of the cotton gin in 1793 revolutionized this crop's production, and it quickly became South Carolina's major export. Cotton plantations relied heavily on slave labor. Slaves were also the primary labor force within the city, working as domestics, artisans, market workers or laborers. Many black Charlestonians spoke Gullah, a language based on African American structures which combined African, French, German, Jamaican, English, Bahamian and Dutch words. In 1807 the Charleston Market was founded. It soon became a hub for the African-American community, with many slaves and free people of color staffing stalls. This article is about crop plantations. ... A cotton gin on display at the Eli Whitney Museum. ... Year 1793 (MDCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see Cotton (disambiguation). ... The Gullah language (Sea Island Creole English, Geechee) is a creole language spoken by the Gullah people (also called Geechees), an African American population living on the Sea Islands and the coastal region of the U.S. states of South Carolina and Georgia. ...


By 1820 Charleston's population had grown to 23,000, with a black majority. When a massive slave revolt planned by Denmark Vesey, a free black, was discovered in 1822, such hysteria ensued amidst white Charlestonians and Carolinians that the activities of free blacks and slaves were severely restricted. Hundreds of blacks, free and slave, and some white supporters involved in the planned uprising were held in the Old Jail. It also was the impetus for the construction of a new State Arsenal in Charleston. Recently, research published by historian Michael P. Johnson of Johns Hopkins University has cast doubt on the veracity of the accounts detailing Vesey's aborted slave revolt. 1820 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Denmark Vesey (originally Telemaque, 1767? — July 2, 1822) was an African American slave, and later a freeman, who planned what would have been one of the largest slave rebellions in the United States had word of the plans not been leaked. ... The Johns Hopkins University, founded in 1876, is a private institution of higher learning located in Baltimore, Maryland, United States. ...


As Charleston's government, society and industry grew, commercial institutions were established to support the community's aspirations. The Bank of South Carolina, the second oldest building constructed as a bank in the nation, was established here in 1798. Branches of the First and Second Bank of the United States were also located in Charleston in 1800 and 1817. While the First Bank was converted to City Hall by 1818, the Second Bank proved to be a vital part of the community as it was the only bank in the city equipped to handle the international transactions so crucial to the export trade. By 1840, the Market Hall and Sheds, where fresh meat and produce were brought daily, became the commercial hub of the city. The slave trade also depended on the port of Charleston, where ships could be unloaded and the slaves sold at markets. Contrary to popular belief, slaves were never traded at the Market Hall areas. Year 1798 (MDCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... // ON MAY 5 1853 MR.FADER HAD SEX WITH A MAN NAME MR WIEN THEN THEY HAD SON NAMEDMRS COTURE AND MR MANOOGIAN WENT INTO MRS HASKELLS OFFICE NAKED AND DANCED AROUND AND MASTERBATED ON HER CHEST AND SHE LICKED IT OFF THEN THEY HAD ORAL SEEX WITH NAPLOEAN OF... 1817 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1818 (MDCCCXVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1840 is a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ...


Pre-Civil War Political Changes

In the first half of the 19th century, South Carolinians became more devoted to the idea that state's rights were superior to the Federal government's authority. Buildings such as the Marine Hospital ignited controversy over the degree in which the Federal government should be involved in South Carolina's government, society, and commerce. During this period over 90 percent of Federal funding was generated from import duties, collected by custom houses such as the one in Charleston. In 1832 South Carolina passed an ordinance of nullification, a procedure in which a state could in effect repeal a Federal law, directed against the most recent tariff acts. Soon Federal soldiers were dispensed to Charleston's forts and began to collect tariffs by force. A compromise was reached by which the tariffs would be gradually reduced, but the underlying argument over state's rights would continue to escalate in the coming decades. Charleston remained one of the busiest port cities in the country, and the construction of a new, larger United States Custom House began in 1849, but its construction was interrupted by the events of the Civil War. The process of nullification may refer to: The Hartford Convention, in which New England Federalists considered secession from the United States of America. ... Custom House is an area of the London Borough of Newham. ... Year 1849 (MDCCCXLIX) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


Prior to the 1860 election, the National Democratic Convention convened in Charleston. Hibernian Hall served as the headquarters for the delegates supporting Stephen A. Douglas, who it was hoped would bridge the gap between the northern and southern delegates on the issue of extending slavery to the territories. The convention disintegrated when delegates were unable to summon a two-thirds majority for any candidate. This divisiveness resulted in a split in the Democratic Party, and the election of Abraham Lincoln, the Republican candidate. Presidential electoral votes by state. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... Stephen Arnold Douglas (nicknamed the Little Giant because he was short but was considered by many a giant in politics) was an American politician from the western state of Illinois, and was the Democratic Party nominee for President in 1860. ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ...


American Civil War and Reconstruction

American Civil War

Main article: Charleston, South Carolina, in the Civil War
The ruins of Mills House and nearby buildings, Charleston A shell-damaged carriage and the remains of a brick chimney in the foreground. 1865.

On December 20, 1860, the South Carolina General Assembly made the state the first to ever secede from the Union. The cause was the election to the presidency of a man "whose opinions and purposes are hostile to slavery". Download high resolution version (1537x998, 374 KB)The ruins of Mills House and nearby buildings, Charleston, South Carolina A shell-damaged carriage and the remains of a brick chimney in the foreground. ... Download high resolution version (1537x998, 374 KB)The ruins of Mills House and nearby buildings, Charleston, South Carolina A shell-damaged carriage and the remains of a brick chimney in the foreground. ... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1860 is the leap year starting on Sunday. ... Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude 78° 32′ W to 83... Animated map of secession, Civil War and re-admission:  States of the Union  Territories of the Union (including occupied territory)  States of the Confederacy  Territories claimed by Confederacy During the American Civil War, the Union was a name used to refer to the twenty-three states of the United States...


On January 9, 1861, Citadel cadets fired the first shots of the American Civil War when they opened fire on the Union ship Star of the West entering Charleston's harbor. On April 12, 1861, shore batteries under the command of General Pierre G. T. Beauregard opened fire on the Union-held Fort Sumter in the harbor. After a 34-hour bombardment, Major Robert Anderson surrendered the fort. Officers and Cadets from The Citadel were assigned to various Confederate batteries during the bombardment of Fort Sumter. Although The Citadel continued to operate as an academy during the Civil War, cadets were made a part of the South Carolina military department along with the cadets from the Arsenal Academy in Columbia, to form the Battalion of State Cadets. Cadets from both institutions continued to aid the Confederate army by helping drill recruits, manufacture ammunition, protect arms depots, and guard Union prisoners. In December 1864 Citadel and Arsenal Cadets were ordered to join Confederate forces at Tullifinny Creek, South Carolina where they engaged in pitched battles with advancing units of General W. T. Sherman's army, suffering eight casualties. is the 9th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina, is a state-supported, comprehensive college located in Charleston, South Carolina. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Civilian ship used by James Buchanan to send supplies and reinforcements to Fort Sumpter before the Civil War. ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Pierre Gustave Toutant de Beauregard Pierre Gustave Toutant de Beauregard (BO-rih-gahrd) (May 28, 1818 – February 20, 1893), best known as a general for the Confederate States of America during the American Civil War, was also a writer, civil servant, and inventor. ... Fort Sumter, a Third System masonry coastal fortification located in Charleston harbor, South Carolina, was named after General Thomas Sumter. ... Anderson after the War Robert Anderson (June 14, 1805 – October 26, 1871) was a Union Army officer in the American Civil War, known for his command of Fort Sumter at the start of the war. ... General Sherman redirects here. ...

Ruins seen from the Circular Church, Charleston, South Carolina, 1865.

In all, The Citadel Corps of Cadets earned eight battle streamers and one service streamer for its service to South Carolina during the War. The city under siege took control of Fort Sumter, became the center for blockade running, and was the site of the first successful submarine warfare on February 17, 1864 when the H.L. Hunley made a daring night attack on the USS Housatonic.[12] In 1865, Union troops moved into the city, and took control of many sites, such as the United States Arsenal, which the Confederate army had seized at the outbreak of the war. The War department also confiscated the grounds and buildings of the Citadel Military Academy, which was used as a federal garrison for over 17 years, until its return to the state and reopening as a military college in 1882. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1476x1038, 393 KB)Ruins seen from the Circular Church, Charleston, South Carolina, 1865. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1476x1038, 393 KB)Ruins seen from the Circular Church, Charleston, South Carolina, 1865. ... is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1864 (MDCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... H. L. Hunley was a submarine of the Confederate States of America that demonstrated both the advantages and the dangers of undersea warfare. ... USS Housatonic was a screw sloop-of-war of the United States Navy, named for one of the rivers of New England which rises in Berkshire County, Massachusetts, and flows southward into Connecticut before emptying into Long Island Sound a little east of Bridgeport, Connecticut. ... The 21st Michigan Infantry, a company of Shermans veterans. ...

Reconstruction

After the defeat of the Confederacy, Federal forces remained in Charleston during the city's reconstruction. The war had shattered the prosperity of the antebellum city. Freed slaves were faced with poverty and discrimination. Industries slowly brought the city and its inhabitants back to a renewed vitality and growth in population. As the city's commerce improved, Charlestonians also worked to restore their community institutions.

King Street circa 1910-1920

In 1867 Charleston's first free secondary school for blacks was established, the Avery Institute. General William T. Sherman lent his support to the conversion of the United States Arsenal into the Porter Military Academy, an educational facility for former soldiers and boys left orphaned or destitute by the war. Porter Military Academy later joined with Gaud School and is now a K-12 prep school, Porter-Gaud School. The William Enston Homes, a planned community for the city's aged and infirmed, was built in 1889. An elaborate public building, the United States Post Office and Courthouse, was completed in 1896 and signaled renewed life in the heart of the city. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 774 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (5544 × 4296 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 774 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (5544 × 4296 pixel, file size: 2. ... General Sherman redirects here. ... A university-preparatory school or college-preparatory school (usually abbreviated to preparatory school, college prep school, or prep school) is a private secondary school designed to prepare a student for higher education. ... Porter-Gaud School is an independent college preparatory school with historic ties to the Episcopal Church. ...


On August 31, 1886, Charleston was nearly destroyed by an earthquake measuring 7.5 on the Richter scale that was felt as far away as Boston and Bermuda. It damaged 2,000 buildings and caused $6 million worth of damage ($133 million(2006 USD)), while in the whole city the buildings were only valued at approximately $24 million($531 million(2006 USD). is the 243rd day of the year (244th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1886 (MDCCCLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Damage from Charleston earthquake of August 31, 1886 The Charleston Earthquake of 1886 was the largest quake to hit the Southeastern United States. ... This article is about the natural seismic phenomenon. ... The Richter magnitude scale, or more correctly local magnitude ML scale, assigns a single number to quantify the amount of seismic energy released by an earthquake. ... Boston redirects here. ... USD redirects here. ... USD redirects here. ...


Yet, through many fires, hurricanes, tornadoes, several wars, and urban renewal in the 20th century, many of Charleston's historic buildings remain intact to this day. Urban Renewal redirects here. ...


Modern-day

Confederate Memorial at Battery Park.
Rainbow Row
Daughters of the Confederacy Building, near Charleston's downtown open market.

Charleston is a notable tourist destination, with streets lined with grand live oaks draped with Spanish moss, and the ubiquity of the Cabbage Palmetto, which is the state tree of South Carolina. Along the waterfront in an area known as Rainbow Row are many beautiful and historic pastel-colored homes. The city is also an important port, boasting the second largest container seaport on the East Coast and the fourth largest container seaport in North America.[13] It is also the second most productive port in the World behind Hong Kong. Charleston is becoming a prime location for information technology jobs and corporations, most notably Blackbaud, Modulant, CSS, Benefitfocus, and Google. Two of the five sections of the Boeing 787 fuselage are fabricated and assembled in Charleston. In the city's downtown area, the medical district is experiencing rapid growth of biotechnology and medical research coupled with substantial expansions of hospital facilities at the Medical University of South Carolina and Roper Hospital. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1200 × 1600 pixel, file size: 285 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Confederate Memorial in Charleston, SC: Taken by me August 2007 File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1200 × 1600 pixel, file size: 285 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Confederate Memorial in Charleston, SC: Taken by me August 2007 File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that... Image File history File links CharlestonSC_RainbowRow_500px. ... Image File history File links CharlestonSC_RainbowRow_500px. ... This page has few or no links to other articles. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 1425 KB) Summary Dan Carmichael Tupper Lake, NY Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 1425 KB) Summary Dan Carmichael Tupper Lake, NY Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Tourist redirects here. ... Binomial name Quercus virginiana Mill. ... Binomial name (L.) L. Spanish moss (Tillandsia usneoides) closely resembles its namesake (Usnea, or beard lichen). ... Binomial name Sabal palmetto (Walt. ... This page has few or no links to other articles. ... Blackbaud Inc. ... This article is about the corporation. ... The Boeing 787 Dreamliner is a mid-sized, wide-body, twin engine jet airliner currently under development by Boeing Commercial Airplanes. ... Insulin crystals Biotechnology is technology based on biology, especially when used in agriculture, food science, and medicine. ... The Medical University of South Carolina opened in Charleston, South Carolina in 1824 as a small private college for the training of physicians. ...


Hurricane Hugo hit Charleston in 1989, and though the worst damage was in nearby McClellanville, the storm damaged three-quarters of the homes in Charleston's historic district. The hurricane caused over $2.8 billion in damage. Lowest pressure 918 mbar (hPa; 27. ...


In 1993, a squadron of the C-17 Globemaster III aircraft was established at Charleston Air Force base. For the Lockheed aircraft with this designation, see C-17 Super Vega. ...


In 2004, the US Navy Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command (SPAWAR) became the largest employer in the Charleston metropolitan area. Until 2004, the Medical University of South Carolina was the largest employer. USN redirects here. ... The Medical University of South Carolina opened in Charleston, South Carolina in 1824 as a small private college for the training of physicians. ...


Charleston is the home of a Consolidated Mail Outpatient Pharmacy (CMOP). It is part of an initiative by the Department of Veterans Affairs to provide mail order prescriptions to veterans using computerization at strategic locations throughout the United States. The Consolidated Mail Outpatient Pharmacy (CMOP) is an initiative by the United States Department of Veterans Affairs to provide mail order prescriptions to veterans using computerization at strategic locations throughout the country. ...


In July of 2005, the Arthur Ravenel Bridge opened as the longest cable-stayed bridge in the country. The nearly completed bridge on April 15, 2005. ...


Government

Charleston has a strong mayor-council government, with the mayor acting as the chief administrator and the executive officer of the municipality. The mayor also presides over city council meetings and has a vote, the same as other council members. Image File history File links CharlestonSCseal. ... Mayor-Council government is one of two variations of government most commonly used in modern representative municipal governments in the United States. ... A city council is the most common style of legislative government in a city or town. ...


Emergency services

City of Charleston Fire Department

Fire department station houses for Engines 2 and 3 of the Charleston Fire Department.

The City of Charleston Fire Department consists of 237 firefighters in 19 companies located throughout the city.[14] The department operates on a 24/48 schedule, and has a Class I ISO rating.[15] Russell (Rusty) Thomas serves as the chief of the fire department. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 532 pixel Image in higher resolution (3008 × 2000 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 532 pixel Image in higher resolution (3008 × 2000 pixel, file size: 2. ... The City of Charleston Fire Department is a Class 1 rated department consisting of 19 fire companies located throughout the city of Charleston, South Carolina, USA. The Fire Chief supervises 3 Assistant Chiefs and 12 Battalion Chiefs, who command three shifts and work 24 hours on and 48 hours off. ...


June 2007 Warehouse Tragedy
Main article: Charleston Sofa Super Store fire

In an unprecedented tragedy for the City of Charleston Fire Department, 9 firefighters were killed on June 18, 2007 in a furniture warehouse fire, while searching for possible trapped occupants and attempting to extinguish the blaze.[16] It was the greatest single loss of firefighters in the United States since 343 firefighters were lost in the collapse of the World Trade Center which resulted from the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, and the greatest loss of firefighters in the history of the Charleston Fire Department. One station lost all but one of its firefighters. The Sofa Super Store burns shortly after the roof collapsed with nine firefighters trapped inside. ... The City of Charleston Fire Department is a Class 1 rated department consisting of 19 fire companies located throughout the city of Charleston, South Carolina, USA. The Fire Chief supervises 3 Assistant Chiefs and 12 Battalion Chiefs, who command three shifts and work 24 hours on and 48 hours off. ... This article is about the profession. ... is the 169th day of the year (170th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Ground Zero debris with markup showing building locations. ... A sequential look at United Flight 175 crashing into the south tower of the World Trade Center The September 11, 2001 attacks (often referred to as 9/11—pronounced nine eleven or nine one one) consisted of a series of coordinated terrorist[1] suicide attacks upon the United States, predominantly...


Police Department

The City of Charleston Police Department, with a total of 382 sworn officers, 137 civilians and 27 reserve police officers, is South Carolina's largest police department. Their procedures on cracking down on drug use and gang violence in the city are used as models to other cities to do the same. According to the final 2005 FBI Crime Reports, Charleston crime level is worse than the national average in almost every major category.[17]. Greg Mullen, the former Deputy Chief of Police in the City of Virginia Beach, Virginia, serves as the current police chief. The former Charleston police chief was Reuben Greenberg who resigned August 12, 2005). Greenberg was credited with creating a polite police force that kept police brutality well in check even as it developed a visible presence in community policing and a significant reductions in crime rates.[18] The City of Charleston Police Department (CPD) is the official police force of Charleston, South Carolina. ... Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia. ... is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... January 31 1919: David Kirkwood on the ground after being struck by batons of the Glasgow police Police brutality is a term used to describe the excessive use of physical force, assault, verbal attacks, and threats by police officers and other law enforcement officers. ...


EMS

Emergency medical services for the City of Charleston are provided by Charleston County Emergency Medical Services (CCEMS) & Berkeley County Emergency Medical Services (BCEMS). The city is served by both Charleston & Berkeley counties EMS and 911 services since the city is part of both counties. An Emergency medical service (abbreviated to initialism EMS in many countries) is a service providing out-of-hospital acute care and transport to definitive care, to patients with illnesses and injuries which the patient believes constitutes a medical emergency. ... Berkeley County is a county in the U.S. state of South Carolina. ...


Infrastructure and economy

Transportation

Airport

The Charleston area is served by Charleston International Airport (IATA: CHS, ICAO: KCHS), which is the busiest passenger airport in the state of South Carolina. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Charleston International Airport (IATA: CHS, ICAO: KCHS) is an airport located nine miles (14 km) northwest of the city of Charleston in Charleston County, South Carolina, USA. The airport has two runways which it shares with Charleston Air Force Base. ... An IATA airport code, also known an IATA location identifier, IATA station code or simply a location identifier [1], is a three-letter code designating many airports around the world, defined by the International Air Transport Association (IATA). ... The ICAO (IPA pronunciation: ) airport code or location indicator is a four-letter alphanumeric code designating each airport around the world. ... Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude 78° 32′ W to 83...

Interstates and highways

Interstate 26 enters the city from the north-northwest, and connects the city to its airport, Interstate 95, and Columbia, South Carolina. It ends at the Septima Clark Expressway downtown, which travels across two-thirds of the peninsula before merging into the Arthur Ravenel, Jr. Bridge. The bridge and Septima Clark Expressway are part of U.S. Highway 17, which travels east-west through the cities of Charleston and Mount Pleasant. Interstate 526, or the Mark Clark Expressway, forms a half-circle around the city. U.S. Highway 52 is Meeting Street and its spur is Morrison Drive, which becomes East Bay Street after leaving the Eastside. This highway merges with King Street in the city's Neck area (Industrial District) to form Rivers Avenue. U.S. Highway 78 is King Street in the downtown area, eventually merging with Meeting Street to form Rivers Avenue. Interstate 26 (abbreviated I-26) is an east-west main route of the Interstate Highway System in the Southeastern United States. ... Look up North in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Ordinal directions are the four compass directions: northeast, southeast, southwest, and northwest, located halfway between the cardinal directions. ... Interstate 95 is a major interstate highway, running along the East Coast of the United States from Florida to Maine. ... For other uses, see Columbia (disambiguation). ... Septima Poinsette Clark (May 3, 1898-1987) was an American educator and civil rights activist. ... The Arthur Ravenel, Jr. ... United States Highway 17 (also known as the Ocean Highway) is a north-south United States highway. ... A compass rose For other uses, see East (disambiguation). ... A compass rose with west highlighted This article refers to the cardinal direction; for other uses see West (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Mount Pleasant. ... Interstate 526 (abbreviated I-526) or the Mark Clark Expressway is an unfinshed beltway Interstate Highway of Interstate 26 in Charleston, South Carolina, USA. It forms a 19. ... Mark Wayne Clark (May 1, 1896 - April 17, 1984) was an American general during World War II and the Korean War. ... U.S. Highway 52 is an unusual United States highway. ... U.S. Route 52 Spur is an unsigned 2. ... U.S. Highway 78 is an east-west United States highway that runs for 715 miles (1,151 km) from Memphis, Tennessee, to Charleston, South Carolina. ...


The metropolitan area is served by several other U.S. highways. U.S. Highway 17A travels through the upper portions of the urban area, going southwest-northeast through the suburban cities of Summerville and Goose Creek. U.S. Highway 176 begins in Goose Creek and leaves the city to the northwest. U.S. Route 17 Alternate is an alternate route of U.S. Route 17 in South Carolina that runs between Georgetown to Pocotaligo. ... Ordinal directions are the four compass directions: northeast, southeast, southwest, and northwest, located halfway between the cardinal directions. ... Ordinal directions are the four compass directions: northeast, southeast, southwest, and northwest, located halfway between the cardinal directions. ... Summerville is a city, technically, but calls itself a town and is in Dorchester County, South Carolina, United States. ... Goose Creek is a city located in Berkeley County, South Carolina. ... U.S. Highway 176 is a spur of U.S. Highway 76. ...


The Charleston area is also served by several state highways including:

  • SC 7 - Sam Rittenberg Boulevard
  • SC 30 - James Island Expressway
  • SC 61 - St. Andrews Boulevard/Ashley River Road
  • SC 41
  • SC 171 - Old Towne Road
  • SC 517 - Clyde Moultrie Dangerfield Highway (Isle of Palms Connector)
  • SC 642 - Dorchester Road
  • SC 700 - Maybank Highway
  • SC 703 - Jasper Boulevard/Palm Boulevard

South Carolina Highway 61 is a minor highway through South Carolina. ... Isle of Palms is a city located in Charleston County, South Carolina. ...

Arthur Ravenel, Jr. Bridge

The Arthur Ravenel, Jr. Bridge across the Cooper River opened on July 16, 2005, and is the largest cable-stayed bridge in the Americas. The bridge links Mount Pleasant with downtown Charleston, and has eight lanes and a 12-foot lane shared by pedestrians and bicycles. It replaced the Silas N. Pearman Bridge (built in 1966) and the Grace Memorial Bridge (built in 1929). They were considered two of the most dangerous bridges in America, and were demolished after the Ravenel Bridge opened. The Arthur Ravenel, Jr. ... is the 197th day of the year (198th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... World map showing the Americas The Americas are the lands of the Western hemisphere historically considered to consist of the continents of North America and South America with their associated islands and regions. ... For other uses, see Mount Pleasant. ... The Silas N. Pearman Bridge, known locally as the New Cooper River Bridge from the opening date to the groundbreaking of its replacement, was a cantilever bridge that crossed the Cooper River in Charleston, South Carolina. ... The Grace Memorial Bridge was a cantilever bridge that crossed the Cooper River in Charleston, South Carolina. ...

The new Arthur Ravenel Jr. bridge, constructed in 2005, is the longest cable-stayed bridge in the Western Hemisphere.

Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 230 pixelsFull resolution (3888 × 1116 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 230 pixelsFull resolution (3888 × 1116 pixel, file size: 1. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A cable-stayed bridge is a bridge that consists of one or more columns (normally referred to as towers or pylons), with cables supporting the bridge deck. ...

Charleston Area Regional Transportation Authority

The logo of CARTA.

The city is also served by a bus system, operated by the Charleston Area Regional Transportation Authority (CARTA). The majority of the urban area is served by regional fixed route buses which are also equipped with bike racks as part of the system's Rack & Ride program. CARTA offers connectivity to historic downtown attractions and accommodations with DASH (Downtown Area Shuttle) trolley buses, and it offers curbside pickup for disabled passengers with its Tel-A-Ride buses. Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Autobus redirects here. ... Charleston Area Regional Transportation Authority or CARTA is a bus system in Charleston, South Carolina, USA. It serves Charleston and some of its suburbs with 31 routes and a fleet of 54 buses. ...


Rural parts of the city and metropolitan area are served by a different bus system, operated by Berkeley-Charleston-Dorchester Rural Transportation Management Association (BCD-RTMA). Autobus redirects here. ...


The Port

Columbus Street Terminal viewed from the southwest.

The Port of Charleston consists of five terminals. Three are on the Harbor and the other two are on the Cooper River just north of Charleston's bustling harbor. The port is ranked number one in North America by Supply Chain Execs.[19] Port activity, behind tourism, is the leading source of Charleston's revenue. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 1. ...


Piers
  • Columbus Street Terminal
  • North Charleston Terminal
  • Union Pier Terminal
  • Veterans Terminal
  • Wando Welch Terminal

A new terminal is being planned on the former Naval Shipyard Grounds to accommodate the growing needs of the port.


Industry

The Hess Corporation (NYSE: HES) is an integrated oil company based in New York City. ... Nucor Corporation (NYSE: NUE) is one of the largest steel producers in the United States, and the largest of the mini-mill operators (those using electric arc furnaces to melt scrap steel, as opposed to companies using traditional blast furnace technology). ... Cellco Partnership, doing business as Verizon Wireless, owns and operates the second largest wireless telecommunications network in the United States, based on total wireless customers. ... The VE-7 was the first plane to make a US carrier takeoff. ... The Boeing 787 Dreamliner is a mid-sized, wide-body, twin engine jet airliner currently under development by Boeing Commercial Airplanes. ...

Geography and Climate

Map showing the major rivers of Charleston and the Charleston Harbor watershed.

The city proper consists of six distinct areas: the Peninsula/Downtown, West Ashley, Johns Island, James Island, Daniel Island, and the Cainhoy Peninsula. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 600 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1000 × 1000 pixel, file size: 395 KB, MIME type: image/png) This is a map of the Charleston Harbor watershed, including the Ashley, Cooper, Wando and Stono rivers. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 600 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1000 × 1000 pixel, file size: 395 KB, MIME type: image/png) This is a map of the Charleston Harbor watershed, including the Ashley, Cooper, Wando and Stono rivers. ... West Ashley is a suburb of Charleston, South Carolina, with an estimated 2007 population of 54,001. ... Johns Island is a barrier island just across the Stono River, located to the west of James Island and to the east of Wadmalaw Island, both barrier islands. ... James Island is a large triangular island in the Atlantic very near Charleston, South Carolina. ... Daniel Island is a planned residential and commercial area situated between the Cooper and Wando Rivers located in the city of Charleston, South Carolina and is the home to Bishop England High School, which relocated from downtown when the island was developed. ...


Coordinates

Charleston is located at 32.78° N 79.93° W.[20]


Demographics

The racial/Ethnic makeup of Charleston is 65.2% White Americans, 31.6% African Americans, 1.6% Asian Americans, and 2.4% Hispanics or Latino (who may be of any race)[1] A European American, or a Euro-American, is an American of European descent. ... African Americans, also known as Afro-Americans or black Americans, are an ethnic group in the United States of America whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Sub-Saharan and West Africa. ... An Asian American is a person of Asian ancestry or origin who was born in or is an immigrant to the United States. ... Hispanic Americans (Spanish: Hispano Americano) are Americans of Hispanic ethnicity who largely identify with the Hispanic cultural heritage. ... For the Brazilian pop singer, see Latino (singer). ...


Topography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 347.5 square kilometers (134.2 sq mi). 251.2 km² (97.0 sq mi) of it is land and 44.3 km² (17.1 sq mi) (15%) of it is water. The old city is located on a peninsula at the point where, as Charlestonians say, "The Ashley and the Cooper Rivers come together to form the Atlantic Ocean." The entire peninsula is very low, some of it is landfill material, and as such, it frequently floods during heavy rains, storm surges and unusually high tides. The city limits have expanded across the Ashley River from the peninsula encompassing the majority of West Ashley as well as James Island and some of Johns Island. The city limits also have expanded across the Cooper River encompassing Daniel Island and the Cainhoy area. North Charleston blocks any expansion up the peninsula, and Mount Pleasant occupies the land directly east of the Cooper River. The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... A peninsula in Croatia A peninsula is a piece of land that is bordered on three or more sides by water. ... The Ashley River is the name of multiple rivers. ... The Cooper River is a river in the U.S. state of South Carolina. ...


The tidal rivers (Wando, Cooper, Stono, and Ashley) are evidence of a submergent or drowned coastline. In other words, the original rivers had a lower base line, but as the ocean rose or the land sank, the landform was changed. There is a submerged river delta off the mouth of the harbor, and the rivers are deep, affording a good location for a port. The rising of the ocean may be due to melting of glacial ice during the end of the ice age. In earth science a submergent coastline is a coastline which has experienced a rise in sea level, either due to a global sea level change, or local subsidence. ... In typography and penmanship, the baseline is the line upon which most letters sit and under which descenders extend. ... Nile River delta, as seen from Earth orbit. ... The Charleston Harbor is an inlet (8 sq mi/20. ... For other uses, see Port (disambiguation). ... Perito Moreno Glacier Patagonia Argentina Aletsch Glacier, Switzerland Icebergs breaking off glaciers at Cape York, Greenland This article is about the geological formation. ... Variations in CO2, temperature and dust from the Vostok ice core over the last 400 000 years For the animated movie, see Ice Age (movie). ...


In recent decades, the urban area of the city has become elongated along Interstate 26, while being fairly short from east to west. Today areas with a population density of over 1,000 people per square mile extends continuously from the tip of the peninsula out to the Summerville area. Interstate 26 (abbreviated I-26) is an east-west main route of the Interstate Highway System in the Southeastern United States. ...


Climate

Charleston has a humid subtropical climate (Köppen climate classification Cfa), with mild winters, hot, humid summers, and significant rainfall all year long. Summer is the wettest season; almost half of the annual rainfall occurs during the summer months in the form of thundershowers, which is an effect similar to the monsoons found in Southern Asia. Fall remains relatively warm through November. Winter is short and mild, and is characterized by occasional rain. Snow flurries seldom occur. The highest temperature recorded (inside city limits at the Customs House on E. Bay St.) was 104 °F (40 °C), on June 2, 1985, and the lowest temperature recorded was 10 °F (−12 °C) on January 21, 1985.[21] Hurricanes are a major threat to the area during the summer and early fall, with several severe hurricanes hitting the area - most notably Hurricane Hugo in 1989 (a Category 4 storm). The humid subtropical climate (Köppen Cfa) is a climate zone characterized by hot, humid summers and chilly to mild winters. ... Updated Köppen-Geiger climate map[1] The Köppen climate classification is one of the most widely used climate classification systems. ... A monsoon is a periodic wind, especially in the Indian Ocean and southern Asia. ... This is a region of the continent of Asia that can have the following interpretations: The Indian Subcontinent and nearby islands in the Indian Ocean; see South Asia India, Pakistan, Nepal, Bhutan, Bangladesh, Maldives, Sri Lanka All of Asia that is considered to be Southwest, South and Southeast Asia. ... For other uses, see Fahrenheit (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Celsius (disambiguation). ... is the 153rd day of the year (154th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... is the 21st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Lowest pressure 918 mbar (hPa; 27. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... The Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale is a scale classifying most Western Hemisphere tropical cyclones that exceed the intensities of tropical depressions and tropical storms, and thereby become hurricanes. ...


Charleston was hit by a large tornado in 1761, which temporarily emptied the Ashley River, and sank five offshore warships.[22] This article is about the weather phenomenon. ...

Monthly Normal and Record High and Low Temperatures
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Rec High °F 83 87 90 95 98 104 103 103 102 94 88 83
Norm High °F 58.9 62.3 69.3 76.1 82.9 87.9 90.9 89.4 85 77 69.6 61.6
Norm Low °F 36.9 39.1 46 52.2 61.3 68.5 72.5 71.6 67.1 55.3 46.4 39.3
Rec Low °F 10 17 22 29 44 53 65 56 42 36 27 16
Precip (in) 4.08 3.08 4 2.77 3.67 5.92 6.13 6.91 5.98 3.09 2.66 3.24
Source: USTravelWeather.com [2]

Metropolitan area

The Charleston Metropolitan Statistical Area consists of three counties: Charleston, Berkeley, and Dorchester. As of 2006, it was estimated that the metropolitan area had a total population of about 603,178 people.[23] Charleston has several large suburbs. North Charleston is nearly as populated as Charleston itself and ranks as the third largest city in the state; Mount Pleasant and Summerville are the next largest suburbs. The traditional parish system persisted until the Reconstruction, when counties were imposed. Nevertheless, traditional parishes still exist in various capacities, mainly as public service districts. The city of Charleston proper, which was originally defined by the limits of the Parish of St. Philip & St. Michael. It now also includes parts of St. James' Parish, St. George's Parish, St. Andrew's Parish, and St. John's Parish, although the last two are mostly still incorporated rural parishes. Charleston County is a county located in the state of South Carolina. ... Berkeley County is a county in the U.S. state of South Carolina. ... Dorchester County is a county located in the state of South Carolina. ...


In the more detailed results of Census 2000, the Charleston-North Charleston metropolitan area had a population of 549,033, of which about 78% lived inside the central city and its surrounding urban area. At that time, the Charleston-North Charleston Urbanized Area proper consisted of 423,410 people (including the suburbs listed below). This population makes Charleston-North Charleston and Columbia essentially tied as the two largest individual urbanized areas within the state. The Charleston MSA also includes a separate and much smaller urban area within Berkeley County, Moncks Corner (2000 pop.: 9,123). This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Moncks Corner is the county seat of Berkeley County, South Carolina. ...


Culture

Charleston is well-known across the United States and beyond for its unique culture, which blends West African, traditional southern American and French elements.


Dialect

Charleston's unique but vanishing dialect has long been noted in the South and elsewhere, for the singular attributes it possesses. Alone among the various regional Southern dialects, Charlestonian speakers inglide long mid vowels, such as the raising for /ay/ and /aw/. Some attribute these unique features of Charleston's speech to its early settlement by the French Huguenots and Sephardic Jews, both of which played influential parts in Charleston's development and history. However, given Charleston's high concentration of African-Americans that spoke the Gullah language, the speech patterns were more influenced by the dialect of the Gullah African-American community. In the 16th and 17th centuries, the name of Huguenots came to apply to members of the Protestant Reformed Church of France, or historically as the French Calvinists. ... In the strictest sense, a Sephardi (ספרדי, Standard Hebrew Səfardi, Tiberian Hebrew Səp̄ardî; plural Sephardim: ספרדים, Standard Hebrew Səfardim, Tiberian Hebrew Səp̄ardîm) is a Jew original to the Iberian Peninsula (Spain and Portugal: ספרד, Standard Hebrew Səfárad, Tiberian Hebrew Səp̄áraḏ / Səp̄āraḏ), or whose ancestors were among the Jews expelled from... The Gullah language (Sea Island Creole English, Geechee) is a creole language spoken by the Gullah people (also called Geechees), an African American population living on the Sea Islands and the coastal region of the U.S. states of South Carolina and Georgia. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Today, the Gullah language and dialect is still spoken among African-American locals. However rapid development, especially on the surrounding sea islands, is slowly diminishing its prominence. The Gullah language (Sea Island Creole English, Geechee) is a creole language spoken by the Gullah people (also called Geechees), an African American population living on the Sea Islands and the coastal region of the U.S. states of South Carolina and Georgia. ...


Two important works which shed light on Charleston's early dialect are "Charleston Provincialisms" and "The Huguenot Element in Charleston's Provincialisms," both written by Sylvester Primer. Further scholarship is needed on the influence of Sephardic Jews to the speech patterns of Charleston. Sylvester Primer was a linguist and philologist. ...


Religion

French Protestant (Huguenot) Church

The city has long been noted for its numerous churches and denominations. It is the seat of both the Roman Catholic Diocese of Charleston and the Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina. One of the few remaining Huguenot congregations in America is located in the city. The city is home to many well known churches, cathedrals, and synagogues. The churchtower spotted skyline is one of the reasons for the city's nickname, "The Holy City." Historically, Charleston was one of the most religiously tolerant cities in the New World. Recently, the conservative Episcopal diocese of South Carolina, headquartered in Charleston, has been one of the key players in potential schism of the Anglican Church. Charleston is home to the only African-American Seventh Day Baptist Church congregation in the Seventh Day Baptist General Conference of the United States and Canada. The First Baptist Church of Charleston is the oldest Baptist church in the South and the first Southern Baptist Church in existence. It is also used as a private K-12 school. Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... The Cathedral of Saint John the Baptist The Roman Catholic Diocese of Charleston is an ecclesiastical territory or diocese of the Roman Catholic Church in the southern United States and is comprised of the entire state of South Carolina,[1] with Charleston as its see city. ... The Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina is located in Charleston, South Carolina. ... From the 16th to the 18th century the name Huguenot was applied to a member of the Protestant Reformed Church of France, historically known as the French Calvinists. ... For other uses, see Cathedral (disambiguation). ...


Charleston also has a large and historic Jewish population. The Judiac Reform movement was founded in Charleston at Synagogue Kahal Kadosh Beth Elohim. It is the fourth oldest Jewish congregation in the continental United States (after New York, Newport and Savannah). The synagogue Scolanova Trani in Italy. ...


Annual cultural events and fairs

Charleston Place on King Street

Charleston annually hosts Spoleto Festival USA, a 17-day art festival featuring over 100 performances by individual artists in a variety of disciplines. Charleston's "other" festival is the MOJA Arts Festival, which is a major, two-week celebration of African-American and Caribbean arts, music, and culture. The Southeastern Wildlife Exposition is also held in the city, as well as the Food + Wine Festival, Family Circle Tennis Cup, Cooper River Bridge Run and the Maritime Festival, which is held annually in May and features tall ships, boatbuilding, and the Charleston to Bermuda Race. In 2007 Charleston Fashion Week made its first appearance and was a huge success. It is held by the fashion publication Charleston Magazine and now will be an annual event in the city. It is like most of the major fashion weeks in other major cities. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2194x1704, 1580 KB) Charleston Place on King Street in Charleston File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Charleston, South Carolina Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2194x1704, 1580 KB) Charleston Place on King Street in Charleston File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Charleston, South Carolina Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added... Spoleto Festival USA is an annual festival of the arts held in Charleston, South Carolina since 1977. ... This article is about the philosophical concept of Art. ... For other uses, see Festival (disambiguation). ... The Cooper River Bridge Run is an annual 10,000 meter run, sanctioned by USA Track and Field, held in the cities of Mount Pleasant and Charleston in South Carolina, on the first Saturday in April, unless it is the day before Easter Sunday, when the event is held on...


Museums and historical attractions

Boone Hall

As an old colonial city, Charleston has a wide variety of museums and historical attractions. The Old Exchange and Customs House in downtown Charleston, finished in 1771, is arguably the third most important Colonial building in the nation (behind Faneuil Hall in Boston, Massachusetts and Independence Hall in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania). The building features a dungeon which held various signers of the Declaration of Independence, and also hosted events for George Washington in 1791, and the ratification of the U.S. Constitution in 1788. It has also served as a U.S. post office, the first Confederate post office, and was used by the United States Coast Guard. Not far from Charleston is the location of Fort Moultrie, which was instrumental in delivering a critical defeat to the British in the American Revolutionary War, and Fort Sumter, the reputed site of the "first shot" of the American Civil War. Patriot's Point, located across the river in nearby Mount Pleasant, South Carolina, is also home to the aircraft carrier USS Yorktown as well as several other naval vessels. There are also several former plantations in the area, including Boone Hall Plantation, Drayton Hall, Magnolia Plantation, and Middleton Place. The Charleston Tea Plantation is located just south of the city on Wadmalaw Island, and is a true working tea farm. Charleston's premier art museum is the Gibbes Museum of Art, one of the country's oldest art organizations and home to over 10,000 works of fine art. Also the Charleston Museum was the first Museum in the Americas. Other attractions include the South Carolina Aquarium, the Audubon Swamp Garden, Cypress Gardens, and Charles Towne Landing. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 374 KB) Boone Hall Plantation, Mount Pleasant, south Carolina Photo by Jan Kronsell, 2002 File links The following pages link to this file: Charleston, South Carolina Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 374 KB) Boone Hall Plantation, Mount Pleasant, south Carolina Photo by Jan Kronsell, 2002 File links The following pages link to this file: Charleston, South Carolina Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner... 1771 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Faneuil Hall (pronounced , previously ), located near the waterfront and todays Government Center, in Boston, Massachusetts, has been a marketplace and a meeting hall since 1742. ... Boston redirects here. ... Independence Hall is a U.S. national landmark located inside Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on Chestnut Street between 5th and 6th Streets. ... For other uses, see Philadelphia (disambiguation) and Philly. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... A declaration of independence is an assertion of the independence of an aspiring state or states. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... 1791 (MDCCXCI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Page I of the Constitution of the United States of America Page II of the United States Constitution Page III of the United States Constitution Page IV of the United States Constitution The Syng inkstand, with which the Constitution was signed The Constitution of the United States is the supreme... 1788 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... USCG HH-65 Dolphin USCG HH-60J JayHawk USCG HC-130H departs Mojave USCG HC-130H on International Ice Patrol duties The United States Coast Guard (USCG) is at all times a branch of the U.S. military, a maritime law enforcement agency, and a federal regulatory body. ... Fort Moultrie is the name of a series of forts on Sullivans Island, South Carolina, built to protect the city of Charleston, South Carolina. ... This article is about military actions only. ... Fort Sumter, a Third System masonry coastal fortification located in Charleston harbor, South Carolina, was named after General Thomas Sumter. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Patriots Point Naval & Maritime Museum is located in Mount Pleasant, SC at the mouth of the Cooper River on the Charleston Harbor, across from Charleston, SC. It is home to four museum ships: USS Yorktown, an aircraft carrier USCGC Ingham, a Coast Guard cutter USS Laffey, a destroyer USS... For other uses, see Mount Pleasant. ... USS Yorktown (CV/CVS-10) was an Essex-class aircraft carrier of the United States Navy, and is now a museum ship at Patriots Point , Mount Pleasant, South Carolina. ... This article is about crop plantations. ... Boone Hall Slave Cabin The Boone Hall Plantation and Gardens is a plantation complex located in Mount Pleasant, South Carolina and listed on the National Register of Historic Places. ... Drayton Hall, in the Carolina Low Country near Charleston, South Carolina, is one of the handsomest examples of Palladian architecture in North America. ... Plantation home at Magnolia Plantation Horticulture maze on the plantation Magnolia Plantation and Gardens (70 acres, 28 hectares) is historic house with gardens located on the Ashley River at 3550 Ashley River Road, Charleston, South Carolina, United States. ... Middleton Place (65 acres) is a historic plantation with gardens located along the Ashley River at 4300 Ashley River Road, Charleston, South Carolina. ... Established as the Carolina Art Association in 1858, the Gibbes Museum of Art opened its doors to the public in 1905. ... The Charleston Museum was the first ever museum built in the western hemisphere. ... World map showing the Americas CIA political map of the Americas in an equal-area projection The Americas are the lands of the Western hemisphere or New World, consisting of the continents of North America and South America with their associated islands and regions. ... The South Carolina Aquarium, located in Charleston, South Carolina, opened in May of 2000 on the historic Charleston Harbor. ... Audubon Swamp Garden is a 60-acre cypress and tupelo swamp on the grounds of Magnolia Plantation near Charleston, South Carolina. ... Cypress Gardens (163 acres) are commercial nature preserves and gardens located at 3030 Cypress Garden Road, Moncks Corner, South Carolina. ...


Sports

Charleston is home to a number of professional minor league and amateur sports teams:

  • The Charleston Outlaws RFC is a Rugby Union Football Club founded in 1973. The Club is in good standing with the Palmetto Rugby Union, USA Rugby South, and USARFU. The club competes for honors in Men's Division II against the Cape Fear, Columbia, Greenville, and Charlotte "B" clubs. The club also hosts a Rugby Sevens tournament during Memorial Day weekend.

Other notable sports venues in the Charleston area include Family Circle Magazine Stadium (home of the WTA Tour affiliated professional tennis tournament for women, the Family Circle Cup) and Johnson Hagood Stadium (home of the The Citadel Bulldogs football team). Construction of the Palmetto Bowl was expected to begin in 2006 or 2007, but due to an NCAA boycott on sporting events being held in the state due to a Confederate flag issue, and a lack of funds, the plan to build a 35,000 seat stadium was scrapped. However, Johnson Hagood Stadium is almost finished with a major renovation, and the new West Stands will open up for the Sertoma Football Classic, a local high school football exhibition, in mid August 2007. The entire stadium will be finished in 2008. The College of Charleston has broken ground on the Carolina First Center which will seat 5,700 people for the school's basketball & volleyball teams, and construction will finish in the fall of 2008. The Charleston Battery is a U.S. professional mens soccer team based in Charleston, South Carolina. ... Soccer redirects here. ... The United Soccer Leagues First Division (often referred to as simply, USL-1) is a professional mens soccer league in North America. ... Blackbaud Stadium is a Soccer-specific stadium that opened in 1999. ... League South Atlantic League Division South Year founded 1886 Major League affiliation New York Yankees Home ballpark Joseph P. Riley, Jr. ... For the organization which many minor leagues belong to, see Minor League Baseball Part of the History of baseball series. ... The South Atlantic League is a minor league baseball league which operates mostly in the southeastern United States, although it now has teams in New Jersey and Ohio. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... Joseph P. Riley, Jr. ... The South Carolina Stingrays are an ECHL team based in North Charleston, South Carolina, a suburb of the metropolitan area of Charleston, South Carolina and have become one of the longest established teams in the ECHL. Since 2004, the team has been affiliated with the Washington Capitals of the National... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... The ECHL (formerly the East Coast Hockey League) is a professional ice hockey league based in Princeton, New Jersey, with teams scattered across the United States and Canada, generally regarded as a tier below the American Hockey League. ... The Washington Capitals are a professional ice hockey team based in Washington, D.C.. They are members of the Southeast Division of the Eastern Conference of the National Hockey League (NHL). ... The North Charleston Coliseum is a 12,405-seat multi-purpose arena in North Charleston, South Carolina, part of the North Charlston Coliseum, Performing Arts Center, and Convention Center complex built in 1993 (the Performing Arts Center and Convention Center opened in 1999) located on the access road to Charleston... The Carolina Sandsharks are a professional indoor football team based in North Charleston, South Carolina, a suburb of the metropolitan area of Charleston, South Carolina. ... The American Indoor Football Association(AIFA) was formed in October of 2006. ... The North Charleston Coliseum is a 12,405-seat multi-purpose arena in North Charleston, South Carolina, part of the North Charlston Coliseum, Performing Arts Center, and Convention Center complex built in 1993 (the Performing Arts Center and Convention Center opened in 1999) located on the access road to Charleston... For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ... Categories: Sports stubs ... WTA stands for Womens Tennis Association, and is also known as the WTA Tour, and is to womens tennis what the ATP is to mens tennis. ... For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ... The Family Circle Cup is a WTA Tour affiliated professional tennis tournament for women, held every year since 1973. ... Johnson Hagood Stadium is a 21,000-seat multi-purpose stadium in Charleston, South Carolina. ... The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina, is a state-supported, comprehensive college located in Charleston, South Carolina. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... For other meanings of confederate and confederacy, see confederacy (disambiguation) National Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God our Vindicator) Official language English de facto nationwide Various European and Native American languages regionally Capital Montgomery, Alabama February 4, 1861–May 29, 1861 Richmond, Virginia May 29, 1861–April 9, 1865 Largest... Johnson Hagood Stadium is a 21,000-seat multi-purpose stadium in Charleston, South Carolina. ... Dakota Zoo, Bismarck, ND Sertoma is the name of a Park in Bismarck, ND. Sertoma is on a three mile stretch of riverside plain on the Missouri River. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... The College of Charleston (C of C) is a public university located in historic downtown Charleston, South Carolina. ... The College of Charleston Arena is a 5,000 seat multi-purpose arena in Charleston, South Carolina. ...


Nearby Kiawah Island Golf Resort's Ocean Course hosted the 1991 Ryder Cup matches, the 2007 Senior PGA Championship and is scheduled to host the 2012 PGA Championship. The Kiawah Island Golf Resort is a resort located in Kiawah Island, South Carolina, United States, near the city of Charleston. ... The Ryder Cup is a golf trophy contested biennially in an event called the Ryder Cup Matches by teams from Europe and the United States. ... The Senior PGA Championship is one of the major championships in mens senior golf. ... The PGA Championship (often referred to as the U.S. PGA Championship outside of North America) is an annual golf tournament conducted by the Professional Golfers Association of America as part of the PGA Tour. ...


Charleston in fiction

See also: List of television shows and movies in Charleston, South Carolina

Several books have been written which utilize Charleston as a setting. In addition, Citadel alumnus and novelist Pat Conroy often writes about Charleston. This is a list of television shows and/or movies that were either filmed, or set, in Charleston, South Carolina. ... Pat Conroy (born October 26, 1945 in Atlanta, Georgia) is a New York Times bestselling author who has written such acclaimed works as The Lords of Discipline, Beach Music, The Great Santini, The Prince of Tides, The Water is Wide, The Boo, My Losing Season, and Conroys stories have...


In the summer of 2007, the pilot episode for an upcoming mini series, "El Cid", was filmed on The Citadel campus and in surrounding Charleston. Directed and produced by 2004 Citadel graduate Nicholaos Collins, the series is a dramatization based on the lives of Citadel Cadets and the rigors of cadet life. The show also stars and was co-produced by notable Charlestonian and 2004 Citadel Alumnus Yanni Bohren. Statue of El Cid in Burgos. ...


The Gullah opera Porgy and Bess is set in Charleston. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The cast of Porgy and Bess during the Boston try-out prior to the Broadway opening. ...


Clive Barker's novel, Galilee, takes place partly in Charleston, as does Josephine Humphreys's 1987 novel Rich in Love. For the South African football (soccer) coach, see Clive Barker (soccer). ... Josephine Humphreys (born February 2, 1945) is a U.S. novelist. ... See also: 1986 in literature, other events of 1987, 1988 in literature, list of years in literature. ...


In Harry Turtledove's Timeline-191 alternate history series about a Confederacy that won the Civil War, Charleston suffers an airstrike from an American aircraft carrier in the summer of 1941, in response to the Confederate invasion of Ohio. By the last year of the war in 1945, the Union army drops its second atomic bomb on Charleston, vaporizing the city, in revenge for its secession in 1861. Harry Norman Turtledove (born June 14, 1949) is an American historian and prolific novelist who has written historical fiction, fantasy, and science fiction works. ... Timeline-191 is a fan name given to a series of Harry Turtledove alternate history novels. ... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial)  States that seceded under CSA control  States and territories claimed by CSA without formal secession and/or control Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... This article is about the U.S. State. ...


Rafael Sabatini's novel, The Carolinian, takes place mostly in Charles Town between the years 1775-9. Rafael Sabatini (April 29, 1875 - February 13, 1950) was an Italian/British writer of novels of romance and adventure. ...


The 1991 bestseller Scarlett, sequel to Gone with the Wind, was partially set in Charleston, where Scarlett goes in the hope of getting her husband back. Rhett Butler, in both the original and in the sequel, is originally from Charleston. In fact, Alexandra Ripley, the author of Scarlett, derived inspiration from the city for her novel Charleston and its sequel On Leaving Charleston. Scarlett is a novel written in 1991 by Alexandra Ripley as a sequel to Margaret Mitchells Gone with the Wind. ... For the film, see Gone with the Wind (film). ... Rhett Butler is the handsome, dashing hero of Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell. ...


The movie The Notebook was almost entirely filmed in and around Charleston. The Notebook is a 1996 American romantic novel by Nicholas Sparks that was later adapted into a popular romantic film by the same name in 2004. ...


Charleston was also destroyed by a nuclear explosion in the 1983 made-for-television film Special Bulletin, which was presented as a realistic news broadcast of a terrorist event. Special Bulletin was an American made-for-TV movie first broadcast in 1983. ...


Several portions of The Patriot were filmed on the College of Charleston campus. Also, several portions of O, a modern film based on Othello, were filmed in Charleston and on the campus of College of Charleston. The miniseries "North and South" starring Patrick Swayze was filmed in and about Charleston. The Patriot is a 2000 film starring Mel Gibson and directed by Roland Emmerich. ... The College of Charleston (C of C) is a public university located in historic downtown Charleston, South Carolina. ... O is a 2001 teen film version of William Shakespeares Othello. ... For other uses, see Othello (disambiguation). ...


Currently, the Lifetime television series Army Wives is filming in Charleston for its second season. Most of the filming has been done at the old Navy base. Lifetime Television is an American television network devoted to movies, sitcoms and dramas, all of which are either geared toward women or feature women in lead roles. ... Army Wives is a US television drama series about a woman who marries a soldier and moves her family onto a US Army post, where she becomes friends with other women and men whose spouses are in the Army. ... Naval redirects here. ...


Cities and towns in the metro area

Location of Awendaw in South Carolina Coordinates: Country United States State South Carolina County Charleston Mayor William H. Alston Area    - City 21. ... Location of Folly Beach in South Carolina Coordinates: , Country United States State South Carolina County Charleston Government  - Mayor Carl B Beckmann Jr Area  - City 18. ... Hanahan is a city located in Berkeley County, South Carolina. ... Isle of Palms is a city located in Charleston County, South Carolina. ... James Island is a town or community in Charleston County, South Carolina. ... For other uses, see Mount Pleasant. ... Nickname: Coordinates: , Country State Counties Charleston, Dorchester Government  - Mayor R. Keith Summey Area  - City 62. ... Sullivans Island is a town located in Charleston County, South Carolina. ... Summerville is a city, technically, but calls itself a town and is in Dorchester County, South Carolina, United States. ... Goose Creek is a city located in Berkeley County, South Carolina. ... Moncks Corner is the county seat of Berkeley County, South Carolina. ... Hollywood is a town located in Charleston County, South Carolina. ... Jamestown is a town located in Berkeley County, South Carolina. ... Ridgeville is a town located in Dorchester County, South Carolina. ... St. ... Rockville is a town located in Charleston County, South Carolina. ... Meggett is a town located in Charleston County, South Carolina. ... McClellanville is a town in Charleston County, South Carolina, United States. ... St. ... Bonneau is a town in Berkeley County, South Carolina, United States. ... Daniel Island is a planned residential and commercial area situated between the Cooper and Wando Rivers located in the city of Charleston, South Carolina and is the home to Bishop England High School, which relocated from downtown when the island was developed. ...

Other unincorporated areas

  • Johns Island
  • Wadmalaw Island
  • Morris Island
  • St. Stephen
  • Dewee's Island
  • Yonges Island

Neighborhoods in the City

Charleston is made up of a main peninsula surrounded by numerous islands and barrier islands that are also part of the Charleston Metro Area. The City of Charleston proper includes the main peninsula, an area west of the Ashley River known as West Ashley, a large area east of the Cooper River which includes Daniel Island and the Cainhoy Peninsula, and also parts of James Island and Johns Island.


Peninsula / Downtown neighborhoods & districts

  • Ansonborough
  • Central Business District
  • Cannonborough
  • Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial District
  • Eastside
  • Elliotborough
  • French Quarter
  • Four Mile-Hibernian
  • Harleston Village
  • Hampton Park Terrace
  • Mazyck-Wraggsborough
  • Medical District
  • North Central
  • Radcliffeborough
  • Rosemont
  • Silver Hill-Magnolia
  • South of Broad
  • Westside
  • Wagener Terrace

The French Quarter of Charleston, South Carolina, is the region bounded by Broad Street, Market Street, East Bay Street, and Meeting Street. ...

West Ashley neighborhoods

  • Air Harbor
  • Albemarle Point
  • Ardmore
  • Ashley Hall Manor
  • Ashley Hall Plantation
  • Ashley Harbor
  • Ashleyville
  • Avondale
  • Byrnes Downs
  • Canterbury Woods
  • Capri Isle
  • Carolina Bay
  • Charlestowne Estates
  • Castlewood Townhouses
  • Drayton on the Ashley
  • Edgewater Park
  • Forest Park
  • Grand Oaks Plantation
  • Harrison Acres
  • Heathwood
  • Hickory Farms
  • Hickory Hill
  • Hunt Club
  • Indigo Point
  • Lenevar
  • MacLaura Hall
  • Oak Forest
  • Old Towne Acres
  • Orleans Woods
  • Maryville
  • Melrose
  • Moreland
  • Northbridge Terrace
  • Orange Grove Estates
  • Orange Grove Shores
  • Parkshore
  • Pierpont
  • Ponderosa
  • Providence Commons
  • Saint Andrews
  • Shadowmoss Plantation
  • Schieveling Plantation
  • Sherwood Forest
  • South Windermere
  • Springfield
  • Stono Park
  • Sylvan Shores
  • The Crescent
  • Village Green
  • Wappoo Shores
  • Wespanee Plantation
  • Windermere

James Island neighborhoods

  • Bayview Farms
  • Charleston Country Club
  • Clearview
  • Harbor Point
  • Harbor Woods
  • Landsdowne
  • Lawton Bluff
  • Parrot Creek
  • Riverland Terrace
  • Stiles Point Plantation
  • Terrabrook
  • White House Plantation
  • Riverfront
  • Secessionville
  • Sol Legare
  • Westchester
  • Woodward Pointe

Johns Island neighborhoods

  • Gift Plantation
  • Grimball Gates
  • Headquarters Island
  • Headquarters Plantation
  • Summertrees
  • The Gardens at Whitney Lake
  • Twelve Oaks at Fenwick Hall Plantation
  • The Villages in St. Johns Woods
  • The Cottages at Johns Island
  • Winnsboro Lakes

Cainhoy Peninsula / Daniel Island neighborhoods

  • Barfield Park
  • Beresford Creek Landing
  • Beresford Hall
  • Cainhoy Historic District
  • Cainhoy Industrial District
  • Center Park
  • Cochran Park
  • Codner's Ferry Park
  • Downtown Daniel Island
  • Etiwan Park
  • Pierce Park
  • River Reach Pointe
  • Smythe Park
  • The Peninsula

Squares in Downtown Charleston

SC State Arsenal (Old Citadel), adjacent to Marion Square

Liberty Square is located at what is known as the Aquarium Wharf and is a gathering area for tourists at the South Carolina Aquarium and the Fort Sumter Visitors Center. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2272x1704, 1236 KB) Old Citadel, located adjacent to Marion Square in Charleston File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Charleston, South Carolina Metadata This file contains additional information... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2272x1704, 1236 KB) Old Citadel, located adjacent to Marion Square in Charleston File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Charleston, South Carolina Metadata This file contains additional information... Court House Square is the land that the Charleston County Court House sits on in downtown Charleston, South Carolina, USA at the intersection of Meeting and Broad Streets. ... A Monumtent in the middle of Marion Square Marion Square in downtown Charleston, South Carolina, USA in the upper Shopping District is the best known square in the city. ... Washington Square is a well known green area in the Charleston Metropolitan area. ...


Marion Square is the largest of downtown's squares, annually becoming the finish-line area for the Cooper River Bridge Run every first weekend of April; the park functions as a gathering area for finishing walkers and runners as well as hosting the run's outdoor festival.


The Cooper River Bridge Run is an annual 10,000 meter run, sanctioned by USA Track and Field, held in the cities of Mount Pleasant and Charleston in South Carolina, on the first Saturday in April, unless it is the day before Easter Sunday, when the event is held on...


Parks in Charleston

  • Mall Park
  • Martin Park
  • Mary Utsey Park
  • McMahon Playground
  • Mitchell Park
  • Moultrie Park
  • Parkshore Park
  • Waterfront Park
  • West Ashley Park
  • White Point Gardens or "Battery Park"

The Battery, which includes a park known as White Point Gardens, is a landmark promenade in Charleston, South Carolina. ... Joseph P. Riley, Jr. ... League South Atlantic League Division South Year founded 1886 Major League affiliation New York Yankees Home ballpark Joseph P. Riley, Jr. ... The Battery, which includes a park known as White Point Gardens, is a landmark promenade in Charleston, South Carolina. ...

Major Shopping Complexes

The Charleston metro area has seen skyrocketing growth. There are many shopping opportunities in Charleston. The major shopping areas are in West Ashley, Mount Pleasant, Summerville, North Charleston near on Rivers Avenue, Ashley Phosphate Road, Dorchester Road and near the Airport, and Downtown Charleston. West Ashley is a suburb of Charleston, South Carolina, with an estimated 2007 population of 54,001. ...

  • Northwoods Mall
  • Citadel Mall
  • Tanger Outlet Center
  • Mount Pleasant Towne Centre
  • Historic King Street

Citadel Mall is a shopping mall located in Charleston, South Carolina. ...

Marinas

The Charleston area has a rich maritime heritage, and this is evidenced by the vast number of boats visible in the area's waterways. Marinas in the Charleston area include:

  • Ashley Marina - Downtown
  • Bohicket Marina - John's Island
  • Bristol Marina - Downtown
  • Buzzard's Roost - John's Island
  • Charleston Harbor Resort Marina - Mount Pleasant
  • Charleston Maritime Center - Downtown
  • City Marina - Downtown
  • Cooper River Marina (Operated by Charleston County Parks & Recreation) - Downtown
  • Daniel Island Marina - Daniel Island
  • Dolphin Cove Marina - Upper Peninsula/"The Neck"
  • Duncan's Boat Harbor - North Charleston
  • Isle of Palms Marina - Isle of Palms
  • Mariner's Cay - Folly Beach
  • Ripley Light Marina - West Ashley
  • Stono Marina - John's Island
  • Patriot's Point - Mount Pleasant
  • Toler's Cove - Sullivan's Island
  • Wild Dunes Yacht Harbour - Isle of Palms

Schools, colleges, and universities

See also: List of schools in Charleston, South Carolina

Charleston is served by the Charleston County School District, which is divided into eight Districts. These eight districts educate approximately 48,500 students from kindergarten through 12th grade, and contain 42 elementary schools, 13 middle schools, 8 high schools, 12 magnet schools, and 4 charter schools. Charleston is also served by the Berkeley County School District in northern portions of the city, such as the Cainhoy Industrial District, Cainhoy Historical District, and Daniel Island. This is a listing of schools in Charleston, South Carolina. ... Headline text Charleston County Schools educates roughly 48,000 kindergarden to 12th grade students in 8 constiuents districts. ... For other uses, see Kindergarten (disambiguation). ... A primary school in Český Těšín, Poland Primary education is the first stage of compulsory education. ... Middle school (also known as intermediate school or junior high school) covers a period of education that straddles primary/elementary education and secondary education, serving as a bridge between the two. ... For other uses, see High school (disambiguation). ... In the U.S. system of education, a magnet school is a public school which offers innovative courses, specialized training, etc. ... Charter schools are publicly funded elementary or secondary schools in the United States that have been freed from some of the rules, regulations, and statutes that apply to other public schools in exchange for some type of accountability for producing certain results, which are set forth in each schools... The Berkeley County School District is a school district with in Berkeley County, South Carolina. ...


Charleston is also served by a large number of private schools, including Porter-Gaud School, Bishop England High School, Ashley Hall, First Baptist, Trident Academy, Charleston Day, and Mason Preparatory School. Porter-Gaud School is an independent college preparatory school with historic ties to the Episcopal Church. ... Bishop England High School of the largest private Catholic four-year high school in South Carolina. ... Ashley Hall is an all girls school in Charleston, South Carolina, founded in 1909 by Mary Vardrine McBee, who headed the institution until 1949. ...


Public institutions of higher education in Charleston include the College of Charleston (the nation's thirteenth oldest university) and The Citadel (the state's military college). The city is also home to Charleston Southern University (affiliated with the South Carolina Baptist Convention), and Springfield College. The city is home to a law school, the Charleston School of Law, as well as a medical school, the Medical University of South Carolina. Charleston is also home to the Roper Hospital School of Practical Nursing and Trident Technical College, and branches of Webster University are also located in the city. Charleston is also the location for the only college in the country that offers bachelors degrees in the building arts, The American College of the Building Arts. The newest school to come to Charleston is the The Art Institute of Charleston located downtown on North Market Street. The College of Charleston (C of C) is a public university located in historic downtown Charleston, South Carolina. ... The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina, is a state-supported, comprehensive college located in Charleston, South Carolina. ... Charleston Southern University, founded in 1964, is an independent comprehensive university located in Charleston, South Carolina. ... The Charleston School of Law (CSOL) is an independent, private law school in Charleston, South Carolina. ... The Medical University of South Carolina opened in Charleston, South Carolina in 1824 as a small private college for the training of physicians. ... Webster University is an American private university in Webster Groves, a suburb of St. ...


Local Military Units

Coast Guard

  • Coast Guard Sector Charleston
  • Maritime Law Enforcement Academy
  • Southeast Regional Fisheries Training Center
  • Naval Engineering Support Unit Charleston
  • Electronics Systems Support Detachment (ESD) Charleston
  • Vessel Boarding and Search Team (VBST) Charleston
  • USCGC Gallatin (WHEC-721)
  • USCGC Dallas (WHEC-716)
  • USCGC Oak (WLB-211)

USCGC Gallatin (WHEC-721) is a U. S. Coast Guard high endurance cutter based out of Charleston, South Carolina. ... The USCGC Dallas, originally commissioned in 1967 at Avondale Shipyard in New Orleans, is the sixth high endurance cutter to bear the name Alexander J. Dallas, the Secretary of the Treasury under President James Madison (1814-1816). ... The USCGC Oak (WLB-211) is a United States Coast Guard seagoing buoy tender home-ported in Charleston, South Carolina. ...

Navy

To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...

Army

  • Charleston Army Depot

Air Force

Charleston Air Force Base is a United States Air Force Base located in North Charleston, South Carolina. ...

Media

The local daily newspaper in Charleston is The Post and Courier. Other newspapers include the Charleston City Paper, the Charleston Mercury, The Chronicle (weekly) and The Charleston Regional Business Journal. Charlestons The Post and Courier is oldest daily newspaper in the South and the eighth oldest newspaper still in publication in the United States. ... The Charleston City Paper is an alternative weekly published every Wednesday in Charleston, South Carolina. ... The Charleston Regional Business Journal is a business journal based in Charleston, South Carolina. ...


Charleston is the nation's 100th largest Designated market area (DMA), with 285,730 households and 0.257% of the U.S. A media market, broadcast market, media region, designated market area, DMA or simply market is a region where the population can receive the same (or similar) television and radio station offerings, and may also include other types of media including newspapers and Internet content. ...


Charleston's major network television affiliates

  • WCBD-TV 2 (NBC)
  • WCIV-TV 4 (ABC)
  • WCSC-TV 5 (CBS)
  • WITV-TV 7 (PBS)
  • WCBD DT2-TV 14 (CW)
  • WJRB-TV 18 (TeleFutura)
  • WAZS-TV 22 (Azteca America)
  • WTAT-TV 24 (FOX)
  • WMMP-TV 36 (MyTV)
  • WJNI-TV 42 (America One)
  • WCHD-TV 49

WCBD channel 2 is the NBC affiliate for Charleston, South Carolina. ... WCIV, News 4, is the ABC affiliate for the Charleston, South Carolina television market. ... WCSC-TV is the CBS-affiliated television station in Charleston, South Carolina. ... South Carolina Educational Television (SCETV) is the statewide public television and public radio network in South Carolina. ... WTAT-TV, channel 24, is the Fox-affiliated television station in Charleston, South Carolina. ... WMMP is the MyNetworkTV television affiliate in Charleston, South Carolina. ...

Radio

AM

  • 690 - [4]WOKV - News-Talk from Jacksonville, Fla.
  • 730 - [5]WLTQ - [Spanish] ("Viva 730")
  • 810 - WQIZ St. George, South Carolina - EWTN Catholic Radio
  • 910 - WTMZ [6] - ESPN Sports Radio ("910 The Team")
  • 950 - WJKB [7] - [Classic Country], NASCAR racing ("AM 950 Classic Hit Country")
  • 980 - WAZS [50's and 60's Oldies] - ("Rocket 980")
  • 1250 - WTMA [8] - News/Talk ("News-Talk 1250")
  • 1340 - WQSC [9]] - Talk/News ("Real 1340")
  • 1390 - WXTC [10]] - Gospel ("Heaven 1390")
  • 1450 - WQNT - News/Sports Fox Sports Radio - ("CNN 1450")
  • 1480 - WZJY - Spanish - ("La Jefa 1480")
  • 1610 - Folly Beach, SC - TIS, information on beach
  • 1640 XSUR - 70s & 80s ("Surfside 1640")
  • College of Charleston Radio - Streaming on the web.

WOKV AM 690, Jacksonville, Florida. ... WLTQ is an adult standards radio station in the Charleston, South Carolina market located at 730 AM and airing the Music of Your Life format. ... EWTN - or The Eternal Word Television Network - is a television and radio operation that broadcasts Catholic religious programming, via satellite and shortwave radio. ... ESPN, formerly an acronym for Entertainment and Sports Programming Network, is an American cable television network dedicated to broadcasting and producing sports-related programming 24 hours a day. ... El Sol is a Regional Mexican radio station in the Charleston, South Carolina market at 98. ... WTMA (branded as News-Talk 1250 AM) is an AM radio station serving the Charleston market area with a News/Talk format. ... WXTC (branded as Heaven 1390 AM) is an AM radio station serving the Charleston market area with a Gospel format. ... Fox Sports Radio, abbreviated FSR, is an international radio network consisting of sports talk programming all day, every day. ...

FM

  • WKCL - We Know Christ Lives [91.5 MHz] - Contemporary Christian
  • WIHB - B92 [92.5 MHz] - Top 40
  • WWWZ - Z93 Jamz [93.3 MHz] - R&B and Hip-Hop
  • WSCC - NewsRadio94.3 [94.3 MHz] - News/Talk
  • WSSX - 95SX [95.1 MHz] - Current Top 50 Hits
  • WAVF - Chuck-FM [96.1 MHz] - Adult/Variety Hits
  • WIWF - 96-9 The Wolf [96.9 MHz] - Country
  • WYBB - 98X [98.1 MHz] - Hard Rock
  • WAZS - El Sol [98.9 MHz] - Regional Mexican
  • WXST - Star99.7 [99.7 MHz] - Urban AC / Classic R&B-Soul
  • WALC - The Drive @ 100.5 [100.5 MHz] - 80's / 90's Variety
  • WPAL-FM - Mega100.9 [100.9 MHz] - NeoSoul (Currently Off The Air)
  • [101.7 MHz] - not on air yet, expected on by April 2008.
  • WXLY - Y102.5 [102.5 MHz] - Oldies
  • WEZL - WEZL 103.5 [103.5 MHz] - Country
  • WRFQ - Q104.5 [104.5 MHz] - Classic Rock
  • WCOO - The Bridge @ 105.5 [105.5 MHz] - Triple A Rock 1055thebridge.com
  • WJNI - Gospel 106.3 [106.3 MHz] - Gospel
  • WMGL - Magic107.3 [107.3 MHz] - Urban AC/ Classic R&B-Soul
See also: Full list of radio stations in Charleston

B-92 is a CHR radio station serving the Charleston, South Carolina market. ... WWWZ 93 JAMZ is a commercial radio station in Charleston, South Carolina. ... WSCC, also known as News Radio 94. ... WSSX, also known as 95SX, is a CHR radio station located in Charleston, South Carolina. ... WAVF is a commercial radio station located in Hanahan, South Carolina, broadcasting to the Charleston, South Carolina area on 96. ... WIWF is a commercial radio station located in Charleston, South Carolina, broadcasting to the Lowcountry area on 96. ... Image:98x logo small flash. ... El Sol is a Regional Mexican radio station in the Charleston, South Carolina market at 98. ... WXST, also known as Star 99. ... WALC-FM also known as 100. ... WXLY-FM is a radio station in Charleston, South Carolina. ... WEZL is a country radio station in Charleston, South Carolina, located at 103. ... WRFQ Q-104. ... WMGL (branded as ) is a radio station that plays an Urban Adult Contemporary in the Charleston, South Carolina area. ...

Sister cities

Charleston has one international sister city:[24] Sign denoting twin towns of Neckarsulm, Germany Town twinning is a concept whereby towns or cities in geographically and politically distinct areas are paired with the goal of fostering human contact and cultural links. ...

Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... Spoleto (Latin: Spoletium), 42°44′ N 12°44′ E, an ancient town in the Italian province of Perugia in east central Umbria, at 385 meters (1391 ft) above sea-level on a foothill of the Apennines. ... Umbria is a region of central Italy, bordered by Tuscany to the west, the Marche to the east and Lazio to the south. ... Nickname: City on the Hill, Beantown, The Hub (of the Universe)1, Athens of America, The Cradle of Revolution, Puritan City, Americas Walking City Location in Massachusetts, USA Counties Suffolk County Mayor Thomas M. Menino(D) Area    - City 232. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized...

See also

This is a list of famous people who were either born in, or have lived in, Charleston, South Carolina. ... FM WKCL - We Know Christ Lives [] - Contemporary Christian WCSQ - Coast92. ... This is a list of television shows and/or movies that were either filmed, or set, in Charleston, South Carolina. ... There is a long history of Jews living in Charleston, South Carolina, USA. The charter of the Carolina Colony, drawn up by John Locke in 1669, granted liberty of conscience to all settlers, expressly mentioning Jews, heathens, and dissenters. ... The College of Charleston (C of C) is a public university located in historic downtown Charleston, South Carolina. ...

References

Notes

  1. ^ American FactFinder. United States Census Bureau. Retrieved on 2008-01-31.
  2. ^ US Board on Geographic Names. United States Geological Survey (2007-10-25). Retrieved on 2008-01-31.
  3. ^ Find a County. National Association of Counties. Retrieved on 2008-01-31.
  4. ^ Charleston Time Line. Retrieved on 2007-07-09.
  5. ^ Population of the 100 Largest Urban Places: 1840.
  6. ^ Century V City of Charleston Population Estimates.
  7. ^ Population Estimates for the 100 Most Populous Metropolitan Statistical Areas Based on July 1, 2006 Population Estimates. Retrieved on 2007-07-09.
  8. ^ "Charleston best-mannered city", CNN.com, January 17, 2004. Accessed May 9, 2007.
  9. ^ "Chalmers Street," Charleston County Public Library, Accessed June 11, 2007.
  10. ^ "A 'portion of the People'," Harvard Magazine, January - February 2003. Accessed June 11, 2007.
  11. ^ "The Jews of South Carolina," NPR.org, March 25, 2002. Accessed June 11, 2007.
  12. ^ "H. L. Hunley, Confederate Submarine," Department of the Navy -- Naval Historical Center, Accessed June 13, 2007.
  13. ^ North American Container Traffic (2005), Port Ranking by TEUs as reported by the American Association of Port Authorities.
  14. ^ "Investigation examining Charleston firefighters' handling of deadly blaze," KSLA News 12, Accessed June 21, 2007.
  15. ^ "Fire department overview," City of Charleston Official Website, Accessed June 20, 2007.
  16. ^ Bruce Smith, "Nine Charleston Firefighters Perish in Blaze," Associated Press article at Firehouse.com, June 19, 2007. Accessed June 19, 2007.
  17. ^ "2005 FBI Crime Reports"
  18. ^ Michael Ledeen, "Hail to the Chief," National Review Online, August 18, 2005. Accessed June 18, 2007.
  19. ^ http://port-of-charleston.com/community/press_room/pressroom.asp?PressRelease=162
  20. ^ US Gazetteer files: 2000 and 1990. United States Census Bureau (2005-05-03). Retrieved on 2008-01-31.
  21. ^ Maximum and minimum temperatures from Yahoo! Weather
  22. ^ Lane, F.W. The Elements Rage (David & Charles 1966), p. 49
  23. ^ Population Estimates for the 100 Most Populous Metropolitan Statistical Areas Based on July 1, 2006 Population Estimates. Retrieved on 2007-07-09.
  24. ^ Sister cities designated by Sister Cities International, Inc. (SCI). Retrieved on June 6, 2006.

The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... InsertSLUTTY WHORES≤ non-formatted text here{| class=toccolours border=1 cellpadding=4 style=float: right; margin: 0 0 1em 1em; width: 20em; border-collapse: collapse; font-size: 95%; clear: right; |+ United States Geological Survey |- |style= align=center colspan=2| [[Image:USGS logo. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Harvard Magazine is an independently edited magazine and separately incorporated affiliate of Harvard University. ... “NPR” redirects here. ... The Associated Press, or AP, is an American news agency, the worlds largest such organization. ... Michael Ledeen (born August 1, 1941) is a resident scholar at the American Enterprise Institute. ... National Review Online is the online presence of the prominent conservative political magazine National Review. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Bibliography

General

  • Borick, Carl P. A Gallant Defense: The Siege of Charleston, 1780. U. of South Carolina Press, 2003. 332 pp.
  • Bull, Kinloch, Jr. The Oligarchs in Colonial and Revolutionary Charleston: Lieutenant Governor William Bull II and His Family. U. of South Carolina Press, 1991. 415 pp.
  • Clarke, Peter. A Free Church in a Free Society. The Ecclesiology of John England, Bishop of Charleston, 1820-1842, a Nineteenth Century Missionary Bishop in the Southern United States. Charleston, S.C.: Bagpipe, 1982. 561 pp.
  • Coker, P. C., III. Charleston's Maritime Heritage, 1670-1865: An Illustrated History. Charleston, S.C.: Coker-Craft, 1987. 314 pp.
  • Doyle, Don H. New Men, New Cities, New South: Atlanta, Nashville, Charleston, Mobile, 1860-1910. U. of North Carolina Press, 1990. 369 pp.
  • Fraser, Walter J., Jr. Charleston! Charleston! The History of a Southern City. U. of South Carolina, 1990. 542 pp. the standard scholarly history
  • Gillespie, Joanna Bowen. The Life and Times of Martha Laurens Ramsay, 1759-1811. U. of South Carolina Press, 2001. 315 pp.
  • Hagy, James William. This Happy Land: The Jews of Colonial and Antebellum Charleston. U. of Alabama Press, 1993. 450 pp.
  • Jaher, Frederic Cople. The Urban Establishment: Upper Strata in Boston, New York, Charleston, Chicago, and Los Angeles. U. of Illinois Press, 1982. 777 pp.
  • McInnis, Maurie D. The Politics of Taste in Antebellum Charleston. U. of North Carolina Press, 2005. 395 pp.
  • Pease, William H. and Pease, Jane H. The Web of Progress: Private Values and Public Styles in Boston and Charleston, 1828-1843. Oxford U. Press, 1985. 352 pp.
  • Pease, Jane H. and Pease, William H. A Family of Women: The Carolina Petigrus in Peace and War. U. of North Carolina Press, 1999. 328 pp.
  • Pease, Jane H. and Pease, William H. Ladies, Women, and Wenches: Choice and Constraint in Antebellum Charleston and Boston. U. of North Carolina Press, 1990. 218 pp.
  • Phelps, W. Chris. The Bombardment of Charleston, 1863-1865. Gretna, La.: Pelican, 2002. 175 pp.
  • Rosen, Robert N. Confederate Charleston: An Illustrated History of the City and the People during the Civil War. U. of South Carolina Press, 1994. 181 pp.
  • Rosen, Robert. A Short History of Charleston. University of South Carolina Press, (1997). ISBN 1-57003-197-5, scholarly survey
  • Spence, E. Lee. Spence's Guide to South Carolina : diving, 639 shipwrecks (1520-1813), saltwater sport fishing, recreational shrimping, crabbing, oystering, clamming, saltwater aquarium, 136 campgrounds, 281 boat landings (Nelson Southern Printing, Sullivan's Island, S.C.: Spence, ©1976) OCLC: 2846435
  • Spence, E. Lee. Treasures of the Confederate Coast: the "real Rhett Butler" & Other Revelations (Narwhal Press, Charleston/Miami, ©1995)[ISBN 1886391017] [ISBN 1886391009], OCLC: 32431590

University of South Carolina Press (or USC Press), founded in 1944, is a university press that is part of University of South Carolina. ... The University of North Carolina Press (or UNC Press), founded in 1922, is a university press that is part of the University of North Carolina. ... The University of Alabama Press is a university press that is part of the University of Alabama. ... The University of Illinois Press is a major American university press. ... Oxford University Press (OUP) is a highly-respected publishing house and a department of the University of Oxford in England. ...

Art, Architecture, Literature, Science

  • Cothran, James R. Gardens of Historic Charleston. U. of South Carolina Press, 1995. 177 pp.
  • Greene, Harlan. Mr. Skylark: John Bennett and the Charleston Renaissance. U. of Georgia Press, 2001. 372 pp.
  • Hutchisson, James M. and Greene, Harlan, ed. Renaissance in Charleston: Art and Life in the Carolina Low Country, 1900-1940. U. of Georgia Press, 2003. 259 pp.
  • Hutchisson, James M. DuBose Heyward: A Charleston Gentleman and the World of Porgy and Bess. U. Press of Mississippi, 2000. 225 pp.
  • McNeil, Jim. Charleston's Navy Yard: A Picture History. Charleston, S.C.: Coker Craft, 1985. 217 pp.
  • O'Brien, Michael and Moltke-Hansen, David, ed. Intellectual Life in Antebellum Charleston. U. of Tennessee Press, 1986. 468 pp.
  • Poston, Jonathan H. The Buildings of Charleston: A Guide to the City's Architecture. U. of South Carolina Press, 1997. 717 pp.
  • Severens, Kenneth. Charleston: Antebellum Architecture and Civic Destiny. U. of Tennessee Press, 1988. 315 pp.
  • Stephens, Lester D. Science, Race, and Religion in the American South: John Bachman and the Charleston Circle of Naturalists, 1815-1895. U. of North Carolina Press, 2000. 338 pp.
  • Waddell, Gene. Charleston Architecture: 1670-1860. 2 vol. Charleston, S.C.: Wyrick, 2003. 992 pp.
  • Weyeneth, Robert R. Historic Preservation for a Living City: Historic Charleston Foundation, 1947-1997. (Historic Charleston Foundation Studies in History and Culture series.) U. of South Carolina Press, 2000. 256 pp.
  • Yuhl, Stephanie E. A Golden Haze of Memory: The Making of Historic Charleston. U. of North Carolina Press, 2005. 285 pp.
  • Zola, Gary Phillip. Isaac Harby of Charleston, 1788-1828: Jewish Reformer and Intellectual. U. of Alabama Press, 1994. 284 pp.

The University of Georgia Press or UGA Press is a publishing house and is a member of the Association of American University Presses. ... The University Press of Mississippi, founded in 1970, is a publisher that is sponsered by the eight state universities in Mississippi: Alcorn State University Delta State University Jackson State University Mississippi State University Mississippi University for Women Mississippi Valley State University University of Mississippi University of Southern Mississippi University Press... The University of Tennessee Press (or UT Press), founded in 1940, is a university press that is part of the University of Tennessee. ...

Race

  • Bellows, Barbara L. Benevolence among Slaveholders: Assisting the Poor in Charleston, 1670-1860. Louisiana State U. Press, 1993. 217 pp.
  • Drago, Edmund L. Initiative, Paternalism, and Race Relations: Charleston's Avery Normal Institute. U. of Georgia Press, 1990. 402 pp.
  • Egerton, Douglas R. He Shall Go Out Free: The Lives of Denmark Vesey. Madison House, 1999. 248 pp. online review
  • Greene, Harlan; Hutchins, Harry S., Jr.; and Hutchins, Brian E. Slave Badges and the Slave-Hire System in Charleston, South Carolina, 1783-1865. McFarland, 2004. 194 pp.
  • Jenkins, Wilbert L. Seizing the New Day: African Americans in Post-Civil War Charleston. Indiana U. Press, 1998. 256 pp.
  • Johnson, Michael P. and Roark, James L. No Chariot Let Down: Charleston's Free People of Color on the Eve of the Civil War. U. of North Carolina Press, 1984. 174 pp.
  • Kennedy, Cynthia M. Braided Relations, Entwined Lives: The Women of Charleston's Urban Slave Society. Indiana U. Press, 2005. 311 pp.
  • Powers, Bernard E., Jr. Black Charlestonians: A Social History, 1822-1885. U. of Arkansas Press, 1994. 377 pp.

Founded in 1935, the Louisiana State University Press is a nonprofit book publisher dedicated to the publication of scholarly, general interest, and regional books. ... Indiana University, founded in 1820, is a nine-campus university system in the state of Indiana. ... The University of Arkansas Press is a university press that is part of the University of Arkansas. ...

External links

Find more about Charleston, South Carolina on Wikipedia's sister projects:
Dictionary definitions
Textbooks
Quotations
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Images and media
News stories
Learning resources
  • CharlestonLowcountry.com - Charleston's Website for Events, Accommodations and Tours
  • City of Charleston Official Website
  • Charleston Convention & Visitors Bureau
  • Charleston Airport
  • Charleston Metro Chamber Of Commerce
  • Historic Charleston by the National Park Service
  • Port of Charleston
  • Historic Charleston's Religious and Community Buildings, a National Park Service Discover Our Shared Heritage Travel Itinerary
  • Charleston at the Open Directory Project
  • Charleston (South Carolina) travel guide from Wikitravel
  • Charleston, South Carolina is at coordinates 32°47′22″N 79°59′11″W / 32.789295, -79.986255 (Charleston, South Carolina)Coordinates: 32°47′22″N 79°59′11″W / 32.789295, -79.986255 (Charleston, South Carolina)

  Results from FactBites:
 
Charleston, South Carolina - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (5307 words)
Charleston is a city in the counties of Berkeley and Charleston in the U.S. state of South Carolina; the city serves as the county seat of Charleston County.
The metropolitan area population of Charleston and North Charleston was estimated to be 594,899 in 2005 (includes entire populations of Charleston, Berkeley, and Dorchester counties).
The city of Charleston is located roughly at the mid-point of South Carolina's coastline, at the junction of the Ashley and Cooper Rivers.
Encyclopedia4U - Charleston, South Carolina - Encyclopedia Article (2580 words)
The City of Charleston is located almost at the center of South Carolina's coast, roughly at the junction of the Ashley and Cooper Rivers.
Charleston is the location of Fort Sumter, which is reputed to have fired the "first shot" of the American Civil War, and Fort Moultrie, which was instrumental in delivering a critical defeat to the British in the American Revolutionary War.
On December 20, 1860, the South Carolina legislature was the first state to vote for secession from the Union.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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