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Encyclopedia > Charleston, SC
Charleston, South Carolina's Oldest City
Charleston, South Carolina's Oldest City

Charleston is an American city located in Charleston County, South Carolina. The city was founded as Charlestown or Charles Towne, Carolina in 1670, and moved to its present location in 1690. Up until 1800, Charleston was the fifth largest city in North America, behind Philadelphia, New York, Boston, and Quebec City. It adopted its present name in 1783. Also known as The Holy City, Charleston brims with the culturally unique, such as the joggling board. Charleston County is a county located in the state of South Carolina. ... State nickname: Palmetto State Other U.S. States Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Governor Mark Sanford Official languages English Area 82,965 km² (40th)  - Land 78,051 km²  - Water 4,915 km² (6%) Population (2000)  - Population 4,012,012 (26th)  - Density 51. ... Carolina was originally just one Province of Carolina. ... 1670 was a common year beginning on a Saturday in countries using the Julian calendar and a Wednesday in countries using the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Giovanni Domenico Cassini observes differential rotation within Jupiters atmosphere. ... World map showing location of North America A satellite composite image of North America North America is the third largest continent in area and in population after Eurasia and Africa. ... This article refers to the largest city of Pennsylvania. ... State nickname: Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York Governor George Pataki Official languages None Area 141,205 km² (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water 18,795 km² (13. ... Alternative meanings: Boston (disambiguation) The 18th-century Old State House in Boston is surrounded by tall buildings of the 19th and 20th centuries. ... Motto: Don de Dieu feray valoir (Gift of God shall make prosper) Area: 547. ... 1783 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... A joggling board is a long, pliable board traditionally made from a palmetto tree that is supported on each end by wooden stands. ...


As of 2003, the Census Bureau estimated the population of the city proper as 101,024, a 4% growth over the population as of the 2000 census. The metropolitan area of Charleston and North Charleston had a population of about 549,000, 76th largest in the country. 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar, and also: The International Year of Freshwater The European Disability Year Events January events January 1 Luíz Inácio Lula Da Silva becomes the 37th President of Brazil. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... 2000 is a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... In the United States, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) has produced a formal definition of metropolitan areas, which are organized around county boundaries. ... North Charleston is a city located in South Carolina. ...


The city of Charleston is located roughly at the mid-point of South Carolina's coastline, at the junction of the Ashley and Cooper Rivers. Charleston's name is derived from Charles Town, named after King Charles II of England. State nickname: Palmetto State Other U.S. States Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Governor Mark Sanford Official languages English Area 82,965 km² (40th)  - Land 78,051 km²  - Water 4,915 km² (6%) Population (2000)  - Population 4,012,012 (26th)  - Density 51. ... Charles II King of England, Scotland and Ireland Charles II (29 May 1630–6 February 1685) was the King of England, Scotland and Ireland from 30 January 1649 (de jure) or 29 May 1660 (de facto) until his death. ...


Charleston is the location of Fort Moultrie, which was instrumental in delivering a critical defeat to the British in the American Revolutionary War, and Fort Sumter, the reputed site of the "first shot" of the American Civil War. Fort Moultrie is the name of a series of forts on Sullivans Island, South Carolina, built to protect the city of Charleston, South Carolina. ... The American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), also known as the American War of Independence, was a war fought primarily between Great Britain and revolutionaries within thirteen of her North American colonies. ... Before the attack Map detailing the location of Fort Sumter Fort Sumter, located in Charleston, South Carolina harbor, was named after General Thomas Sumter. ... The American Civil War was fought in the United States from 1861 until 1865 between the United States – forces coming mostly from the 23 northern states of the Union – and the newly-formed Confederate States of America, which consisted of 11 southern states that had declared their secession. ...

Contents

Early history of Charleston

After Charles II of England was restored to the English throne, he granted the chartered Carolina territory to eight of his loyal friends, known as the Lords Proprietor, in 1663. It took seven years before the Lords could arrange for settlement, the first being that of Charles Town. The community was established by English settlers in 1670 across the Ashley River from the city's current location. It was soon chosen by Anthony Ashley-Cooper, one of the Lords Proprietor, to become a "great port towne," a destiny which the city fulfilled. By 1680, the settlement had grown, joined by others from England, Barbados, and Virginia, and relocated to its current peninsular location. The capital of the Carolina colony, Charleston was the center for further expansion and the southernmost point of English settlement during the late 1600s. Charles II King of England, Scotland and Ireland Charles II (29 May 1630–6 February 1685) was the King of England, Scotland and Ireland from 30 January 1649 (de jure) or 29 May 1660 (de facto) until his death. ... Royal motto: Dieu et mon droit (French: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area  - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 1st UK 49,138,831 377/km² Religion... Events Prix de Rome scholarship established for students of the arts. ... Events First Portuguese governor was appointed to Macau The Swedish city Karlskrona was founded as the Royal Swedish Navy relocated there. ... Royal motto: Dieu et mon droit (French: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area  - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 1st UK 49,138,831 377/km² Religion... State nickname: Old Dominion Other U.S. States Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Governor Mark R. Warner Official languages English Area 110,862 km² (35th)  - Land 102,642 km²  - Water 8,220 km² (7. ... Centuries: 16th century - 17th century - 18th century Decades: 1550s 1560s 1570s 1580s 1590s - 1600s - 1610s 1620s 1630s 1640s 1650s Years: 1600 1601 1602 1603 1604 1605 1606 1607 1608 1609 Events and Trends November 5, 1605 - The Gunpowder Plot to blow up the British Parliament. ...


The settlement was often subject to attack from sea and from land. Periodic assaults from Spain and France, who still contested England's claims to the region, were combined with resistance from Native Americans as well as pirate raids. Charleston's colonists erected a fortification wall around the small settlement to aid in its defense. The only building to remain from the Walled City is the Powder Magazine, where the city's supply of gun powder was stored. Native Americans (also Indians, Aboriginal Peoples, American Indians, First Nations, Alaskan Natives, Amerindians, or Indigenous Peoples of America) are the indigenous inhabitants of The Americas prior to the European colonization, and their modern descendants. ... The defensive wall of Braşov, Romania. ...


A 1680 plan for the new settlement, the Grand Modell, laid out "the model of an exact regular town," and the future for the growing community. Land surrounding the intersection of Meeting and Broad Streets was set aside for a Civic Square. Over time it became known as the Four Corners of the Law, referring to the various arms of governmental and religious law presiding over the square and the growing city. St. Michael's Episcopal, Charleston's oldest and most noted church, was built on the southeast corner in 1752. The following year the Capitol of the colony was erected across the square. Because of its prominent position within the city and its elegant architecture, the building signaled to Charleston's citizens and visitors its importance within the British colonies. Provincial court met on the ground floor, the Commons House of Assembly and the Royal Governor's Council Chamber met on the second floor. Events First Portuguese governor was appointed to Macau The Swedish city Karlskrona was founded as the Royal Swedish Navy relocated there. ...


While the earliest settlers primarily came from England, colonial Charleston was also home to a mixture of ethnic and religious groups. In colonial times, Boston, Massachusetts and Charleston were sister cities, and people of means spent summers in Boston and winters in Charleston. There was a great deal of trade with Bermuda and the Caribbean, and some people came to live in Charleston from these areas. French, Scottish, Irish and Germans migrated to the developing seacoast town, representing numerous Protestant denominations, as well as Catholicism and Judaism. Sephardic Jews migrated to the city in such numbers that Charleston became one of the largest Jewish communities in North America. The Jewish Coming Street Cemetery, first established in 1762, attests to their long-standing presence in the community. The first Anglican church, St. Philip's Episcopal, was built in 1682, although later destroyed by fire and relocated to its current location. Slaves also comprised a major portion of the population, and were active in the city's religious community. Free black Charlestonians and slaves helped establish the Old Bethel United Methodist Church in 1797, and the congregation of the Emanuel A.M.E. Church stems from a religious group organized solely by African Americans, free and slave, in 1791. Boston is the capital of and the largest city in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts in the United States. ... Summer is one of the four temperate seasons. ... In many parts of the world, winter is associated with snow. ... Scotland (Alba in Scottish Gaelic) is a country or nation and former independent kingdom of northwest Europe, and one of the four constituent parts of the United Kingdom. ... In the strictest sense, a Sephardi (ספרדי, Standard Hebrew Səfardi, Tiberian Hebrew ardî; plural Sephardim: ספרדים, Standard Hebrew Səfardim, Tiberian Hebrew ) is a Jew original to the Iberian Peninsula (Spain and Portugal: ספרד, Standard Hebrew Səfárad, Tiberian Hebrew / ), or whose ancestors were among the Jews expelled from said peninsula during... 1762 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... The African Methodist Episcopal Church, usually called the AME Church, is a Christian denomination founded by Bishop Richard Allen in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1816. ...


By the mid-18th century Charleston had become a bustling trade center, and the wealthiest and largest city south of Philadelphia. Rice and indigo had been successfully cultivated by gentleman planters in the surrounding coastal lowcountry, while merchants profited from the successful shipping industry. The first American museum opened to the public on January 12, 1773 in Charleston. Independence Hall Philadelphia (sometimes referred to as Philly or the City of Brotherly Love) is the sixth-most-populous city in the United States and the most populous city in the state of Pennsylvania, occupying all of Philadelphia County. ... Species Oryza barthii Oryza glaberrima Oryza latifolia Oryza longistaminata Oryza punctata Oryza rufipogon Oryza sativa References ITIS 41975 2002-09-22 This article is about the food grain, not the university or Condoleezza Rice; see also rice (disambiguation). ... This article is about the color. ... A museum is typically a non-profit, permanent institution in the service of society and of its development, open to the public, which acquires, conserves, researches, communicates and exhibits, for purposes of study, education enjoyment, the tangible and intangible evidence of people and their environment. ... January 12 is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1773 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ...


After the United States Declaration of Independence

As the relationship between the colonists and England deteriorated, Charleston became a focal point in the ensuing Revolution. In protest of the Tea Act of 1773, which embodied the concept of taxation without representation, Charlestonians confiscated tea and stored it in the Exchange and Custom House. Representatives from all over the colony came to the Exchange in 1774 to elect delegates to the Continental Congress, the group responsible for drafting the Declaration of Independence; and South Carolina declared its independence from the crown on the steps of the Exchange. Soon, the church steeples of Charleston, especially St. Michael's, became targets for British war ships causing rebel forces to paint the steeples black to blend with the night sky. A siege on the city in 1776 was successfully defended by William Moultrie from Sullivan's Island, but by 1780 Charleston came under British control for two and a half years. After the British retreated in December 1782, the city's name was officially changed to Charleston. By 1788, Carolinians were meeting at the Capitol building for the Constitutional Ratification Convention, and while there was support for the Federal Government, division arose over the location of the new State Capital. A suspicious fire broke out in the Capitol building during the Convention, after which the delegates removed to the Exchange and decreed Columbia the new State Capital. By 1792, the Capitol had been rebuilt and became the Charleston County Courthouse. Upon its completion, the city possessed all the public buildings necessary to be transformed from a colonial capital to the center of the antebellum South. But the grandeur and number of buildings erected in the following century reflect the optimism, pride, and civic destiny that many Charlestonians felt for their community. No taxation without representation was a rallying cry for advocates of American independence from Great Britain in the eighteenth century. ... 1774 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... In May 1775 over 50 men arrived in Philadelphia, called the Continental Congress, their purpose was to represent the interest of colonist in America. ... U.S. Declaration of Independence The Declaration of Independence is a document in which the Thirteen Colonies declared themselves independent of the Kingdom of Great Britain and explained their justifications for doing so. ... William Moultrie (pronounced Moltree), 1730—1805, American Revolutionary general, b. ... Antebellum is a Latin word meaning before the war. In United States history and historiography Antebellum is sometimes used instead of the term pre-Civil War, especially in the South. ...


As Charleston grew, so did the community's cultural and social opportunities, especially for the elite merchants and planters. The first theater building in America was built in Charleston in 1736, but was later replaced by the 19th-century Planter's Hotel where wealthy planters stayed during Charleston's horse-racing season (now the Dock Street Theatre). Benevolent societies were formed by several different ethnic groups: the South Carolina Society, founded by French Huguenots in 1737; the German Friendly Society, founded in 1766; and the Hibernian Society, founded by Irish immigrants in 1801. The Charleston Library Society was established in 1748 by some wealthy Charlestonians who wished to keep up with the scientific and philosophical issues of the day. This group also helped establish the College of Charleston in 1770, the oldest college in South Carolina and the 13th oldest in the United States. In the 16th and 17th centuries, the name of Huguenots came to apply to members of the Protestant Reformed Church of France. ... College of Charleston - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ...


Charleston became more prosperous in the plantation-dominated economy of the post-Revolutionary years. The invention of the cotton gin in 1793 revolutionized this crop's production, and it quickly became South Carolina's major export. Cotton plantations relied heavily on slave labor. Slaves were also the primary labor force within the city, working as domestics, artisans, market workers or laborers. Many black Charlestonians spoke Gullah, a dialect based on African American structures which combined African, Portuguese, and English words. By 1820 Charleston's population had grown to 23,000, with a black majority. When a massive slave revolt planned by Denmark Vesey, a free black, was discovered in 1822, such hysteria ensued amidst white Charlestonians and Carolinians that the activities of free blacks and slaves were severely restricted. Hundreds of blacks, free and slave, and some white supporters involved in the planned uprising were held in the Old Jail. It also was the impetus for the construction of a new State Arsenal in Charleston. Recently, research published by historian Michael P. Johnson of Johns Hopkins University has cast doubt on the veracity of the accounts detailing Vesey's aborted slave revolt. A sugarcane plantation at Ribeirão Preto, Brazil, 2005 A plantation is a large tract of monoculture, as a tree plantation, a cotton plantation, a tea plantation or a tobacco plantation. ... The Cotton gin is a machine invented in 1793 invented by American Eli Whitney (granted a patent on March 14, 1794) to mechanize the production of cotton fiber. ... 1793 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Gullah is the name of both an ethnic group and its English-African creole language. ... Denmark Vesey (originally Telemanque) was an American slave and entrepreneur who planned what would have been a large slave rebellion had word of the plans not been leaked. ...


As Charleston's government, society and industry grew, commercial institutions were established to support the community's aspirations. The Bank of South Carolina, the second oldest building constructed as a bank in the nation, was established here in 1798. Branches of the First and Second Bank of the United States were also located in Charleston in 1800 and 1817. While the First Bank was converted to City Hall by 1818, the Second Bank proved to be a vital part of the community as it was the only bank in the city equipped to handle the international transactions so crucial to the export trade. By 1840, the Market Hall and Sheds, where fresh meat and produce were brought daily, became the commercial hub of the city. The slave trade also depended on the port of Charleston, where ships could be unloaded and the slaves sold at markets.


In the first half of the 19th century, South Carolinians became more devoted to the idea that state's rights were superior to the Federal government's authority. Buildings such as the Marine Hospital ignited controversy over the degree in which the Federal government should be involved in South Carolina's government, society, and commerce. During this period over 90 percent of Federal funding was generated from import duties, collected by custom houses such as the one in Charleston. In 1832 South Carolina passed an ordinance of nullification, a procedure in which a state could in effect repeal a Federal law, directed against the most recent tariff acts. Soon Federal soldiers were dispensed to Charleston's forts and began to collect tariffs by force. A compromise was reached by which the tariffs would be gradually reduced, but the underlying argument over state's rights would continue to escalate in the coming decades. Charleston remained one of the busiest port cities in the country, and the construction of a new, larger United States Custom House began in 1849, but its construction was interrupted by the events of the Civil War. This article or section should be merged with Nullification Crisis This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


Prior to the 1860 election, the National Democratic Convention convened in Charleston. Hibernian Hall served as the headquarters for the delegates supporting Stephen A. Douglas, who it was hoped would bridge the gap between the northern and southern delegates on the issue of extending slavery to the territories. The convention disintegrated when delegates were unable to summon a two-thirds majority for any candidate. This divisiveness resulted in a split in the Democratic party, and the election of Abraham Lincoln, the Republican candidate. Summary The election of 1860 is widely considered to be a realigning election. ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... Stephen Arnold Douglas (April 23, 1813 – June 3, 1861), American politician from Illinois, was one of the Democratic Party nominees for President in 1860 (the other being John C. Breckinridge of Kentucky). ... Abraham Lincoln (February 12, 1809 – April 15, 1865), sometimes called Abe Lincoln and nicknamed Honest Abe, the Rail Splitter, and the Great Emancipator, was the 16th (1861–1865) President of the United States, and the first president from the Republican Party. ...


The War Between the States

Enlarge
The ruins of Mills House and nearby buildings, Charleston A shell-damaged carriage and the remains of a brick chimney in the foreground. 1865.

On December 20, 1860, the South Carolina legislature was the first state to vote for secession from the Union. They asserted that one of the causes was the election to the presidency of a man "whose opinions and purposes are hostile to slavery." December 20 is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1860 is the leap year starting on Sunday. ... State nickname: Palmetto State Other U.S. States Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Governor Mark Sanford Official languages English Area 82,965 km² (40th)  - Land 78,051 km²  - Water 4,915 km² (6%) Population (2000)  - Population 4,012,012 (26th)  - Density 51. ...


On January 9, 1861, Citadel cadets fired the first shots of the American Civil War when they opened fire on a Union ship entering Charleston's harbor. On April 12, 1861, shore batteries under the command of General Pierre G. T. Beauregard opened fire on the Union-held Fort Sumter in the harbor. After a 34-hour bombardment, Major Robert Anderson surrendered the fort. Cadets from the Citadel, South Carolina's liberal arts military college, continued to aid the Confederate army by helping drill recruits, manufacture ammunition, protect arms depots, and guard Union prisoners. The city under siege took control of Fort Sumter, became the center for blockade running, and was the site of the first submarine warfare in 1863. In 1865, Union troops moved into the city, and took control of many sites, such as the United States Arsenal which the Confederate army had seized at the outbreak of the war. January 9 is the 9th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ... The American Civil War was fought in the United States from 1861 until 1865 between the United States – forces coming mostly from the 23 northern states of the Union – and the newly-formed Confederate States of America, which consisted of 11 southern states that had declared their secession. ... April 12 is the 102nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (103rd in leap years). ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ... Before the attack Map detailing the location of Fort Sumter Fort Sumter, located in Charleston, South Carolina harbor, was named after General Thomas Sumter. ... Categories: Stub ... 1863 is a common year starting on Thursday. ... 1865 is a common year starting on Sunday. ...


After the eventual and destructive defeat of the Confederacy, Federal forces remained in Charleston during the city's reconstruction. The war had shattered the prosperity of the antebellum city. Freed slaves were faced with poverty and discrimination. Industries slowly brought the city and its inhabitants back to a renewed vitality and growth in population. As the city's commerce improved, Charlestonians also worked to restore their community institutions. In 1867 Charleston's first free secondary school for blacks was established, the Avery Institute. General William T. Sherman lent his support to the conversion of the United States Arsenal into the Porter Military Academy, an educational facility for former soldiers and boys left orphaned or destitute by the war. Porter Military Academy later joined with Gaud School and is now a well-known K-12 prep school, [Porter-Gaud School (http://www.portergaud.edu/)]. The William Enston Home, a planned community for the city's aged and infirm, was built in 1889. An elaborate public building, the United States Post Office and Courthouse, was completed in 1896 and signaled renewed life in the heart of the city. Portrait of William Tecumseh Sherman by Mathew Brady William Tecumseh Sherman (February 8, 1820 – February 14, 1891) was an American soldier, businessman, and author. ... Primary education and secondary education together are sometimes (in particular, in Canada and the United States) referred to as K-12 education. ... In the United States a preparatory school, or prep school, is usually a private secondary school (or high school) designed to prepare a student for higher education. ...


A 125 mile-an-hour hurricane hit Charleston August 25, 1885, destroying or damaging 90 percent of the homes and causing an estimated $2 million in damages. 1885 is a common year starting on Thursday. ...


In 1886 Charleston was nearly destroyed by a major earthquake that was felt as far away as Boston and Bermuda. It damaged 2,000 buildings and caused $6 million worth of damage, while in the whole city the buildings were only valued at approximately $24 million. 1886 is a common year starting on Friday (click on link to calendar) Events January 18 _ Modern field hockey is born with the formation of The Hockey Association in England. ... Alternative meanings: Boston (disambiguation) The 18th-century Old State House in Boston is surrounded by tall buildings of the 19th and 20th centuries. ...


However, though there have been many fires, hurricanes, tornados, several wars, and urban renewal in the 20th century, many of Charleston's historic buildings remain intact. Urban regeneration (also called urban renewal in American English) is a movement in urban planning that reached its peak in the United States from the late 1940s through the early 1970s. ...


Modern-day Charleston

Charlestonians today fondly refer to their city as The Holy City, and describe it as the site where the "Ashley and Cooper Rivers merge to form the Atlantic Ocean."


America's most-published etiquette expert, Marjabelle Young Stewart, has recognized the city ever since 1995 as the "best-mannered" city in the U.S, a claim lent credence by the fact that it has the only Livability Court in the country. Etiquette is the code that governs the expectations of social behavior, the conventional norm. ... 1995 was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A Livability Court is a municipal court (or court of limited jurisdiction) focused on cases involving non-compliance with codes and standards about housing, waste, environment, noise, animal control, zoning, traffic and tourism. ...

Rainbow Row
Rainbow Row

Charleston is a tourist Mecca, with streets lined with grand live oaks draped with Spanish moss. Along the waterfront are many beautiful and historic pastel-colored homes. It's also a busy port, though the majority of the larger container ships are now docking at the Wando Terminal in Mount Pleasant. The Wando River and the Cooper River meet at the Southern point of Daniel Island. A new Cooper River bridge is under construction and set to open in 2005. When completed, the new Arthur Ravenel bridge will be the largest cable-stayed bridge in North America, External link: [1] (http://www.cooperriverbridge.org/). A tourist boat travels the River Seine in Paris, France Tourism can be defined as the act of travel for the purpose of recreation, and the provision of services for this act. ... Binomial name Quercus virginiana Mill. ... Binomial name Tillandsia usneoides Ref: ITIS 42371 2002-08-25 Spanish Moss (Tillandsia usneoides) closely resembles its namesake Usnea, or beard moss yet is not a moss at all, but instead a flowering plant in the Family Bromeliaceae (the bromeliads) that grows hanging from tree branches in full sun or... Mount Pleasant is a town located in Charleston County, South Carolina. ...


Charleston annually hosts Spoleto Festival USA External link: [2] (http://www.spoletousa.org/), as well as the Southeastern Wildlife Exposition External link: [3] (http://www.sewe.com/), the Family Circle Tennis Cup, External link [4] (http://www.familycirclecup.com/), and the Cooper River Bridge Run External link: [5] (http://www.bridgerun.com/). Nature lovers may visit the South Carolina Aquarium, the Audubon Swamp Garden, or Cypress Gardens, External link: [6] (http://www.cypressgardens.org/). History buffs can visit the Old Exchange Building, Fort Moultrie, Fort Sumter, or any of the several beautiful former slave plantations such as Boone Hall Plantation, Magnolia Plantation, and Middleton Place. Spoleto Festival USA is an annual festival of the arts held in Charleston, South Carolina since 1977. ... Fort Moultrie is the name of a series of forts on Sullivans Island, South Carolina, built to protect the city of Charleston, South Carolina. ... Before the attack Map detailing the location of Fort Sumter Fort Sumter, located in Charleston, South Carolina harbor, was named after General Thomas Sumter. ... A monument celebrating the emancipation of slaves in the British Empire in 1834, erected in Victoria Tower Gardens, Millbank, Westminster, London Wiktionary has a definition of: Slavery Slavery can mean one or more related conditions which involve control of a person against his or her will, enforced by violence or... A sugarcane plantation at Ribeirão Preto, Brazil, 2005 A plantation is a large tract of monoculture, as a tree plantation, a cotton plantation, a tea plantation or a tobacco plantation. ... Magnolia Plantation, located 13 miles north of Charleston, South Carolina was founded in 1676 on the Ashley River and is one of the oldest plantations in the south. ...


Hurricane Hugo hit Charleston in 1989, damaging three-quarters of the homes in Charleston's historic district. The hurricane caused over $2.8 billion in damage. Hurricane Hugo off the coast of South Carolina Hurricane Hugo was first detected as a group of thunderstorms near Cape Verde, Africa, on September 9, 1989. ... 1989 is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In 2004, SPAWAR (US Navy Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command) became the largest employer in the Charleston metropolitan area. Until 2004, the Medical University of South Carolina was the largest employer. The United States Navy (USN) is the branch of the United States armed forces responsible for naval operations. ... The Medical University of South Carolina opened in Charleston, South Carolina in 1824 as a small private college for the training of physicians. ...


Charleston is served by Charleston International Airport. Charleston International Airport is an airport in Charleston, South Carolina. ...


Geography

Location of Charleston, South Carolina

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 295.5 km² (114.1 mi²). 251.2 km² (97.0 mi²) of it is land and 44.3 km² (17.1 mi²) of it is water. The total area is 15.00% water. The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... This article is about the unit of measure. ...


Demographics

As of the census2 of 2000, there are 96,650 people in the city, organized into 40,791 households and 22,149 families. The population density is 384.7/km² (996.5/mi²). There are 44,563 housing units at an average density of 177.4/km² (459.5/mi²). The racial makeup of the city is 63.08% White, 34.00% Black or African American, 1.24% Asian, 0.15% Native American, 0.06% Pacific Islander, 0.54% from other races, and 0.94% from two or more races. 1.51% of the population are Hispanic or Latino of any race. A census is the process of obtaining information about every member of a population (not necessarily a human population). ... Shortcut: {{GR|#}} {{Cite:GR|#}} The following is a list of sources used in the creation of Wikipedia articles on various geographic topics and locations, such as cities, counties, states, and countries. ... 2000 is a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... Hispanic, as used in the United States, is one of several terms used to categorize US citizens, permanent residents and temporary immigrants, whose background hail either from the Spanish-speaking countries of Latin America or relating to a Spanish-speaking culture. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ...


There are 40,791 households out of which 23.2% have children under the age of 18 living with them, 36.0% are married couples living together, 15.2% have a female householder with no husband present, and 45.7% are non-families. 33.7% of all households are made up of individuals and 10.1% have someone living alone who is 65 years of age or older. The average household size is 2.23 and the average family size is 2.92. Marriage is a relationship and bond, most commonly between a man and a woman, that plays a key role in the definition of many families. ...


In the city the population is spread out with 20.0% under the age of 18, 17.2% from 18 to 24, 28.8% from 25 to 44, 20.5% from 45 to 64, and 13.5% who are 65 years of age or older. The median age is 33 years. For every 100 females there are 89.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there are 87.2 males.


The median income for a household in the city is $35,295, and the median income for a family is $48,705. Males have a median income of $32,585 versus $26,688 for females. The per-capita income for the city is $22,414. 19.1% of the population and 13.3% of families are below the poverty line. Out of the total population, 24.3% of those under the age of 18 and 13.9% of those 65 and older are living below the poverty line. The poverty line is the level of income below which one cannot afford to purchase all the resources one requires to live. ...


Fiction about Charleston

The opera Porgy and Bess takes place in Charleston. 1935-10-10. ...


Clive Barker's novel Galilee takes place partly in Charleston Clive Barker (born October 5, 1952, Liverpool, England) is a British author, director and visual artist. ...


Notable Charlestonians

Robert F. Furchgott (born June 4, 1916 in Charleston, South Carolina) is a Nobel Prize-winning American chemist. ... Christopher Gadsden (1724-1805) was an American general and statesman during the American Revolution. ... James Gadsden (May 15, 1788 - December 25, 1858) was born in 1788 in Charleston, South Carolina, the grandson of American Revolutionary patriot Christopher Gadsden. ... Ernest Frederick Fritz Hollings (born January 1, 1922) was a Democratic United States Senator from South Carolina. ... Ernest Everett Just (1883 - 1941) was a U.S. biologist. ... Henry Laurens (1724–1792) was an American merchant and planter from South Carolina who became a political leader during the Revolutionary War. ... Robert Mills (1781 - 1855) was the first native born American to become a professional architect. ... Charles Cotesworth (C.C.) Pinckney (February 5, 1746- August 16, 1825), was an American statesman born in Charleston, South Carolina, the son of Charles Pinckney (and second cousin to Governor Charles Pinckney), by his second wife, the celebrated planter, Eliza Lucas. ... Joel Roberts Poinsett (1779-1851) Official Department of Defense portrait, artist unknown. ... William Charles Wells (1757 — 1817) was Wells was born Charlestown, where? and was sent to school in Dumfries and later attended the University of Edinburgh. ...

External links

  • City of Charleston website (http://www.ci.charleston.sc.us/)
  • Historic Charleston by the National Park Service (http://www.cr.nps.gov/nr/travel/Charleston/)
  • Charleston Convention & Visitors Bureau (http://www.charlestoncvb.com/)
  • Charleston Metro Chamber Of Commerce (http://charlestonchamber.net/)
  • Charleston's Finest (http://www.charlestonsfinest.com)
  • Celebrate Charleston (http://www.celebratecharleston.com)
  • Charleston Gateway (http://www.charlestongateway.com/)
  • Port of Charleston (http://www.port-of-charleston.com)
  • Maps and aerial photos (http://kvaleberg.com/extensions/mapsources/index.php?params=32.789295_N_-79.986255_E_type:city_region:US)
    • Street map from Mapquest (http://www.mapquest.com/maps/map.adp?latlongtype=decimal&latitude=32.789295&longitude=-79.986255&zoom=6) or Google (http://maps.google.com/maps?ll=32.789295,-79.986255&spn=0.11,0.18)
    • Topographic map from Topozone (http://www.topozone.com/map.asp?lat=32.789295&lon=-79.986255&s=200&size=m&layer=DRG100&datum=nad83)
    • Aerial photograph from Terraserver (http://terraservice.net/image.aspx?s=14&lon=-79.986255&lat=32.789295&w=2) or Google (http://maps.google.com/maps?ll=32.789295,-79.986255&spn=0.11,0.18&t=k)

 
 

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