FACTOID # 10: The total number of state executions in 2005 was 60: 19 in Texas and 41 elsewhere. The racial split was 19 Black and 41 White.
 
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Encyclopedia > Charles the Bad

Charles II (1332 - 1387), called "Charles the Bad," was King of Navarre, Count of Evreux (Comte d'Evreux), and Lord of Albret (Sire d'Albret).


Besides the Pyrenees Kingdom of Navarre, he had extensive properties in Normandy and around, as inheritance from his father Count Philip of Evreux, and as compensations agreed to his mother, Queen Joan II of Navarre in exchange of her rights to the throne of France and her inherited rights to fiefs of Brie and Champagne. Thus, in Northern France, Charles possessed Evreux, Mortain, parts of Vexin, and a portion of Cotentin.


He hoped for a long time a restoration of their rights to the crown of France (as son of the daughter of King Louis X) - his mother had renounced those rights 1328 by a treaty with Philip VI in order to obtain Navarre and those concessions in Normandy.


He married Joan of France (1343-1373), daughter of king John II of France.


He was implicated in the assassination (January 8, 1354) of the constable of France, Charles d'Espagne (Charles de La Cerda). King John attacked thus Evreux and Navarre, but after alliance with the Black Prince, the Treaty of Mantes returned the peace, Charles enlarging his possessions. During certain stages of the Hundred Years' War, he was allied with the English. He was one of the nobles involved in the repression of the Jacquerie.


In 1361, after the premature death of his second cousin, Duke Philip I of Burgundy, Charles claimed on basis of primogeniture to inherit the duchy of Burgundy. He was grandson of Margaret of Burgundy, eldest daughter of Duke Robert II of Burgundy (d 1306). However, the duchy was taken by king John II of France, son of Joan of Burgundy, second daughter of duke Robert II, on basis of his being nearest heir in degree of proximity.


He was the father of Joanna of Navarre, who married Henry IV of England, and Charles III of Navarre, who succeeded him.



Preceded by:
Philip III
King of Navarre Succeeded by:
Charles III







  Results from FactBites:
 
Guardian | Bad heir day (2625 words)
All Charles could think to do last autumn was buy himself time, by appointing his right-hand man to examine events in one of which he himself was closely involved, as the man responsible for keeping the Queen informed of developments in the Burrell investigation.
Luckily for Charles, however, he is not married to a Prime Minister some newspapers seek to hound, and is heir to an institution they wish to see preserved; so he has emerged largely unscathed from his involvement with a long parade of dubious characters.
That side of Charles, which considers it his divine right to two-time the mother of his children, and her to put up with it, is the side now coming home to roost.
Charles II of Navarre - definition of Charles II of Navarre in Encyclopedia (363 words)
Charles II ( 1332 - 1387), called "Charles the Bad," was King of Navarre, Count of Evreux ( Comte d'Evreux), and Lord of Albret ( Sire d'Albret).
Besides the Pyrenees Kingdom of Navarre, he had extensive properties in Normandy and around, as inheritance from his father Count Philip of Evreux, and as compensations agreed to his mother, Queen Joan II of Navarre in exchange of her rights to the throne of France and her inherited rights to fiefs of Brie and Champagne.
However, the duchy was taken by king John II of France, son of Joan of Burgundy, second daughter of duke Robert II, on basis of his being nearest heir in degree of proximity.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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