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Encyclopedia > Charles X of France
Charles X
King of France and Navarre
Reign 16 September 1824 - 2 August 1830
Coronation 28 May 1825, Reims
Full name Charles-Philippe
Titles Count of Artois (17571824)
Duke of Angoulême &c 17731790)
Born 9 October 1757
Palace of Versailles, France
Died 6 November 1836
Gorizia, Austrian Empire
Predecessor Louis XVIII
Successor Louis XIX
Consort Marie-Thérèse de Savoie
Issue Louis-Antoine, Duke of Angoulême
Princess Sophie of France
Charles Ferdinand, duc de Berry
Royal House Bourbon
Father Louis-Ferdinand, Dauphin of France
Mother Marie-Josèphe of Saxony

Charles X (October 9, 1757November 6, 1836) ruled as King of France and Navarre from 1824 until the French Revolution of 1830, when he abdicated. He was the last king of the senior Bourbon line to reign over France. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (450x626, 200 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): List of French monarchs Charles X of France ... // 1400 - Owain Glyndŵr declared Prince of Wales by his followers. ... 1824 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... August 2 is the 214th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (215th in leap years), with 151 days remaining. ... Liberty Leading the People by Eugène Delacroix commemorates the July Revolution 1830 (MDCCCXXX) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... May 28 is the 148th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (149th in leap years). ... Opening of the Stockton and Darlington Railway 1825 (MDCCCXXV) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Reims (English traditionally Rheims) (pronounced in French) is a city of northern France, 144 km (89 miles) east-northeast of Paris. ... The County of Artois was a Carolingian county, established by the counts Odalric and Ecfrid of Artois, then integrated into the County of Flanders, first by Baldwin II of Flanders around 898, then by Arnulf I of Flanders. ... 1757 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... 1824 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Angoulême (Angoumois) in western France was part of the Carolingian empire as the kingdom of Aquitaine. ... 1773 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1790 (MDCCXC) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... October 9 is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1757 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... The Château de Versailles, or Versailles, is a royal château in Versailles, France. ... November 6 is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 55 days remaining. ... Year 1836 (MDCCCXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Gorizia (Slovenian: Gorica, German: Görz, Friulian: Gurize) is a small town at the foot of the Alps, in northeastern Italy, on the border with Slovenia. ... Anthem: Volkshymne (Peoples Anthem) Capital Vienna Language(s) German Religion Roman Catholic Government Monarchy History  - Established 1804  - Disestablished 1867 Flag of the Habsburg Monarchy The Crown of the Austrian Emperor The Austrian Empire (German: ) was an empire centred on what is modern day Austria that officially lasted from 1804... Louis XVIII (November 17, 1755 - September 16, 1824) was King of France and Navarre from 1814 (although he declared that he considered his reign to have begun in 1795) until his death in 1824, with a brief break in 1815 due to Napoleons return in the Hundred Days. ... Louis XIX, King of France and of Navarre (Louis-Antoine, duc dAngoulême) (August 6, 1775 - June 3, 1844) was the eldest son of the comte dArtois (later King Charles X of France). ... Marie-Thérèse of Savoy (31 January 1756 - 1805), princess of Sardinia and of Piedmont, was the wife of Charles, Comte dArtois, the youngest grandson of Louis XV of France, who would become Charles X of France. ... Louis XIX, King of France and of Navarre (Louis-Antoine, duc dAngoulême) (August 6, 1775 – June 3, 1844) was the eldest son of the comte dArtois (later King Charles X of France) and Marie-Thérèse de Savoie. ... Charles Ferdinand, duc de Berry (1778 - February 13, 1820) was the younger son of Charles X of France and Marie-Thérèse de Savoie. ... Also see:  Early Modern France The House of Bourbon is an important European royal house. ... Louis, Dauphin of France Louis, Dauphin of France (Louis-Ferdinand de France [1]) (4 September 1729 – 20 December 1765), was the eldest and only surviving son of King Louis XV of France and his wife, Queen Marie LeszczyÅ„ska. ... Marie-Josèphe of Saxony Marie-Josèphe of Saxony, (4 November 1731-13 March 1767), Dauphiness of France, was the daughter of Augustus II, prince-Elector of Saxony and king of Poland, and Marie Josepha of Austria, (1699-1757), the daughter of Joseph I, Holy Roman Emperor. ... October 9 is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1757 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... November 6 is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 55 days remaining. ... Year 1836 (MDCCCXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Coronation of Louis VIII and Blanche of Castile at Reims in 1223; a miniature from the Grandes Chroniques de France, painted in the 1450s, kept at the National Library of France See also List of Queens and Empresses of France The monarchs of France ruled, first as kings and later... Coat of Arms of the Kings of Navarre since 1212. ... Liberty Leading the People by Eugène Delacroix commemorates the July Revolution The French Revolution of 1830, also known as the July Revolution, was a revolt by the middle class against Bourbon King Charles X which forced him out of office and replaced him with the Orleanist King Louis-Philippe. ... Look up abdication in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Also see:  Early Modern France The House of Bourbon is an important European royal house. ...

Contents

Biography

Early life

Charles-Philippe was born on October 9, 1757 in the Palace of Versailles in France, the fifth son of Louis-Ferdinand, the Dauphin of France, and his wife, Marie-Josèphe of Saxony. His paternal grandparents were King Louis XV of France and his consort, Queen Maria Leszczyńska. His maternal grandparents were King Augustus III of Poland, also the Elector of Saxony, and his wife, the Archduchess Maria Josepha, daughter of the Holy Roman Emperor Joseph I. At birth, he received the title of Comte d'Artois. During most of the reign of his oldest surviving brother, King Louis XVI, he was fourth in line to the throne after the King's two young sons and his brother, the Comte de Provence. However, after the accession of the Comte de Provence as King Louis XVIII of France in 1814, he became heir presumptive and was generally known as Monsieur, the traditional title of the eldest brother of the King. October 9 is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1757 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... The Château de Versailles, or Versailles, is a royal château in Versailles, France. ... Louis-Ferdinand, the Dauphin of France, in a pastel by Maurice Quentin de La Tour Louis-Ferdinand, Dauphin of France (4 September 1729 – 20 December 1765), born in Versailles, was the eldest and only surviving son of King Louis XV of France and his wife, Queen Marie LeszczyÅ„ska. ... Marie-Josèphe of Saxony Marie-Josèphe of Saxony, (4 November 1731-13 March 1767), Dauphiness of France, was the daughter of Augustus II, prince-Elector of Saxony and king of Poland, and Marie Josepha of Austria, (1699-1757), the daughter of Joseph I, Holy Roman Emperor. ... Louis XV of France (February 15, 1710 – May 10, 1774), the Beloved (French: le Bien-Aimé), was King of France from 1715 until his death. ... Noble Family LeszczyÅ„ski Coat of Arms Wieniawa Parents Stanislaw LeszczyÅ„ski Katarzyna OpaliÅ„ska Consorts Louis XV of France Children with Louis XV of France Louise-Elisabeth Henriette-Anne Marie-Louise Louis (dauphin) Philippe Adélaïde Victoire-Louise Sophie-Philippine Thérèse-Félicité Louise-Marie Date... Reign From 1734 until October 5, 1763 Elected In 1734 in Wola, today suburb of Warsaw, Poland Coronation On January 17, 1734 in the Wawel Cathedral, Kraków, Poland Royal House Wettin Parents August II Mocny ? Consorts Marie Josepha Children Frederick Christian Date of Birth October 7, 1696 Place of... List of Dukes, Electors, and Kings of Saxony, 880-1918 The original Duchy of Saxony comprised lands in the north-westen part of present-day Germany, roughly corresponding to the modern German state of Lower Saxony and to Westphalia. ... Archduchess Maria Josefa of Austria, Queen of Poland. ... Joseph I. Joseph I (July 26, 1678 – April 17, 1711), Holy Roman Emperor, King of Hungary and Bohemia, Archduke of Austria, was the elder son of the emperor Leopold I and his third wife, Eleanora, Countess Palatine, daughter of Philip William of Neuburg, Elector Palatine. ... The County of Artois was a Carolingian county, established by the counts Odalric and Ecfrid of Artois, then integrated into the County of Flanders, first by Baldwin II of Flanders around 898, then by Arnulf I of Flanders. ... Louis XVI, born Louis-Auguste de France (23 August 1754 – 21 January 1793) ruled as King of France and Navarre from 1774 until 1791, and then as King of the French from 1791 to 1792. ... Louis XVIII (November 17, 1755 - September 16, 1824) was King of France and Navarre from 1814 (although he declared that he considered his reign to have begun in 1795) until his death in 1824, with a brief break in 1815 due to Napoleons return in the Hundred Days. ... Year 1814 (MDCCCXIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... An Heir Presumptive (capitalised) is the person provisionally scheduled to inherit a throne, peerage, or other hereditary honor, but whose position can be displaced by the birth of an Heir Apparent or of a new Heir Presumptive with a better claim to the throne. ... Monsieur means My Lord in French, and is now generally used as an honorific for all men, the equivalent to the English Mister. ...


Extravagant and temperamental, Charles was charming, affectionate and a witty conversationalist. Despite a flurry of youthful hedonism, he was also devoutly religious. A strong belief in the Roman Catholic Church bound him closely to his younger sister, Madame Élisabeth. The Roman Catholic Church or Catholic Church (see terminology below) is the Christian Church in full communion with the Bishop of Rome, currently Pope Benedict XVI. It traces its origins to the original Christian community founded by Jesus Christ and led by the Twelve Apostles, in particular Saint Peter. ... Élisabeth Philippine Marie Hélène of France (May 3, 1764 – May 10, 1794), commonly called Madame Élisabeth, was the youngest sister of King Louis XVI of France. ...


As a young prince he was a noted womanizer, popular, well-mannered and entertaining. He struck up a firm friendship with his sister-in-law, Marie Antoinette of Austria. The closeness of the relationship was such that he was falsely accused of having seduced Marie Antoinette by Parisian rumor mongers. As part of Marie Antoinette's social set, Charles often appeared opposite her in the private theatre of her favourite royal retreat, the Petit Trianon. They were both said to be very talented amateur actors; with Marie Antoinette playing milkmaids, shepherdesses and country ladies, and Charles playing lovers, valets and farmers. A famous story concerning the two involves the construction of the Château de Bagatelle. In 1775, Charles purchased a small hunting lodge in the Bois de Boulogne. He soon had the existing house torn down with plans to rebuild. Marie Antoinette wagered her brother-in-law that the new château could not be completed within three months. Charles engaged the neoclassical architect François-Joseph Bélanger to design the building. He won his bet, with Bélanger completing the house in sixty-three days. It is estimated that the project, which came to include manicured gardens, cost over two million livres. Marie-Antoinette, painted by Wagenschon shortly after her marriage in 1770 Marie-Antoinette, Queen of France and Archduchess of Austria (born 2 November 1755 – executed 16 October 1793) Daughter of Maria Theresa of Austria, wife of Louis XVI and mother of Louis XVII. She was guillotined at the height... The Petit Trianon, Versailles The Petit Trianon, situated at a short distance from the Grand Trianon in Versailles, France, was designed by Ange-Jacques Gabriel by order of Louis XV for his long-term mistress, Madame de Pompadour, and was constructed between 1762-1768. ... Bagatelle was built as a small hunting lodge built for the Maréchal dEstrées in 1720 in what is now the Bois de Boulogne in the 16ème arrondissement of Paris. ... Year 1775 (MDCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... A hunter on horseback shoots at deer or elk with a bow. ... The upper lake, with rowboats The Bois de Boulogne is a park located along the western edge of the 16ème arrondissement of Paris, near the suburb of Boulogne-Billancourt. ... The neoclassical movement that produced Neoclassical architecture began in the mid-18th century, both as a reaction against the Rococo style of anti-tectonic naturalistic ornament, and an outgrowth of some classicizing features of Late Baroque. ... François-Joseph Bélanger (Paris 12 April 1744–Paris 1 May 1818) was a French architect and decorator working in the Neoclassic style. ...


Considered the handsomest member of the royal family, his affairs were numerous. According to the Comte d'Hezecques, "few beauties were cruel to him." Later, he embarked upon a life-long love affair with the beautiful Louise de Polastron (née d' Esparbès de Lussan) (1764-1804). She was the sister-in-law of Marie Antoinette's closest companion, the Duchesse de Polignac. Madame de Polastron stayed with the prince for the rest of her life. 1764 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1804 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Gabrielle de Polastron Yolande Martine Gabrielle de Polastron, comtesse de Polignac (September 8, 1749–December 9, 1793) was a French aristocrat and friend of Marie Antoinette, whom she first met at Versailles in 1775. ...


As a father, his clear favourite was his youngest son, Charles Ferdinand, duc de Berry, who most closely resembled his father in looks and personality. Relations with his eldest son, Louis-Antoine, Duc d'Angoulême, were more strained as Louis-Antoine was a quiet, weak and introverted liberal with a nervous disposition. Charles Ferdinand, duc de Berry (1778 - February 13, 1820) was the younger son of Charles X of France and Marie-Thérèse de Savoie. ... Louis XIX, King of France and of Navarre (Louis-Antoine, duc dAngoulême) (August 6, 1775 - June 3, 1844) was the eldest son of the comte dArtois (later King Charles X of France). ...


His political awakening started with the first great crisis of the monarchy in 1786, after which he headed the reactionary faction at the court of Louis XVI. The Comte d'Artois supported the removal of the aristocracy's financial privileges, but he was opposed to any reduction in the social privileges enjoyed by either the Church or the nobility. He believed that France's finances should be reformed without the monarchy being overthrown. In his own words, it was "time for repair, not demolition." 1786 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ...


He also enraged the Third Estate (politicians representing the commoners) by objecting to every initiative to increase their voting power in 1789. This prompted criticism from his brother, who accused him of being "plus royaliste que le roi"("more royalist than the King"). In France of the ancien régime and the age of the French Revolution, the term Third Estate (tiers état) indicated the generality of people which were not part of the clergy (the First Estate) nor of the nobility (the Second Estate). ... 1789 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ...


In conjunction with the Baron de Breteuil, Charles had political alliances arranged to depose the liberal prime minister, Jacques Necker. These plans backfired when Charles attempted to secure Necker's dismissal on July 11th without Breteuil's knowledge, much earlier than they had originally intended. It was the beginning of a decline in his political alliance with Breteuil, which ended in mutual loathing. Louis-Auguste le Tonnelier Louis-Auguste le Tonnelier, baron de Breteuil, baron de Preuilly (March 7, 1730 – November 2, 1807) was a French aristocrat, statesman and politician. ... Jacques Necker Jacques Necker (September 30, 1732 – April 9, 1804) was a French statesman of Swiss origin and finance minister of Louis XVI. // Necker was born in Geneva, Switzerland. ...


In Exile

Blue plaque at 72 South Audley Street, London, his home 1805-1814.
French Monarchy-
Capetian Dynasty,
House of Bourbon

Henry IV
Sister
   Catherine of Navarre, Duchess of Lorraine
Children
   Louis XIII
   Elisabeth, Queen of Spain
   Christine Marie, Duchess of Savoy
   Nicholas Henry
   Gaston, Duke of Orléans
   Henriette-Marie, Queen of England and Scotland
Louis XIII
Children
   Louis XIV
   Philippe, Duke of Orléans
Louis XIV
Children
   Louis, Dauphin
   Marie-Anne
   Marie-Therese
   Philippe-Charles, Duc d'Anjou
   Louis-François, Duc d'Anjou
Grandchildren
   Louis, Dauphin
   King Philip V of Spain
   Charles, Duke of Berry
Great Grandchildren
   Louis, Dauphin
   Louis XV
Louis XV
Children
   Louise-Elisabeth, Duchess of Parma
   Madame Henriette
   Louis, Dauphin
   Madame Marie Adélaïde
   Madame Victoire
   Madame Sophie
   Madame Louise
Grandchildren
   Clotilde, Queen of Sardinia
   Louis XVI
   Louis XVIII
   Charles X
   Madame Élisabeth
Louis XVI
Children
   Marie-Thérèse-Charlotte, Duchess of Angouleme
   Louis-Joseph, Dauphin
   Louis (XVII)
   Sophie-Beatrix
Louis (XVII)
Louis XVIII
Charles X
Children
   Louis (XIX), Duke of Angoulême
   Charles, Duke of Berry
Grandchildren
   Henry (V), comte de Chambord
   Louise, Duchess of Parma

After the fall of the Bastille on July 14, 1789 he was ordered to leave France by his brother Louis XVI, who feared that Charles would soon be the victim of an assassination due to his expressed conservatism. It was also Louis's intention that Charles should represent the Bourbon Monarchy abroad, and carry on the dynasty if the worst should happen. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1181x1077, 204 KB) Blue plaque to Charles X of France on his house (1805-1814) at 72 South Audley Street, London, England. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1181x1077, 204 KB) Blue plaque to Charles X of France on his house (1805-1814) at 72 South Audley Street, London, England. ... A blue plaque showing information about The Spanish Barn at Torre Abbey in Torquay. ... Also see:  Early Modern France The House of Bourbon is an important European royal house. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Henry IV of France, also Henry III of Navarre (13 December 1553 – 14 May 1610), ruled as King of France from 1589 to 1610 and King of Navarre from 1572 to 1610. ... Henry I (November 8, 1563 – July 31, 1624), was Duke of Lorraine from 1608 until his death. ... Louis XIII (September 27, 1601 – May 14, 1643), called the Just (French: le Juste), was King of France from 1610 to 1643. ... Philip IV of Spain Elisabeth of France, portrait by Diego Velázquez Élisabeth de Bourbon (November 22, 1602 - October 6, 1644), was the eldest daughter of King Henry IV of France and his second Queen Marie de Medici. ... Victor Amadeus I (May 8, 1587 – October 7, 1637) was the Duke of Savoy from 1630 to 1637. ... Gaston Jean-Baptiste, duc dOrléans (April 25, 1608, Fontainebleau – February 2, 1660, Blois), was the third son of the French king Henry IV and of his wife Marie de Medici. ... Queen Henrietta Maria (November 25, 1609 – September 10, 1669) was Queen Consort of England, Scotland and Ireland (June 13, 1625 - January 30, 1649) through her marriage to Charles I. The U.S. state of Maryland (in Latin, Terra Mariae) was so named in her honour by Cæcilius Calvert, son... Louis XIII (September 27, 1601 – May 14, 1643), called the Just (French: le Juste), was King of France from 1610 to 1643. ... “Sun King” redirects here. ... Philippe I, Duc dOrléans (September 21, 1640 – June 8, 1701) was the son of the Louis XIII of France and Anne of Austria, and younger brother of Louis XIV of France. ... “Sun King” redirects here. ... Louis, Dauphin of France (known as The Great Dauphin, le Grand Dauphin in French) (1 November 1661 - 14 April 1711) was the eldest son and heir of King Louis XIV of France and Queen Maria Theresa of Spain. ... Louis, Dauphin of France and Duke of Burgundy (August 16, 1682 - February 18, 1712) was the son of Louis, le Grand Dauphin, and Maria Anna of Bavaria. ... King Philip V of Spain (December 19, 1683 – July 9, 1746) or Philippe of Anjou was king of Spain from 1700 to 1746, the first of the Bourbon dynasty in Spain. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Louis as Duke of Brittany Louis, Dauphin of France and Duke of Brittany (8 January 1707–8 March 1712) was the second son of Louis, duc de Bourgogne and Marie-Adélaïde of Savoy. ... Louis XV of France (February 15, 1710 – May 10, 1774), the Beloved (French: le Bien-Aimé), was King of France from 1715 until his death. ... Louis XV of France (February 15, 1710 – May 10, 1774), the Beloved (French: le Bien-Aimé), was King of France from 1715 until his death. ... Louise-Élisabeth of France and her daught y su hija Luisa Isabel de Borbón-Parma. ... Madame Henriette jouant de la basse viole (Madame Henriette playing the bass viol) by Jean-Marc Nattier Henriette-Anne of France (14 August 1727 at Versailles—-10 February 1752 at Versailles), was the twin sister of Princess Louise-Élisabeth, the eldest child of King Louis XV of France and his... Louis, Dauphin of France Louis, Dauphin of France (Louis-Ferdinand de France [1]) (4 September 1729 – 20 December 1765), was the eldest and only surviving son of King Louis XV of France and his wife, Queen Marie LeszczyÅ„ska. ... Marie Adélaïde (23 March 1732 - 27 February 1800) was a French princess. ... Victoire Louise Marie Thérèse (May 11, 1733 - June 7, 1799) was the seventh child and fifth daughter of King Louis XV of France and his Queen consort Maria LeszczyÅ„ska. ... Sophie Philippine Elisabeth Justine (27 July 1734 - 2 March 1782) was a French princess. ... Portrait of the young Marie-Louise by Jean-Marc Nattier. ... Charles Emmanuel IV. Charles Emmanuel IV (May 24, 1751 - October 6, 1819) was King of Sardinia from 1796 to 1802. ... Louis XVI, born Louis-Auguste de France (23 August 1754 – 21 January 1793) ruled as King of France and Navarre from 1774 until 1791, and then as King of the French from 1791 to 1792. ... Louis XVIII (November 17, 1755 - September 16, 1824) was King of France and Navarre from 1814 (although he declared that he considered his reign to have begun in 1795) until his death in 1824, with a brief break in 1815 due to Napoleons return in the Hundred Days. ... Élisabeth Philippine Marie Hélène of France (May 3, 1764 – May 10, 1794), commonly called Madame Élisabeth, was the youngest sister of King Louis XVI of France. ... Louis XVI, born Louis-Auguste de France (23 August 1754 – 21 January 1793) ruled as King of France and Navarre from 1774 until 1791, and then as King of the French from 1791 to 1792. ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... Louis de France. ... Louis XVII of France (March 27, 1785 – June 8, 1795), from birth to 1789 known as Louis-Charles, Duke of Normandy; then from 1789 to 1791 as Louis-Charles, Dauphin of Viennois; and from 1791 to 1793 as Louis-Charles, Prince Royal of France, was the son of King Louis... Princess Sophie died as a baby, much to the grief of her parents. ... Louis XVII of France (March 27, 1785 – June 8, 1795), from birth to 1789 known as Louis-Charles, Duke of Normandy; then from 1789 to 1791 as Louis-Charles, Dauphin of Viennois; and from 1791 to 1793 as Louis-Charles, Prince Royal of France, was the son of King Louis... Louis XVIII (November 17, 1755 - September 16, 1824) was King of France and Navarre from 1814 (although he declared that he considered his reign to have begun in 1795) until his death in 1824, with a brief break in 1815 due to Napoleons return in the Hundred Days. ... Louis XIX, King of France and of Navarre (Louis-Antoine, duc dAngoulême) (August 6, 1775 – June 3, 1844) was the eldest son of the comte dArtois (later King Charles X of France) and Marie-Thérèse de Savoie. ... Charles Ferdinand, duc de Berry (1778 - February 13, 1820) was the younger son of Charles X of France and Marie-Thérèse de Savoie. ... Henri, comte de Chambord Henri Charles Ferdinand Marie Dieudonné dArtois, comte de Chambord (September 29, 1820 – August 24, 1883) was technically King Henri V of France from July 30th to August 9, 1830. ... Charles III of Parma. ... The Bastille The Bastille ( ) was a fight in Paris, known formally as Bastille Saint-Antoine—Number 232, Rue Saint-Antoine—best known today because of the storming of the Bastille on July 14, 1789, which along with the Tennis Court Oath is considered the beginning of the French Revolution. ... July 14 is the 195th day (196th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 170 days remaining. ... 1789 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Also see:  Early Modern France The House of Bourbon is an important European royal house. ...


In exile—first in Germany and then Italy—Charles feared that his brother, the Comte de Provence, would compromise with the Revolution and betray the Monarchy. He took the disastrous decision of appointing Calonne to his council, which outraged Marie Antoinette. This was an end to Charles and Marie Antoinette's deep friendship, and Charles was left wracked with guilt after her execution in 1793. Charles' major foreign ally at this time was Catherine the Great, the Empress of Russia, who preferred Charles to the Baron de Breteuil, who was the opposing leader of the royalists-in-exile. Louis XVIII (November 17, 1755 - September 16, 1824) was King of France and Navarre from 1814 (although he declared that he considered his reign to have begun in 1795) until his death in 1824, with a brief break in 1815 due to Napoleons return in the Hundred Days. ... Charles Alexandre de Calonne, portrait by Marie Louise Élisabeth Vigée-Lebrun. ... 1793 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Catherine II (Екатерина II Алексеевна: Yekaterína II Alekséyevna, April 21, 1729 - November 6, 1796), born Sophie Augusta Fredericka, known as Catherine the Great, reigned as empress of Russia from... Louis-Auguste le Tonnelier Louis-Auguste le Tonnelier, baron de Breteuil, baron de Preuilly (March 7, 1730 – November 2, 1807) was a French aristocrat, statesman and politician. ...


The Comte d'Artois later emigrated to Britain, where George III allowed him to live in Holyrood House, a royal palace in Edinburgh. He was not comfortable with the ultra-Protestant environment of the city and spent most of his time behind the palace walls, although he was by no means rude to the locals. Communication between Charles and his surviving brother, the Comte de Provence, living in Russia at Mittau, was particularly strained once it became apparent that Charles was utterly indifferent to his brother's financial problems. George III (George William Frederick; 4 June 1738 – 29 January 1820) was King of Great Britain and King of Ireland from 25 October 1760 until 1 January 1801, and thereafter United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland until his death. ... Holyrood Palace The Palace of Holyroodhouse, more commonly known as Holyrood Palace, originally founded as a monastery by David I of Scotland in 1128, has served as the principal residence of the Kings and Queens of Scotland since the 15th century. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... Louis XVIII (November 17, 1755 - September 16, 1824) was King of France and Navarre from 1814 (although he declared that he considered his reign to have begun in 1795) until his death in 1824, with a brief break in 1815 due to Napoleons return in the Hundred Days. ... Jelgava (German: Mitau; Russian: Елгава / Митава; Polish: Mitawa) is a town in central Latvia about 41 km southwest of Riga with approximately 66,000 inhabitants. ...


When Louise de Polastron died of consumption in 1804, Charles took a vow of perpetual chastity. His grief was intense, for he had been truly in love with her. His religious convictions strengthened and he became even more devout than he had been before. His personal life became "entirely blameless". In his later years, he enthusiastically supported the Ultramontane movement within the Roman Catholic Church. Tuberculosis (abbreviated as TB for Tubercle Bacillus) is a common and deadly infectious disease that is caused by mycobacteria, primarily Mycobacterium tuberculosis. ... 1804 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Ultramontanism literally alludes to a policy supporting those dwelling beyond the mountains (ultra montes), that is beyond the Alps - generally referring to the Pope in Rome. ... The Roman Catholic Church or Catholic Church (see terminology below) is the Christian Church in full communion with the Bishop of Rome, currently Pope Benedict XVI. It traces its origins to the original Christian community founded by Jesus Christ and led by the Twelve Apostles, in particular Saint Peter. ...


Charles's wife, Marie-Thérèse, died in 1805. His eldest son, the Duc d'Angoulême, was married to his cousin Princess Marie-Thérèse-Charlotte, the only surviving child of Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette of Austria. Charles's other son, the Duc de Berry, secretly married an English Protestant named Amy Brown who was also a commoner. This marriage was annulled when it was discovered—probably at Charles's behest. Berry was later married to Princess Caroline Ferdinande Louise of the Two Sicilies, and they produced the Comte de Chambord. 1805 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Louis XIX, King of France and of Navarre (Louis-Antoine, duc dAngoulême) (August 6, 1775 - June 3, 1844) was the eldest son of the comte dArtois (later King Charles X of France). ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... Louis XVI, born Louis-Auguste de France (23 August 1754 – 21 January 1793) ruled as King of France and Navarre from 1774 until 1791, and then as King of the French from 1791 to 1792. ... Marie-Antoinette, painted by Wagenschon shortly after her marriage in 1770 Marie-Antoinette, Queen of France and Archduchess of Austria (born 2 November 1755 – executed 16 October 1793) Daughter of Maria Theresa of Austria, wife of Louis XVI and mother of Louis XVII. She was guillotined at the height... Charles Ferdinand, duc de Berry (1778 - February 13, 1820) was the younger son of Charles X of France and Marie-Thérèse de Savoie. ... Caroline Ferdinande Louise, duchesse de Berry (1798-1890). ... Henri, comte de Chambord Henri Charles Ferdinand Marie Dieudonné dArtois, comte de Chambord (September 29, 1820 – August 24, 1883) was technically King Henri V of France from July 30th to August 9, 1830. ...


Restoration and reign as king of France

Charles was still living in Edinburgh in 1814 when the French monarchy was restored under his other brother, who assumed the name Louis XVIII. The two royal brothers were not especially close, since Charles viewed Louis XVIII as treacherous and irreligious. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Year 1814 (MDCCCXIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... Louis XVIII (November 17, 1755 - September 16, 1824) was King of France and Navarre from 1814 (although he declared that he considered his reign to have begun in 1795) until his death in 1824, with a brief break in 1815 due to Napoleons return in the Hundred Days. ...


Charles never met any of the claimants pretending to be his long-lost nephew, Louis XVII, since he was convinced the child had died in Paris in 1795. Louis XVII of France (March 27, 1785 – June 8, 1795), from birth to 1789 known as Louis-Charles, Duke of Normandy; then from 1789 to 1791 as Louis-Charles, Dauphin of Viennois; and from 1791 to 1793 as Louis-Charles, Prince Royal of France, was the son of King Louis... City flag City coat of arms Motto: Fluctuat nec mergitur (Latin: Tossed by the waves, she does not sink) Paris Eiffel tower as seen from the esplanade du Trocadéro. ... 1795 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ...


Shortly after he took the throne he proposed (and the Chamber of Deputies passed) laws that approved the death penalty for sacrilege and theft or destruction of the Host. No one was ever executed for either of these crimes during his reign but they had a powerful significance. During the reign of Louis XVIII he headed the ultra-royalist opposition, which took power after the traumatic assassination of Charles's son, the Duc de Berry. The event caused the fall of the ministry of Élie Decazes and the rise of the Comte de Villèle, who continued as chief minister after Charles became king. Emotionally, Charles never really recovered from his son's murder. Capital punishment, or the death penalty, is the execution of a convicted criminal by the state as punishment for crimes known as capital crimes or capital offences. ... Sacrilege is in general the violation or injurious treatment of a sacred object. ... The term Ultra-Royalists or simply Ultras refers to a reactionary faction which sat in the French parliament from 1815 to 1830 under the Bourbon Restoration. ... Élie, duc Decazes, French statesman Elie, Comte (later Duc) Decazes (1788 - October 24, 1860), was a French statesman. ... Jean-Baptiste Guillaume Joseph Marie Anne Seraphin, comte de Villèle (April 14, 1773 - March 13, 1854), was a French statesman. ...

Monarchical Styles of
Charles X
Par la grâce de Dieu, Roi de France et Navarre
Reference style His Most Christian Majesty
Spoken style Your Most Christian Majesty
Alternative style Monsieur Le Roi

In 1824, Charles, aged 67, became king upon the death of his brother. His coronation on 28 May 1825 deliberately harked back to the Ancien Régime: the sacre du roi (consecration) was performed by the Archbishop of Rheims in his cathedral, the traditional coronation venue for French kings, amid much theatrical pomp (compare the coronation of Britain's George IV in 1820). It even featured a ceremony where Charles touched sufferers of the King's Evil, scrofula, the last time this ancient ritual was performed. This deliberate impression of royal splendour was in contrast to his predecessor and successor, neither of whom had a coronation (the only other nineteenth century French coronation was Napoleon's in 1804). Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... A style of office, or honorific, is a form of address which by tradition or law precedes a reference to a person who holds a title or post, or to the political office itself. ... Main articles: France in the Middle Ages and Early Modern France The Valois Dynasty succeeded the Capetian Dynasty as rulers of France from 1328-1589. ... The coronation of Empress Farah, of Iran in 1967. ... Ancien Régime, a French term meaning Former Regime, but rendered in English as Old Rule, Old Order, or simply Old Regime, refers primarily to the aristocratic social and political system established in France under the Valois and Bourbon dynasties. ... Reims (English traditionally Rheims) (pronounced in French) is a city of northern France, 144 km (89 miles) east-northeast of Paris. ... George IV King of the United Kingdom George IV (George Augustus Frederick) (12 August 1762–26 June 1830) was King of the United Kingdom and Hanover from 29 January 1820. ... King Henry IV of France touching a number of sufferers of scrofula who are gathered about him in a circle. ... For other uses, see Napoleon (disambiguation). ...


The Villèle cabinet resigned in 1827 under pressure from the liberal press. His successor, the Vicomte de Martignac, tried to steer a middle course, but in 1829 Charles appointed Prince Jules Armand de Polignac (Louise de Polastron's nephew), an ultra-reactionary, as chief minister. Polignac initiated French colonization in Algeria. His dissolution of the Chamber of Deputies, his July Ordinances, which set up rigid control of the press, and his restriction of suffrage resulted in the July Revolution. Year 1827 (MDCCCXXVII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Jean Baptiste Gay, vicomte de Martignac, French statesman Jean Baptiste Sylvere Gay, Vicomte de Martignac (June 20, 1778 - April 3, 1832), was a French statesman. ... Johann Wolfgang von Goethe 1829 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Jules, prince de Polignac, French statesman Jules Auguste Armand Marie, prince de Polignac (1780 - March 29, 1847), French statesman, played a conspicuous part in the clerical and ultra-royalist reaction after the Revolution. ... Chamber of Deputies (French: ) was the name given to several parliamentary bodies in France in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries: 1814 - 1848 during the Bourbon Restoration and the July Monarchy, the Chamber of Deputies was the Lower chamber of the French Parliament, elected by census suffrage. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...

Eugène Delacroix's famous painting

Charles abdicated in favor of his grandson, the Comte de Chambord, and left for England. However, the liberal, bourgeois-controlled Chamber of Deputies refused to confirm the Comte de Chambord as Henri V. In a vote largely boycotted by conservative deputies, the body declared the French throne vacant, and elevated Louis-Philippe, duc d'Orleans, to power. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1241x1022, 171 KB) Same image in much smaller size is found at Image:Liberty Leading the People. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1241x1022, 171 KB) Same image in much smaller size is found at Image:Liberty Leading the People. ... Ferdinand Victor Eugène Delacroix (April 26, 1798 – August 13, 1863) was the most important of the French Romantic painters. ... Henri Charles Ferdinand Marie Dieudonne, Comte de Chambord (September 29, 1820 - August 24, 1883) was the grandson of King Charles X of France, the posthumous son of Charless younger son Charles, Duc de Berry, who had been assassinated several months before Henris birth. ... Henri Charles Ferdinand Marie Dieudonne, Comte de Chambord (September 29, 1820 - August 24, 1883) was the grandson of King Charles X of France, the posthumous son of Charless younger son Charles, Duc de Berry, who had been assassinated several months before Henris birth. ... Louis Philippe (real name: Philippe Auclair) is a London-based French singer, songwriter, arranger and producer who has been active from the mid-80s onwards. ... This article is about Orléans, France; for other meanings see Orleans (disambiguation). ...


After a sojourn in Britain, Charles later settled in Prague in the present-day Czech Republic. He died from cholera on November 6, 1836 in the palace of Count Michael Coronini Comberg zu Graffenberg at Gorizia, in present-day Italy, tended by his niece Marie-Thérèse. He is buried in the Church of Saint Mary of the Annunciation on Kostanjevica Hill, on what is now the Slovenian side of the border in Nova Gorica. Nickname: Motto: Praga Caput Rei publicae Location within the Czech Republic Coordinates: Country Czech Republic Region Capital City of Prague Founded 9th century Government  - Mayor Pavel Bém Area  - City 496 km²  (191. ... November 6 is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 55 days remaining. ... Year 1836 (MDCCCXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Gorizia (Slovenian: Gorica, German: Görz, Friulian: Gurize) is a small town at the foot of the Alps, in northeastern Italy, on the border with Slovenia. ... Portrait of Marie-Thérèse-Charlotte, Madame Royale Marie-Thérèse-Charlotte, (December 19, 1778 - October 19, 1851), also known as La Princesse Royale or Madame Royale, was the eldest child of King Louis XVI and his Austrian wife, Queen Marie Antoinette. ... Area: 309. ...


Ancestors

Charles's ancestors in three generations
Charles X of France Father:
Louis-Ferdinand, Dauphin of France
Paternal Grandfather:
Louis XV of France
Paternal Great-Grandfather:
Louis, duc de Bourgogne
Paternal Great-grandmother:
Marie-Adélaïde of Savoy
Paternal Grandmother:
Maria Leszczyńska
Paternal Great-Grandfather:
Stanisław Leszczyński
Paternal Great-Grandmother:
Katarzyna Opalińska
Mother:
Marie-Josèphe of Saxony
Maternal Grandfather:
Augustus III of Poland
Maternal Great-Grandfather:
Augustus II the Strong
Maternal Great-Grandmother:
Christiane Eberhardine, Margravine of Brandenburg-Bayreuth
Maternal Grandmother:
Maria Josepha of Austria
Maternal Great-grandfather:
Joseph I, Holy Roman Emperor
Maternal Great-Grandmother:
Wilhelmina Amalia of Brunswick-Lüneburg

Louis-Ferdinand, the Dauphin of France, in a pastel by Maurice Quentin de La Tour Louis-Ferdinand, Dauphin of France (4 September 1729 – 20 December 1765), born in Versailles, was the eldest and only surviving son of King Louis XV of France and his wife, Queen Marie LeszczyÅ„ska. ... Louis XV of France (February 15, 1710 – May 10, 1774), the Beloved (French: le Bien-Aimé), was King of France from 1715 until his death. ... Louis, Dauphin of France and Duke of Burgundy (August 16, 1682 - February 18, 1712) was the son of Louis, le Grand Dauphin, and Maria Anna of Bavaria. ... Marie-Adélaïde of Savoy (December 6, 1685-February 12, 1712) was the mother of King Louis XV of France. ... Noble Family LeszczyÅ„ski Coat of Arms Wieniawa Parents Stanislaw LeszczyÅ„ski Katarzyna OpaliÅ„ska Consorts Louis XV of France Children with Louis XV of France Louise-Elisabeth Henriette-Anne Marie-Louise Louis (dauphin) Philippe Adélaïde Victoire-Louise Sophie-Philippine Thérèse-Félicité Louise-Marie Date... Reign From 1704 until 1709 and from 1733 until 1736 Elected In 1704 and 1733 in Wola, today suburb of Warsaw, Poland Coronation On October 4, 1705 in the St. ... Katarzyna OpaliÅ„ska (1682 - 1747) was the daughter of Magnate Jean-Charles OpaliÅ„ski and his wife Catherine-Sophie-Anne. ... Marie-Josèphe of Saxony Marie-Josèphe of Saxony, (4 November 1731-13 March 1767), Dauphiness of France, was the daughter of Augustus II, prince-Elector of Saxony and king of Poland, and Marie Josepha of Austria, (1699-1757), the daughter of Joseph I, Holy Roman Emperor. ... Reign From 1734 until October 5, 1763 Elected In 1734 in Wola, today suburb of Warsaw, Poland Coronation On January 17, 1734 in the Wawel Cathedral, Kraków, Poland Royal House Wettin Parents August II Mocny ? Consorts Marie Josepha Children Frederick Christian Date of Birth October 7, 1696 Place of... Reign From 1697, until 1706 and from 1709, until February 1, 1733 Elected In 1697 in Wola, today suburb of Warsaw, Poland Coronation On September 15, 1697 in the Wawel Cathedral, Kraków, Poland Royal House Wettin Parents John George III Wettin Anne Sophie Consorts  ? Children August III Sas Maurice... Archduchess Maria Josefa of Austria, Queen of Poland. ... Joseph I. Joseph I (July 26, 1678 – April 17, 1711), Holy Roman Emperor, King of Hungary and Bohemia, Archduke of Austria, was the elder son of the emperor Leopold I and his third wife, Eleanora, Countess Palatine, daughter of Philip William of Neuburg, Elector Palatine. ... Wilhelmina Amalia (21 April 1673 - 10 April 1742) was the daughter of John Frederick, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg, and Benedicta-Henrietta of Simmern. ...

Marriage and issue

He married Marie-Thérèse de Savoie, the daughter of Victor Amadeus III of Savoy, on November 16, 1773. Marie-Thérèse of Savoy (31 January 1756 - 1805), princess of Sardinia and of Piedmont, was the wife of Charles, Comte dArtois, the youngest grandson of Louis XV of France, who would become Charles X of France. ... Victor Amadeus III (Vittorio Amedeo III in Italian b. ... November 16 is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 45 days remaining. ... 1773 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ...


Their children:

  1. Louis-Antoine, duc d'Angoulême (Louis XIX) (August 6, 1775 - June 3, 1844)
  2. Sophie (August 5, 1776 - December 5, 1783)
  3. Charles Ferdinand, duc de Berry (January 24, 1778 - February 13, 1820)

Louis XIX, King of France and of Navarre (Louis-Antoine, duc dAngoulême) (August 6, 1775 – June 3, 1844) was the eldest son of the comte dArtois (later King Charles X of France) and Marie-Thérèse de Savoie. ... Charles Ferdinand, duc de Berry (1778 - February 13, 1820) was the younger son of Charles X of France and Marie-Thérèse de Savoie. ...

Trivia

Charles would never countenance a voluntary reduction of his royal prerogative. He remarked, "I would rather saw wood than be a King of the English type" (Je préfère scier du bois qu'être un roi à l'anglaise").


References

Charles X of France
House of Bourbon
Cadet Branch of the House of Capet
Born: 9 October 1757
Died: 6 November 1836
Regnal Titles
Preceded by
Louis XVIII
King of France
16 September 1824–2 August 1830
Succeeded by
Louis-Philippe
Titles in pretence
New Title * NOT REIGNING *
King of France
Legitimist claimant

(2 August 1830–6 November 1836)
Succeeded by
Louis XIX

  Results from FactBites:
 
Charles X (of France) (219 words)
As comte d'Artois, Charles enjoyed a notoriously dissolute life at court, and became involved in reactionary politics.
Returning to France after the French Revolution, he became leader of the ultra-royalist group that put his brother Louis XVIII on the throne in 1814.
He fled to England at the beginning of the French Revolution, and when he came to the throne on the death of Louis XVIII, he attempted to reverse the achievements of the Revolution.
Charles X of France - LoveToKnow 1911 (1045 words)
CHARLES X. (1757-1836), king of France from 1824 to 1830, was the fourth child of the dauphin, son of Louis XV.
In July 1789 he left France, became leader of the emigres, and visited several of the courts of Europe in the interest of the royalist cause.
At Maintenon Charles took leave of the bulk of his troops, and proceeding with an escort of some 1200 men to Cherbourg, took ship there for England on the 16th of August.
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