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Encyclopedia > Charles Warren

General Sir Charles Warren, GCMG, KCB, FRS, RE (7 February 184021 January 1927) was an officer in the British Royal Engineers, and in later life was Commissioner of Police of the Metropolis, the head of the London Metropolitan Police, from 1886 to 1888, during the period of the Jack the Ripper murders. On the Orders insignia, St Michael is often depicted subduing Satan. ... Military Badge of the Order of the Bath The Most Honourable Order of the Bath is a British order of chivalry founded by George I on 18 May 1725. ... The premises of the Royal Society in London (first four properties only). ... The Corps of Royal Engineers, usually just called the Royal Engineers (RE), and commonly known as the Sappers, is one of the corps of the British Army. ... February 7 is the 38th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1840 is a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... January 21 is the 21st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1927 (MCMXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Corps of Royal Engineers, usually just called the Royal Engineers (RE), and commonly known as the Sappers, is one of the corps of the British Army. ... The Commissioner of Police of the Metropolis (usually just referred to as the Metropolitan Police Commissioner or, more colloquially, as the Met Commissioner) is the head of the Metropolitan Police Service in London. ... This article is about the British city. ... The Metropolitan Police Service (MPS) (commonly referred to by its former official name of the Metropolitan Police, or colloquially as The Met; often referred to in legislation as the Police of the Metropolis) is the Home Office (territorial) police force responsible for Greater London, England, with the exception of the... 1886 (MDCCCLXXXVI) is a common year starting on Friday (click on link to calendar) // Events January 18 - Modern field hockey is born with the formation of The Hockey Association in England. ... 1888 (MDCCCLXXXVIII) is a leap year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar. ... Jack the Ripper is the pseudonym given to an unidentified serial killer active in the largely impoverished Whitechapel area of London, England in the second half of 1888. ...

Contents


Education and early military career

Warren was born in Bangor, Caernarfonshire, Wales, the son of Major-General Sir Charles Warren. He was educated at Bridgnorth School and Wem Grammar School in Shropshire. He also attended Cheltenham College for one term in 1854, from which he went to the Royal Military College, Sandhurst and then the Royal Military Academy at Woolwich (18551857). On 27 December 1857, he was commissioned a Second Lieutenant in the Royal Engineers. On 1 September 1864, he married Fanny Haydon; they had two sons and a daughter. Warren was a devout Anglican and an enthusiastic freemason. Bangor, in north Wales, UK, is one of the smallest cities in the United Kingdom. ... Caernarfonshire, also known as Carnarvonshire or, in Welsh, as Sir Gaernarfon, is a maritime traditional county of Wales, bounded N. by the Irish Sea, E. by Denbighshire, S. by Cardigan Bay and Merionethshire, and W. by Caernarfon Bay and the Menai Straits, which separates it from Anglesey. ... For an explanation of often confusing terms such as Great Britain, Britain, United Kingdom and England, see British Isles (terminology). ... Map sources for Wem at grid reference SJ513288 If you are looking for the mall in Edmonton (WEM), see West Edmonton Mall. ... Shropshire (abbreviated Salop or Shrops) is a traditional, ceremonial and administrative county in the West Midlands region of England. ... Cheltenham College Coat of Arms Cheltenham College opened in July 1841, in Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, England. ... 1854 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... New College, Royal Military Academy Sandhurst The Royal Military Academy Sandhurst (commonly known as Sandhurst) is the British Army officer initial training centre. ... The Royal Military Academy was founded in 1741 in Woolwich, south-east London. ... Woolwich is a town in south-east London, England in the London Borough of Greenwich, on the south side of the River Thames, though the tiny exclave of North Woolwich (which is now part of the London Borough of Newham) is on the north side of the river. ... 1855 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1857 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... December 27 is the 361st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Second Lieutenant is the lowest commissioned rank in many armed forces. ... The Corps of Royal Engineers, usually just called the Royal Engineers (RE), and commonly known as the Sappers, is one of the corps of the British Army. ... September 1 is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years). ... 1864 (MDCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... The Church of England is the officially established Christian church in England, and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion, as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. ... The Masonic Square and Compasses. ...


From 1859, Warren worked on the survey of Gibraltar. From 1865 to 1867, he was an assistant instructor in surveying at the School of Military Engineering in Chatham. 1859 is a common year starting on Saturday. ... 1865 (MDCCCLXV) is a common year starting on Sunday. ... 1867 (MDCCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... The Royal School of Military Engineering (RSME) is the main training establishment for the British Armys Corps of Royal Engineers. ... Location within the British Isles Chatham is an English town that developed around an important naval dockyard on the east bank of the River Medway in the county of Kent. ...


Palestine

In 1867, Warren went to Palestine with the Palestine Exploration Fund. He conducted the first major excavations of Jerusalem, thereby ushering in a new age of Biblical archaeology. His most significant discovery was a water shaft, now known as Warren's Shaft, and a series of tunnels underneath the Temple Mount. He also helped to discover the Moabite Stone. Map of the territory under the British Mandate of Palestine. ... The Palestine Exploration Fund is a British society founded in 1865 by a group of Biblical archaeologists. ... Jerusalem (31°46′N 35°14′E; Hebrew: (help· info) Yerushalayim; Arabic: (help· info) al-Quds, Greek Ιεροσόλυμα), is an ancient Middle Eastern city on the watershed between the Mediterranean Sea and the Dead Sea at an elevation of 650-840 meters. ... Biblical archaeology involves the recovery and scientific investigation of the material remains of past cultures that can illuminate the periods and descriptions in the Bible. ... The Temple Mount (Hebrew: (without niqqud: הר הבית), Har haBáyit) or Noble Sanctuary (Arabic: الحرم الشريف, ▶ (help· info)) is a hotly contested religious site in the Old City of Jerusalem. ... The stele as photographed circa 1891 The Mesha Stele (popularized in the 19th century as the Moabite Stone) is a black basalt stone, bearing an inscription by the 9th century BC Moabite King Mesha, discovered in 1868. ...


Africa

In 1870, ill-health forced Warren to return to England, serving at Dover (18711872) and the School of Gunnery at Shoeburyness (18721876). The Colonial Office then appointed him special commissioner to survey the boundary between Griqualand West and the Orange Free State. For this work, he was made a Companion of St Michael and St George (CMG) in 1877. In the Transkei War (1877–1878), he commanded the Diamond Fields Horse and was badly wounded at Perie Bush. For this service, he was mentioned in dispatches and promoted to Brevet Lieutenant-Colonel. He was then appointed special commissioner to investigate 'native questions' in Bechuanaland. In 1879, he became Administrator of Griqualand West. 1870 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Royal motto (French): Dieu et mon droit (Translated: God and my right) Englands location (dark green) within the British Isles Languages None official English de facto Capital None official London de facto Largest city London Area – Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population – Total (mid-2004) – Total (2001... Map sources for Dover at grid reference TR315415 Arms of Dover Borough Council This article is about the English port town. ... 1871 (MDCCCLXXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1872 (MDCCCLXXII) was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... Location within the British Isles Shoeburyness is a town in southeast Essex, England, situated at the mouth of the river Thames. ... 1872 (MDCCCLXXII) was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... 1876 (MDCCCLXXVI) is a leap year starting on Saturday. ... The Secretary of State for the Colonies or Colonial Secretary was the British Cabinet official in charge of managing the various British colonies. ... The Griqua are a subgroup of South Africas Coloured population, descended from an admixture of European settlers and the Khoisan peoples they encountered on their initial arrival at the Cape. ... Capital Bloemfontein Created 1854 Dissolved 1900 Official language Dutch (Afrikaans more common) The Orange Free State (Afrikaans: Oranje Vrystaat) was an independent country in southern Africa during the second half of the 19th century, and later a province in South Africa. ... On the Orders insignia, St Michael is often depicted subduing Satan. ... 1877 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1878 (MDCCCLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Mentioned in Dispatches (MID) is a military award for gallantry or otherwise commendable service. ... In the US military, brevet referred to a warrant authorizing a commissioned officer to hold a higher rank temporarily, but usually without receiving the pay of that higher rank. ... In the U.S. Army, Air Force and Marine Corps, a lieutenant colonel is a commissioned officer superior to a major and inferior to a colonel. ... The Bechuanaland Protectorate (BP) was a protectorate established in 1885 by Britain in the area of what is now Botswana. ... 1879 (MDCCCLXXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ...


Sinai

In 1880, Warren returned to England to become Chief Instructor in Surveying at the School of Military Engineering. He held this post until 1884, but it was interrupted in 1882, when he was sent to Sinai to discover what had happened to Professor Edward Henry Palmer's archaeological expedition. He discovered that the expedition members had been robbed and murdered, located their remains, and brought their killers to justice. For this, he was created Knight Commander of St Michael and St George (KCMG) on 24 May 1883 and was also created a third class Mejidiye by the Egyptian government. In 1883, he was also made a Knight of Justice of the Order of St. John of Jerusalem, and in June 1884 he was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society (FRS). 1880 (MDCCCLXXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1884 (MDCCCLXXXIV) is a leap year starting on Tuesday (click on link to calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Thursday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1882 (MDCCCLXXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Sinai Peninsula, Gulf of Suez (west), Gulf of Aqaba (east) from Space Shuttle STS-40 The Sinai Peninsula (in Arabic, Shibh Jazirat Sina) is a triangle-shaped peninsula lying between the Mediterranean Sea (to the north) and Red Sea (to the south). ... Edward Henry Palmer (August 7, 1840 - August 1882) was an English orientalist, He was born in Cambridge as the son of a private schoolmaster. ... On the Orders insignia, St Michael is often depicted subduing Satan. ... May 24 is the 144th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (145th in leap years). ... 1883 (MDCCCLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... This page deals with the order after its revival in the 19th century. ... The premises of the Royal Society in London (first four properties only). ...


Warren Expedition

In December 1884, Warren was sent to command a military expedition to Bechuanaland, to assert British sovereignty in the face of encroachments from Germany and the Transvaal, and to suppress the Boer freebooter states of Stellaland and Goshen, which were backed by the Transvaal and were stealing land and cattle from the local Tswana tribes. Known as the Warren Expedition, the force of 4,000 British and local troops headed north from Cape Town, accompanied by the first three observation balloons ever used by the British Army in the field. The expedition achieved its aims without bloodshed, and Warren was recalled in September 1885 and made a Knight Grand Cross of St Michael and St George (GCMG) on 4 October. Flag of Transvaal The Transvaal (lit. ... Boer is the Afrikaans (and Dutch) word for farmer which came to denote the descendants of the Afrikaans-speaking migrating farmers of the expanding eastern Cape frontier. ... Map of Stellaland and surrounding regions Stellaland was a short-lived Boer republic established in 1882 by David Massouw and 400 followers, who invaded a Bechuana area west of the Transvaal. ... Goshen is the name of several places including 1 county and at least 29 other sites in the United States: Goshen County, Wyoming Goshen Scout Reservation, a Boy Scout reservation (consisting of six resident camps) run by the National Capital Area Council. ... Tswana (Motswana, plural Batswana) is the name of a Southern African people. ... City motto: Spes Bona (Latin: Good Hope) Province Western Cape Mayor Helen Zille Area  - % water 2,499 km² N/A Population  - Total (2004)  - Density Ranked 100th 2,893,251 1,158/km² Established 1652 Time zone SAST (UTC+2) Calling code 021 edit Cape Town (Afrikaans: Kaapstad /ˈkɑːpstÉ‘t... Balloons, like greeting cards or flowers, are given for special occasions. ... 1885 (MDCCCLXXXV) is a common year starting on Thursday. ... October 4 is the 277th day of the year (278th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ...


Commissioner of Police

In 1886, Warren stood for election to Parliament as an independent Liberal candidate in the Sheffield Hallam constituency with a radical manifesto. He lost by 690 votes, and was appointed commander at Suakin. A few weeks after he arrived, however, he was appointed Commissioner of Police of the Metropolis following Sir Edmund Henderson's resignation. By this time, he held the military rank of Major-General. The Houses of Parliament, seen over Westminster Bridge The Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is the supreme legislative institution in the United Kingdom and British overseas territories (it alone has parliamentary sovereignty). ... Hallamshire is the name given to an area of South Yorkshire, England. ... A constituency is any cohesive corporate unit or body bound by shared structures, goals or loyalty. ... Suakin is a port in north eastern Sudan, on the Red Sea. ... Lieutenant-Colonel Sir Edmund Yeamans Walcott Henderson KCB (19 April 1821–8 December 1896) was an officer in the British Army who was Comptroller-General of Convicts in Western Australia from 1850 to 1863, Home Office Surveyor-General of Prisons from 1863 to 1869, and Commissioner of Police of the... Insignia of a United States Air Force Major General German Generalmajor Insignia Major General is a military rank used in many countries. ...


The Metropolitan Police was in a bad state when Warren took over, suffering from Henderson's inactivity over the past few years. Economic conditions in London were bad, leading to demonstrations. He was concerned for his men's welfare, but much of this went unheeded. His men found him rather aloof, although he generally had good relations with his superintendents. At Queen Victoria's Golden Jubilee in 1887, the police received considerable adverse publicity after Miss Elizabeth Cass, an apparently respectable young seamstress, was (possibly) mistakenly arrested for soliciting, and was vocally supported by her employer in the courts. Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria) (24 May 1819 – 22 January 1901) was the eminent Queen of England, Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from 20 June 1837, and Empress of India from 1 January 1877, until her death in 1901. ... 1887 (MDCCCLXXXVII) is a common year starting on Saturday (click on link for calendar). ... Elizabeth Cass, later Elizabeth Langley (born 1863) was a British seamstress and dress designer whose mistaken arrest for prostitution in 1887 became a minor cause célèbre. ... Solicitation is a crime; it is an inchoate offense that consists of a person inciting, counseling, advising, urging, or commanding another to commit a crime with the specific intent that the person solicited commit the crime. ...


To make matters worse, Warren, a Liberal, did not get along with Conservative Home Secretary Henry Matthews, appointed a few months after he became Commissioner. Matthews supported the desire of the Assistant Commissioner (Crime), James Monro, to remain effectively independent of the Commissioner and also supported the Receiver, the force's chief financial officer, who continually clashed with Warren. Home Office Permanent Secretary Godfrey Lushington did not get on with Warren either. Warren was pilloried in the press for his extravagant dress uniform, his concern for the quality of his men's boots (a sensible concern considering they walked up to 20 miles a day, but one which was derided as a military obsession with kit), and his reintroduction of drill. The radical press completely turned against him after Bloody Sunday on 13 November 1887, when a demonstration in Trafalgar Square was broken up by 4,000 police officers on foot, 300 infantrymen and 600 mounted police and Life Guards. The Liberal Party was one of the two major British political parties from the early 19th century until the 1920s, and a third party of varying strength and importance up to 1988, when it merged with the Social Democratic Party (the SDP) to form a new party which would become... The Conservative Party is the largest political party on the right-of-centre in the United Kingdom and the most successful party in political history based on election victories. ... The Home Secretary (official full title Secretary of State for the Home Department) is the chief United Kingdom government minister responsible for law and order in England and Wales; his or her remit includes policing, the criminal justice system, the prison service, internal security, and matters of citizenship and immigration. ... Henry Matthews, 1st Viscount Llandaff (January 13, 1826 - April 3, 1913) was a British Conservative politician and statesman. ... Assistant Commissioner of Police of the Metropolis, usually just called Assistant Commissioner (AC), is today the third highest rank in the London Metropolitan Police, ranking below Deputy Commissioner and above Deputy Assistant Commissioner. ... James Monro CB (1838–1920) was a lawyer who became the first Assistant Commissioner (Crime) of the London Metropolitan Police and also served as Commissioner of Police of the Metropolis from 1888 to 1890. ... The Receiver, formally called The Receiver for the Metropolitan Police District (and sometimes referred to early in the posts existence as the Receiver-General), was until 2000 the chief financial officer of the Metropolitan Police in London, the Treasurer of the Metropolitan Police Fund. ... The modern concept of Small Office and Home Office or SoHo , or Small or Home Office deals with the category of business which can be from 1 to 10 workers. ... In the United Kingdom, the non-political civil service head of a government department, as distinct from the political Secretary of State to whom he or she reports. ... United States Marines on parade. ... Bloody Sunday 1887 Bloody Sunday, London, 13 November 1887 was a demonstration against coercion in Ireland and to demand the release from prison of MP William OBrien. ... November 13 is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 48 days remaining. ... 1887 (MDCCCLXXXVII) is a common year starting on Saturday (click on link for calendar). ... Trafalgar Square is a square in central London that commemorates the Battle of Trafalgar (1805), a British naval victory of the Napoleonic Wars. ... Infantry of the Royal Irish Rifles during the Battle of the Somme in World War I. Infantry are soldiers or marines who fight primarily on foot with small arms in organized military units. ... The Life Guards is the senior regiment of the British Army. ...


In 1888, Warren introduced five Chief Constables, ranking between the Superintendents and the Assistant Commissioners. Monro insisted that the Chief Constable of the Criminal Investigation Department (CID), his deputy, should be a friend of his, Melville Macnaghten, but Warren opposed his appointment on the grounds that during a riot in Bengal Macnaghten had been "beaten by Hindoos", as he put it. This grew into a major row between Warren and Monro, with both men offering their resignation to the Home Secretary. Matthews accepted Monro's resignation, but simply moved him to the Home Office and allowed him to keep command of Special Branch, which was his particular interest. Robert Anderson was appointed Assistant Commissioner (Crime) and Superintendent Adolphus Williamson was appointed Chief Constable (CID). Both men were encouraged to liaise with Monro behind Warren's back. 1888 (MDCCCLXXXVIII) is a leap year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar. ... Chief Constable is the title given to the commanding officer of every territorial police force in the United Kingdom except the two responsible for Greater London. ... Superintendent may refer to: Superintendent (education), an education executive or administrator Superintendent (police), a police rank Superintendent (United States Air Force), a United States Air Force position In buildings, a manager, a maintenance or repair person, a custodian or janitor. ... The Criminal Investigation Department (CID) is the branch of all British Police forces to which plain clothes detectives belong. ... Sir Melville MacNaghten Sir Melville Leslie MacNaghten CBE, CB (June 16, 1853-May 12, 1921) was Assistant Commissioner (Crime) of the London Metropolitan Force from 1903-1913. ... Bengal, known as Bôngo (Bengali: বঙ্গ), Bangla (বাংলা), Bôngodesh (বঙ্গদেশ), or Bangladesh (বাংলাদেশ) in Bangla, is a region in the northeast of South Asia. ... Special Branch is the arm of the British, Irish and many Commonwealth police forces that deals with national security matters. ... Robert Anderson (theologian) Sir Robert Anderson (1841 - 1918) Born in Dublin, Ireland. ...


Jack the Ripper

Warren's biggest difficulty was the Jack the Ripper case. He was probably unfairly blamed for the failure to track down the killer and faced press accusations that were frequently baseless. He was accused of failing to offer a reward for information, although in fact he supported the idea and it was blocked by the Home Office. He was accused of not putting enough police officers on the ground, whereas in fact Whitechapel was swamped with them. He was accused of being more interested in uniformed policing than detective work, which was true, but failed to take into consideration the fact that he sensibly allowed his experienced detective officers to conduct their own affairs and rarely interfered in their operations. He was accused of not using bloodhounds, and when he did eventually bring them in he was accused of being obsessed with them. Whitechapel is a place in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets, United Kingdom. ... A Bloodhound (also known as the Chien de Saint-Hubert) is a large breed of dog. ...


He rather stupidly responded to these criticisms by attacking his detractors in the pages of Murray's Magazine, supporting vigilante activity, which the police on the streets knew was a bad idea, and publicly complaining about his lack of control of CID, which brought an official Home Office reprimand for daring to discuss his office publicly without permission. Warren had had enough and resigned... coincidentally right before the murder of Mary Jane Kelly on 9 November 1888. Every superintendent on the force visited him at home to express their regret. He returned to military duties. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Mary Jane Kelly (c. ... November 9 is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 52 days remaining. ...


He was created a Knight Commander of the Bath (KCB) on 7 January 1888. Military Badge of the Order of the Bath The Most Honourable Order of the Bath is a British order of chivalry founded by George I on 18 May 1725. ... January 7 is the seventh day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Later military career and Boer War

In 1889, Warren was sent to command the garrison in Singapore, where he remained until 1894. Returning to England, he commanded the Thames District from 1895 to 1897, when he was promoted Lieutenant-General and retired. 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Garrison House, built 1675, Dover, NH, USA In the military, garrison is the collective term for the body of troops stationed in a particular location, originally to guard it, but now often simply using it as a home base. ... 1894 (MDCCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1895 (MDCCCXCV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1897 (MDCCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Lieutenant General is a military rank used in many countries. ...


On the outbreak of the Boer War in 1899, he returned to the colours to command the 5th Division of the South African Field Force. In January 1900, he played a major part in the second attempted relief of Ladysmith. At the Battle of Spion Kop, on 2324 January, he had operational command, and his apparent failure of judgment was the subject of much controversy. He was recalled to Britain in August 1900 and never again commanded troops in the field. He was, however, promoted General in 1904 and became Colonel-Commandant of the Royal Engineers in 1905. The Second Boer War, also known as the South African War (outside of South Africa), the Anglo-Boer War (among some South Africans) and in Afrikaans as the Anglo-Boereoorlog or Tweede Vryheidsoorlog (Second War of Independence), was fought from 11 October 1899 until 31 May 1902. ... 1899 (MDCCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1900 (MCM) was an exceptional common year starting on Monday. ... The Siege of Ladysmith was a famous battle in the Boer War, taking place between 2 November 1899 and 28 February 1900. ... Combatants Great Britain Boers Commanders Charles Warren Alexander Thorneycroft Louis Botha Strength 11,000 infantry 2,200 cavalry 36 field guns 6,000 men Casualties 383 killed 1,000 wounded 300 captured 58 killed 140 wounded The Battle of Spion Kop (Afrikaans: Slag van Spioenkop) was fought about 38 km... (Redirected from 23 January) January 23 is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... January 24 is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... General is a high military rank, used by nearly every country in the world. ... 1904 (MCMIV) was a leap year starting on a Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... Commandant is a military or police title or rank and can mean any of the following: The commander of certain military corps and services, such as the Commandant of the Marine Corps and the Commandant of the Coast Guard in the United States or the Commandant of the (now obsolete... 1905 (MCMV) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ...


Last years

From 1908, he became involved with Baden-Powell in the creation of the Boy Scout movement. He died of pneumonia, brought on by a bout of influenza, at his home in Weston-super-Mare, Somerset, was given a military funeral in Canterbury, and was buried in the churchyard at Westbere, Kent, next to his wife. 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Robert Stephenson Smyth Baden-Powell Robert Stephenson Smyth Baden-Powell, 1st Baron Baden-Powell, OM, GCMG, GCVO, KCB (February 22, 1857 – January 8, 1941), also known as B-P, was a Lieutenant-General in the British Army, writer, and founder of the world Scouting Movement. ... It has been suggested that Section (Scouting) be merged into this article or section. ... Pneumonia is an illness of the lungs and respiratory system in which the microscopic, air-filled sacs (alveoli) responsible for absorbing oxygen from the atmosphere become inflamed and flooded with fluid. ... Influenza, commonly known as the flu or the grippe, is a contagious disease of the upper airways and the lungs, caused by an RNA virus of the orthomyxoviridae family. ... Weston-super-Mare is an English seaside resort town in North Somerset, population 65,000 (1991 estimate). ... Somerset is a county in the south-west of England. ... Canterbury is a cathedral city in east Kent in South East England and is the seat of the Archbishop of Canterbury, the Primate of All England and nominal head of the Anglican Communion. ... A small village in Kent between Canterbury and Thanet. ... Kent is a county in England, south-east of London. ...


Publications

  • The Recovery of Jerusalem (with Charles Wilson, 1871)
  • Underground Jerusalem (1874)
  • The Temple or the Tomb (1880)
  • On the Veldt in the Seventies (1902)
  • The Survey of Western Palestine (with Claude Conder, 1884) [online copy]

References

The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom. ...

External links

Preceded by:
Sir Edmund Henderson
Commissioner of Police of the Metropolis
1886–1888
Succeeded by:
James Monro

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