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Encyclopedia > Charles University of Prague
Charles University of Prague
Univerzita Karlova v Praze
Charles University seal
Latin name Universitas Carolina Pragensis
Motto --
Established 1347 or 1348
School type Public
Rector magnificus Professor Vaclav Hampl
Location Prague, Czech Republic (EU)
Enrollment circa 42,500 students (--)
Staff -- (--)
Member Coimbra Group, EUA, Europaeum
Homepage www.cuni.cz

The Charles University of Prague (also simply University of Prague; Czech: Univerzita Karlova; Latin: Universitas Carolina) is the oldest, largest and most prestigious Czech university and among the oldest universities in Europe, being founded in 1340s (for the exact year, see below). Image File history File links Seal_of_Charles_University_of_Prague. ... Prague (Czech: Praha, see also other names) is the capital and largest city of the Czech Republic. ... Founded in 1985 and formally constituted by Charter in 1987, the Coimbra Group is a network of European universities which gathers 39 of the older universities, including Oxford, Cambridge, Salamanca, Bristol, Leuven/Louvain, Montpellier, Uppsala, Göttingen, Heidelberg, Jagiellonian, Dublin, Bologna, Siena, Leiden, Coimbra, Barcelona and Granada. ... The European University Association (EUA) is the main voice of the higher education community in Europe. ... The Europaeum is a loose organisation of ten leading European universities. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... // History Because of the above definition, the oldest universities in the world were all European, as the awarding of academic degrees was not a custom of older institutions of learning in Asia and Africa. ... This is a list of the oldest extant universities in the world. ...


As the first university in Central Europe, it attracted number of scholars from the region, mostly from neighbouring German states of the Holy Roman Empire of which was Prague the capital at that time, and therefore it is in Germany sometimes mentioned as the first German university as well (Karlsuniversität), despite the first university in German-speaking world was established in Vienna (1365) and the first university in present-day Germany in Heidelberg (1386). Historical lands and provinces in Central Europe Central Europe is the region lying between the variously and vaguely defined areas of Eastern and Western Europe. ... The Holy Roman Empire of the German Nation (German: Heiliges Römisches Reich Deutscher Nation â–¶(?), Latin Sacrum Romanum Imperium Nationis Germanicae, see names and designations of the empire) was a political conglomeration of lands in Central Europe in the Middle Ages and the early modern period. ... Prague (Czech: Praha, see also other names) is the capital and largest city of the Czech Republic. ... University of Vienna, main building, seen from Beethovens apartment The University of Vienna (German: Universität Wien) in Austria was founded in 1365 by Rudolph IV and hence named Alma mater Rudolphina. ... The Ruprecht Karl University of Heidelberg (German Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg; also known as simply University of Heidelberg) was established in the town of Heidelberg in the Rhineland in 1386. ...


According to the recent Academic Ranking of World Universities by Shanghai Jiao Tong University it was qualified 203-300th in the complete list and 80-123rd at the ranking of European universities as the leading university in the region of Central and Eastern Europe, together with the University of Szeged in Hungary. The Academic Ranking of World Universities is compiled by researchers from Shanghai Jiao Tong University and includes major institutes of higher education in all countries of North America, Europe, Asia, Pacific, and Latin America, compared and ranked by multiple numerical criteria, including publications in peer-reviewed journals and Nobel prizes... Shanghai Jiao Tong University, (SJTU, 上海交通大學), abbreviated Jiao Da (交大),is one of the oldest and most influential universities in the Peoples Republic of China. ... Central building of the University of Szeged at Dugonics Square The University of Szeged is one of the most distinguished universities in Hungary and in Central Europe. ...

Contents


History

Most Czech sources since at least the 19th century - encyclopedias, general histories, materials of the University itself - offer 1348 as the year of the founding of the university. On April 7 of that year, Charles I, the King of Bohemia (later known as Charles IV, Holy Roman Emperor) issued a Golden Bull (transcription of the Latin original) granting its privileges. One may however also see the papal bull of pope Clement VI on January 26 of the previous year (1347) as primary, as for the foundation of any other Church institution, with the King's later bull only exempting it from secular authority; it is possible that an anticlerical shift in the 19th century is to be seen as an explanation for 1348 usually being seen as the founding year. Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... Events April 7 - Charles University is founded in Prague. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... Charles IV, Holy Roman Emperor. ... Bohemia This article is about the historical region in central Europe; for other uses, see Bohemia (disambiguation). ... The Holy Roman Emperor was, with some variation, the ruler of the Holy Roman Empire, the predecessor of modern Germany, during its existence from the 10th century until its collapse in 1806. ... The Golden Bull of 1356 issued by Holy Roman Emperor Charles IV. A Golden Bull or chrysobull was a golden ornament representing a seal (a bulla aurea or golden seal in Latin), attached to a decree issued by monarchs in Europe and the Byzantine Empire during the Middle Ages and... Papal bull of Pope Urban VIII, 1637, sealed with a leaden bulla. ... Clement VI, né Pierre Roger (1291 – December 6, 1352), pope (1342-1352), the fourth of the Avignon popes, was elected in May 1342. ... January 26 is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... -1...


Based on the model of the University of Bologna and the University of Paris, the university was opened in 1349 and sanctioned by king Charles I in 1349. The University of Bologna (Università di Bologna, UNIBO) is the university of Bologna, in Italy. ... The Sorbonne, Paris, in a 17th century engraving The historic University of Paris (French: Université de Paris) first appeared in the second half of the 12th century, but was in 1970 reorganized as 13 autonomous universities (University of Paris I–XIII). ... // Events August 24 - Black Death outbreak in Elbing (modern-day Elblag in Poland) October 20 - Pope Clement VI publishes a papal bull that condemns the Flagellants The bubonic plague is spread to Norway when an English ship with everyone dead on board floats to Bergen Births September 9 - Duke Albert... // Events August 24 - Black Death outbreak in Elbing (modern-day Elblag in Poland) October 20 - Pope Clement VI publishes a papal bull that condemns the Flagellants The bubonic plague is spread to Norway when an English ship with everyone dead on board floats to Bergen Births September 9 - Duke Albert...


Archbishop Arnost of Pardubice took an active part in the foundation by obliging the clergy to contribute. The lectures were held in the colleges, of which the oldest was named for the king the Carolinum. The university was sectioned into Czech, Bavarian, Saxon and Polish parts called nations. Arnost of Pardubice (Czech: Arnošt z Pardubic, German: Ernst Parduebitz or Ernst von Pardubice) (March 25, 1297 - June 30, 1364) was the first Archbishop of Prague. ... One of the most influential doctrines in history is that all humans are divided into groups called nations. ...

Monument to the founder of the university, Emperor Charles IV
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Monument to the founder of the university, Emperor Charles IV

In 1403 the university forbade its members to follow the teachings of Wycliff, but his doctrine continued to gain in popularity. Jan Hus had translated Wycliff's Trialogus into the Czech language. He was dean and rector of the university. The other nations of the university declared their support for the side of pope Gregory XII. Hus knew how to make use of king Wenceslaus' opposition to Gregory. By the decree of Kutná Hora (Dekret Kutnohorský in Czech) in 1409, Hus and the Czech nation had three votes in all affairs of the university, while only a single vote was for all the other nations combined where before each nation had one vote. The result of this was the emigration of the German professors and students to the University of Leipzig in May 1409. The Prague university lost the largest part of its students and the faculty. From then on the university declined to a merely national institution with a very low status. For decades no degrees were given and only the faculty of arts remained. Emperor Sigismund, son of Charles IV, took what was left into his personal property and some progress was made, and again later under emperor Rudolph II, when he took up residence in Prague. The emperor Ferdinand I called the Jesuits to Prague and they opened an academy. Soon they took over, were expelled 1618 - 1621, but by 1622 they had a predominant influence over the emperor. An Imperial decree gave the Jesuits supreme control over the entire school system of Bohemia, Moravia and Silesia. The last four professors at the Carolinum now resigned and all of the Carolinum and nine colleges went to the Jesuits. The right of handing out degrees, of holding chancellorships and of appointing the secular professors was also granted to the Jesuits. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (400x925, 69 KB) Author: Patrick-Emil Zörner Paddy File links The following pages link to this file: Charles University of Prague ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (400x925, 69 KB) Author: Patrick-Emil Zörner Paddy File links The following pages link to this file: Charles University of Prague ... Events July 21 - Battle of Shrewsbury. ... Wycliffe may also refer to Wycliffe Bible Translators John Wycliff (or Wycliffe) (1328 - December 31, 1384) was an English theologian and early proponent of reform in the Roman Catholic Church during the 14th century. ... Jan Hus, born circa 1369 in Husinec, Bohemia (now Czech Republic) was a Bohemian religious thinker and reformer. ... The Czech language is one of the West Slavic languages, along with Slovak, Polish, Pomeranian (extinct), and Lusatian Sorbian. ... Gregory XII, né Angelo Correr or Corraro (died October 18, 1417), pope from 1406 to 1415, succeeded Innocent VII on November 30, 1406, having been chosen at Rome by a conclave consisting of only fifteen cardinals, under the express condition that, should Benedict XIII, the rival pope at Avignon, renounce... Wenceslaus (German: Wenzel; sometimes known as the Drunkard, Czech: Václav IV) of the house of Luxembourg (born February 26, 1361, died August 16, 1419) succeeded his father Charles IV as Holy Roman Emperor (ruled 1378 - 1400) and as king of Bohemia (ruled 1378 - 1419). ... Kutná Hora   listen? (German: Kuttenberg, Hory Kutné in medieval Czech) is a city in the Czech Republic, in Central Bohemian Region of Bohemia. ... Events January 1 - The Welsh surrender Harlech Castle to the English. ... The University of Leipzig (Universität Leipzig), located in Leipzig in the Free State and former Kingdom of Saxony, is one of the oldest universities in Europe. ... Events January 1 - The Welsh surrender Harlech Castle to the English. ... Sigismund (February 14/15, 1368 - December 9, 1437) was Holy Roman Emperor from 1433 to 1437. ... Holy Roman Emperor Rudolf II Rudolph IIs personal imperial crown, later crown of the Austrian Empire Rudolf II Habsburg was an emperor of the Holy Roman Empire, king of Bohemia, and king of Hungary. ... Ferdinand I, Holy Roman Emperor (March 10, 1503 - July 27, 1564) was one of the Habsburg emperors that at various periods during his life ruled over Austria, Germany, Bohemia, and Hungary. ... The Society of Jesus (Latin: Societas Iesu), commonly known as the Jesuits, is a Roman Catholic religious order. ... Events March 8 - Johannes Kepler discovers the third law of planetary motion (he soon rejects the idea after some initial calculations were made but on May 15 confirms the discovery). ... Events February 9 - Gregory XV is elected pope. ... Events January 1 - In the Gregorian calendar, January 1 is declared as the first day of the year, instead of March 25. ... Moravia in relation to the current kraje of the Czech Republic Moravia (Czech and Slovak: Morava, German: Mähren, Polish: Morawy, Hungarian: Morvaország) is an historical region in the east of the Czech Republic. ... Prussian Silesia, 1871, outlined in yellow; Silesia at the close of the Seven Years War in 1763, outlined in cyan (areas now in Czech Republic were Austrian-ruled at that time) Silesia (-Latin, Polish: ÅšlÄ…sk, German: Schlesien, Czech: Slezsko) is a historical region in central Europe. ...


Cardinal Ernst, Count von Harrach actively opposed this union of power and prevented the drawing up of the Golden Bull for the confirmation of this grant. Cardinal Ernst funded the Collegium Adalbertinum and in 1638 emperor Ferdinand III limited the teaching monopoly enjoyed by the Jesuits. He took from them the rights, properties and archives of the Carolinum making the university once more independent under an imperial protector. During the last years of the Thirty Years' War the Charles Bridge in Prague was courageously defended by students of the Carolinum and Clementinum. Events March 29 - Swedish colonists establish first settlement in Delaware, called New Sweden. ... Ferdinand III, Holy Roman Emperor Ferdinand III, Holy Roman Emperor (July 13, 1608 – April 2, 1657), ruled February 15, 1637 – 1657. ... The victory of Gustavus Adolphus at the Battle of Breitenfeld (1631) The Thirty Years War was a conflict fought between the years 1618 and 1648, principally on the territory of todays Germany, but also involving most of the major continental powers. ... Charles Bridge on a winters day, as viewed from the Old Town bridge tower. ... The Clementinum (Klementinum in Czech) is the national library of the Czech Republic situated in Prague. ...


The dilapidated Carolinum was rebuilt in 1718 at the expense of the state. Since 1650 those who received any degrees took an oath to maintain the Immaculate Conception of the Blessed Virgin, renewed annually. The rebuilding and the bureaucratic reforms of universities of Austria in 1752 and 1754 deprived the university of many of its former privileges. // Events July 21 - Treaty of Passarowitz signed November 22 - Off the coast of Virginia, English pirate Edward Teach (best known as Blackbeard) is killed in battle when a British boarding party cornered and then shot and stabbed him more than 25 times. ... // Events June 23 - Claimant King Charles II of England, Scotland and Ireland arrives in Scotland, the only of the three Kingdoms that has accepted him as ruler. ... Mary Immaculate This article refers to the doctrine of the immaculate conception of Mary, Mother of Jesus. ... 1752 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... 1754 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ...

Doctoral diploma from 1905 for the astronomer Friedrich Hopfner
Doctoral diploma from 1905 for the astronomer Friedrich Hopfner

(date 1806?) For the first time Protestants were allowed and soon after Jews. The university funded an additional Czech professorship. By 1863 out of 187 lecture courses 22 were held in Czech, the remainder in German. The Czechs were not satisfied. Consequently after long negotiations the Carolo-Ferdinandea was divided into a German and a Czech Charles-Ferdinand University by a law of 1882. Each section was entirely independent of the other, only the aula and the library were used in common. By 1909 the Czech students at the Czech Charles-Ferdinand University (Karlo-Ferdinandova univerzita) numbered 4,300 students and the students at the German Charles-Ferdinand University (Karl-Ferdinand Universität) numbered 1,800. The two institutions continued to operate independently until 1939. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1220x930, 268 KB) Image from the German Wikipedia, originally uploaded by Henryart. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1220x930, 268 KB) Image from the German Wikipedia, originally uploaded by Henryart. ... 1863 is a common year starting on Thursday. ... 1882 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ...


The Czech part of the university was closed on November 17, 1939, after the burial of a student shot in an earlier October 28 demonstration during the World War II Nazi occupation. All other higher-education institutions in Czechoslovakia, were also closed down by force; many of its students and teachers were imprisoned in concentration camps and several student leaders executed. On the other hand, the German part of the institution proclaimed itself a university of Reich and was abolished after the liberation in 1945. 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece. ... 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... October 28 is the 301st day of the year (302nd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 64 days remaining. ... Combatants Allied Powers Axis Powers Commanders {{{commander1}}} {{{commander2}}} Strength {{{strength1}}} {{{strength2}}} Casualties 17 million military deaths 7 million military deaths World War II, also known as the Second World War, was a mid-20th century conflict that engulfed much of the globe and is accepted as the largest and deadliest... == On the same day, Hitler met with Chamberlain at Berchtesgaden and demanded the swift return of the Sudetenland to the Third Reich under threat of war. ... A concentration camp is a large detention center created for political opponents, aliens, specific ethnic or religious groups, civilians of a critical war-zone, or other groups of people, often during a war. ... Nazi Germany, or the Third Reich, commonly refers to Germany in the years 1933–1945, when it was under the firm control of the totalitarian and fascist ideology of the Nazi Party, with the Führer Adolf Hitler as dictator. ... 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ...


Although the university began to recover rapidly after 1945, it did not enjoy much academic freedom for long. After the communist putsch in 1948, the newly forming regime started to arrange purges and repress all forms of disagreement with the official ideology, and continued to do so for the next four decades, with the most painful wave of purges during the "normalization" period in the beginning of the 1970s. Such state purges lasted until the "Velvet revolution" in 1989, initiated by several peaceful student demonstrations, brought about the final collapse of the communist government. New representatives recruited from the independent academic community were appointed in January 1990. Academic freedom is the freedom of teachers, students, and academic institutions to pursue knowledge wherever it may lead, without undue or unreasonable interference. ... 1948 (MCMXLVIII) is a leap year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). ... In the history of Czechoslovakia, normalization is a name commonly given to the period 1969 to about 1987. ... The 1970s in its most obvious sense refers to the decade between 1970 and 1979. ... The Velvet Revolution (Czech: samatová revoluce, Slovak: nežná revolúcia) (November 16 - December 29, 1989) refers to a bloodless revolution in Czechoslovakia that saw the overthrow of the communist government there. ... 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ...


Organisation

Seal of the Faculty of Medicine
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Seal of the Faculty of Medicine
Seal of the Faculty of Evangelical Theology
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Seal of the Faculty of Evangelical Theology

Today, Charles University comprises 17 faculties: Image File history File links Uni-Prague_Fac_of_Medicine-seal. ... Image File history File links Uni-Prague_Fac_of_Medicine-seal. ... Image File history File links Uni-Prague_Fac_of_Evang_Theology-seal. ... Image File history File links Uni-Prague_Fac_of_Evang_Theology-seal. ...

  • catholic theology
  • protestant theology
  • hussite theology
  • law
  • medicine (three faculties located in Prague)
  • natural sciences
  • mathematics and physics
  • pedagogy
  • social sciences
  • humanities
  • arts (philosophy)
  • physical education and sport

Also, there are three faculties which are located outside of Prague:

The title given to this article is incorrect due to technical limitations. ... Hradec Králové (German: Königgrätz) is a city of the Czech Republic, in the Hradec Králové Region of Bohemia. ... Hradec Králové (German: Königgrätz) is a city of the Czech Republic, in the Hradec Králové Region of Bohemia. ...

Notable alumni

Edvard BeneÅ¡ Edvard BeneÅ¡ â–¶(?) (May 28, 1884 - September 3, 1948) was a leader of the Czechoslovak independence movement and the second President of Czechoslovakia. ... Bernard Bolzano Bernard Placidus Johann Nepomuk Bolzano (October 5, 1781 – December 18, 1848) was a Czech mathematician, theologian, philosopher and logician. ... Max Brod Max Brod (May 27, 1884 - December 20, 1968) was an ethnically Jewish Czech German-speaking author, composer, and journalist. ... Karel ÄŒapek (pronounced â–¶ (help· info); IPA: ) (January 9, 1890 - December 25, 1938) was one of the most important Czech writers of the 20th century. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Carl Ferdinand Cori (December 5, 1896 – October 20, 1984) was an American biochemist born in Prague (then in Austria-Hungary) who, together with his wife Gerty Cori and Argentine physiologist Bernardo Houssay, received a Nobel Prize in 1947 for their discovery of how glycogen (animal starch) - a derivative of glucose... Gerty Theresa Cori, née Radnitz, (August 15, 1896 – October 26, 1957) was an American biochemist born in Prague (then Austria-Hungary) who, together with her husband Carl Ferdinand Cori and Argentine physiologist Bernardo Houssay, received a Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1947 for their discovery of how glycogen... Josef Dobrovský (1753-1829) was Bohemian philologist and historian, one of the most important figures of the Bohemian national revival. ... Jaroslav Heyrovský listen â–¶(?) (December 20, 1890 – March 27, 1967) was a Czech chemist who was awarded the Nobel Prize in chemistry in 1959. ... Bohumil Hrabal (March 28, 1914, Brno - February 3, 1997, Prague) was a famous Czech writer. ... Jan Hus, born circa 1369 in Husinec, Bohemia (now Czech Republic) was a Bohemian religious thinker and reformer. ... Jan Janský (April 3, 1873, Prague – September 8, 1921, ÄŒernoÅ¡ice near Prague) was a Czech serologist, neurologist and psychiatrist. ... -1... Karl I of Austria, Károly IV. of Hungary, Karel III of Bohemia Blessed Karl I (August 17, 1887 – April 1, 1922), Karl Franz Josef Ludwig Hubert Georg Maria von Habsburg-Lothringen, was (among other titles) the last Emperor of Austria, the last King of Hungary and Bohemia, and... Egon Erwin Kisch ( Prague, April 29, 1885 - March 31, 1948) was a Czechoslovakian writer and journalist, who wrote in German. ... LuboÅ¡ Kohoutek (January 29, 1935, ZábÅ™eh in Moravia) is a Czech astronomer. ... Milan Kundera (born April 1, 1929 in Brno, Czechoslovakia) is a Franco-Czech writer. ... Jan Marek Marci (in Latin Ioannes (or Johannes) Marcus Marci) (1595 â€“ 1677), was a Bohemian doctor and scientist born in LanÅ¡kroun (Kronland). ... George Placzek (September 26, 1905 - October 9, 1955) was a Czech physicist. ... Jan Evangelista PurkynÄ› (also written Johannes Evangelists Purkinje,  listen?) (1787 - 1869) was a Czech anatomist, patriot, and physiologist. ... Ota Å ik, (September 11, 1919 – August 22, 2004), was a Czech economist and politician. ... Ferdinand Stoliczka (May 1838 - June 19, 1874) was an Austrian/Czech palaeontologist born at Hochwald in Moravia. ... Nikola Tesla (July 10, 1856 – c. ... Vladislav Vančura in Giant Mountains, Bohemia, 1930s Vladislav Vančura (23 June 1891, Háj near Opava – 1 June 1942, Prague) was one of the most important Bohemian (Czech) writers of the 20th century. ... Max Wertheimer (Prague, April 15, 1880 - New York, October 12, 1943) was one of the founders of Gestalt psychology. ...

Notable professors

  • Jan Hus - religious thinker and reformer
  • Tomáš Garrigue Masaryk - philosopher, politician, 1st president of Czechoslovakia
  • Albert Einstein - theoretical physicist. Professor in the German part of the university.
  • Jan Patočka - philosopher

Jan Hus, born circa 1369 in Husinec, Bohemia (now Czech Republic) was a Bohemian religious thinker and reformer. ... Tomáš Garrigue Masaryk, sometimes called Thomas Masaryk in English, (March 7, 1850 Hodonín, Moravia, Austria, now Czech Republic - September 14, 1937 Lány, Czechoslovakia, now Czech Republic) was an advocate of Czechoslovak independence during WW I and became the first President of Czechoslovakia. ... Albert Einstein photographed by Oren J. Turner in 1947. ... Jan Patočka (June 1, 1907 - March 13, 1977) is considered one of the most important contributors to Czech philosophical phenomenology, as well as one of the most influential philosophers of the 20th century. ...

Leadership

  • Prof. RNDr. Václav Hampl, DrSc. has been the Chancellor of Charles University since 2005.

A University Chancellor is the title frequently used — particularly in Europe — to indicate the head of a university. ...

External links

  • Official webpages in English (currently being reworked)
  • Official webpages in English (old version)
  • University history - DOC file with pictures

In computing, DOC (short for document) is a common file extension, traditionally used for documentation in plain-text format, particularly of programs or computer hardware, on a wide range of operating systems. ...

See also:


The first European medieval universities were established in Italy, France and England in the late 11th and the 12th Century for the study of arts, law, medicine, and theology. ...

Europaeum  Europaeum

Bologna | Bonn | HEI, Geneva | Helsinki | Kraków (Jagiellonian) | Leiden | Madrid (Complutense) | Oxford | Paris I: Panthéon-Sorbonne | Prague The Europaeum is a loose organisation of ten leading European universities. ... This is a copyrighted and/or trademarked logo. ... The University of Bologna (Università di Bologna, UNIBO) is the university of Bologna, in Italy. ... The main building, viewed from the Hofgarten. ... Graduate Institute of International Studies (HEI), based in Geneva in Switzerland, is one of the worlds leading graduate schools devoted to the study of international studies, most notably of an historic, judicial, economic, political and social nature. ... The University of Helsinki is a university located in Helsinki, Finland. ... Jagiellonian University (Polish: Uniwersytet JagielloÅ„ski, often shortened to UJ) is a university in Krakow, Poland. ... Leiden University in the city of Leiden, is the oldest university in the Netherlands. ... The Complutense University of Madrid, in Spanish Universidad Complutense de Madrid, is a prestigious Spanish university, located in Madrid. ... The University of Oxford, located in the city of Oxford, England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... The Sorbonne, Paris, in a 17th century engraving The historic University of Paris (French: Université de Paris) first appeared in the second half of the 12th century, but was in 1970 reorganized as 13 autonomous universities (University of Paris I–XIII). ...

Coimbra Group
(of European research universities)
Coimbra Group
Aarhus | Barcelona | Bergen | Bologna | Bristol | Budapest | Cambridge | Coimbra | Dublin | Edinburgh | Galway | Geneva | Göttingen | Granada | Graz | Groningen | Heidelberg | Jena | Kraków | Leiden | Leuven | Louvain-la-Neuve | Lyon | Montpellier | Oxford | Padua | Pavia | Poitiers | Prague | Salamanca | Siena | Tartu | Thessaloniki | Turku I | Turku II | Uppsala | Würzburg

  Results from FactBites:
 
COMPSTAT 2004 : International Conference on Computational Statistics, Prague August 23-27, 2004 (1501 words)
The oldest university north of the Alps and east of Paris was founded by the King of Bohemia and King of the Romans, later the Emperor Charles IV, in his royal seat of Prague on the 7th of April 1348.
Charles wished his power to be based on all three pillars, strove to build the third pillar from the time of his coronation as King of the Romans in Bonn in 1346, and immediately afterwards com-municated his plan to Pope Clement VI.
Charles University makes great efforts to support the development of academic research, which creates the basis for the existence of the university and is an essential component of that unity of science, scholarship and education without which an institution ceases to be a university.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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