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Encyclopedia > Charles Talbot, 1st Duke of Shrewsbury

Charles Talbot, 1st The term duke is a title of nobility which refers to the sovereign male ruler of a Continental European duchy, to a nobleman of the highest grade of the British peerage, or to the highest rank of nobility in various other European countries, including Spain and France (in Italy, principe... Duke of This article is about the town of Shrewsbury in England. For other places of the same name, see Shrewsbury (disambiguation) Porthill Bridge crossing the Severn at Shrewsbury. Shrewsbury (pronounced both Shroozbury and Shrowzbury) is the county town of the county of Shropshire, England. History Shrewsbury may have been founded by... Shrewsbury ( July 24 is the 205th day (206th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 160 days remaining. Events 1500-1899 1567 - Mary Queen of Scots is deposed. 1701 - Detroit, Michigan founded. 1814 - War of 1812: General Phineas Riall advances toward Niagara to halt Jacob Browns... 24 July Events January 1 - colonel George Monck with his regiment crosses from Scotland to England at the village of Coldstream and begins advance towards London in support of English Restoration February 2 – George Monck and his regiment arrive in London February 23 - Charles XI becomes king of Sweden. February 27... 1660 February 1 is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. There are 333 days remaining, (334 in leap years). Events 1662 - The Chinese pirate Koxinga seizes the island of Taiwan after a nine-month siege. 1713 - The Kalabalik or Tumult in Bendery results from the Ottoman sultan... 1 February Events May 15 - James Puckle, a London lawyer, patents the worlds first machine gun. July 21 - Treaty of Passarowitz signed November 22 - Off the coast of Virginia, English pirate Edward Teach (best known as Blackbeard) is killed in battle when a British boarding party cornered and then shot and... 1718), was the only son of Francis Talbot, 11th Earl of Shrewsbury and his second wife, Anne-Marie Brudenell, a daughter of Robert Brudenell, 2nd Earl of Cardigan; (she became the notorious mistress of the George Villiers, 2nd Duke of Buckingham (January 10, 1628 - April 16, 1687), English statesman, son of the 1st Duke of the second creation (1623) of that title. He was brought up, together with his younger brother Francis, by King Charles I with his own children, and was educated at Trinity... 2nd Duke of Buckingham, who killed Charles's father in a duel in Events January - The Triple Alliance of 1668 is formed. February 13 Lisbon - Peace Treaty between Afonso VI of Portugal and Carlos II of Spain, by mediation of Charles II of England where it is recognized the legitimity of the Portuguese monarch. Portugal yields Ceuta to Spain. The first Treaty of... 1668).


Charles was a godson of King Charles II King of England, Scotland and Ireland Charles II (29 May 1630–6 February 1685) was the King of England, Scotland and Ireland from 30 January 1649 (de jure) or 29 May 1660 (de facto) until his death. Charles IIs father, Charles I, had been executed in... Charles II, after whom he was named, and he was brought up as a The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. Members generally prefer the term Catholic Church, but this term has multiple meanings (see Catholicism); the term Roman Catholic Church is used in this article to avoid... Roman Catholic, but in Events January 24 - King Charles II of England disbands Parliament August 7 - The brigantine Le Griffon, which was commissioned by René Robert Cavelier, Sieur de La Salle, is towed to the southern end of the Niagara River, to become the first ship to sail the upper Great Lakes. Battle of... 1679 under the influence of John Tillotson (October 1630 - November 22, 1694) was an Archbishop of Canterbury (1691 - 1694). Tillotson was the son of a Puritan clothier in Sowerby, Yorkshire. He entered as a pensioner of Clare Hall, Cambridge, in 1647, graduated in 1650 and was made fellow of his college in 1651. In 1656... John Tillotson he became a member of the The Church of England is the officially established Christian church in England and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. Theology and sociology The Church of England considers itself to stand both in a Reformed... Church of England.


On his father's death he succeeded to the An Earl as a member of the British peerage ranks below a Marquess and above a Viscount. A British Earl equates in rank to a continental Count. The wife of an Earl bears the rank of Countess. Etymology The word earl derives from Middle English erl meaning warrior, nobleman, equivalent... earldom of Shrewsbury; received an appointment in the household of Charles II, and served in the army under James VII and II King of England, Scotland and Ireland James II of England and VII of Scotland (14 October 1633–16 September 1701) became King of England, Scotland and Ireland from 6 February 1685. He would prove to be the last Catholic monarch to reign over England, Scotland... James II. Nonetheless, in Events March 19 - The men under explorer Robert Cavelier de La Salle murder him while searching for the mouth of the Mississippi River. July 5 - Isaac Newtons Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica is published. December 31 - The first France to the Cape of Good Hope. King James II of England... 1687 he was in correspondence with the William III King of England, Scotland and Ireland William III and II (14 November 1650–8 March 1702; also known as William Henry and William of Orange) was Prince of Orange from his birth, King of England and Ireland from 13 February 1689, and King of Scotland from 11... Prince of Orange, and he was one of the seven signatories of the letter of invitation to William in the following year. He contributed towards defraying the expenses of the projected invasion, and having crossed to Holland to join William, he landed with him in England in November Events A high-powered conspiracy of notables, the Immortal Seven, invite William and Mary to depose James II of England. November 5 - Glorious Revolution begins: William of Orange lands at Brixham but James II of England was prevented from meeting him in battle because many of his officers and men... 1688.


Shrewsbury became The Secretary of State for the Southern Department was a position in the cabinet of the government of United Kingdom up to 1782. Before 1782, the responsibilities of the two British Secretaries of State were divided not based on the principles of modern ministerial divisions, but geographically. The Secretary of... Secretary of State for the Southern Department in the first administration of William and Mary II Queen of England, Scotland and Ireland Mary II (30 April 1662–28 December 1694) was Queen of England and Ireland from 13 February 1689 until her death, and Queen of Scotland from 11 April 1689 until her death. Mary, a Protestant, came to the Throne following the... Mary, but he resigned office in Events Giovanni Domenico Cassini observes differential rotation within Jupiters atmosphere. January 6 - Joseph, son of Emperor Leopold I becomes King of the Romans January 14 - The clarinet is invented in Nuremberg, Germany May 20 - England passes Act of Grace, forgiving followers of James II July 1 - The Battle of... 1690 when the The term Tory derives from the Tory Party, the ancestor of the modern UK Conservative Party. To this day it is often used as a shortened alternative for Conservative. A similar usage for Tory exists in Canada to describe the Conservative Party. It was also used during the American Revolutionary... Tories gained the upper hand in parliament. While in opposition he brought forward the Triennial Bill, to which the king refused assent. In Events February 6 - The colony Quilombo dos Palmares is destroyed. July 27 - A Royal Charter is granted to the Bank of England. December 22 - The Triennial Bill became law. December 28 - Queen Mary II of England died; King William III of England, Scotland and Ireland is now sole ruler after... 1694 he again became United Kingdom In the United Kingdom, a Secretary of State is a senior Cabinet Minister in charge of a Government Department. Secretary of State positions can be created without primary legislation; and legislation refers to Secretary of State, which is a notional position split between all the Secretaries of State... Secretary of State; but there is some evidence that as early as 1690, when he resigned, he had gone over to the This article is not about the Jacobite Orthodox Church, nor is it about Jacobinism or the earlier Jacobean period. While military campaigns are covered in outline, for details see Jacobite Rising. Charles Edward Stuart, Bonnie Prince Charlie, wearing the Jacobite blue bonnet Jacobitism was the political movement dedicated to the... Jacobites and was in correspondence with James at his court in exile at Saint-Germain-en-Laye is a city west of Paris, in the Yvelines d partement (of which it is a sous-pr fecture), in the Ile-de-France r gion, in France. History Saint-Germain-en-Laye was founded in 1020 when King Robert the Pious (ruled 996-1031) founded... Saint-Germain-en-Laye, though it has been stated on the other hand that these relations were entered upon with William's connivance for reasons of policy.


However this may be, William appears to have had no suspicion of Shrewsbury's loyalty, for on April 30 is the 120th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (121st in leap years). There are 245 days remaining. Events 313 - Roman emperor Licinius unifies the entire Eastern Roman Empire under his rule. 1492 - Spain gives Christopher Columbus his commission of exploration. 1671 - Petar Zrinski, the Croatian... 30 April Events February 6 - The colony Quilombo dos Palmares is destroyed. July 27 - A Royal Charter is granted to the Bank of England. December 22 - The Triennial Bill became law. December 28 - Queen Mary II of England died; King William III of England, Scotland and Ireland is now sole ruler after... 1694 the latter was created A Marquess is a nobleman of hereditary rank in Europe and Japan. In British peerage it ranks below a Duke and above an Earl. A woman with the rank of marquess, or the wife of a marquess, is a marchioness. The word derives from the Middle French marquis (feminine, marquise... Marquess of Alton and Duke of Shrewsbury, and he acted as one of the For the insecticide Regent, see Regent (insecticide) A regent is an acting governor. In a monarchy, a regent usually rules due to the actual monarchs absence, incapacity, or minority. In the case of Finland and Hungary, military officers served as regents in the absence of a monarch, while in... regents during the king's absence from England in the two following years. In The year 1696 had the earliest equinoxes and solstices for 400 years in the Gregorian calendar, because this year is a leap year and the Gregorian calendar would have behaved like the Julian calendar since March 1500 had it have been in use that long. See 1903. Events Peter the... 1696 definite accusations of In law, treason is the crime of disloyalty to ones nation. A person who reneges on an oath of loyalty or a pledge of allegiance, and in some way willfully cooperates with an enemy, is considered to be a traitor. Orans Dictionary of the Law (1983) defines treason... treason were brought against him by Sir Sir John Fenwick (c. 1645 - 28 January 1697) was an English conspirator. He was the eldest son of Sir William Fenwick, or Fenwicke, a member of an old Northumberland family. He entered the army, becoming major-general in 1688, but before this date he had been returned in succession to... John Fenwick, which William himself communicated to Shrewsbury; and about this time the secretary of state took but a small part in public business, again professing his anxiety to resign. His plea of ill-health was a genuine one, and in Events January 1 - Russia accepts Julian calendar. January 1 - in around this year, Denmark-Norway adopt the Gregorian calendar, including the convention that New Years Day is January 1st. January 26 - One of the greatest earthquakes on record ruptures the submarine Cascadia thrust fault from Vancouver Island to northern... 1700 the king reluctantly consented to his retirement into private life. For the next seven years Shrewsbury lived abroad, chiefly at The Roman Colosseum Rome (Italian and Latin Roma) is the capital city of Italy, and of its Lazio region. It is located on the lower Tiber river, near the Mediterranean Sea, at 41°50N, 12°15E. The Vatican City State, a sovereign enclave within Rome, is the seat... Rome, whence in Events January 18 - Frederick I becomes King of Prussia. May 23 - After being convicted of murdering William Moore and for piracy, Captain William Kidd is hanged in London. July 24 - Detroit, Michigan founded. September 16 - Prince James Francis Edward Stuart becomes the new claimant to the thrones of Scotland as... 1701 he wrote a celebrated letter to John Somers, 1st Baron Somers (4 March 1651-26 April 1716), was Lord Chancellor of England under King William III. He was born near Worcester, the eldest son of John Somers, an attorney in large practice in that town, who had formerly fought on the side of the Parliament, and... Lord Somers expressing his abhorrence of public life and declaring that if he had a son he "would sooner bind him to a cobbler than a courtier, and a hangman than a statesman."


On the accession of Anne Queen of Great Britain and Ireland Anne (6 February 1665–1 August 1714), became Queen of England and Scotland on 8 March 1702. On 1 May 1707, when England and Scotland combined into a single Kingdom, Anne became the first Sovereign of Great Britain. She continued to reign... Queen Anne the This article is about the British Whig party. For other uses of the word Whig, see the disambiguation page. For a long time in British politics, the two main parties were the Tories (the Conservative Party) and the Whigs. The term Whig originates from the Exclusion Bill crisis of 1678... Whig leaders made an ineffectual attempt to persuade Shrewsbury to return to office. When he returned at last to England in Events March 26 - Act of Union with Scotland becomes law, making the separate Kingdoms of England and Scotland into one country, the Kingdom of Great Britain. April 25 - Allied army is defeated by Bourbonic army at Almansa (Spain) in the War of the Spanish Succession. May 1 - Union of the... 1707, he gradually became alienated from his old political associates, and in Events Enactment of the worlds first copyright legislation, Britains Act for the Encourage of Learning (short title) Ongoing events Great Northern War (1700-1721) War of the Spanish Succession (1702-1713) Births January 4 - Giovanni Battista Pergolesi, composer (d. 1736) February 15 - King Louis XV of France (d... 1710 he accepted the post of The Lord Chamberlain or Lord Chamberlain of the Household is one of the chief officers of the royal household in the United Kingdom, and is to be distinguished from the Lord Great Chamberlain, one of the great offices of state. The Lord Chamberlain is always a peer and a privy... Lord Chamberlain in the Tory administration, to which the queen appointed him without the knowledge of Sidney Godolphin, 1st Earl of Godolphin (c. 1645 - September 15, 1712), was a leading British politician of the late 17th and early 18th centuries. He came from an ancient family of Cornwall. At the Restoration he was introduced into the royal household by King Charles II of England, whose favourite... Godolphin and John Churchill, 1st Duke of Marlborough, in his Garter robes John Churchill, 1st Duke of Marlborough (May 26, 1650 - June 16, 1722), in full The Most Noble Captain-General John Churchill, 1st Duke of Marlborough, Earl of Marlborough, Baron Churchill of Sandridge, Lord Churchill of Eyemouth, KG, PC (in addition... Marlborough; his wife was at the same time made a Lady of the Bedchamber.


After a diplomatic mission to The French Republic or France ( French: République française or France) is a country whose metropolitan territory is located in western Europe, and which is further made up of a collection of overseas islands and territories located in other continents. France is a democracy organised as a... France for the purpose of negotiating preliminaries of peace, Shrewsbury became The Lord Lieutenant of Ireland (also known as the Viceroy or in the Middle Ages as the Lord Deputy) was the head of Englands (pre-1707) or Britains (post 1707) administration in Ireland. The office was originally the central focus of English/British administration in Ireland under the... Lord Lieutenant of Ireland in Events April 11 - War of the Spanish Succession: Treaty of Utrecht June 23 - French residents of Acadia given one year to declare allegiance to Britain or leave Nova Scotia Canada first Orrery built by George Graham Ongoing events Great Northern War (1700-1721) War of the Spanish Succession (1702-1713... 1713; but he was in London — containing the City of London — is the capital of the United Kingdom and of England and a major world city. With over seven million inhabitants (Londoners) in Greater London area, it is amongst the most densely populated areas in Western Europe. Founded as Londinium, the capital of... London in July Events August 1 - George, elector of Hanover becomes King George I of Great Britain. September 11 - Barcelona surrenders to Spanish and French Borbonic armies in the War of the Spanish Succession. The Duchy of Savoy and Piedmont becomes the Kingdom of Sardinia Louis Juchereau de St. Denis establishes Fort St... 1714 during the memorable crisis occasioned by the impending death of Queen Anne. On July 29 is the 210th day (211th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 155 days remaining. Events 1014 - Battle of Kleidion: Byzantine emperor Basil II inflicts not only a decisive defeat on the Bulgarian army, but his subsequent savage treatment of 15,000 prisoners reportedly... 29 July, when the queen was dying, the Robert Harley, 1st Earl of Oxford and Mortimer (5 December 1661 - 21 May 1724), was an English statesman of the Stuart and early Georgian periods. Harley was the eldest son of Sir Edward Harley (1624-1700), a prominent landowner in Herefordshire, and grandson of the celebrated letter-writer Lady Brilliana... Earl of Oxford received his long-delayed dismissal from the office of The Lord High Treasurer bears a white staff as his symbol of office. The post of Lord High Treasurer or Lord Treasurer is an ancient English (after 1707, British) government position. The holder of the post functions as the head of Her Majestys Treasury, and is third highest Great... Lord Treasurer. On July 30 is the 211th day (212th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 154 days remaining. Events 1608 - At Ticonderoga (now Crown Point, New York), Samuel de Champlain shot two Iroquois chiefs to death. This was to set the tone for French-Iroquois relations for... July 30, Shrewsbury and other ministers assembled at Categories: Stub | Historic houses in London | Royal buildings in London | Palaces in England | British Royal Residences ... Kensington Palace and, being admitted to the queen's bedchamber, Henry St John, 1st Viscount Bolingbroke (1678 - December 12, 1751) was an English statesman and writer. (Note that in Britain the surname St John is pronounced Sinjn and Bolingbroke is pronounced Bullingbrook or Bullenbrook.) He was the son of Sir Henry St John, Bart. (afterwards 1st Viscount St John... Bolingbroke recommended the appointment of Shrewsbury to the vacant treasurership; Anne at once placed the staff of that high office in the duke's hands.


Thus, when the queen died on August 1st is the 213th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (214th in leap years), with 152 days remaining. Events 500-1899 527 - Justinian I becomes Byzantine Emperor. 1291 - The Swiss Confederation is formed. 1492 - Ferdinand and Isabella drive the Jews out of Spain. 1461 - Edward IV crowned... 1 August, Shrewsbury was in a position of supreme power with reference to the momentous question of the succession to the crown. He threw his influence into the scale in favor of the Hanover (German Hannover) is a historical territory in todays Germany. It was an independent kingdom from 1814 to 1866 and a province of Prussia from 1866 to 1946. It is named after its capital, Hanover. In 1636, the capital of the Calenberg line of the Duchy of Brunswick-L... Elector of Hanover, and was powerfully influential in bringing about the peaceful accession of George I King of Great Britain and Ireland George I (George Ludwig von Guelph-dEste) (28 May 1660–11 June 1727) was Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg (Hanover) from 23 January 1698, and King of Great Britain and King of Ireland from 1 August 1714, until his death... George I, and in defeating the design of the Jacobites to place the Prince James Francis Edward Stuart or Stewart (June 10, 1688 - January 1, 1766) was a claimant of the thrones of Scotland and England (September 16, 1701 - January 1, 1766) who is more commonly referred to as The Old Pretender. His Jacobite supporters referred to him as James III of England... son of James II on the throne. His disinclination for the highest political offices remained, however, as great as before; and having resigned the lord-treasurership and the lord-lieutenancy of Ireland, he was appointed The Lord Chamberlain or Lord Chamberlain of the Household is one of the chief officers of the royal household in the United Kingdom, and is to be distinguished from the Lord Great Chamberlain, one of the great offices of state. The Lord Chamberlain is always a peer and a privy... Lord Chamberlain. This place he resigned in July Events September 1 - King Louis XIV of France dies after a reign of 72 years, leaving the throne of his exhausted and indebted country to his great-grandson Louis XV. Regent for the new, five years old monarch is Philippe dOrléans, nephew of Louis XIV. September - First of... 1715, and he died on February 1 is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. There are 333 days remaining, (334 in leap years). Events 1662 - The Chinese pirate Koxinga seizes the island of Taiwan after a nine-month siege. 1713 - The Kalabalik or Tumult in Bendery results from the Ottoman sultan... 1 February Events May 15 - James Puckle, a London lawyer, patents the worlds first machine gun. July 21 - Treaty of Passarowitz signed November 22 - Off the coast of Virginia, English pirate Edward Teach (best known as Blackbeard) is killed in battle when a British boarding party cornered and then shot and... 1718.


The Duke of Shrewsbury was one of the greatest noblemen of the reign of Queen Anne. Strikingly handsome in person, his demeanour was dignified and his manners full of grace and courtesy. Jonathan Swift Jonathan Swift (November 30, 1667 - October 19, 1745) was an Anglo-Irish writer and satirist. Jonathan Swift was born, after his father had been dead for seven months, to an English mother, and educated by his Uncle Godwin. After a not very successful career at Trinity College, Dublin... Swift described him as "the finest gentleman we have", and as "the favorite of the nation", while William III spoke of him as "the king of hearts". Like most of his contemporaries he endeavoured to keep himself in favor both with the exiled house of Stuart and with the reigning sovereign in England; but at the two critical junctures of Events A high-powered conspiracy of notables, the Immortal Seven, invite William and Mary to depose James II of England. November 5 - Glorious Revolution begins: William of Orange lands at Brixham but James II of England was prevented from meeting him in battle because many of his officers and men... 1688 and Events August 1 - George, elector of Hanover becomes King George I of Great Britain. September 11 - Barcelona surrenders to Spanish and French Borbonic armies in the War of the Spanish Succession. The Duchy of Savoy and Piedmont becomes the Kingdom of Sardinia Louis Juchereau de St. Denis establishes Fort St... 1714 he acted decisively in favor of the Protestant succession. At other times he appeared weak and vacillating, and he never whole-heartedly supported either Whigs or Tories, though he co-operated with each in turn. His magnanimous disposition saved him from the vindictiveness of the party politician of the period; and the weak health from which he suffered through life probably combined with a congenital lack of ambition to prevent his grasping the power which his personality and talents might have placed in his hands.


In Events Construction begins on Blenheim Palace, in Oxfordshire, England. It is completed in 1724 The Sophia Naturalization Act 1705 is passed by the English Parliament, which naturalized Sophia of Hanover and the issue of her body as British subjects. Births October 31 - Pope Clement XIV (died 1774) Thomas Birch, British... 1705 Shrewsbury married Adelaide, daughter of the Marquis Paleotti of Bologna. This lady, who is said to have had "a great many engaging qualities" besides many accomplishments, was the subject of much malicious gossip. She was the widow, or as some declared, the mistress of a Count Brachiano; and Lady Cowper reported that the lady's brother had forced Shrewsbury to marry her "after an intrigue together". After Shrewsbury's return to England the duchess became conspicuous in London society, where the caustic wit of Lady The Lady Mary Wortley Montagu (May 26, 1689 - August 21, 1762), was an English woman of letters. She was the eldest daughter of Evelyn Pierrepont, later Duke of Kingston, and was baptized at Covent Garden. Her mother, who died while her daughter was still a child, was a daughter of... Mary Wortley Montagu was exercised at her expense. On the accession of George I the duchess of Shrewsbury became a lady of the bedchamber to the Caroline of Ansbach (or Anspach) (Wilhelmine-Caroline of Brandenburg) was the queen consort of King George II of Great Britain 1727_1737. Caroline was born on March 1, 1683, at Ansbach in Germany, the daughter of Johann Friedrich Margrave of Brandenburg-Ansbach. Orphaned early on, she grew up an intelligent, cultured... Princess of Wales, a position which she retained till her death on June 29 is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 185 days remaining. Events 1600-1899 1613 - The Globe Theatre burns to the ground. 1749 - New Governor, Charles de la Ralière Des Herbiers, arrives at Isle Royale (Cape Breton Island). 1786... 29 June Events George Friderich Handel becomes a British subject. Jonathan Swift publishes Gullivers Travels. The city of Montevideo was established. Mary Toft allegedly gives birth to 16 rabbits in England, later revealed to be a hoax. The Gujin tushu jicheng, an immense Chinese encyclopedia, is printed using movable copper type... 1726. Shrewsbury left no children, and at his death the dukedom became extinct, the earldom of Shrewsbury passing to his cousin Gilbert Talbot.


This article incorporates text from the The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. (Proprietary interest is typically represented by a copyright or patent.) Such works and inventions are considered part of... public domain The Eleventh Edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica (1911) in many ways represents the sum of knowledge at the beginning of the 20th century. The edition is still often regarded as the greatest edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica, with many articles being up to 10 times the length of... 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica.



Preceded by:
Charles Middleton, 2nd Earl of Middleton (c. 1640–1719), held several offices under Charles II and James II, being envoy extraordinary at Vienna and afterwards joint secretary for Scotland. In 1684 he became an English Secretary of State, and with Richard Graham, Viscount Preston, he had the difficult task... The Earl of Middleton
The Secretary of State for the Southern Department was a position in the cabinet of the government of United Kingdom up to 1782. Before 1782, the responsibilities of the two British Secretaries of State were divided not based on the principles of modern ministerial divisions, but geographically. The Secretary of... Southern Secretary
1689–1690
Succeeded by:
Daniel Finch, 7th Earl of Winchilsea, 2nd Earl of Nottingham (2 July 1647-1 January 1730), son of Heneage Finch, 1st Earl of Nottingham, entered parliament for Lichfield in 1679. He was one of the privy councillors who in 1685 signed the order for the proclamation of the duke of... The Earl of Nottingham
Preceded by:
Sir John Trenchard ( 30 March 1640 - 27 April 1695), English politician belonged to an old Dorset family, his father being Thomas Trenchard (1615-1671), of Wolverton, and his grandfather Sir Thomas Trenchard (1582-1657), also of Wolverton, who was knighted by James I in 1613. Born at Lytchett Matravers, near... Sir John Trenchard
The Secretary of State for the Northern Department was a position in the Cabinet of the government of United Kingdom up to 1782. Before 1782, the responsibilities of the two Secretaries of State were not divided up in terms of area of authority, but rather geographically. The Secretary of State... Northern Secretary
1694–1695
Succeeded by:
Sir William Trumbull
Preceded by:
Sir John Trenchard ( 30 March 1640 - 27 April 1695), English politician belonged to an old Dorset family, his father being Thomas Trenchard (1615-1671), of Wolverton, and his grandfather Sir Thomas Trenchard (1582-1657), also of Wolverton, who was knighted by James I in 1613. Born at Lytchett Matravers, near... Sir John Trenchard
The Secretary of State for the Southern Department was a position in the cabinet of the government of United Kingdom up to 1782. Before 1782, the responsibilities of the two British Secretaries of State were divided not based on the principles of modern ministerial divisions, but geographically. The Secretary of... Southern Secretary
1695–1698
Succeeded by:
James Vernon
Preceded by:
Robert Spencer, 2nd Earl of Sunderland (1640 - September 28, 1702) was an English statesman and nobleman. Born in Paris, Spencer inherited his fathers peerage dignities at the age of three, becoming Baron Spencer of Wormleighton and Earl of Sunderland. He joined the British Army, reaching the rank of captain... The Earl of Sunderland
The Lord Chamberlain or Lord Chamberlain of the Household is one of the chief officers of the royal household in the United Kingdom, and is to be distinguished from the Lord Great Chamberlain, one of the great offices of state. The Lord Chamberlain is always a peer and a privy... Lord Chamberlain
1699–1700
Succeeded by:
Edward Villiers, 1st Earl of Jersey (c. 1656 - 25 August 1711) son of Sir Edward Villiers (1620-1689), of Richmond, Surrey was created Baron Villiers and Viscount Villiers in 1691 and Earl of Jersey in 1697. His grandfather, Sir Edward Villiers (c. 1585-1626), Master of the Mint and President... The Earl of Jersey
Preceded by:
James Butler, 2nd Duke of Ormonde (April 29, 1665 - November 16, 1745), Irish statesman and soldier, son of Thomas, earl of Ossory, and grandson of James Butler, 1st Duke of Ormonde, was born in Dublin and was educated in France and afterwards at Christ Church, Oxford. On the death of... The Duke of Ormonde
The Lord Lieutenant of Ireland (also known as the Viceroy or in the Middle Ages as the Lord Deputy) was the head of Englands (pre-1707) or Britains (post 1707) administration in Ireland. The office was originally the central focus of English/British administration in Ireland under the... Lord Lieutenant of Ireland
1713–1714
Succeeded by:
Charles Spencer, 3rd Earl of Sunderland (c. 1674-1722), English statesman, was the second son of the 2nd Earl, but on the death of his elder brother Henry in Paris in September 1688 he became heir to the peerage. Called by John Evelyn a youth of extraordinary hopes, he completed... The Earl of Sunderland
Preceded by:
Robert Harley, 1st Earl of Oxford and Mortimer (5 December 1661 - 21 May 1724), was an English statesman of the Stuart and early Georgian periods. Harley was the eldest son of Sir Edward Harley (1624-1700), a prominent landowner in Herefordshire, and grandson of the celebrated letter-writer Lady Brilliana... The Earl of Oxford and Mortimer
The Lord High Treasurer bears a white staff as his symbol of office. The post of Lord High Treasurer or Lord Treasurer is an ancient English (after 1707, British) government position. The holder of the post functions as the head of Her Majestys Treasury, and is third highest Great... Lord High Treasurer
1714
Succeeded by:
In Commission
(First Lord: Charles Montagu, 1st Earl of Halifax (April 16, 1661 - May 19, 1715) was Chancellor of the Exchequer, poet, statesman, and Earl of Halifax. Charles was born at Horton, in Northamptonshire, the son of Mr. George Montagu, a younger son of the Earl of Manchester. He was educated first in the... The Earl of Halifax)
Preceded by:
Henry Grey, 1st Duke of Kent (1671-1740), was a British courtier. He succeeded his father as 12th Earl of Kent in 1702, having succeeded his mother as 2nd Baron Lucas earlier the same year. He was made Lord Chamberlain and a Privy Counsellor in 1704. He was created Marquess... The Duke of Kent
The Lord Chamberlain or Lord Chamberlain of the Household is one of the chief officers of the royal household in the United Kingdom, and is to be distinguished from the Lord Great Chamberlain, one of the great offices of state. The Lord Chamberlain is always a peer and a privy... Lord Chamberlain
1714–1715
Succeeded by:
Charles Paulet, 2nd Duke of Bolton (1661-January 21, 1722), was a member of parliament for Hampshire and a supporter of William III of Orange. He was son to Charles Paulet, 1st Duke of Bolton and Mary Scrope, daughter of Emanuel Scrope, 1st Earl of Sunderland. He was lord-lieutenant... The Duke of Bolton




Preceded by:
New Creation
The Earl of Shrewsbury is the senior Earl on the Roll in the Peerage of England (the more senior Earldom of Arundel being held by the Duke of Norfolk). The title was created in 1442 for John Talbot, an English general in the Hundred Years War. An earlier creation occurred... Duke of Shrewsbury
Succeeded by:
Extinct
Preceded by:
Francis Talbot
The Earl of Shrewsbury is the senior Earl on the Roll in the Peerage of England (the more senior Earldom of Arundel being held by the Duke of Norfolk). The title was created in 1442 for John Talbot, an English general in the Hundred Years War. An earlier creation occurred... Earl of Shrewsbury
Succeeded by:
Gilbert Talbot



  Results from FactBites:
 
Charles Talbot, 1st Duke of Shrewsbury - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (957 words)
Charles was a godson of King Charles II, after whom he was named, and he was brought up as a Roman Catholic, but in 1679 under the influence of John Tillotson he became a member of the Church of England.
The Duke of Shrewsbury was one of the greatest noblemen of the reign of Queen Anne.
In 1705 Shrewsbury married Adelaide, daughter of the Marquis Paleotti of Bologna.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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