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Encyclopedia > Charles Tait
Charles Tait
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Charles Tait

Charles Tait was an American politician. A Democratic Republican, he served as a United States Senator from Georgia. A politician is an individual involved in politics to the extent of holding or running for public office. ... The Democratic-Republican Party was one of two major American political parties in the First Party System that lasted from 1792 to 1824. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ...

Contents


Early Life

Tait was born near the present town of Hanover, Virginia on February 1, 1768. He moved to Georgia in 1783 with his parents, who settled near Petersburg, where he completed preparatory studies. Tait attended Wilkes Academy, Washington, Georgia in 1786 and 1787 and Cokesbury College, Abingdon, Maryland in 1788. February 1 is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1768 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1783 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1786 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1787 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1788 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ...


Academic and Legal Career

Tait was a professor of French in Cokesburg College from 1789 to 1794, while he also studied law and was admitted to the Georgia bar in 1795. He was a rector and professor at Richmond Academy, Augusta, Georgia from 1795 to 1798, when he commenced the practice of law in Elbert County. He was presiding judge of the western circuit court of Georgia from 1803 to 1809. 1789 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1794 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1795 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1795 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1798 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Circuit courts previously were United States federal courts established in each federal judicial district. ... 1803 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... 1809 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ...


Political Career

He was elected as a Democratic Republican to the United States Senate to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of John Milledge, and was reelected in 1813, serving from November 27, 1809 to March 3, 1819. During the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Congress he was chairman on the Committee on Naval Affairs. After serving in the Senate, he moved to Wilcox County, Alabama in 1819. Tait was appointed by President James Monroe as United States district judge for Alabama from 1820 until 1826 when he resigned. He worked as a planter near Claiborne, Alabama. Tait declined a mission to Great Britain in 1828. He died near Claiborne, Alabama on October 7, 1835 and was intered in Dry Forks Cemetery on his country estate in Wilcox County, Alabama. John Milledge (1757–February 9, 1818) was an American politician. ... 1813 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... November 27 is the 331st day (332nd on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1809 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... March 3 is the 62nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (63rd in leap years). ... 1819 common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Fourteenth United States Congress Links and spelling have to be verified. ... Fifteenth United States Congress Links and spelling have to be verified. ... 1819 common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... James Monroe (April 28, 1758 – July 4, 1831) was the fifth (1817–1825) President of the United States and author of the eponymous Monroe Doctrine. ... A federal judge is a judge appointed in accordance with Article III of the United States Constitution. ... 1820 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... The oldest surviving photograph, Nicéphore Niépce, circa 1826 1826 (MDCCCXXVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... October 7 is the 280th day of the year (281st in leap years). ... | Come and take it, slogan of the Texas Revolution 1835 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ...


Sources

Preceded by:
John Milledge
United States Senator (Class 3) from Georgia
1809–1819
Served alongside: William H. Crawford, William B. Bulloch, William Wyatt Bibb, George M. Troup, John Forsyth
Succeeded by:
John Elliott

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Charles Tait has excellent photos, and an account of a recent visit is available.
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