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Encyclopedia > Charles Spurgeon
Charles Haddon Spurgeon

Born June 19, 1834(1834-06-19)
Kelvedon, Essex, England
Died January 31, 1892 (aged 57)
Menton, Alpes-Maritimes, France
Nationality British
Occupation pastor, author
Religious beliefs Christian (Reformed Baptist)
Spouse Susannah Spurgeon (née Thompson)
(January 8, 1856)
Children Charles & Thomas Spurgeon (twins) (1856)
Parents John & Eliza Spurgeon

Charles Haddon Spurgeon, commonly C.H. Spurgeon, (June 19, 1834January 31, 1892) was a British Reformed Baptist preacher who remains highly influential amongst Christians of different denominations, among whom he is still known as the "Prince of Preachers." He also founded the charity organization now known as Spurgeon's, that works worldwide with families and children, as well as a famous theological college which after his death was called after him: Spurgeon's College. His sermons were translated into many languages in his lifetime. is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1834 (MDCCCXXXIV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Not to be confused with Kelvedon Hatch, another village in Essex. ... For other meanings of Essex, see Essex (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1892 (MDCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Menton (Occitan: Menton in classical norm or Mentan in Mistralian norm; Italian: Mentone) is a town and commune in the Alpes-Maritimes département of the Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur région of France. ... Alpes_Maritimes is a département in the extreme southeast corner of France. ... For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... The name Reformed Baptist does not refer to a distinct Christian denomination, but instead is a description of the churchs theological leaning. ... The French word née (feminine) or né (masculine) (or the English word nee) is still commonly used in some newspapers when mentioning the maiden name of a woman in engagement or wedding announcements. ... is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1856 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1834 (MDCCCXXXIV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1892 (MDCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The name Reformed Baptist does not refer to a distinct Christian denomination, but instead is a description of the churchs theological leaning. ... This article is about the religous people known as Christians. ... For other senses of this word, see denomination. ... Spurgeons College is a theological institute of higher learning located in South Norwood Hill, London. ...

Contents

Early beginnings

Born in Kelvedon, Essex, Spurgeon's conversion to Christianity came on January 6, 1850 at the age of fifteen. On his way to a scheduled appointment, a snow storm forced him to cut short his intended journey and to turn into a Primitive Methodist chapel in Colchester where, in his own words: "God opened his heart to the salvation message." The text that moved him was Isaiah 45:22 - "Look unto me, and be ye saved, all the ends of the earth, for I am God, and there is none else." Not to be confused with Kelvedon Hatch, another village in Essex. ... For other meanings of Essex, see Essex (disambiguation). ... Topics in Christianity Preaching Prayer Ecumenism Relation to other religions Movements Music Liturgy Calendar Symbols Art Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the game, see: 1850 (board game) 1850 (MDCCCL) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The Primitive Methodist Church is a body of evangelical Christians within the Methodist denomination, which began in England in the early 1800s, with the influence of American evangelist Lorenzo Dow (1777-1834). ... For other places with the same name, see Colchester (disambiguation). ...


Later that year, on April 4, 1850, he was admitted to the church at Newmarket. His baptism followed on May 3 in the river Lark, at Isleham. Later that same year he moved to Cambridge. He preached his first sermon in the winter of 1850 / 1851 in a cottage at Teversham, Cambridge; from the beginning of his ministry his style and ability were considered to be far above average. In the same year, he was installed as pastor of the small Baptist church at Waterbeach, Cambridgeshire, where he published his first literary work: a Gospel tract written in 1853. The River Lark is a river in England. ... Isleham is a small village and civil parish in the English county of Cambridgeshire. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Baptist is... Waterbeach is a large fen-edge village north of Cambridge in Cambridgeshire in England, and belongs to the administrative district of South Cambridgeshire. ... Cambridgeshire (abbreviated Cambs) is a county in England, bordering Lincolnshire to the north, Norfolk to the northeast, Suffolk to the east, Essex and Hertfordshire to the south, and Bedfordshire and Northamptonshire to the west. ... “Treatise” redirects here. ...


The New Park Street Pulpit

Spurgeon at age 23.
Spurgeon at age 23.

In April 1854, after preaching three months on probation and just four years after his conversion, Spurgeon, then only 19, was called to the pastorate of London's famed New Park Street Chapel, Southwark (formerly pastored by the Particular Baptists Benjamin Keach, theologian John Gill, and John Rippon). This was the largest Baptist congregation in London at the time, although it had dwindled in numbers for several years. Spurgeon found friends in London among his fellow pastors, such as William Garrett Lewis of Westbourne Grove Church, an older man who along with Spurgeon went on to found the London Baptist Association. Within a few months of Spurgeon's arrival at Park Street, his powers as a preacher made him famous. The following year the first of his sermons in the "New Park Street Pulpit" was published. Spurgeon's sermons were published in printed form every week, and enjoyed a high circulation. By the time of his death in 1892, he had preached almost thirty-six hundred sermons and published forty-nine volumes of commentaries, sayings, anecdotes, illustrations, and devotions. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1240x2000, 322 KB) From Spurgeons Sermons 1857 This image is in the public domain because its copyright has expired in the United States and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years or less. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1240x2000, 322 KB) From Spurgeons Sermons 1857 This image is in the public domain because its copyright has expired in the United States and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years or less. ... New Park Street Chapel ca. ... For other places with the same name, see Southwark (disambiguation). ... Strict Baptists, also known as Particular Baptists, are people who believe in a strict-Calvinist interpretation of Christian theology. ... Benjamin Keach (February 29, 1640 - July 18, 1704) was a Reformed Baptist preacher in London. ... For other persons of the same name, see John Gill. ... John Rippon John Rippon (1751-1836) was an English Baptist minister and in 1787 published an important hymnal, A Selection of Hymns from the Best Authors, Intended to Be an Appendix to Dr. Watts’ Psalms and Hymns, commonly known as Rippons Selection, which was very successful, and was reprinted... William Garrett Lewis (born before 1834-died in 1885) was a British Baptist preacher and pastor of Westbourne Grove Church in Bayswater, London for 33 years. ...

Part of a series on
Baptists

Historical Background
Christianity · General Baptist · Particular Baptist Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Baptist is... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 600 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2000 × 2000 pixel, file size: 462 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) From:Baptizing in the Jordan; Silas Xavier Floyd, 1869-1923 Life of Charles T. Walker, D.D., (The Black Spurgeon. ... Topics in Christianity Preaching Prayer Ecumenism Relation to other religions Movements Music Liturgy Calendar Symbols Art Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... General Baptist is a generic term for Baptists that hold the view of a general atonement, as well as a specific name of groups of Baptists within the broader category. ... The name Reformed Baptist does not refer to a distinct denomination but instead is a description of the churchs theological leaning. ...

Doctrinal distinctives
Prima and Sola scriptura · Ordinance · Offices · Confessions · Congregationalism · Separation of church and state Main article: Baptist The Beliefs of Baptist Churchs are not totally consistent from one Baptist church to another, as churches do not have a central governing authority, unlike most other denominations. ... The Bible is considered as first or above all sources of divine revelation. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      This article is about theological concept. ... Baptists recognize only two ordinances—believers baptism and the Lords Supper (communion). ... Baptists generally recognize two Scriptural offices, those of pastor-teacher and deacon. ... 1600s 1644 First London Baptist Confession - revised in 1646 1651 The Faith and Practice of Thirty Congregations 1654 The True Gospel-Faith Declared According to the Scriptures 1656 The Somerset Confession of Faith 1655 Midland Confession of Faith 1660 The Standard Confession 1678 The Orthodox Creed 1689 Second London Baptist... Congregational churches are Protestant Christian churches practicing congregationalist church governance, in which each congregation indepedently and autonomously runs its own affairs. ... Separation of church and state is one of the primary theological distinctions of the Baptist tradition. ...

Pivotal figures
John Bunyan · Andrew Fuller · Thomas Helwys · John Smyth · Charles Haddon Spurgeon · Roger Williams John Bunyan. ... Andrew Fuller (1754-1815) was an eminent Baptist minister, born in Cambridgeshire, and settled at Kettering. ... Thomas Helwys, (c. ... John Smyth (1570 - c. ... Charles Haddon Spurgeon (June 19, 1834 – January 31, 1892) was Englands best-known and most-loved preacher for most of the second half of the nineteenth century. ... For other persons named Roger Williams, see Roger Williams (disambiguation). ...

Largest associations
American Baptist · Baptist General Convention of Texas · National Baptist · Progressive National Baptist · Southern Baptist Convention · Asia Pacific Baptist Federation  · European Baptist Federation ABCUSA American Baptist Churches USA (ABCUSA) is a group of Baptist churches within the United States; headquartered in Valley Forge, Pennsylvania. ... The Baptist General Convention of Texas is the oldest surviving Baptist convention in the state of Texas. ... The National Baptist Convention, USA, Inc. ... The Progressive National Baptist Convention (PNBC) is a convention of African-American Baptists emphasizing civil rights and social justice. ... The Southern Baptist Convention (SBC) is a United States-based Christian denomination that consists of numerous agencies including six seminaries, two mission boards and a variety of other organizations such as: the Executive Committee of the Southern Baptist Convention, which can act for the SBC ad interim between annual meetings... The European Baptist Federation (EBF) is a federation of 51 Baptist associations and is one of six regional fellowships in the Baptist World Alliance. ...

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Immediately following his fame was controversy. The first attack in the Press appeared in the Earthen Vessel in January 1855. His preaching, although not revolutionary in substance, was a plain spoken and direct appeal to the people using the Bible to provoke them to consider the claims of Jesus Christ. Critical attacks from the media persisted throughout his life.


The congregation quickly outgrew their building, moved to Exeter Hall, then to Surrey Music Hall. In these venues Spurgeon frequently preached to audiences numbering more than 10,000. At twenty-two Spurgeon was the most popular preacher of the day.[citation needed] Exeter Hall was a hall in The Strand, London. ... Royal Surrey Gardens were pleasure gardens in Kennington, London in the Victorian period, slightly east of The Oval. ...


On January 8, 1856, Spurgeon married Susannah, daughter of Robert Thompson of Falcon Square, London, by whom he had twin sons, Charles and Thomas September 20, 1856. At the end of that eventful year, tragedy struck on October 19, 1856 as Spurgeon was preaching at the Surrey Gardens Music Hall for the first time. Someone in the crowd yelled, "Fire!" and there was a panic and a stampede that left several dead. Spurgeon was emotionally devastated by the event and it had a sobering influence on his life. He struggled against clinical depression for many years and spoke of being moved to tears for no reason known to himself. is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1856 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1856 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... On the Threshold of Eternity. ...


Walter Thornbury later wrote in "Old and New London" (1897) describing a subsequent meeting at Surrey:

a congregation consisting of 10,000 souls, streaming into the hall, mounting the galleries, humming, buzzing, and swarming-a mighty hive of bees-eager to secure at first the best places, and, at last, any place at all. After waiting more than half an hour-for if you wish to have a seat you must be there at least that space of time in advance .. Mr. Spurgeon ascended his tribune. To the hum, and rush, and trampling of men, succeeded a low, concentrated thrill and murmur, of' devotion, which seemed to run at once, like an electric current, through the breast of every one present, and by this magnetic chain the preacher held us fast bound for about two hours. It is not my purpose to give a summary of his discourse. It is enough to say of his voice, that its power and volume are sufficient to reach every one in that vast assembly; of his language that it is neither high-flown nor homely; of his style, that it is at times familiar, at times declamatory, but always happy, and often eloquent; of his doctrine, that neither the 'Calvinist' nor the ' Baptist' appears in the forefront of the battle which is waged by Mr. Spurgeon with relentless animosity, and with Gospel weapons, against irreligion, cant, hypocrisy, pride, and those secret bosom-sins which so easily beset a man in daily life; and to sum up all in a word, it is enough to, say of the man himself, that he impresses you with a perfect conviction of his sincerity.
Spurgeon preaching at the Surrey Music Hall circa 1858.

Still the work went on. A Pastors' College was founded in 1857 by Spurgeon and was renamed Spurgeon's College in 1923 when it moved to its present building in South Norwood Hill, London;[1]. At the Fast Day, October 7, 1857 he preached to the largest crowd ever: 23,654 people at The Crystal Palace in London. Spurgeon noted: Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1333x969, 343 KB) From Spurgeons Sermons Fifth Series; Sheldon & Co. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1333x969, 343 KB) From Spurgeons Sermons Fifth Series; Sheldon & Co. ... Royal Surrey Gardens were pleasure gardens in Kennington, London in the Victorian period, slightly east of The Oval. ... Spurgeons College is a theological institute of higher learning located in South Norwood Hill, London. ... is the 280th day of the year (281st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1857 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... For other uses, see Crystal Palace. ...

In 1857, a day or two before preaching at the Crystal Palace, I went to decide where the platform should be fixed; and, in order to test the acoustic properties of the building, cried in a loud voice, "Behold the Lamb of God, which taketh away the sin of the world." In one of the galleries, a workman, who knew nothing of what was being done, heard the words, and they came like a message from heaven to his soul. He was smitten with conviction on account of sin, put down his tools, went home, and there, after a season of spiritual struggling, found peace and life by beholding the Lamb of God. Years after, he told this story to one who visited him on his death-bed.

The Metropolitan Tabernacle Pulpit

Metropolitan Tabernacle in 2004
Metropolitan Tabernacle in 2004

On March 18, 1861 the congregation moved permanently to the newly constructed purpose-built Metropolitan Tabernacle at Elephant and Castle, Southwark, seating five thousand people with standing room for another thousand. The Metropolitan Tabernacle was the largest church edifice of its day and can be considered a precursor to the modern "megachurch."[1] It was at the Tabernacle that Spurgeon would continue to preach several times per week until his death 31 years later. He never gave altar calls at the conclusion of his sermons, but he always extended the invitation that if anyone was moved to seek an interest in Christ by his preaching on a Sunday, that they could come to meet with him at his vestry on Monday morning. Without fail, there was always someone at his door the next day. He wrote his sermons out fully before he preached, but what he carried up to the pulpit was a note card with an outline sketch. Stenographers would take down the sermon as it was delivered, then Spurgeon would have opportunity to make revisions to their transcripts the following day for immediate publication. His weekly sermons that sold for a penny each were widely circulated and still remain one of the all-time best selling series of writings published in history. Better image of Metropolitan Tabernacle taken by C Ford, 18th July 2004. ... Better image of Metropolitan Tabernacle taken by C Ford, 18th July 2004. ... is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Metropolitan Tabernacle in 2004 The Metropolitan Tabernacle is a large Reformed Baptist church in the Elephant and Castle in London. ... The Elephant and Castle, commonly shortened to the Elephant, is a major road intersection in inner south London, and is also used as a name for the surrounding district. ... The interior of Rev. ... An altar call is a practice in some evangelical churches in which those who wish to make a new spiritual commitment to Jesus Christ are invited to come forward publicly. ... Shorthand is a writing method that can be done at speed because an abbreviated or symbolic form of language is used. ...

Spurgeon in his late twenties.

Besides sermons, Spurgeon also wrote several hymns and published a new collection of worship songs in 1866 called "Our Own Hymn Book". It was mostly a compilation of Isaac Watts' Psalms and Hymns that had been originally selected by John Rippon, a Baptist predecessor to Spurgeon. What is remarkable compared to most modern practices, is that the singing in the congregation was exclusively a cappella under his pastorate. It is noteworthy that thousands heard the preaching and were led in the singing without any amplification of sound that exists today. Hymns were a subject that he took seriously. While Spurgeon was still preaching at New Park Street, a hymn book called "The Rivulet" was published. Spurgeon's first controversy arose due to his critique of its theology, which was largely deistic. At the end of his review, Mr Spurgeon warned: Image File history File links old photo of ODG. File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links old photo of ODG. File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... For other uses, see Hymn (disambiguation). ... Isaac Watts (July 17, 1674 – November 25, 1748) is recognised as the Father of English Hymnody, as he was the first prolific and popular English hymnwriter, credited with some 750 hymns. ... John Rippon John Rippon (1751-1836) was an English Baptist minister and in 1787 published an important hymnal, A Selection of Hymns from the Best Authors, Intended to Be an Appendix to Dr. Watts’ Psalms and Hymns, commonly known as Rippons Selection, which was very successful, and was reprinted... This article is about the vocal technique. ... Deism is belief in a God or first cause based on reason, rather than on faith or revelation, and thus a form of theism in opposition to fideism. ...

We shall soon have to handle truth, not with kid gloves, but with gauntlets, – the gauntlets of holy courage and integrity. Go on, ye warriors of the cross, for the King is at the head of you.

On June 5, 1862, Spurgeon also challenged many paedobaptist Christian leaders when he preached against infant baptism in a famous sermon called "Baptismal Regeneration". However, Spurgeon did build bridges across denominational lines as well. It was during this period at the new Tabernacle that Spurgeon found a friend in James Hudson Taylor, the founder of the inter-denominational China Inland Mission. Spurgeon supported the work of the mission financially, and directed many missionary candidates to apply for service with Taylor. He also aided in the work of cross-cultural evangelism by promoting "The Wordless Book", a teaching tool that he described in a message given on January 11, 1866 regarding Psalm 51:7 "Wash me, and I shall be whiter than snow." This "book" has been and is still used to teach uncounted thousands of illiterate people - young and old - around the globe about the Gospel message.[2] An infant is held over a baptismal font as holy water is poured over the head at a Catholic Church in the United States in 2004 In Christian religious practice, infant baptism is the baptism of young children or infants. ... James Hudson Taylor (May 21, 1832 – June 3, 1905), Christian missionary to China and founder of the China Inland Mission, served there for 51 years, bringing over 800 missionaries to the country and personally baptizing an estimated 50,000 converts. ... The China Inland Mission was a missionary society, set up by English missionary Hudson Taylor on 25 June 1865 in Brighton during a home leave. ... Open air preaching in China using the Wordless Book[1] The Wordless Book is a Christian evangelistic device. ...

Missionary preaching in China using The Wordless Book

In the steps of another Christian figure that he admired from a different denomination - George Muller, Spurgeon founded the Stockwell Orphanage, which opened for boys in 1867 and for girls in 1879 and continued in London until it was bombed in the Second World War.[2] [3] [4] This orphanage turned into Spurgeon's Child Care which still exists today. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 460 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1668 × 2172 pixel, file size: 414 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) From Chinas Millions; China Inland Mission; London; January 1892 (colors added by Brian York in photoshop for emphasis) This image is in the public domain... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 460 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1668 × 2172 pixel, file size: 414 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) From Chinas Millions; China Inland Mission; London; January 1892 (colors added by Brian York in photoshop for emphasis) This image is in the public domain... Open air preaching in China using the Wordless Book[1] The Wordless Book is a Christian evangelistic device. ... George Müller (September 27, 1805 – March 10, 1898), a Christian evangelist and coordinator of orphanges in Bristol, England, cared for a total of over 100,000 orphans in his life. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


On the death of missionary David Livingstone in 1873, a discolored and much used copy of one of Spurgeon's printed sermons Accidents, Not Punishments was found among his few possessions much later, along with the handwritten comment at the top of the first page "Very good, D.L." He had carried it with him throughout his travels in Africa, and it was returned to Spurgeon and treasured by him (W. Y. Fullerton, Charles Haddon Spurgeon: A Biography, ch. 10). For other uses, see Missionary (disambiguation). ... David Livingstone (19 March 1813 – 1 May 1873) was a Scottish Congregationalist pioneer medical missionary with the London Missionary Society and explorer in central Africa. ... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ... William Young Fullerton was born in Belfast, in what is now Northern Ireland, on the eighth of March 1857 and died at Bedford Park, Middlesex, England on the seventeenth of August 1932 at the age of 75. ...


Downgrade controversy

A controversy among the Baptists flared in 1887 with Spurgeon's first "Down-grade" article, published in The Sword & the Trowel. In the ensuing "Downgrade Controversy" The Metropolitan Tabernacle became disaffiliated from the Baptist Union, effectuating Spurgeon's congregation as the world's largest self-standing church and thus a precursor of megachurches of the 20th century. Contextually the Downgrade Controversy was British Baptists' equivalent of hermeneutic tensions which were starting to sunder Protestant fellowships in general. The Controversy took its name from Spurgeon's use of the term "Downgrade" to describe certain other Baptists' outlook toward the Bible (i.e., they had "downgraded" the Bible and the principle of sola scriptura). Spurgeon alleged that an incremental creeping of the Graf-Wellhausen hypothesis, Charles Darwin's theory of evolution by natural selection, and other concepts was weakening the Baptist Union and reciprocally explaining the success of his own evangelistic efforts. In the standoff, which even split his pupils trained at the College, each side accused the other of raising issues which did not need to be raised.[3] The Downgrade Controversy continues.[4] The Baptist Union of Great Britain is the oldest and largest national association of Baptist churches in Great Britain. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      This article is about theological concept. ... A relational diagram describing the various versions postulated by the biblical documentary hypothesis. ... For other people of the same surname, and places and things named after Charles Darwin, see Darwin. ... This article is about evolution in biology. ... For other uses, see Natural selection (disambiguation). ...


Final years and death

Often Spurgeon's wife was too ill for her to leave home to hear him preach. C.H. Spurgeon too suffered ill health toward the end of his life, afflicted by a combination of rheumatism, gout, and Bright's disease. He often recuperated at Menton, near Nice, France, where he eventually died on 1892 January 31. Spurgeon's wife and sons outlived him. His remains were buried at West Norwood Cemetery in London where the tomb is still visited by admirers. Rheumatism or Rheumatic disorder is a non-specific term for medical problems affecting the heart, bones, joints, kidney, skin and lung. ... Brights disease is a historical classification of kidney diseases that would be described in modern medicine as acute or chronic nephritis. ... Menton (Occitan: Menton in classical norm or Mentan in Mistralian norm; Italian: Mentone) is a town and commune in the Alpes-Maritimes département of the Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur région of France. ... This article is about the French city. ... Year 1892 (MDCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... West Norwood Cemetery is a cemetery in West Norwood, Lambeth, London. ...


Chronology of Spurgeon's life and legacy

  • Born at Kelvedon, Essex, England, June 19, 1834
  • Converted to Christianity at Colchester, January 6, 1850
  • Becomes a Baptist, May 3, 1850 (Baptized in the River Lark, at Isleham)
  • Preaches first sermon [5], at a cottage in Teversham, 1850
  • Preached first sermon at Waterbeach Baptist Chapel, October 12, 1851
  • Preached first sermon at New Park Street Chapel, London, December 18, 1853
  • Accepts pastorate at New Park Street Chapel, April 28, 1854, (then 232 members)
  • First sermon in the "New Park Street Pulpit" series published, January 10, 1855
  • Marriage to Miss Susannah Thompson (born January 15, 1832), January 8, 1856
  • 10-Day wedding trip in Paris, France by the newly married Spurgeons, Spring 1856
  • Twin sons (not identical) Thomas and Charles born, September 20, 1856
  • Metropolitan Tabernacle Building Committee begins, June 1856
  • Establishes the Pastors' College, 1856, expanded in 1857
  • Metropolitan Tabernacle opens with a great prayer meeting, March 18, 1861
  • First sermon in the Metropolitan Tabernacle March 31, 1861 [6]
  • Metropolitan Tabernacle Colportage Association founded, 1866
  • Stockwell Orphanage (Boy's side) founded, 1867, foundation stone laid Sept. 9, 1869
  • Foundation stone laid by senior deacon Thomas Olney for the Pastors' College building, May 6, 1867; construction completed in March, 1868
  • Begins annual vacations to southern France for rest and recuperation, December 1871
  • 571 new church members added by February 1873, now 4,417 total membership
  • Foundation stone laid for a newer Pastors' College building, October 14, 1873
  • Mrs. Spurgeon's Book Fund inaugurated, 1875
  • Presentation of the pastoral silver wedding gift (offering) May 20, 1879
  • Stockwell Orphanage (Girl's side) founded, 1879; stone laid June 22, 1880
  • Jubilee celebrations and testimonials, June 18 & 19, 1884
  • The seven volumes of "The Treasury of David", an exposition of the Psalms, were published weekly over a 20-year time period in The Sword and the Trowel, with the final volume being released in 1885.[5]
  • "Downgrade" paper #1 [7] published in The Sword & the Trowel, March 1887
  • Spurgeon's mother Eliza dies, aged 75 Years, 1888
  • Last sermon delivered at Metropolitan Tabernacle, June 7, 1891
  • During his pastorate, 14,692 were baptized and joined the Tabernacle
  • As year 1891 ends, membership given as 5,311. The Tabernacle capacity was 6,000 people, with 5,500 seated, 500 standing room; the Tabernacle dimensions were 146' long, 81' wide, 68' high
  • Suffers much pain and sickness during the months of June and July, 1891
  • Travels to Menton, France again (for the last time), October 26, 1891. While there, becomes severely ill from his long-suffering combination of Rheumatism, Gout and Bright's disease (Kidney)
  • Still resting in Menton, he finally takes to bed, January 20, 1892
  • Spurgeon dies, January 31, 1892
  • Remains interred and buried at West Norwood Cemetery, February 11, 1892
  • His brother (& Asst. Tabernacle Pastor) James dies, aged 61 years, March 22, 1899
  • His father (& pastor) John dies, aged almost 92 years, June 14, 1902
  • His wife Susannah dies, aged 71 years, October 22, 1903
  • His son (& Pastor) Thomas dies, aged 61 years, October 17, 1917
  • His son (& Pastor) Charles dies, aged 70 years, December 13, 1926

Not to be confused with Kelvedon Hatch, another village in Essex. ... For other meanings of Essex, see Essex (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1834 (MDCCCXXXIV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Topics in Christianity Preaching Prayer Ecumenism Relation to other religions Movements Music Liturgy Calendar Symbols Art Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... For other places with the same name, see Colchester (disambiguation). ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Baptist is... The River Lark is a river in England. ... Isleham is a small village and civil parish in the English county of Cambridgeshire. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      A sermon is an oration by... Teversham is a village in Cambridgeshire. ... Waterbeach is a large fen-edge village north of Cambridge in Cambridgeshire in England, and belongs to the administrative district of South Cambridgeshire. ... New Park Street Chapel ca. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1856 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... This article is about the capital of France. ... Metropolitan Tabernacle in 2004 The Metropolitan Tabernacle is a large Reformed Baptist church in the Elephant and Castle in London. ... For other uses, see Deacon (disambiguation). ... Psalms (Hebrew: Tehilim, תהילים, or praises) is a book of the Hebrew Bible included in the collected works known as the Writings or Ketuvim. ... Menton (Occitan: Menton in classical norm or Mentan in Mistralian norm; Italian: Mentone) is a town and commune in the Alpes-Maritimes département of the Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur région of France. ... Rheumatism or Rheumatic disorder is a non-specific term for medical problems affecting the heart, bones, joints, kidney, skin and lung. ... Brights disease is a historical classification of kidney diseases that would be described in modern medicine as acute or chronic nephritis. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1892 (MDCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... West Norwood Cemetery is a cemetery in West Norwood, Lambeth, London. ...

Some of Spurgeon's written works

Wikisource has original works written by or about:
Spurgeon near the end of his life.
Spurgeon near the end of his life.
  • 2200 Quotations from the Writings of Charles H. Spurgeon compiled by Tom Carter
  • Able To The Uttermost
  • According To Promise
  • All of Grace
  • An All Round Ministry
  • Around the Wicket Gate
  • Barbed Arrows
  • C. H. Spurgeon’s Autobiography
  • Chequebook Of The Bank Of Faith, The
  • Christ’s Incarnation
  • Come Ye Children
  • Commenting and Commentaries
  • The Dawn of Revival, (Prayer Speedily Answered), Diggory Press ISBN 978-1846856822
  • Down Grade Controversy, The
  • Eccentric Preachers
  • Feathers For Arrows
  • Flashes Of Thought
  • Gleanings Among The Sheaves
  • Good Start, A
  • Greatest Fight In The World, The
  • Home Worship And The Use of the Bible in the Home (American reprint of "The Interpreter" with the devotions of Rev. Joseph Parrish Thompson)
Caricature of Spurgeon from Vanity fair (1870)
Caricature of Spurgeon from Vanity fair (1870)
  • Interpreter, The or Scripture for Family Worship
  • John Ploughman’s Pictures
  • John Ploughman’s Talks — the Gospel in the language of "plain people"
  • Lectures to My Students — Four volumes of lectures to students of college Spurgeon established
  • Metropolitan Tabernacle Pulpit, The
  • Miracles and Parables of Our Lord-- Three volumes
  • New Park Street Pulpit, The
  • Only A Prayer Meeting
  • Our Own Hymn Book edited by Spurgeon and he authored several hymns
  • Pictures From Pilgrim’s Progress
  • The Preachers Power and the Conditions of Obtaining it Diggory Press ISBN 978-1846856358
  • Saint And His Saviour, The
  • Sermons In Candles
  • Sermons On Unusual Occasions
  • Soul Winner, The
  • Speeches At Home And Abroad
  • Spurgeon's Commentary on Great Chapters of the Bible compiled by Tom Carter
  • Spurgeon’s Morning and Evening — a book of daily devotional readings
  • Sword and The Trowel, The — a monthly magazine edited by Spurgeon
  • Till He Come
  • Treasury of David, The — a multi-volume commentary on the Psalms
  • We Endeavour
  • The Wordless Book
  • Words Of Advice
  • Words Of Cheer
  • Words Of Counsel

It is known that Spurgeon's writings were published in the following languages: Arabic, Armenian, Bengali, Bulgarian, Castilian (for the Argentine Republic), Chinese, Kongo, Czech, Danish, Dutch, Estonian, French, Gaelic, German, Hindi, Hungarian, Italian, Japanese, Kaffir, Karen, Lettish, Maori, Norwegian, Polish, Russian, Serbian, Spanish, Swedish, Syriac, Tamil, Telugu, Urdu, and Welsh, with a few sermons in Moon's and Braille type for the blind. Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... The original Wikisource logo. ... Photo of Spurgeon File links The following pages link to this file: Charles Spurgeon Categories: Public domain images ... Photo of Spurgeon File links The following pages link to this file: Charles Spurgeon Categories: Public domain images ... This article is about defunct magazines bearing the name Vanity Fair. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Arabic redirects here. ... Bangla redirects here. ... This article is about the international language known as Spanish. ... Kongo or Kikongo is the Bantu language spoken by the Bakongo people living in the tropical forests of Democratic Republic of the Congo, Republic of the Congo and Angola. ... Goidelic is one of two major divisions of modern-day Celtic languages (the other being Brythonic). ... Hindi (हिन्दी) is a language spoken mainly in North and Central India. ... Outdated term to refer to native languages in Southern Africa. ... The Karelian language is a variety closely related to Finnish, with which it is not necessarily mutually intelligible. ... Latvian, also called Lettish, is a language spoken by 1. ... Māori (or Maori) is a language spoken by the native peoples of New Zealand and the Cook Islands. ... Serbian (; ) is one of the standard versions of the Shtokavian dialect, used primarily in Serbia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Croatia, and by Serbs in the Serbian diaspora. ... Syriac ( Suryāyā) is an Eastern Aramaic language that was once spoken across much of the Fertile Crescent. ... Tamil ( ; IPA: ) is a Dravidian language spoken predominantly by Tamil people, originating on the Indian subcontinent. ... Telugu redirects here. ... The phrase Zaban-e Urdu-e Mualla written in Urdu Urdu () is an Indo-European language of the Indo-Aryan family that developed under Persian, Turkish, Arabic, Hindi, and Sanskrit influence in South Asia during the Delhi Sultanate and Mughal Empire (1200-1800). ... Welsh redirects here, and this article describes the Welsh language. ... Listen to this article ( info/dl) This audio file was created from a revision dated 2006-09-06, and may not reflect subsequent edits to the article. ...


Spurgeon's library

William Jewell College in Liberty, Missouri purchased Spurgeon's 5,103-volume library collection for £500 ($2500) in 1906. The collection was purchased by Midwestern Baptist Theological Seminary [8]in Kansas City, Missouri in 2006 for $400,000 and is currently undergoing restoration. A special collection of Spurgeon's handwritten sermon notes and galley proofs from 1879–1891 resides at Samford University in Birmingham, Alabama.[9] Spurgeon's College in London also has a small number of notes and proofs. William Jewell College is a private, four-year liberal arts college of 1,274 undergraduate students located in Liberty, Missouri, U.S. It was founded in 1849 by members of the Missouri Baptist Convention and other civic leaders which included Robert James, a Baptist minister and father of the infamous... Liberty is a city in Clay County, Missouri. ... Midwestern Baptist Theological Seminary (MBTS) is one of six official seminaries of the Southern Baptist Convention. ... Birds-Eye View of the Campus Samford University is a private, coeducational, Baptist-affiliated university located in Homewood, Alabama, (a suburb of Birmingham). ... Nickname: Location in Jefferson County in the state of Alabama Coordinates: , Country State Counties Jefferson, Shelby Incorporated December 19, 1871 Government  - Type Mayor - Council  - Mayor Bernard Kincaid (Current) Larry Langford (Mayor-Elect) Area  - City 151. ... Spurgeons College is a theological institute of higher learning located in South Norwood Hill, London. ...


References

  • Austin, Alvyn (2007). China’s Millions: The China Inland Mission and Late Qing Society. Grand Rapids, Michigan: Eerdmans. 
  • The Standard Life of C. H. Spurgeon. GLondon: Passmore and Alabaster. 

Notes

  1. ^ Austin (2007), p.86
  2. ^ Austin (2007), 1-10
  3. ^ An accessible analysis, sympathetic to Spurgeon but no less useful, of the Downgrade Controversy appears at http://www.tecmalta.org/tft351.htm. Also see Dennis M. Swanson, "The Down Grade Controversy and Evangelical Boundaries," at http://www.narnia3.com/articles/ETS%202001.pdf
  4. ^ See, e.g., Jack Sin (2000), "The Judgement Seat of Christ," The Burning Bush 6(2), pp. 302-323, esp. p. 310:The Burning Bush (PDF). Far Eastern Bible College,Singapore (July 2000).
  5. ^ Treasury of David. Retrieved on 2007-10-25.

Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Charles Spurgeon
Religious titles
Preceded by
William Walters
Pastor of the Metropolitan Tabernacle
1854-1892
Succeeded by
Arthur Tappan Pierson
Persondata
NAME Spurgeon, Charles Haddon
ALTERNATIVE NAMES
SHORT DESCRIPTION British Preacher, Author, Pastor, Evangelist
DATE OF BIRTH June 19, 1834
PLACE OF BIRTH Kelvedon, Essex, England
DATE OF DEATH January 31, 1892
PLACE OF DEATH Menton, France
Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... // Eliza Rennie/Mrs Eliza Walker - born probably (17 May 1813 – d. ... Metropolitan Tabernacle in 2004 The Metropolitan Tabernacle is a large Reformed Baptist church in the Elephant and Castle in London. ... Arthur Tappan Pierson (March 6, 1837 – June 3, 1911) was an American pastor and Christian writer. ... is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1834 (MDCCCXXXIV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Not to be confused with Kelvedon Hatch, another village in Essex. ... For other meanings of Essex, see Essex (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1892 (MDCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Menton (Occitan: Menton in classical norm or Mentan in Mistralian norm; Italian: Mentone) is a town and commune in the Alpes-Maritimes département of the Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur région of France. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Charles H. Spurgeon Preacher, Author, Editor, Sword and the Trowel - Christian Biography Resources (1443 words)
Charles Haddon Spurgeon (1834-1892), preacher, came of a family of Dutch origin which sought refuge in England during the persecution of the Duke of Alva.
Charles Haddon, elder son of John Spurgeon, by his wife, the youngest sister of Charles Parker Jarvis of Colchester, was born at Kelvedon, Essex, [England] on 19 June 1834.
Spurgeon's early fame as a preacher was largely due to his extreme youth, to the free play of his humour, and to the fervour of his unconventional appeals to the conscience.
Charles Haddon Spurgeon, Preacher, Editor, Sword and the Trowel - Christian Biography Resources (199 words)
Charles H. Spurgeon (1834-1892) was an English Baptist preacher, author, and editor.
Conversion of C. Spurgeon: The Prince of Preachers.
Travel with CH Spurgeon: In the footsteps of the 'Prince of Preachers' by Clive Anderson.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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