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Encyclopedia > Charles Pinckney (governor)
Charles Pinckney
Charles Pinckney

Charles Pinckney (October 26, 1757October 29, 1824) was an American politician who was a signer of the United States Constitution, Governor of South Carolina, a Senator and a member of the House of Representatives. He was the second cousin of fellow-signer Charles Cotesworth Pinckney. Image File history File links Charles_Pinckney. ... Image File history File links Charles_Pinckney. ... October 26 is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 66 days remaining. ... 1757 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... October 29 is the 302nd day of the year (303rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1824 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... The United States Constitution is the supreme law of the United States of America. ... A list of South Carolina Governors. ... Official language(s) English Capital Charleston(1670-1789) Columbia(1790-present) Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Greenville-Spartanburg-Anderson Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32°430N to 35... Seal of the U.S. Senate The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress, the other being the House of Representatives. ... Seal of the House of Representatives The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress, the other being the Senate. ... Charles Cotesworth (C.C.) Pinckney (February 5, 1746 – August 16, 1825), was an early American statesman and a signer of the U.S. Constitution. ...


Pinckney was born at Charleston, South Carolina. His father, Colonel Charles Pinckney, was a rich lawyer and planter, who on his death in 1782 was to bequeath Snee Farm, a country estate outside the city, to his son Charles. The latter apparently received all his education in the city of his birth, and he started to practice law there in 1779. Nickname: The Holy City, The Palmetto City, Chucktown, The Port City, Charlie O The C-Port City Motto: Aedes Mores Juraque Curat (She cares for her temples, customs, and rights) Location of Charleston in South Carolina. ... Colonel Charles Pinckney (March 7, 1731 (or 1732)- September 22, 1782) was a prominent South Carolina politician and the father of Governor Charles Pinckney. ... English barrister 16th century painting of a civil law notary, by Flemish painter Quentin Massys. ... A plantation is an intentional planting of a crop, on a larger scale, usually for uses other than cereal production or pasture. ... 1782 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1779 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ...


About that time, well after the War for Independence had begun, young Pinckney enlisted in the militia, though his father demonstrated ambivalence about the Revolution. He became a lieutenant, and served at the siege of Savannah (September-October 1779). When Charleston fell to the British the next year, the youth was captured and remained a prisoner until June 1781. Lieutenant is a military, paramilitary, fire service or police officer rank. ... hi The Siege of Savannah was a battle of the American Revolutionary War in 1779. ... 1779 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1781 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...


Pinckney had also begun a political career, serving in the Continental Congress (1777-78 and 1784-87) and in the state legislature (1779-80, 1786-89, and 1792-96). A nationalist, he worked hard in Congress to ensure that the United States would receive navigation rights to the Mississippi and to strengthen congressional power. The Continental Congress is the label given to two successive bodies of representatives of the inhabitants of the Thirteen Colonies in 18th century British North America: The First Continental Congress met from September 5, 1774, to October 26, 1774. ... 1777 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1778 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1784 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1787 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1779 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1780 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... 1786 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1789 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1792 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1796 was a leap year starting on Friday. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ...


Pinckney's role in the Constitutional Convention is controversial. Although one of the youngest delegates, he later claimed to have been the most influential one and contended he had submitted a draft, known as the Pinckney Plan, that was the basis of the final Constitution. Most historians have rejected this assertion. They do, however, recognize that he ranked among the leaders. Pinckney's vanity led him to boast that he was only 24, allowing him to claim distinction as the youngest delegate. He was in fact 30 years old. He attended full time, spoke often and effectively, and contributed immensely to the final draft and to the resolution of problems that arose during the debates. He also worked for ratification in South Carolina (1788). That same year, he married Mary Eleanor Laurens, daughter of a wealthy and politically powerful South Carolina merchant Henry Laurens; she was to bear at least three children. Two of his brothers-in-law were Colonel John Laurens and South Carolina Congressman David Ramsay; another brother-in-law married the daugther of South Carolina Governor John Rutledge. Scene at the Signing of the Constitution of the United States, by Howard Chandler Christy. ... Official language(s) English Capital Charleston(1670-1789) Columbia(1790-present) Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Greenville-Spartanburg-Anderson Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32°430N to 35... 1788 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Henry Laurens Henry Laurens (1724–1792) was an American merchant and rice planter from South Carolina who became a political leader during the Revolutionary War. ... John Laurens (October 28, 1754 - August 27, 1782) was an American soldier and statesman from South Carolina during the Revolutionary War. ... David Ramsay (April 2, 1749 – May 8, 1815) was an American physician and historian from Charleston, South Carolina. ... John Rutledge (September 17, 1739 – July 18, 1800) was Governor of South Carolina, delegate to the Constitutional Convention, signer of the United States Constitution, and served on the U.S. Supreme Court (Chief Justice from August to December 1795). ...


Subsequently, Pinckney's career blossomed. From 1789 to 1792 he held the governorship of South Carolina, and in 1790 chaired the state constitutional convention. During this period, he became associated with the Federalist Party, in which he and his cousin Charles Cotesworth Pinckney were leaders. But, with the passage of time, the former's views began to change. In 1795 he attacked the Federalist backed Jay's Treaty and increasingly began to cast his lot with Carolina back-country Democratic-Republicans against his own eastern aristocracy. In 1796 he became governor once again, and in 1798 his Democratic-Republican supporters helped him win a seat in the U.S. Senate. There, he bitterly opposed his former party, and in the presidential election of 1800 served as Thomas Jefferson's campaign manager in South Carolina. ... 1795 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... John Jay The Jay Treaty of 1795 (also known as Jays Treaty or the Treaty of London), named after U.S. Supreme Court chief justice John Jay, was a treaty between the United States and Great Britain signed on November 19, 1794 that attempted to clear up some of... The Democratic-Republican party was a United States political party, which evolved early in the history of the United States. ... The Ancient Greek term aristocracy meant a system of government with rule by the best. This is the first definition given in most dictionaries. ... 1796 was a leap year starting on Friday. ... 1798 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Seal of the U.S. Senate The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress, the other being the House of Representatives. ... 1800 (MDCCC) was an exceptional common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar, but a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar. ... Thomas Jefferson (April 13, 1743 N.S. – July 4, 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–1809), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ...


The victorious Jefferson appointed Pinckney as Minister to Spain (1801-5), in which capacity he struggled valiantly but unsuccessfully to win cession of the Floridas to the United States and facilitated Spanish acquiescence in the transfer of Louisiana from France to the United States in 1803. The Union Jack, flag of the newly formed United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... 1805 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... 1803 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...


Upon completion of his diplomatic mission, his ideas moving ever closer to democracy, Pinckney headed back to Charleston and to leadership of the state Democratic-Republican Party. He sat in the legislature in 1805-6 and then was again elected as governor (1806-8). In this position, he favored legislative reapportionment, giving better representation to back-country districts, and advocated universal white manhood suffrage. He served again in the legislature from 1810 to 1814 and then temporarily withdrew from politics. In 1818 he won election to the United States House of Representatives, where he fought against the Missouri Compromise. 1805 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1806 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1806 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1808 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1810 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1814 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... 1818 (MDCCCXVIII) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar. ... Seal of the House of Representatives The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress, the other being the Senate. ... The United States in 1820. ...


In 1821, Pinckney's health beginning to fail, he retired for the last time from politics. He died in 1824, just 3 days after his 67th birthday. He was laid to rest at St. Philip's Episcopal Churchyard in Charleston. Pickney's Snee Farm plantation is maintained as Charles Pinckney National Historic Site. The coronation banquet for George IV 1821 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Charles Pinckney National Historic Site preserves a portion of Charles Pinckneys Snee Farm. ...


External links

Preceded by:
Thomas Pinckney
Governor of South Carolina
1789–1792
Succeeded by:
William Moultrie
Preceded by:
Arnoldus Vanderhorst
Governor of South Carolina
1796–1798
Succeeded by:
Edward Rutledge
Preceded by:
John Hunter
United States Senator (Class 2) from South Carolina
1798–1801
Served alongside: Jacob Read, John Ewing Colhoun
Succeeded by:
Thomas Sumter
Preceded by:
David Humphreys
U.S. Ambassador to Spain
1802–1804
Succeeded by:
George W. Erving
Preceded by:
Paul Hamilton
Governor of South Carolina
1806–1808
Succeeded by:
John Drayton
Preceded by:
Henry Middleton
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from South Carolina's 1st congressional district

1819–1821
Succeeded by:
Joel Roberts Poinsett

  Results from FactBites:
 
Charles Pinckney (589 words)
Charles Pinckney, the second cousin of fellow-signer Charles Cotesworth Pinckney[?], was born at Charleston, South Carolina, in 1757.
His father, Colonel Charles Pinckney, was a rich lawyer and planter[?], who on his death in 1782 was to bequeath Snee Farm, a country estate outside the city, to his son Charles.
Pinckney had also begun a political career, serving in the Continental Congress (1777-78 and 1784-87) and in the state legislature (1779-80, 1786-89, and 1792-96).
Charles Pinckney - LoveToKnow 1911 (520 words)
CHARLES PINCKNEY (1757-1824), American statesman, was born on the 26th of October 1757 at Charleston, South Carolina; he was the son of Charles Pinckney (1731-1784), first president of the first South Carolina Provincial Congress (Jan. to June 1775), and a cousin of Charles Cotesworth Pinckney and Thomas Pinckney.
He was elected a delegate to the Congress of the Confederation in 1784, 1785 and 1786, and in 1786 he moved the appointment of a committee "to take into consideration the affairs of the nation," advocating in this connexion an enlargement of the powers of Congress.
His Son, Henry Laurens Pinckney (1794-1863), was a member of the state House of Representatives in 1816-1832, founded in 1819 and edited for fifteen years the Charleston Mercury, the great exponent of state's rights principles, and was a member of the National House of Representatives in 1833-1837.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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