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Encyclopedia > Charles Pepys, 1st Earl of Cottenham
Lord Cottenham wearing ceremonial robes when presiding in the House of Lords as Lord Chancellor.
Lord Cottenham wearing ceremonial robes when presiding in the House of Lords as Lord Chancellor.

Charles Christopher Pepys, 1st Earl of Cottenham (April 29, 1781April 29, 1851), a lawyer, judge, politician, and eventual Lord Chancellor of England, was born in London, England. He was the second son of Sir William W. Pepys, a master in chancery, who was descended from John Pepys, of Cottenham, Cambridgeshire, a great-uncle of Samuel Pepys the diarist. Educated at Harrow and Trinity College, Cambridge, Pepys was called to the bar at Lincolns Inn in 1804. Practising at the chancery bar, his progress was extremely slow, and it was not till twenty-two years after his call that he was made a kings counsel. He sat in Parliament, successively, for Higham Ferrars and Malton, was appointed Solicitor-General in 1834, and in the same year became Master of the Rolls. On the formation of Lord Melbourne's second administration in April 1835, the great seal was for a time in commission, but eventually Pepys, who had been one of the commissioners, was appointed Lord Chancellor (January 1836) with the title of Baron Cottenham. He held office until the defeat of the ministry in 1841. In 1846 he again became Lord Chancellor in Lord John Russell's administration. His health, however, had been gradually failing, and he resigned in 1850. Shortly before his retirement, he was created Viscount Crowhurst and Earl of Cottenham. He lived at Prospect Place, Wimbledon from 1831 to 1851 and died at Pietra Santa, in the duchy of Lucca. Lord Chancellor painting The image appears to be a coloured engraving by H. T. Ryall, after a painting by Charles Robert Leslie. ... Lord Chancellor painting The image appears to be a coloured engraving by H. T. Ryall, after a painting by Charles Robert Leslie. ... April 29 is the 119th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (120th in leap years). ... 1781 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... April 29 is the 119th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (120th in leap years). ... 1851 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... A lawyer is a person licensed by the state to advise clients in legal matters and represent them in courts of law and in other forms of dispute resolution. ... A judge or justice is an official who presides over a court. ... A politician is an individual involved in politics to the extent of holding or running for public office. ... The Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain, or Lord Chancellor and in former times the Chancellor of England and the Lord Chancellor of Scotland, is one of the most senior and important functionaries in the government of the United Kingdom, and its predecessor states. ... Royal motto (French): Dieu et mon droit (Translated: God and my right) Englands location within the British Isles Languages English (de facto) Capital London de facto Largest city London Area – Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population – Total (mid-2004) – Total (2001 Census) – Density Ranked 1st UK 50. ... The Houses of Parliament and the clock tower containing Big Ben Part of the London skyline viewed from the South Bank London is the capital of the United Kingdom and England. ... Royal motto (French): Dieu et mon droit (Translated: God and my right) Englands location within the British Isles Languages English (de facto) Capital London de facto Largest city London Area – Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population – Total (mid-2004) – Total (2001 Census) – Density Ranked 1st UK 50. ... Cottenham is a village in Cambridgeshire. ... Cambridgeshire (abbreviated Cambs) is a county in England, bordering Lincolnshire to the north, Norfolk to the northeast, Suffolk to the east, Essex and Hertfordshire to the south, and Bedfordshire and Northamptonshire to the west. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Harrow School Crest Harrow School is a British public school, located in Harrow on the Hill in North West London. ... Full name The College of the Holy and Undivided Trinity Motto Virtus vera nobilitas Virtue is true Nobility Named after The Holy Trinity Previous names Kings Hall and Michaelhouse (until merged in 1546) Established 1546 Sister College(s) Christ Church Master The Lord Rees of Ludlow Location Trinity Street... Lincolns Inn is one of four Inns of Court in London to which barristers of England and Wales belong and where they are called to the Bar. ... 1804 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Insert non-formatted text hereInsert non-formatted text here:This article is about the legislative institution. ... The Solicitor General or Solicitor-General is a government position in several countries, dealing with legal affairs. ... 1834 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The Master of the Rolls is the third most senior judge of England, the Lord Chancellor of Great Britain traditionally being first and the Lord Chief Justice second. ... Arms of Lord Melbourne The Right Honourable William Lamb, 2nd Viscount Melbourne, PC (15 March 1779–24 November 1848) was a British Whig statesman who served as Home Secretary (1830-1834) and Prime Minister (1834 and 1835-1841), and a mentor of Queen Victoria. ... | Come and take it, slogan of the Texas Revolution 1835 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... The Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain, or Lord Chancellor and in former times the Chancellor of England and the Lord Chancellor of Scotland, is one of the most senior and important functionaries in the government of the United Kingdom, and its predecessor states. ... Charles Darwin 1836 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... take you to calendar). ... 1846 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... John Russell, 1st Earl Russell (August 18, 1792 - May 28, 1878), known as Lord John Russell before 1861, was a Whig politician who served twice as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom in the mid-19th century. ... 1850 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Wimbledon (pronounced ) is a suburb of London, part of the London Borough of Merton and located seven miles (11. ... Lucca (population 90,000) is a city in Tuscany, northern central Italy, near (but not on) the Ligurian Sea. ...


Both as a lawyer and as a judge, Lord Cottenham was remarkable for his mastery of the principles of equity. An indifferent speaker, he nevertheless adorned the bench by the soundness of his law and the excellence of his judgments. As a politician, though, he was somewhat of a failure; his only contribution to the statute-book generally considered important was the Judgments Act of 1838, which amended the law for the relief of insolvent debtors. | Jöns Jakob Berzelius, discoverer of protein 1838 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... In economics a debtor (or a borrower) owes money to a creditor. ...

Preceded by:
Sir John Campbell
Solicitor General
1834
Succeeded by:
Sir Robert Rolfe
Preceded by:
Sir John Leach
Master of the Rolls
1834–1836
Succeeded by:
The Lord Langdale
Preceded by:
In Commission
Lord Chancellor
1836–1841
Succeeded by:
The Lord Lyndhurst
Preceded by:
The Lord Lyndhurst
Lord Chancellor
1846–1850
Succeeded by:
The Lord Truro
Preceded by:
Viscount Milton
Member for Higham Ferrers
1831
Succeeded by:
John Ponsonby
Preceded by:
Lord Cavendish
Member for Malton
1831–1836
Succeeded by:
John Childers
Preceded by:
New Creation
Earl of Cottenham
1850–1851
Succeeded by:
Charles Edward Pepys
Baron Cottenham
1836–1851
Preceded by:
Henry Leslie
Baronet
(of Juniper Hill)
1833–1851
Preceded by:
William Pepys
Baronet
(of London)
1825–1851

  Results from FactBites:
 
Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Charles Pepys, 1st Earl of Cottenham (339 words)
Charles Christopher Pepys, 1st Earl of Cottenham (April 29 1781 - April 29 1851), a lawyer, judge, politician, and eventual Lord Chancellor of England, was born in London, England.
He was the second son of Sir William W. Pepys, a master in chancery, who was descended from John Pepys, of Cottenham, Cambridgeshire, a great-uncle of Samuel Pepys the diarist.
Both as a lawyer and as a judge, Lord Cottenham was remarkable for his mastery of the principles of equity.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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