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Encyclopedia > Charles Laughton
Charles Laughton

photograph by Carl Van Vechten, 1940.
Birth name Charles Laughton
Born July 1, 1899(1899-07-01)
Scarborough, Yorkshire, England
Died December 15, 1962 (aged 63)
Hollywood, California, U.S.

Charles Laughton (1 July 189915 December 1962) was an English stage and film actor. He became an American citizen in 1950. While best known for his historical roles in films, he started his career as a remarkable stage actor. During a time when most "legitimate" stage actors despised the motion picture medium, seeing it only as a source of income, Laughton showed keen and serious interest in the pioneering possibilities of film, and later other media, such as radio, recordings, and TV, proving that quality work could be made available to audiences other than theatre-goers. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 472 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (630 × 800 pixel, file size: 82 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Charles Laughton in 1940 Other version: Image:Charles Laughton01. ... Carl Van Vechten (June 17, 1880 – December 21, 1964) was an American writer and photographer who was a patron of the Harlem Renaissance and the literary executor of Gertrude Stein. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1899 (MDCCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... , Scarborough is a town on the North Sea coast of North Yorkshire, England. ... Look up Yorkshire in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem specific to England — the anthem of the United Kingdom is God Save the Queen. See also Proposed English National Anthems. ... is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Greetings from Hollywood Hollywood is a district of the city of Los Angeles, California, U.S.A., that extends from Vermont Avenue on the east to just beyond Laurel Canyon Boulevard above Sunset and Crescent Heights Boulevards on the west; the north to south boundary east of La Brea Avenue... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... The Academy Award for Best Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role is one of the awards given to actors working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ... The Private Life of Henry VIII is a 1933 film nominated for the Academy Award for Best Picture. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1899 (MDCCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem specific to England — the anthem of the United Kingdom is God Save the Queen. See also Proposed English National Anthems. ... Actors in period costume sharing a joke whilst waiting between takes during location filming. ...

Contents

Early life and career

Charles Laughton circa 1929 photographed by Dorothy Wilding

Laughton was born in Scarborough, Yorkshire, England. His mother was a devout Catholic and he attended the famed Jesuit school, Stonyhurst College, in Lancashire, England.[1] He served during World War I (in which he was gassed).[2] Image File history File links Laughton_about_29_years_of_age. ... Image File history File links Laughton_about_29_years_of_age. ... , Scarborough is a town on the North Sea coast of North Yorkshire, England. ... Look up Yorkshire in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem specific to England — the anthem of the United Kingdom is God Save the Queen. See also Proposed English National Anthems. ... The Society of Jesus (Latin: Societas Iesu), commonly known as the Jesuits, is a Roman Catholic religious order. ... Stonyhurst College is a Roman Catholic English Jesuit independent boarding school near Clitheroe, Lancashire, England. ... Lancashire (archaically, the County of Lancaster) is a county palatine of England, lying on the Irish Sea. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Chemical warfare is warfare (and associated military operations) using the toxic properties of chemical substances to kill, injure or incapacitate an enemy. ...


At first he went into the family business (hotels), while participating in amateur theatricals in Scarborough. Finally allowed by his family to become a drama student at RADA in 1925, he would make his first professional stage appearance in 1926. Despite not having the looks for a romantic lead, he impressed audiences with his talent and played many classical roles before making his Hollywood film debut in 1932. Previously, he had appeared in a few British films. He took small roles in two short silent comedies starring his wife Elsa Lanchester, Daydreams and Blue Bottles (both 1928) and he made a brief appearance as a disgruntled diner in another silent film Piccadilly with Anna May Wong in 1929. He appeared with Elsa Lanchester again in a "film revue" called Comets (1930) and made two other early British talkies: Wolves with Dorothy Gish (1930) and Down River (1931). Rada is the term for council or assembly borrowed by Polish from Middle High German Rat (council) and later passed into Czech, Ukrainian, and Belarusian languages. ... Lanchester in Naughty Marietta Elsa Lanchester (October 28, 1902 - December 26, 1986 in Woodland Hills, California) was an Oscar-nominated English character actress who became a naturalized American citizen in 1950 along with her husband, actor Charles Laughton. ... Piccadilly is a major London street, running from Hyde Park Corner in the west to Piccadilly Circus in the east. ... Anna May Wong (January 3, 1905 – February 2, 1961) was the first notable Chinese American Hollywood actress. ... Comet Hale-Bopp, showing a white dust tail and blue gas tail (February 1997) A comet is a small astronomical object similar to an asteroid but composed largely of ice. ... Dorothy Gish photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1932 Dorothy Gish (March 11, 1898 - June 4, 1968) was an American actress. ...


His first Hollywood film was The Old Dark House (1932) with Boris Karloff but his best-remembered film role of that year was as Nero in Cecil B. DeMille's The Sign of the Cross. That same year, he turned out a number of memorable performances, such as Dr. Moreau in Island of Lost Souls, and the little clerk in the segment of If I Had a Million directed by Ernst Lubitsch. In Hollywood, he also repeated his stage role as a murderer in Payment Deferred and played a demented submarine commander in The Devil and the Deep with Tallulah Bankhead, Gary Cooper and Cary Grant. The Old Dark House is a 1932 horror film directed by James Whale and starring Boris Karloff, produced just one year after their success with Frankenstein. ... Boris Karloff (born William Henry Pratt) (London, November 23, 1887 – February 2, 1969) was an English actor, who immigrated to Canada in the 1910s, best known for his roles in horror films and the creation of Frankensteins monster in 1931s Frankenstein. ... Nero[1] Claudius Caesar Augustus Germanicus (December 15, 37 – June 9, 68)[2], born Lucius Domitius Ahenobarbus, also called Nero Claudius Caesar Drusus Germanicus, was the fifth and last Roman Emperor of the Julio-Claudian dynasty. ... Cecil Blount DeMille (August 12, 1881 – January 21, 1959) was one of the most successful filmmakers during the first half of the 20th century. ... A 1932 film directed by Cecil B. DeMille, starring Claudette Colbert, Fredric March, Charles Laughton, and Elissa Landi. ... Island of Lost Souls was a sci-fi/horror film made by Paramount Pictures in 1932 but released in 1933. ... If I Had A Million (1932), an American movie, is an ensemble piece about what happens to eight otherwise unconnected people when theyre picked out of the phone book by a dying multimillionaire and each endowed with a million dollars. ... Ernst Lubitsch (January 28, 1892 – November 30, 1947), was a German-born Jewish film director. ... Payment Deferred is a crime novel by C.S. Forester, first published in 1926. ... Tallulah Brockman Bankhead (January 31, 1902 - December 12, 1968) was an American actress, talk-show host and bon vivant. ... Gary Cooper (born Frank James Cooper May 7, 1901 – May 13, 1961) was a two-time Academy Award-winning American film actor of English heritage. ... This article is about the British actor. ...


His association with film director Alexander Korda began in 1933 with The Private Life of Henry VIII (loosely based on the life of King Henry VIII of England), for which Laughton won an Academy Award, the first British actor to do so. However, he continued to act in the theatre, and his American production of Galileo by (and with) Bertolt Brecht is legendary. Sir Alexander Korda (September 16, 1893 - January 23, 1956) was a film director and producer, a leading figure in the British film industry and the founder of London Films. ... The Private Life of Henry VIII is a 1933 film nominated for the Academy Award for Best Picture. ... “Henry VIII” redirects here. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... Galileo can refer to: Galileo Galilei, astronomer, philosopher, and physicist (1564 - 1642) the Galileo spacecraft, a NASA space probe that visited Jupiter and its moons the Galileo positioning system Life of Galileo, a play by Bertolt Brecht Galileo (1975) - screen adaptation of the play Life of Galileo by Bertolt Brecht... Brecht redirects here. ...


Later career

from the trailer for Mutiny on the Bounty (1935)

Later films included White Woman (1933) in which he co-starred with Carole Lombard as a cockney river trader in the Malaysian jungle; The Barretts of Wimpole Street (1934) as Norma Shearer's malevolent father; Les Misérables (1935) as Javert, the police inspector; Mutiny on the Bounty (1935) (as Captain Bligh, one of his most famous screen roles, co-starring with Clark Gable as Fletcher Christian); Ruggles of Red Gap (1935) as the very English butler transported to early 1900s America; and the title roles in Rembrandt (1936) and The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1939). In 1937, he was to have starred in an ill-fated film version of the classic novel, I, Claudius, by Robert Graves, which was abandoned only part-way into filming due to the injuries suffered by co-star Merle Oberon in a car crash. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Mutiny on the Bounty, based on the 1932 novel by Charles Nordhoff, is a 1935 film starring Charles Laughton, Clark Gable and Franchot Tone. ... The Barretts of Wimpole Street is a 1934 film detailing the real-life romance between poets Elizabeth Barrett (Norma Shearer) and Robert Browning (Fredric March), despite the opposition of her father, played by Charles Laughton. ... Les Misérables is a 1935 film based upon the famous Victor Hugo novel of the same name. ... Mutiny on the Bounty, based on the 1932 novel by Charles Nordhoff, is a 1935 film starring Charles Laughton, Clark Gable and Franchot Tone. ... William Bligh William Bligh (September 9, 1754 _ December 7, 1817) was an officer of the British Royal Navy with final rank of Vice Admiral, who is best known for the famous mutiny that occurred against his command aboard HMAV Bounty. ... William Clark Gable (February 1, 1901 – November 16, 1960) was an Academy Award-winning American film actor. ... Fletcher Christian Fletcher Christian (September 25, 1764 – October 3, 1793) was a Masters Mate on board the Bounty during William Blighs fateful voyage to Tahiti for breadfruit plants (see Mutiny on the Bounty). ... Ruggles of Red Gap is a 1914 play by Harry Leon Wilson, made into a movie several times, mostly famously in 1935. ... Rembrandt was a 1936 British film about the life of 17th century Dutch painter Rembrandt van Rijn, played by Charles Laughton. ... The Hunchback of Notre Dame is a 1939 American monochrome motion picture. ... I, Claudius was the proposed 1937 film of the book I, Claudius. ... Robert von Ranke Graves (24 July 1895 – 7 December 1985) was an English poet, scholar, and novelist. ... Merle Oberon (February 19, 1911 – November 23, 1979), born Estelle Merle OBrien Thompson, was an Academy Award-nominated Anglo-Indian film actress. ...


After I, Claudius, he and the legendary German film producer Erich Pommer teamed up founding the company Mayflower Pictures in the UK, which produced three films starring Laughton: Vessel of Wrath (1938) , based on a story by W. Somerset Maugham, St. Martin's Lane, a story about London street entertainers, and Jamaica Inn, based on a novel by Daphne du Maurier, and the last film Alfred Hitchcock directed in Britain before moving to Hollywood in the late 1930s. (Note: Hitchcock returned to London to film Frenzy in the early 1970s.) The films produced were not successful enough, and the company was saved from bankruptcy when RKO Pictures offered Laughton the role of Quasimodo in The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1939). Laughton and Pommer had plans to make further films, but the outbreak of World War II, which implied the loss of many foreign markets, meant the end of the company. Erich Pommer (July 20, 1889 – May 8, 1966) was one of the most influential producers of the silent film era, having been one of the most influential creators being the German Expressionism movement as the head of production at Ufa from 1924 to 1926. ... The Vessel of Wrath is a novella, published in 1931 by W. Somerset Maugham. ... W. Somerset Maugham as photographed in 1934 by Carl Van Vechten. ... St. ... Jamaica Inn is a film made by Alfred Hitchcock adapted from Daphne du Mauriers novel of the same name, in 1939, the first of three of du Mauriers works that Hitchcock adapted. ... Dame Daphne du Maurier DBE (13 May 1907–19 April 1989) was a famous British novelist best known for her short story The Birds and her classic novel Rebecca, published in 1938. ... This article or section includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Frenzy (1972) is a crime thriller film directed by Alfred Hitchcock, and is the penultimate feature film of his extensive career. ... Notice of closure stuck on the door of a computer store the day after its parent company, Granville Technology Group Ltd, declared bankruptcy (strictly, put into administration—see text) in the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the film production company. ... For the Rap Artist see Quasimoto. ... The Hunchback of Notre Dame is a 1939 American monochrome motion picture. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


Laughton's film roles in the 1930s consisted almost entirely of the costume and historical drama parts for which he is best remembered (ie: Nero, Henry VIII, Captain Bligh, Rembrandt, Quasimodo, etc). In his modern-dress film roles in his 1940s movies his over-the-top acting style often led to variable results. He played an Italian vineyard owner in California in They Knew What They Wanted (1940); a South Seas patriarch in The Tuttles of Tahiti (1942); an impoverished pianist in Tales of Manhattan (1942); an American admiral in Stand by for Action (1942); a butler in Forever and a Day (1943); a cowardly school-master in occupied France in This Land is Mine (1943); an Australian bar-owner in The Man from Down Under (1943); the title role in an up-dated version of Oscar Wilde's The Canterville Ghost (1944); and a wife-murderer in The Suspect (1944). They Knew What They Wanted is a 1940 film with Carole Lombard, Charles Laughton, William Gargan, Harry Carey, and Karl Malden (in his film debut). ... Tales of Manhattan is a 1942 black-and-white anthology film directed by Julien Duvivier. ... Forever and a Day is the debut album of Idols winner Karin Kortje. ... This Land Is Mine is a 1943 war drama set in Nazi-occupied France and directed by Jean Renoir. ... The Canterville Ghost is a popular novella by Oscar Wilde, widely adapted for the screen and stage. ... The Suspect is a 1944 film noir set in Victorian times. ...


More successful however were the two comedies he made with Deanna Durbin, It Started with Eve (1941) and Because of Him (1946). He also seemed to enjoy himself both as a blood-thirsty pirate in Captain Kidd (1945) and as a malevolent judge in Alfred Hitchcock's The Paradine Case (1948). Laughton was on top form again as a megalomaniac press tycoon in The Big Clock (1948). He had supporting roles as a Nazi in pre-war Paris in Arch of Triumph (1948); as a bishop in The Girl from Manhattan (1948); as a seedy go-between in The Bribe (1949); and a kindly widower in The Blue Veil (1951). (He played a bible-reading pastor in the multi-story A Miracle Can Happen (1947) but his sequence was deleted and replaced with another featuring Dorothy Lamour. In this form the film was re-titled On Our Merry Way). Deanna Durbin (born Edna Mae Durbin on December 4, 1921, in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, to English immigrant parents) was a popular young singer and actress in Hollywood films of the 1930s and 1940s. ... Captain Kidd is a 1945 film, starring Charles Laughton, Randolph Scott, Barbara Britton, and John Carradine, directed by Rowland V. Lee, produced by Benedict Bogeaus and James Nasser, and released by United Artists. ... The Paradine Case was a 1947 courtroom drama movie, directed by Alfred Hitchcock, produced by David O. Selznick. ... The Big Clock is a 1948 film noir thriller set in New York City based on the novel by Kenneth Fearing. ... Arc de Triomphe, Paris A triumphal arch is a structure in the shape of a monumental gate, usually built to celebrate a victory in war. ... The Blue Veil is a 1951 film which tells the story of a child torn between the competing claims of her birth mother versus his adoptive mother. ...


Laughton made his first colour film in Paris as Inspector Maigret in The Man on the Eiffel Tower (1949) and hammed it up enormously alongside Boris Karloff in The Strange Door (1951). He was a tramp in O. Henry's Full House (1952) in which he had a one-minute scene with Marilyn Monroe. He became a pirate again, buffoon-style this time, in Abbott and Costello Meet Captain Kidd (1952); he played Herod Antipas in Salome (1953) and repeated his role as Henry VIII in Young Bess (1953). He returned to England to star in Hobson's Choice (1954) under David Lean's direction. The Strange Door is a 1951 horror film, released by Universal Pictures. ... O. Henrys Full House is a 1952 portmanteau film made by 20th Century Fox, consisting of five separate stories by O. Henry. ... Abbott and Costello Meet Captain Kidd is a 1952 comedy co-starring Charles Laughton. ... Herod Antipas (short for Antipatros) was an ancient leader (tetrarch, meaning ruler of a quarter) of Galilee and Perea. ... Coin of Salome (daughter of Herodias), queen of Chalcis and Armenia Minor. ... Young Bess is a 1953 film about the early career of Queen Elizabeth I of England. ... Hobsons choice is an apparently free choice which is really no choice at all. ... Sir David Lean, KBE (March 25, 1908 – April 16, 1991) was an English film director and producer, best remembered for big-screen epics such as Lawrence of Arabia, The Bridge on the River Kwai, and Doctor Zhivago . ...


Laughton received Academy Award and Golden Globe nominations for his role as Sir Wilfrid Robarts in the screen version of Agatha Christie's play Witness for the Prosecution (1957). He was the first actor to portray Agatha Christie's Belgian detective Hercule Poirot when he starred in Alibi - a stage adaptation of The Murder of Roger Ackroyd - in 1928. Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ... Agatha Mary Clarissa, Lady Mallowan, DBE (15 September 1890 – 12 January 1976), mainly known as Agatha Christie, was an English crime fiction writer. ... Witness for the Prosecution is a 1957 crime film based on a short story (and later play) by Agatha Christie. ... David Suchet as Hercule Poirot in The Dream Hercule Poirot (pronounced in english ) is a fictional Belgian detective created by Agatha Christie. ... The Murder of Roger Ackroyd (published in 1926) is a detective novel by Agatha Christie. ...


He played a British admiral in Under Ten Flags (1960) and worked for the first and only time with his chief acting rival, Laurence Olivier, in Spartacus (1960) as a wily Roman senator. Laurence Kerr Olivier, Baron Olivier, OM (22 May 1907 – 11 July 1989) was an Academy Award, Golden Globe, BAFTA and four-time Emmy winning English actor, director, and producer. ... Spartacus is a 1960 film directed by Stanley Kubrick and based on the novel of the same name by Howard Fast about the historical life of Spartacus and the Third Servile War. ...


His final film was Advise and Consent (1962), for which he received favorable comments for his performance as a southern U.S. Senator (for which accent he studied recordings of the late Mississippi Senator John Stennis). Laughton worked on the film, which was directed by Otto Preminger, while he was dying from bone cancer. Advise and Consent is a 1962 Columbia motion picture based on the novel of the same name by Allen Drury. ... John Cornelius Stennis (August 3, 1901 - April 23, 1995) was a Senator from the state of Mississippi. ... Otto Ludwig Preminger (December 5, 1906 – April 23, 1986) was a film director. ... A sarcoma is a cancer of the bone, cartilage, fat, muscle, blood vessels, or other connective or supportive tissue. ...


The Night of the Hunter

Laughton took a stab at directing a movie, and the result was the legendary The Night of the Hunter (1955), starring Robert Mitchum, Shelley Winters and Lillian Gish. This movie is often cited among today's critics as one of the best movies of the 1950s; unfortunately it was a critical and box-office flop when it was originally released. Laughton never had another chance to direct his own movies. He did not appear in the film, but worked solely as a director. The Night of the Hunter is a 1955 film noir based on the novel by Davis Grubb. ... Robert Charles Durman Mitchum (August 6, 1917 – July 1, 1997) was an American film actor and singer. ... Shelley Winters (August 18, 1920 – January 14, 2006) was a two-time Academy Award-winning American actress. ... Lillian Diana de Guiche (October 14, 1893 – February 27, 1993), was an Oscar-nominated American actress, better known as Lillian Gish. ...


Theatre

Laughton made his London stage debut in Gogol's The Government Inspector (1926). He appeared in many West End plays over the next few years and his earliest successes on the stage were in roles like Hercule Poirot in Alibi and William Marble in Payment Deferred, in which he made his Broadway debut in 1931. He gave up the stage for a film career, but after the success of The Private Life of Henry VIII he appeared at the Old Vic Theatre in 1933 for a season of classic revivals. He appeared in roles like Macbeth, Lopakin in The Cherry Orchard, Prospero in The Tempest and had a major personal success as Angelo in Measure for Measure, but felt his appearance in the title role of Shakespeare's play Henry VIII was a mistake because audiences compared it with his Academy Award-winning film. At the end of 1936, Laughton played Captain Hook and Elsa Lanchester played Peter Pan in J. M. Barrie's play at the London Palladium. The Inspector General or The Government Inspector (in Russian, Ревизор) is a satirical play by 19th century Russian playwright and novelist Nikolai Gogol, published and produced in 1836. ... David Suchet as Hercule Poirot in The Dream Hercule Poirot (pronounced in english ) is a fictional Belgian detective created by Agatha Christie. ... The Lion King at the New Amsterdam Theatre, 2003 Broadway theatre[1] is the most prestigious form of professional theatre in the U.S., as well as the most well known to the general public and most lucrative for the performers, technicians and others involved in putting on the shows. ... The Private Life of Henry VIII is a 1933 film nominated for the Academy Award for Best Picture. ... The Old Vic is a theatre in the Waterloo area of London. ... Macbeth and Banquo meeting the witches on the heath by Théodore Chassériau. ... Bust of Anton Chekhov at Badenweiler, Germany The Cherry Orchard (Вишнëвый сад or Vishniovy sad in Russian) is Russian playwright Anton Chekhovs last play. ... Prospero and Miranda by William Maw Egley Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Prospero Prospero is the protagonist in The Tempest, a play by William Shakespeare. ... For other uses, see The Tempest (disambiguation). ... Angelo seduces Isabella in a Los Angeles production of Measure for Measure. ... Claudio and Isabella (1850) by William Holman Hunt Measure for Measure is a play by William Shakespeare, written in 1603. ... Shakespeare redirects here. ... Dame Ellen Terry as Katherine of Aragon The Famous History of the Life of King Henry the Eighth was one of the last plays written by the English playwright William Shakespeare, based on the life of Henry VIII of England. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ...


Laughton worked closely with Bertolt Brecht on Brecht's play Galileo, which Laughton directed and played the title role at the play's English language premiere in Los Angeles in 1947 and later that year in New York. Brecht redirects here. ... Brecht redirects here. ... Life of Galileo is a play by Bertolt Brecht. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ...


Laughton had one of his most notable successes in the theatre by directing and playing the Devil in Don Juan in Hell beginning in 1950. The piece is actually the third act sequence from George Bernard Shaw's play Man and Superman, frequently cut from productions to reduce its playing time, consisting of a philosophical debate between Don Juan and the Devil with contributions from Doña Ana and the statue of Ana's father. Laughton conceived the piece as a staged reading and cast Charles Boyer, Cedric Hardwicke, and Agnes Moorehead (billed as "The First Drama Quartette") in the other roles. It was Boyer instead of Laughton who won a special Tony Award for the performance, possibly because Laughton was well-known for not caring about awards and never attended awards ceremonies when he was nominated for or won one, including the Oscars. The Devil is the name given to a supernatural entity, who, in most Western religions, is the central embodiment of evil. ... Man and Superman is a 1903 play in four acts by G. Bernard Shaw. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... George Bernard Shaw (26 July 1856–2 November 1950) was an Irish dramatist, literary critic, and socialist. ... Man and Superman is a 1903 play in four acts by G. Bernard Shaw. ... Don Juan with his sword in Don Giovanni, by Mozart Don Juan is a legendary fictional libertine, whose story has been told many times by different authors. ... The Devil is the name given to a supernatural entity, who, in most Western religions, is the central embodiment of evil. ... Charles Boyer (August 28, 1899 – August 26, 1978) was a French-American actor who starred in several classic Hollywood films, TV director and TV producer. ... Sir Cedric Webster Hardwicke (February 19, 1893 - August 6, 1964) was a British actor. ... Agnes Robertson Moorehead (December 6, 1900 – April 30, 1994) was an Oscar-nominated American character actress. ... Charles Boyer (August 28, 1899 – August 26, 1978) was a French-American actor who starred in several classic Hollywood films, TV director and TV producer. ... What is popularly called the Tony Award (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theater, including musical theater, primarily honoring productions on Broadway in New York. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ...


He directed several plays on Broadway. His most notable box-office success as a director came in 1954, with The Caine Mutiny Court-Martial, a full-length stage dramatization by Herman Wouk of the court-martial scene in Wouk's novel The Caine Mutiny. The play, starring Henry Fonda as defense attorney Barney Greenwald, opened the same year as the film starring Humphrey Bogart as Captain Queeg and Jose Ferrer as Greenwald based on the original novel, but did not affect that film's box-office performance. Laughton also directed a staged reading in 1953 of Stephen Vincent Benét's John Brown's Body, a full-length poem about the American Civil War and its aftermath. The production starred Tyrone Power, Raymond Massey (re-creating his film characterizations of Abraham Lincoln and John Brown (abolitionist)), and Judith Anderson. Laughton did not appear himself in either of these productions, but John Brown's Body was recorded complete by Columbia Masterworks. The Lion King at the New Amsterdam Theatre, 2003 Broadway theatre[1] is the most prestigious form of professional theatre in the U.S., as well as the most well known to the general public and most lucrative for the performers, technicians and others involved in putting on the shows. ... The Caine Mutiny Court-Martial is a two-act play by Herman Wouk, which he adapted from his own novel, The Caine Mutiny. ... Herman Wouk (May 27, 1915 —) is a bestselling American author with a number of notable novels to his credit, including The Caine Mutiny, The Winds of War, and War and Remembrance. ... The Caine Mutiny, a 1954 movie directed by Edward Dmytryk, and based on Herman Wouks Pulitzer Prize-winning (1951), best-selling novel and subsequent stage hit (The Caine Mutiny Court Martial), provided Humphrey Bogart with the next-to-last great role of his acting career and a spectacular comeback... Henry Jaynes Fonda (May 16, 1905 – August 12, 1982) was a highly acclaimed Academy Award-winning American film actor, best known for his roles as plain-speaking idealists. ... Humphrey DeForest Bogart (December 25, 1899 – January 14, 1957) was an American actor. ... José Vicente Ferrer de Otero y Cintron, known as José Ferrer (January 8, 1912-January 26, 1992), was an actor and director, born in Santurce, Puerto Rico. ... Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Stephen Vincent Benét (July 22, 1898 – March 13, 1943) was a United States author, poet, short story writer and novelist. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Tyrone Edmund Power, Jr. ... Raymond Massey photographed by Carl Van Vechten Raymond Hart Massey (August 30, 1896 – July 29, 1983) was a Canadian actor. ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... John Brown John Brown (May 9, 1800 – December 2, 1859) was the first white American abolitionist to advocate and practice insurrection as a means to the abolition of slavery. ... Dame Judith Anderson, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1934 Dame Judith Anderson, AC DBE (February 10, 1897–January 3, 1992), born Frances Margaret Anderson-Anderson, was an Tony award and Emmy winning stage and film actress who was also nominated for a Grammy and an Oscar. ... John Browns Body (originally known as John Browns Song) is a famous Union marching song of the American Civil War. ...


Laughton returned to the London stage in 1958 in Jane Arden's The Party which also had Elsa Lanchester and Albert Finney in the cast. He made his final theatre appearances as Nick Bottom in A Midsummer Nights Dream and King Lear at the Shakespeare Memorial Theatre in 1959, although failing health resulted in both performances being disappointing, according to some British critics. The fact that he tried an unorthodox approach to the character of Lear, and was resented by some for having become an American citizen may have also something to do with the lukewarm critical reception, as well, although this is only speculation. His performance as King Lear came in for particular lambasting by critics, with many reviews saying that the portly actor looked more like Old King Cole than Shakespeare's creation, and critic Kenneth Tynan wrote that Laughton's Nick Bottom "...behaves in a manner that has nothing to do with acting, although it perfectly hits off the demeanor of a rapscallion uncle dressed up to entertain the children at a Christmas party". Unfortunately, although a British production of A Midsummer Night's Dream did air on television around this time, it was not the one with Laughton, but rather a 1958 production with Paul Rogers as Bottom. The Party is a 1968 comedy film directed by Blake Edwards and starring Peter Sellers and Claudine Longet. ... Nick Bottom is a character in Shakespeares A Midsummer Nights Dream who provides comic relief throughout the play, and is famously known for getting his head transformed into that of a donkey by the elusive Puck within the play. ... A Midsummer Nights Dream is a romantic comedy by William Shakespeare. ... King Lear and the Fool in the Storm by William Dyce (1806-1864) King Lear is a play by William Shakespeare, considered one of his greatest tragedies, based on the legend of King Lear of Britain. ... The Royal Shakespeare Theatre is a large theatre dedicated to British playwright William Shakespeare in his birthplace of Stratford-upon-Avon. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... King Lear and the Fool in the Storm by William Dyce (1806-1864) King Lear is a play by William Shakespeare, considered one of his greatest tragedies, based on the legend of King Lear of Britain. ... Old King Cole, according to William Wallace Denslow For other uses of King Cole, see King Cole (disambiguation). ... Shakespeare redirects here. ... Kenneth Peacock Tynan (April 2, 1927 - July 26, 1980), was an influential and often controversial British theatre critic and writer. ... Nick Bottom is a character in Shakespeares A Midsummer Nights Dream who provides comic relief throughout the play, and is famously known for getting his head transformed into that of a donkey by the elusive Puck within the play. ... Christmas is an annual holiday that celebrates the birth of Jesus. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Although he did not appear in any later plays, he continued to tour the US with staged readings, including a very successful appearance on the Stanford University campus in 1960.


Recordings

Laughton's voice first appeared on 78 rpm records with the release of five British Regal Zonophone 10 inch discs entitled Voice of the Stars issued annually from 1934 to 1938. These featured short soundtrack snippets from the year's top films. He is heard on all five records in, respectively, The Private Life of Henry VIII, The Barratts of Wimpole Street, Mutiny on the Bounty, I, Claudius (curiously, since this film was unfinished and thus never released), and Vessel of Wrath. In 1937 he recorded Lincoln's Gettysburg Address on a 10 inch Columbia 78, having made such an impression with it in Ruggles of Red Gap. The only known photo of Abraham Lincoln at Gettysburg (seated, center), taken about noon, just after Lincoln arrived and some three hours before he spoke. ...


He made several other spoken word recordings and one of his most famous was his one-man album of Charles Dickens's Mr. Pickwick's Christmas, a twenty-minute version of the Christmas chapter from Dickens's The Pickwick Papers. It was first released by Decca in 1944 as a four record 78 rpm set, but was afterwards transferred to LP. It frequently appeared on LP with a companion piece, Decca's 1941 adaptation of Dickens's A Christmas Carol, starring Ronald Colman as Scrooge. Both stories were released together on a Deutsche Grammophon CD in time for Christmas 2005. In 1943, Laughton recorded a reading of the Nativity story from St. Luke's Gospel, and this was released in 1995 on CD on a Nimbus Records collection entitled Prima Voce: The Spirit of Christmas Past. “Dickens” redirects here. ... Christmas is an annual holiday that celebrates the birth of Jesus. ... The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, better known as The Pickwick Papers, is the first novel by Charles Dickens. ... It has been suggested that Decca Music Group be merged into this article or section. ... For the movie, see 1941 (film). ... A Christmas Carol in Prose, Being a Ghost Story of Christmas (commonly known as A Christmas Carol ) is what Charles Dickens described as his little Christmas Book and was first published on December 19, 1843 with illustrations by John Leech. ... Ronald Colman (February 9, 1891 – May 19, 1958) was an Oscar-winning British actor. ... Logo Deutsche Grammophon is a German record label. ... CD may stand for: Compact Disc Canadian Forces Decoration Cash Dispenser (at least used in Japan) CD LPMud Driver Centrum-Demokraterne (Centre Democrats of Denmark) Certificate of Deposit České Dráhy (Czech Railways) Chad (NATO country code) Chalmers Datorförening (computer club of the Chalmers University of Technology) a 1960s... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Gospel of Luke is a synoptic Gospel, and the third and longest of the four canonical Gospels of the New Testament, which purport to tell the story of Jesus life, death, and resurrection. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... CD may stand for: Compact Disc Canadian Forces Decoration Cash Dispenser (at least used in Japan) CD LPMud Driver Centrum-Demokraterne (Centre Democrats of Denmark) Certificate of Deposit České Dráhy (Czech Railways) Chad (NATO country code) Chalmers Datorförening (computer club of the Chalmers University of Technology) a 1960s... Nimbus Records is a British record company specializing in classical music recordings. ...


A Brunswick/American Decca LP entitled Readings from the Bible featured Laughton reading Garden of Eden, The Fiery Furnace, Noah's Ark, and David and Goliath. It was released in 1958.


In an unusual move regarding a suspense thriller, Laughton was also heard narrating the story on the soundtrack album of the film that he directed, Night of the Hunter, accompanied by the film's score. This album has also been released on CD. A soundtrack album is any album that incorporates music from a particular feature film. ...


Also, and deriving from the movie they made together, a complete radio show (18 June 1945) of 'The Canterville Ghost' was broadcast which featured Laughton and Margaret O'Brien. It has been issued on a Pelican LP.


His wife Elsa Lanchester made three LPs in the 1950s entitled "Songs for a Shuttered Parlour," "Songs for a Smoke-Filled Room," and "Cockney London." Laughton introduced the various numbers with spoken introductions on the first two and wrote the sleeve notes for the third.


However, none of Laughton's other record albums have been made available on CD as yet. There are two especially notable ones still waiting. The first is a complete, two LP, Columbia Masterworks recording of the 1950 Broadway staging of George Bernard Shaw's Don Juan in Hell. Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Lion King at the New Amsterdam Theatre, 2003 Broadway theatre[1] is the most prestigious form of professional theatre in the U.S., as well as the most well known to the general public and most lucrative for the performers, technicians and others involved in putting on the shows. ... George Bernard Shaw (26 July 1856–2 November 1950) was an Irish dramatist, literary critic, and socialist. ... Man and Superman is a 1903 play in four acts by G. Bernard Shaw. ...


The other notable recording unavailable on CD is a two LP Capitol Records album that was released in 1962, the year of Laughton's death, entitled The Story Teller. Taken from the one-man stage shows that Laughton loved to appear in, it culls together dramatic readings from several sources. Three of the excerpts are broadcast annually on a Minnesota Public Radio Thanksgiving program entitled Giving Thanks. The Story Teller won a Grammy in 1962 for Best Spoken Word Recording. Capitol Records is a major United States-based record label, owned by EMI. // The Capitol Records company was founded by the songwriter Johnny Mercer in 1942, with the financial help of movie producer Buddy DeSylva and the business acumen of Glenn Wallichs, (1910-1971) (owner of Music City, at the... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Minnesota Public Radio logo Minnesota Public Radio (MPR) is a regional public radio network based in the U.S. state of Minnesota that has been broadcasting since 1967. ... The First Thanksgiving, painted by Jean Leon Gerome Ferris (1863-1930). ... Grammy Award statuette The Grammy Awards, presented by the Recording Academy (an association of Americans professionally involved in the recorded music industry) for outstanding achievements in the recording industry, is one of four major music awards shows held annually in the United States (the Billboard Music Awards, the American Music... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Grammy Award for Best Spoken Word Album has been awarded since 1959. ...


Private life

He had a long and resilient marriage to actress Elsa Lanchester, although, in her autobiography, Lanchester revealed that Laughton was homosexual. According to her own account, she was shocked to learn about this, but eventually decided to remain married to him. However, she claims as a result of this, she decided not to have children with him. The decision caused him great grief, as he longed to become a father, as many friends of Laughton, among them Maureen O'Hara and Stanley Cortez, have stated. In her autobiographical book, Lanchester tells that one night, after they had been married for two years, the police stopped Laughton at the door of his London flat; they had a young boy in custody who had been loitering outside the house, presumably to get money after Laughton had approached him in Hyde Park. When her husband, in tears, confessed, Miss Lanchester told him not to worry about it, that it didn't matter. That's why he cried . . . when I told him it didn't matter.[3] Lanchester in Naughty Marietta Elsa Lanchester (October 28, 1902 - December 26, 1986 in Woodland Hills, California) was an Oscar-nominated English character actress who became a naturalized American citizen in 1950 along with her husband, actor Charles Laughton. ... Homosexuality refers to sexual interaction and / or romantic attraction between individuals of the same sex. ... Maureen OHara Maureen OHara (born Maureen FitzSimons) on August 17, 1920 is an Irish film actress. ... Stanley Cortez (1908-1997) was a cinemataographer. ...


Elsa Lanchester appeared opposite him in several films, including Rembrandt (1936) and Witness for the Prosecution (1957) for which both received Academy Award nominations. Laughton for Best Actor, and Lanchester for Best Supporting Actress. Neither won. Lanchester in Naughty Marietta Elsa Lanchester (October 28, 1902 - December 26, 1986 in Woodland Hills, California) was an Oscar-nominated English character actress who became a naturalized American citizen in 1950 along with her husband, actor Charles Laughton. ... Rembrandt was a 1936 British film about the life of 17th century Dutch painter Rembrandt van Rijn, played by Charles Laughton. ... Witness for the Prosecution is a 1957 crime film based on a short story (and later play) by Agatha Christie. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ...


In 1950, the couple became American citizens.


Laughton is interred in the Forest Lawn, Hollywood Hills Cemetery in Los Angeles, California. Forest Lawn - Hollywood Hills Cemetery is located at 6300 Forest Lawn Drive in Los Angeles, California, on the south edge of the San Fernando Valley by Burbank (and on the north side of the Santa Monica Mountains from Hollywood). ... Nickname: Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates: , State County Settled 1781 Incorporated April 4, 1850 Government  - Type Mayor-Council  - Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa  - City Attorney Rocky Delgadillo  - Governing body City Council Area  - City  498. ...


Trivia

  • Charles Laughton is caricatured as the prefect (and the villain) in the comic Asterix and the Golden Sickle.[4]
  • Tony Hancock, though now more famous as a comedy actor, often included an impression of Laughton as Captain Bligh in his stage comedy routines in his early career and later in the 1960s.
  • In 1934, after Laughton had achieved fame and an Oscar with The Private Life of Henry VIII, mangled versions of two of his earlier British films were shown in America. In the 'film revue' Comets, he and Elsa Lanchester had performed The Ballad of Frankie and Johnnie in duet. It was extracted and shown as a seven-minute 'talking short' in U.S. movie-houses. Similarly, a cut-down version of Wolves, re-titled Wanted Men, was shown in America on the strength of Laughton's performance therein. It seems doubtful if prints of any of these films have survived.

Asterix and the Golden Sickle is the second volume of the Asterix comic book series, by René Goscinny (stories) and Albert Uderzo (illustrations). ... Biography published in 1978 (1983 paperback reprint shown) Anthony John Hancock, best known as Tony Hancock (May 12, 1924 – June 24, 1968) was a major figure in British television and radio comedy in the 1950s and 1960s. ...

Academy Awards nominations

He won the New York Film Critics Circle Awards for Mutiny on the Bounty and Ruggles of Red Gap. 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... The Academy Award for Best Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role is one of the awards given to actors working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ... The Private Life of Henry VIII is a 1933 film nominated for the Academy Award for Best Picture. ... 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Academy Award for Best Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role is one of the awards given to actors working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ... For other uses, see Mutiny on the Bounty (disambiguation). ... Year 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Academy Award for Best Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role is one of the awards given to actors working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ... Witness for the Prosecution is a 1957 crime film based on a short story (and later play) by Agatha Christie. ... 1st New York Film Critics Circle Awards January 2, 1936 The 1st New York Film Critics Circle Awards, announced on 2 January 1936, honored the best filmmaking of 1935. ... For other uses, see Mutiny on the Bounty (disambiguation). ... Ruggles of Red Gap is a 1914 play by Harry Leon Wilson, made into a movie several times, mostly famously in 1935. ...


References

  1. ^ RonaldBruceMeyer.com "July 1 Almanac." Retrieved August 12, 2007.
  2. ^ Hunts Cyclist: "Charles Laughton wartime page." Retrieved August 12, 2007.
  3. ^ The New York Times: "The Bride of Frakenstein" Retrieved August 12, 2007.
  4. ^ The Complete Guide to Asterix by Peter Kessler. ISBN 0-340-65346-9

The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City by Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr. ...

Bibliography

  • Callow, Simon, Charles Laughton. A Difficult Actor (1987, rev. 1988). Biography and analysis of his film and stage work.
  • Jones, Preston Neal, Heaven and Hell to Play With: The Filming of the Night of the Hunter. Book covering the genesis, making and aftermath of the film, with many interviews with people involved in its making, which offer insights and bring down some false myths.
  • Tell Me a Story (1957) and The Fabulous country (1962). Two literary anthologies selected by Charles Laughton. They contain pieces which were presented by him in his reading tours across America, with written introductions which give some insight about Laughton's thoughts. This selection presents texts from the Bible, Charles Dickens, Thomas Wolfe, Ray Bradbury and James Thurber to name just a few.
  • Lyon, James K., Bertolt Brecht in America (1983). An extensively researched account of the German playwright's sojourn in the USA after fleeing Nazi Germany. The book covers the collaboration, preparatory work and 1947 stagings of Galileo with Charles Laughton.
  • Lanchester, Elsa, Charles Laughton and I (1938) and Elsa Lanchester Herself (1983). In her very personal memoirs Lanchester offers a somewhat unbalanced portrait of her late husband.
  • Singer, Kurt, The Charles Laughton Story (1954).
  • Higham, Charles, Charles Laughton: An Intimate Biography (1976). Introduction by Elsa Lanchester.
  • Brown, William, Charles Laughton: A Pictorial Treasury of his Films (1970).
  • Diverse authors, articles in The Stonyhurst magazine: "Charles Laughton at Stonyhurst, by David Knight (Volume LIV, No. 501, 2005), "Charles Laughton. A Talent in Bloom (1899-1931)", by Gloria Porta (Volume LIV, No. 502, 2006),

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Charles Laughton
Awards
Preceded by
Wallace Beery
for The Champ and
Fredric March
for Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde
Academy Award for Best Actor
1933
for The Private Life of Henry VIII
Succeeded by
Clark Gable
for It Happened One Night
Preceded by

NYFCC Award for Best Actor
1935
for Mutiny on the Bounty
Succeeded by
Walter Huston
for Dodsworth
Persondata
NAME Laughton, Charles
ALTERNATIVE NAMES
SHORT DESCRIPTION English/American stage and film actor
DATE OF BIRTH July 1, 1899
PLACE OF BIRTH Scarborough, Yorkshire, England
DATE OF DEATH December 15, 1962
PLACE OF DEATH Hollywood, California, U.S.

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ... Turner Classic Movies (TCM) is a cable television channel featuring commercial-free classic movies, mostly from the Turner Entertainment and Warner Bros. ... Internet Broadway Database The Internet Broadway Database (IBDb) is an online database of Broadway theatre productions and their personnel. ... Wallace Beery (April 1, 1885 – April 15, 1949) was an American actor, best known for his many cinema appearances. ... The Champ is a 1931 movie that was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Picture. ... Fredric March (August 31, 1897 – April 14, 1975) was a two-time Academy Award-winning American actor. ... Dr. Jekyll and Mr. ... The Academy Award for Best Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role is one of the awards given to actors working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ... The Private Life of Henry VIII is a 1933 film nominated for the Academy Award for Best Picture. ... William Clark Gable (February 1, 1901 – November 16, 1960) was an Academy Award-winning American film actor. ... It Happened One Night is a 1934 romantic comedy directed by Frank Capra, in which a pampered socialite (Claudette Colbert) tries to get out from under her fathers thumb, and falls in love with a roguish reporter (Clark Gable). ... The New York Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actor is one of the awards given by the New York Film Critics Circle to honor the finest achievements in filmmaking. ... Mutiny on the Bounty, based on the 1932 novel by Charles Nordhoff, is a 1935 film starring Charles Laughton, Clark Gable and Franchot Tone. ... Walter Huston (April 6, 1884 – April 7, 1950) was a Canadian-born American actor. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ... The Night of the Hunter is a 1955 film noir based on the novel by Davis Grubb. ... Erich Pommer (July 20, 1889 – May 8, 1966) was one of the most influential producers of the silent film era, having been one of the most influential creators being the German Expressionism movement as the head of production at Ufa from 1924 to 1926. ... Tim Whelan (born November 2, 1893 in Cannelton, Indiana, USA - died August 12, 1957 in Beverly Hills, Los Angeles, California, USA) was an American film director, writer, producer and actor. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1899 (MDCCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... , Scarborough is a town on the North Sea coast of North Yorkshire, England. ... Look up Yorkshire in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem specific to England — the anthem of the United Kingdom is God Save the Queen. See also Proposed English National Anthems. ... is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Greetings from Hollywood Hollywood is a district of the city of Los Angeles, California, U.S.A., that extends from Vermont Avenue on the east to just beyond Laurel Canyon Boulevard above Sunset and Crescent Heights Boulevards on the west; the north to south boundary east of La Brea Avenue... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Charles Laughton - MSN Encarta (173 words)
Charles Laughton (1899-1962), English-born American actor, one of the most popular and versatile character actors of his time.
Laughton made his London stage debut in 1926 in The Government Inspector, by Russian writer Nikolay Gogol.
Laughton married English-born actress Elsa Lanchester in 1929.
Charles: Information from Answers.com (1381 words)
Charles I, Duke of Burgundy, the son of Philip III, Duke of Burgundy and Isabella of Portugal, Duchess of Burgundy
Charles I of Savoy, the Duke of Savoy from 1482 to 1490 and titular king of Cyprus, Jerusalem, and Armenia from 1485 to 1490
Charles Emmanuel I, Duke of Savoy, the Duke of Savoy from 1580 to 1630
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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