FACTOID # 22: South Dakota has the highest employment ratio in America, but the lowest median earnings of full-time male employees.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Charles Krauthammer

Charles Krauthammer (born March 13, 1950 in New York City[1][2]), is a Pulitzer Prize-winning syndicated columnist and commentator. Krauthammer appears regularly as a guest commentator on Fox News. His print work appears in the The Washington Post, Time Magazine, and The Weekly Standard. is the 72nd day of the year (73rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... An Op-Ed is a piece of writing expressing an opinion. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Fox News Channels slogan is We Report, You Decide The Fox News Channel is a U.S. cable and satellite news channel. ... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C.. It is also one of the citys oldest papers, having been founded in 1877. ... (Clockwise from upper left) Time magazine covers from May 7, 1945; July 25, 1969; December 31, 1999; September 14, 2001; and April 21, 2003. ... The Weekly Standard is an American neoconservative [1] magazine published 48 times per year. ...

Contents

Career

Krauthammer was born to Jewish parents of French citizenship.[3] He was raised in Montreal, Canada where he attended McGill University and obtained an honors degree in political science and economics in 1970. From 1970 to 1971, he was a Commonwealth Scholar in politics at Balliol College, Oxford. He later moved to the United States, where he attended Harvard Medical School In his freshman year there in 1972, Krauthammer was paralyzed in a serious diving accident. Continuing medical training during his rehabilitation, he earned an M.D. from Harvard Medical School in 1975, and then began working as a psychiatrist at Massachusetts General Hospital. The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination... Nickname: Motto: Concordia Salus (well-being through harmony) Coordinates: , Country Province Region Montréal Founded 1642 Established 1832 Government  - Mayor Gérald Tremblay Area [1][2][3]  - Total 365. ... McGill University. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Political Science is the field concerning the theory and practice of politics and the description and analysis of political systems and political behaviour. ... Face-to-face trading interactions on the New York Stock Exchange trading floor. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... and of the Balliol College College name Balliol College Named after John de Balliol Established 1263 Sister college St Johns College, Cambridge Master Andrew Graham JCR President Helen Lochead Undergraduates 403 MCR President Chelsea Payne Graduates 228 Location of Balliol College within central Oxford , Homepage Boatclub Balliol College (pronounced... Harvard Medical School (HMS) is one of the graduate schools of Harvard University. ... Paralysis is the complete loss of muscle function for one or more muscle groups. ... For other uses, see Psychiatrist (disambiguation). ... Massachusetts General Hospital (often abbreviated to Mass General or just MGH) is a teaching hospital of Harvard Medical School and biomedical research facility in Boston, Massachusetts. ...


From 1975-1978, Krauthammer was a Resident and then a Chief Resident in Psychiatry at the Massachusetts General Hospital. During this time he and a colleague identified a form of mania (a part of bipolar disorder) which they named "secondary mania"[4] and published a second important paper.[5] The standard textbook for bipolar disease (“Manic Depressive Illness” by Goodwin and Jamison) contains nine citations of his work. Massachusetts General Hospital (often abbreviated to Mass General or just MGH) is a teaching hospital of Harvard Medical School and biomedical research facility in Boston, Massachusetts. ... This article is an expansion of a section entitled Mania from within the main article Bipolar disorder. ... For other uses, see Bipolar. ...


In 1978, Krauthammer quit medical practice to direct planning in psychiatric research for the Jimmy Carter administration, and began contributing to The New Republic magazine. During the presidential campaign of 1980, Krauthammer served as a speech writer to Vice President Walter Mondale. For other persons named Jimmy Carter, see Jimmy Carter (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see New Republic. ... A vice president is an officer in government or business who is next in rank below a president. ... Walter Frederick Fritz Mondale (born January 5, 1928) is an American politician and member of the Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party (largely established by former Vice President Hubert Humphrey). ...


In 1981, following the defeat of the Carter/Mondale ticket, Krauthammer began his journalistic career, joining The New Republic as a writer and editor. His New Republic writings won the 1984 "National Magazine Award for Essays and Criticism." In 1983, he began writing essays for Time magazine. In 1985, he began a weekly column for the Washington Post for which he won the 1987 Pulitzer Prize for commentary. For other uses, see New Republic. ... (Clockwise from upper left) Time magazine covers from May 7, 1945; July 25, 1969; December 31, 1999; September 14, 2001; and April 21, 2003. ... ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ...


In 2006, the Financial Times named Krauthammer the most influential commentator in America,[6] saying “Krauthammer has influenced US foreign policy for more than two decades. He coined and developed `The Reagan Doctrine’ in 1985 and he defined the US role as sole superpower in his essay, `The Unipolar Moment’, published shortly after the fall of the Berlin Wall. Krauthammer’s 2004 speech `Democratic Realism’ set out a framework for tackling the post 9/11 world, focusing on the promotion of democracy in the Middle East.” The Financial Times (FT) is a British international business newspaper. ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ...


On the other hand, left-wing commentators have been quite hostile to Krauthammer. For example, in a 2006 column in The American Prospect criticizing The New Republic and other proponents of democratization in Arab countries, Matthew Yglesias wrote that "Krauthammer is very possibly the worst journalist working in America today, a relentlessly pernicious force, never right about anything, who feels his commentary should not be shackled by the small-minded bonds of accuracy or logic."[7] A columnist is a journalist who produces a specific form of writing for publication called a column. Columns appear in newspapers, magazines and the Internet. ... The American Prospect is a monthly magazine which focuses on US politics and public policy. ... For other uses, see New Republic. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ...


Opinions

Ideology

Krauthammer is generally considered a conservative or neoconservative. However, he is a supporter of legalized abortion[8][9][10], an opponent of the death penalty[11][12][13][14], an intelligent design critic and an advocate for the scientific consensus on evolution, calling the creation-evolution controversy a "false conflict" [15][16], a supporter of embryonic stem cell research (involving embryos discarded by fertility clinics)[17][18][19], a longtime advocate of radically higher energy taxes to induce conservation[20][21][22][23], and, in a written work of over a million words, has never once quoted Leo Strauss. The late Meg Greenfield, editorial page editor for The Washington Post who edited Krauthammer's columns for 15 years, called his weekly column "independent and hard to peg politically. It's a very tough column. There's no 'trendy' in it. You never know what is going to happen next."[24] American conservatism is a constellation of political ideologies within the United States under the blanket heading of conservative. ... Neoconservatism describes several distinct political ideologies which are considered new forms of conservatism. ... Abortion in the United States is a highly-charged issue with significant political and ethical debate. ... Capital punishment in the United States is officially sanctioned by 37 of the 50 states of the United States, as well as by the federal government and the military. ... For other uses, see Intelligent design (disambiguation). ... Scientific consensus is the collective judgment, position, and opinion of the community of scientists in a particular field of science at a particular time. ... This article is about evolution in biology. ... The creation-evolution controversy (also termed the creation vs. ... Mouse embryonic stem cells. ... Taxation in the United States is a complex system which may involve payment to at least four different levels of government. ... For the physical concepts, see conservation of energy and energy efficiency. ... Leo Strauss (September 20, 1899 – October 18, 1973), was a German-born Jewish-American political philosopher who specialized in the study of classical political philosophy. ... Meg Greenfield (December 27, 1930 - May 13, 1999) was a Washington Post and Newsweek editorial writer and a Washington insider known for her wit and for being reclusive. ... Look up editorial, op-ed in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Wiktionary has a definition of: Trend Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: Trend The word trend has a number of possible meanings: In statistics, a trend is a long-term movement in time series data after other components have been accounted for. ...


Foreign Policy and Interventionism

Cold War:


Krauthammer first gained attention in the mid-1980s when he first used the phrase Reagan Doctrine in his Time magazine column.[25] The phrase was a reference to the new American foreign policy of supporting anti-communist insurgencies around the globe (most notably Nicaragua, Angola, and Afghanistan) as a response to the Brezhnev Doctrine and reflected a new U.S. foreign policy that went beyond containment of the Soviet Union to rollback of these recent Soviet acquisitions in the Third World. The policy, which was strongly supported by Heritage Foundation foreign policy analysts and other conservatives, was ultimately embraced by Reagan's senior national security and foreign policy officials. Krauthammer's description of it as the "Reagan Doctrine" has since endured. The Reagan Doctrine was a strategy orchestrated and implemented by the United States to oppose the global influence of the Soviet Union during the final years of the Cold War. ... The Brezhnev Doctrine was a Soviet policy doctrine, introduced by Leonid Brezhnev in a speech at the Fifth Congress of the Polish United Workers Party on November 13, 1968, which stated: When forces that are hostile to socialism try to turn the development of some socialist country towards capitalism, it... This article is about foreign policy. ... Rollback was a term used by American foreign policy thinkers during the Cold War. ... For the Jamaican reggae band, see Third World (band). ... The Heritage Foundation is one of the most prominent conservative think tanks in the United States. ...


In “The Poverty of Realism” (New Republic, February 17, 1986), he developed the underlying theory “that the end of American foreign policy is not just the security of the United States, but what John Kennedy called ‘the success of liberty.’ That means, first, defending the community of democratic nations (the repository of the liberal idea), and second, encouraging the establishment of new liberal polities at the frontier, most especially in the Third World.” The foreign policy, he argued, should be both “universal in aspiration,” and “prudent in application,” thus combining American idealism and realism. Over the next 20 years these ideas developed into what is now called "Democratic Realism.” There have been several John Kennedys: John F. Kennedy, American president John F. Kennedy, Jr. ...


Post-Cold War:


In the lead article in Foreign Affairs, titled “The Unipolar Moment”[26] Krauthammer coined the term “unipolarity” to describe the world structure that was emerging with the fall of the Soviet Union. Conventional wisdom of the late 1980s was that the bipolar world of the Cold War would give way to a multipolar world in which the U.S. was one of many centers of power, co-equal to the European Union, Japan, China, and others. Krauthammer predicted that instead a unipolar world would emerge dominated by the United States with a power gap between the number one and number two power that would exceed any other in history. He also suggested that American hegemony would inevitably exist for only a historical "moment,” lasting at best for three or four decades.


Hegemony gave the United States the capacity and responsibility to act unilaterally if necessary, Krauthammer argued. Throughout the 90s, however, he was circumspect about how that power ought to be used. He split from his neoconservative colleagues who were arguing for an interventionist policy of “American greatness.” Krauthammer wrote that in the absence of a global existential threat the United States should stay out of "teacup wars” in failed states, and instead adopt a “dry powder” foreign policy of nonintervention and readiness.[27]


Krauthammer opposed purely “humanitarian intervention" (with the exception of overt genocide). While he supported the 1991 Gulf War on the grounds of both humanitarianism and strategic necessity (preventing Saddam Hussein from gaining control of the Persian Gulf and its resources), he opposed American intervention in the Balkan wars on the grounds that America should not be committing the lives of its soldiers to purely humanitarian missions in which there is no American national interest at stake.[28] Saddam Hussein Abd al-Majid al-Tikriti (28 April 1937 – 30 December 2006) was the fifth President of Iraq and Chairman of the Iraqi Revolutionary Command Council from 1979 until his overthrow by US forces in 2003. ... Map of the Persian Gulf. ...


9/11, Iraq and the War on Terror:


He laid out the underlying principle of strategic necessity restraining democratic idealism in his controversial 2004 Kristol Award Lecture: “We will support democracy everywhere, but we will commit blood and treasure only in places where there is a strategic necessity—meaning, places central to the larger war against the existential enemy, the enemy that poses a global mortal threat to freedom.”[29]


The 9/11 attacks, Krauthammer wrote, made clear the new existential threat and the necessity for a new interventionism. On September 12, 2001 he wrote that, if the suspicion that al Qaeda was behind the attack proved correct, the United States had no choice but to go in to war in Afghanistan.[30] He supported the Iraq war on the “realist" grounds of the strategic threat to Saddam regime posed to the region as UN sanctions were eroding and of his weapons of mass destruction; and on the "idealist" grounds that a self-sustaining democracy in Iraq would be a first step towards changing the poisonous political culture of tyranny, intolerance and religious fanaticism in the Arab world that had incubated the anti-American extremism from which 9/11 emerged.


In October 2002, he presented what he believed were the primary arguments for and against the war, writing, “Hawks favor war on the grounds that Saddam Hussein is reckless, tyrannical and instinctively aggressive, and that if he comes into possession of nuclear weapons in addition to the weapons of mass destruction he already has, he is likely to use them or share them with terrorists. The threat of mass death on a scale never before seen residing in the hands of an unstable madman is intolerable -- and must be preempted." Saddam Hussein Abd al-Majid al-Tikriti (28 April 1937 – 30 December 2006) was the fifth President of Iraq and Chairman of the Iraqi Revolutionary Command Council from 1979 until his overthrow by US forces in 2003. ... The mushroom cloud of the atomic bombing of Nagasaki, Japan, 1945, rose some 18 km (11 mi) above the epicenter. ... For the Xzibit album, see Weapons of Mass Destruction (album). ... Terrorism refers to the use of violence for the purpose of achieving a political, religious, or ideological goal. ... Preemptive war (or preemptive attack) is waged in an attempt to repel or defeat a perceived imminent offensive or invasion, or to gain a strategic advantage in an impending (allegedly unavoidable) war. ...


“Doves oppose war on the grounds that the risks exceed the gains. War with Iraq could be very costly, possibly degenerating into urban warfare". Urban warfare is a modern warfare conducted in urban areas such as towns and cities. ...


“I happen to believe that the preemption school is correct, that the risks of allowing Saddam Hussein to acquire his weapons will only grow with time. Nonetheless, I can both understand and respect those few Democrats who make the principled argument against war with Iraq on the grounds of deterrence, believing that safety lies in reliance on a proven (if perilous) balance of terror rather than the risky innovation of forcible disarmament by preemption."[31] Preemptive war (or preemptive attack) is waged in an attempt to repel or defeat a perceived imminent offensive or invasion, or to gain a strategic advantage in an impending (allegedly unavoidable) war. ... Saddam Hussein Abd al-Majid al-Tikriti (28 April 1937 – 30 December 2006) was the fifth President of Iraq and Chairman of the Iraqi Revolutionary Command Council from 1979 until his overthrow by US forces in 2003. ... Deterrence ALOHA!! is a means of controlling a persons behavior through negative motivational influences, namely fear of punishment. ...


On the eve of the invasion, Krauthammer wrote that “reformation and reconstruction of an alien culture are a daunting task. Risky and, yes, arrogant.”[32] In February 2004, Krauthammer cautioned that "it may yet fail. But we cannot afford not to try. There is not a single, remotely plausible, alternative strategy for attacking the monster behind 9/11. It’s not Osama bin Laden; it is the cauldron of political oppression, religious intolerance, and social ruin in the Arab-Islamic world--oppression transmuted and deflected by regimes with no legitimacy into virulent, murderous anti-Americanism.”[33] Krauthammer in 2003 noted that the reconstruction of Iraq would provide many benefits for the Iraqi people, once the political and economic infrastructure destroyed by Saddam was restored: "With its oil, its urbanized middle class, its educated population, its essential modernity, Iraq has a future. In two decades Saddam Hussein reduced its GDP by 75 percent. Once its political and industrial infrastructures are reestablished, Iraq's potential for rebound, indeed for explosive growth, is unlimited."[34] See also: 2003, Iraq, Iraq disarmament crisis, Invasion of Iraq, Occupation of Iraq Events January January 30 - Facing worldwide criticism and against the wishes of the majorities of their own electorates, leaders of Britain, Spain, Italy, Hungary, Poland, Denmark, and the Czech Republic release a statement, the letter of the... A Rendering of the Sindbad Hotel Complex and Conference Center. ...


In a speech to the Foreign Policy Association in Philadelphia, he noted how the democratic tide in the Arab world had turned in early 2006 with a fierce counterattack by radical Islamist forces in Lebanon, Palestine and especially Iraq, where the Samarra bombing had led to a major intensification of sectarian warfare.[35] He continues to argue that despite the unexpected initial successes in Afghanistan and Iraq and the subsequent deterioration on both fronts, most particularly Iraq, the entire region is now in play and the outcome will depend on America’s ability to tolerate this long war. The Foreign Policy Association (FPA) is a non-profit organization dedicated to inspiring the American public to learn more about the world. ... For other uses, see Philadelphia (disambiguation) and Philly. ...


President's Council on Bioethics

Appointed to President George W. Bush's President's Council on Bioethics in 2002, Krauthammer has opposed human experimentation, human cloning and euthanasia[36] but supports relaxing the Bush administration's limits on federal funding of human embryonic stem cell research.[37] George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... A controversial entity, created by George W. Bush, whose purpose is to regulate (or, at least, tell the president how he ought to regulate) biotechnology and biomedical research. ... Human experimentation involves medical experiments performed on human beings. ... For other uses, see clone. ... For mercy killings not performed on humans, see Animal euthanasia. ... Mouse embryonic stem cells. ...


Krauthammer may have a unique perspective on stem cell research, being a paraplegic himself. A fellow member of the Council, Janet D. Rowley, insists that Krauthammer's vision is still an issue far in the future and not a topic to be discussed at the present time,[38] yet many council members tend to agree with Krauthammer. Paraplegia is a condition where the lower half of a patients body is paralyzed and cannot move. ... Janet Davison Rowley (born 1925) is an American human geneticist and the first scientist to identify a chromosomal translocation as the cause of leukemia and other cancers. ...


Religion

Krauthammer is a critic of intelligent design, and wrote several articles in 2005 likening it to "tarted-up creationism."[39] For other uses, see Intelligent design (disambiguation). ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Creationism is a religious belief that humanity, life, the Earth, and the universe were created in their original form by a deity or deities (often the Abrahamic God of Judaism, Christianity and Islam), whose existence is presupposed. ...


He has received a number of awards for his commentary related to religion, including the People for the American Way’s First Amendment Award for his New Republic essay “America's Holy Wars”.[40] in 1985, and the Guardian of Zion Award of Bar-Ilan University in 2002.[41] People For the American Way (PFAW) is a liberal, self described progressive advocacy organization in the United States. ... For other uses, see New Republic. ... This article is about the year. ... The Guardian of Zion Award is an annual award given to Jews who have been supportive to the State of Israel. ... Bar-Ilan University (BIU, אוניברסיטת בר-אילן) is a university in Ramat Gan, Israel. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ...


Miers nomination

Krauthammer criticized President George W. Bush's nomination of Harriet Miers to succeed Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor. He called the nomination of Miers a “mistake” on several occasions. He noted her lack of constitutional experience as the main obstacle to her nomination. George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... Harriet Ellan Miers (born August 10, 1945 in Dallas, Texas) is an American lawyer, and former White House Counsel. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the... Sandra Day OConnor (born March 26, 1930) is an American jurist who served as the first female Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States from 1981 to 2006. ...


On October 21, 2005, Charles Krauthammer published "Miers: The Only Exit Strategy,"[42] in which he explained that all of Miers' relevant constitutional writings are protected by both attorney/client privilege and executive privilege. The only face-saving solution to the “mistake” would be if “Miers withdraws out of respect for both the Senate and the executive's prerogatives”. On October 27, 2005, Miers indeed withdrew her candidacy for the Supreme Court. is the 294th day of the year (295th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Attorney/client privilege is a legal concept that protects communications between an attorney and their client(s) and keeps those communications confidential. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... is the 300th day of the year (301st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Israel

Krauthammer strongly opposed the Oslo accords, predicting that Palestinian Liberation Organization leader Yasir Arafat would use the foothold it gave him in the West Bank and Gaza to continue the war against Israel that he had ostensibly renounced. These predictions were vindicated by the launching of the second intifada in 2000. In a July 2006 essay in Time, Krauthammer asserted that the Israeli-Palestinian conflict was fundamentally defined by the Palestinians' unwillingness to accept compromise.[43] Yitzhak Rabin, Bill Clinton, and Yasser Arafat during the Oslo Accords on September 13, 1993. ... The Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) (Arabic Munazzamat al-Tahrir Filastiniyyah منظمة تحرير فلسطينية ) is a political and paramilitary organization of Palestinian Arabs dedicated to the establishment of an independent Palestinian state to consist of the... Yasser Arafat Yasser Arafat (August 4 or August 24, 1929 – November 11, 2004), born Muhammad `Abd ar-Rauf al-Qudwa al-Husayni (Arabic محمد عبد الرؤوف القدوة الحسي&#1606... Not to be confused with the Spanish name Garza or the Egyptian town of Giza. ... Israel-Palestine Liberation Organization letters of recognition (or Israel-PLO Recognition or Letters of Mutual Recognition) were a series of official letters of recognition between the government of Israel and its Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin and the Palestine Liberation Organizations Chairman Yasser Arafat dated September 9, 1993. ... Early elections in November are announced in the Netherlands. ... (Clockwise from upper left) Time magazine covers from May 7, 1945; July 25, 1969; December 31, 1999; September 14, 2001; and April 21, 2003. ... Israel, with the West Bank, Gaza Strip and Golan Heights The Israeli-Palestinian conflict is an ongoing dispute between the State of Israel and Arab Palestinians. ...


During the Israel-Lebanon war in 2006, Krauthammer wrote a column, "Let Israel Win the War," saying: "What other country, when attacked in an unprovoked aggression across a recognized international frontier, is then put on a countdown clock by the world, given a limited time window in which to fight back, regardless of whether it has restored its own security?"[44] He later criticised Prime Minister Ehud Olmert's conduct, arguing that he "has provided unsteady and uncertain leadership. Foolishly relying on air power alone, he denied his generals the ground offensive they wanted, only to reverse himself later."[45] Combatants Hezbollah Amal[1] LCP[2] PFLP-GC[3]  Israel Commanders Hassan Nasrallah Dan Halutz Moshe Kaplinsky[10] Udi Adam Strength 600-1,000 active fighters 3,000-10,000 reservists[4] Up to 10,000 ground troops. ... Ehud Olmert (IPA ; Hebrew:אהוד אולמרט; born September 30, 1945) is the 12th and current Prime Minister of Israel. ...


Krauthammer supports a two-state solution to the conflict. Contrary to many conservatives, he supported Israel's Gaza withdrawal as a step towards rationalizing the frontiers between Israel and the future Palestinian state. He believes the importance of a security barrier between the two states' final borders will be an important element of any lasting peace.[46] The two-state solution is the name for a class of proposed resolutions of the long-running Arab-Israeli conflict now explicitly backed by the Israeli and United States governments. ... A map illustrating the four phases of the Gaza disengagement plan. ... It has been suggested that State of Palestine be merged into this article or section. ...


Torture

In a December 5, 2005 in the Weekly Standard,[47] Krauthammer argues that any ban of torture must entail at least two exceptions. He claims that in both the situation of imminent danger (“ticking time bomb scenario”) or if it is believed that torture can procure life-saving information in the case of a high-level terrorist deeply involved in the planning of future attacks. is the 339th day of the year (340th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Weekly Standard is an American Conservative political magazine published 48 times per year. ... The ticking time bomb scenario is a thought experiment that has been used in the ethics debate over whether torture can ever be justified. ...


This column appeared amidst the controversy surrounding Senator John McCain's proposed ban on torture in an Amendment on the U.S. Army Field Manuals and Cruel, Inhumane, Degrading Treatment. (Many pundits wrote on this issue; Andrew Sullivan's article in the New Republic was seen as a counter to Krauthammer's Weekly Standard piece.[48] Other responses include Michael Kinsley in Slate Magazine[49] and the Wall Street Journal editorial.[50]) For McCains grandfather and father, see John S. McCain, Sr. ... U.S. Army Field Manuals are published by the United States Armys Army Publishing Directorate. ...


Neoconservatism

In a high profile piece in Commentary, Krauthammer wrote that "above all," neoconservativism "is the maturation of a governing ideology whose time has come." The original "fathers of neoconservatism" were “former liberals or leftists”. More recently, they have been joined by "realists, newly mugged by reality," such as Condoleezza Rice, Richard Cheney and George W. Bush, who "have given weight to neoconservatism, making it more diverse and, given the newcomers’ past experience, more mature." The "Bush Doctrine," according to Krauthammer, is essentially "a synonym for neoconservative foreign policy."[51] // Commentary, a monthly magazine founded by the American Jewish Committee in 1945, bills itself as Americas premier monthly magazine of opinion. ... Neoconservatism describes several distinct political ideologies which are considered new forms of conservatism. ... Condoleezza Rice (born November 14, 1954) is the 66th United States Secretary of State, and the second in the administration of President George W. Bush to hold the office. ... Richard Bruce Cheney (born January 30, 1941), widely known as Dick Cheney, is an American politician and businessman affiliated with the U.S. Republican Party. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... President Bush makes remarks in 2006 during a press conference in the Rose Garden about Irans nuclear ambitions and discusses North Koreas nuclear test. ...


Francis Fukuyama's 2006 book America at the Crossroads: Democracy, Power, and the Neoconservative Legacy (ISBN 0-300-11399-4) criticizes Krauthammer, mentioning a February 2004 speech about the Iraq war which led Fukuyama to "resign from the neoconservative movement."[52] Krauthammer responded that "Fukuyama's claim that I attributed 'virtually unqualified success' to the war is a fabrication. [...] Far from calling it an unqualified success, virtual or otherwise, I said quite bluntly that 'it may be a bridge too far'."[53] Francis Fukuyama Yoshihiro Francis Fukuyama (born October 27, 1952, Chicago, Illinois) is an American philosopher, political economist and author. ...


References

  1. ^ Washington Post Writers Group Biography, http://www.postwritersgroup.com/krauthammer.htm
  2. ^ Interview with Brian Lamb on C-SPAN, May 1, 2005, http://www.q-and-a.org/Transcript/?ProgramID=1021
  3. ^ Krauthammer, Charles. "Not for Moi, Thanks", Jewish World Review, November 29, 1999. Retrieved on 2007-02-05. 
  4. ^ C. Krauthammer and G. L. Klerman. "Secondary mania: manic syndromes associated with antecedent physical illness or drugs", Archives of General Psychiatry 1978; 35:1333-1339.
  5. ^ C. Krauthammer and G. L. Klerman. "The Epidemiology of Mania". In Manic Illness, edited by B. Shopsin, Raven Press, New York, 1979.
  6. ^ Barber, Lionel. "Views of the world Who is the most influential commentator in China? Or the most powerful voice in Iran? Or Britain? FT foreign correspondents gave us their picks, and came up with a revealing list that says as much about the world's political elites as the media that analyse them.", Financial Times, May 20, 2006
  7. ^ Arab Winter by Matthew Yglesias, The American Prospect, 21 November 2006
  8. ^ "Giuliani's Abortion 'Gaffe'" by Charles Krauthammer, Washington Post May 11, 2007 http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/05/10/AR2007051001806.html
  9. ^ "Roe v. Roberts" by Charles Krauthammer, Washington Post, September 16, 2005 http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2005/09/15/AR2005091502141.html
  10. ^ "Federalism's New Friends" by Charles Krauthammer, Washington Post, November 8, 1999 http://www.jewishworldreview.com/cols/krauthammer110899.asp
  11. ^ "Silent Executions," by Charles Krauthammer, Washington Post,June 14, 1985
  12. ^ “The Court is Just Doing its Job” by Charles Krauthamemr, Washington Post, June 30, 1989
  13. ^ “Without the Noose, Without the Gag” by Charles Krauthammer, Washington Post, April 24, 1992
  14. ^ “Sparing Moussaoui for the wrong reasons” by Charles Krauthammer Washington Post, May 12, 2006 http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/05/11/AR2006051101949.html
  15. ^ "Phony Theory, False Conflict” by Charles Krauthammer, Washington Post, November 18, 2005 http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2005/11/17/AR2005111701304.html
  16. ^ “Let's Have No More Monkey Trials” by Charles Krauthammer Time, Aug. 01, 2005 http://www.time.com/time/columnist/krauthammer/article/0,9565,1088869,00.html
  17. ^ “Stem Cell Miracle?” by Charles Krauthammer Washington Post, January 12, 2007 http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/01/11/AR2007011101571.html
  18. ^ “Cell Lines, Moral Lines” by Charles Krauthammer Washington Post, August 5, 2005 http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2005/08/04/AR2005080401825.html
  19. ^ “Research Cloning? No.” by Charles Krauthammer, Washington Post, May 10, 2002 http://www.washingtonpost.com/ac2/wp-dyn?pagename=article&node=&contentId=A63060-2002May9
  20. ^ “The Oil-Bust Panic” by Charles Krauthammer, The New Republic, Feb 21, 1983
  21. ^ “Pump Some Seriousness Into Energy Policy” by Charles Krauthammer Washington Post, November 11, 2005 http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2005/11/10/AR2005111001502.html
  22. ^ “Energy Independence?” by Charles Krauthammer, Washington Post, January 26, 2007 http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/01/25/AR2007012501547.html
  23. ^ “The Tax-Free Lunch” by Charles Krauthammer, Washington Post, June 29, 2007 http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/06/28/AR2007062801793.html
  24. ^ [http://www.postwritersgroup.com/krauthammer.htm "Washington Post Writers Group Biography"
  25. ^ "The Reagan Doctrine", by Charles Krauthammer
  26. ^ The Unipolar Moment by Charles Krauthammer, Foreign Affairs, Winter 1990/1991
  27. ^ Democratic Realism by Charles Krauthammer, American Enterprise Institute, February 2004
  28. ^ The Path to Putin by Charles Krauthammer, Washington Post, April 3, 2000
  29. ^ Democratic Realism by Charles Krauthammer, American Enterprise Institute, February 2004
  30. ^ This Is Not a Crime, This is War by Charles Krauthammer, Washington Post, September 12, 2001
  31. ^ What Good Is Delay? by Charles Krauthammer, Jewish World Review, 7 October 2002
  32. ^ Coming Ashore by Charles Krauthammer, Time, February 17, 2003
  33. ^ Democratic Realism by Charles Krauthammer, American Enterprise Institute, February 2004
  34. ^ Krauthammer, Charles. "Democrats and Nation-Building", The Washington Post, September 19, 2003. Retrieved on 2007-07-20. 
  35. ^ Past the Apogee by Charles Krauthammer, Foreign Policy Research Institute, December 2006
  36. ^ Krauthammer: “The Great Stem Cell Hoax” by Charles Krauthammer, Weekly Standard, 13 August 2001
  37. ^ “Cell Lines, Moral Lines; Research Should Expand — With a Key Limit” by Charles Krauthammer, Washington Post, Friday, 5 August 2005
  38. ^ “Bush's Advisers on Ethics Discuss Human Cloning” by Sheryl Gay Stolberg, New York Times, 18 January 2002
  39. ^ “Phony Theory, False Conflict; ‘Intelligent Design’ Foolishly Pits Evolution Against Faith” by Charles Krauthammer, Washington Post, November 18, 2005
  40. ^ “Charles Krauthammer to Receive 2004 Irving Kristol Award”, American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research, 1 October 2003
  41. ^ “Charles Krauthammer: A Pen in Defense of Zion” by Bret Stephens, Jerusalem Post, June 13, 2002
  42. ^ “Miers: The Only Exit Strategy” by Charles Krauthammer, Washington Post, 12 October 2006
  43. ^ "Remember What Happened Here" by Charles Krauthammer, "Time Magazine", 5 July 2006
  44. ^ http://www.realclearpolitics.com/articles/2006/07/lost_moral_bearings.html
  45. ^ http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/08/03/AR2006080301258.html
  46. ^ http://media.www.yucommentator.com/media/storage/paper652/news/2002/11/10/News/Yeshiva.Students.Attend.Wexner.Memorial.Lecture.Krauthammer.Draws.Tremendous.Cro-664160.shtml
  47. ^ “The Truth about Torture” by Charles Krauthammer, the Weekly Standard, December 5, 2005
  48. ^ "The Abolition of Torture" by Andrew Sullivan, The New Republic, 7 December 2005
  49. ^ “Torture for Dummies; Exploding the ‘ticking bomb’ argument” by Michael Kinsley, Slate, 13 December 2005
  50. ^ “Tortuous Progress”, Wall Street Journal, 13 December 2005
  51. ^ “The Neoconservative Convergence”, Charles Krauthammer, Commentary magazine, accessed June 30, 2006
  52. ^ “Neo-Con No More”, Paul Berman, New York Times, 26 March 2006, accessed 1 March 2007
  53. ^ Fukuyama's Fantasy, Charles Krauthammer, Washington Post, 28 March 2006, accessed 30 June 2006

Jewish World Review is an online magazine published five days a week, which purports to appeal to people of faith and those interested in learning more about contemporary Judaism from Jews who take their religion seriously. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 36th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Archives of General Psychiatry is a monthly professional medical journal published by the American Medical Association. ... The Financial Times (FT) is a British international business newspaper. ... is the 140th day of the year (141st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... The American Prospect is a monthly magazine which focuses on US politics and public policy. ... is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... Look up time in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... ... ... ... For other uses, see New Republic. ... ... ... ... This article is about a journal. ... The American Enterprise Institutes Logo The American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research (AEI) is a neoconservative think tank, founded in 1943. ... ... The American Enterprise Institutes Logo The American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research (AEI) is a neoconservative think tank, founded in 1943. ... ... Jewish World Review is an online magazine published five days a week, which purports to appeal to people of faith and those interested in learning more about contemporary Judaism from Jews who take their religion seriously. ... is the 280th day of the year (281st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Look up time in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The American Enterprise Institutes Logo The American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research (AEI) is a neoconservative think tank, founded in 1943. ... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C.. It is also one of the citys oldest papers, having been founded in 1877. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 201st day of the year (202nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Foreign Policy Research Institute (FPRI) is a American think tank. ... The Weekly Standard is an American Conservative political magazine published 48 times per year. ... is the 225th day of the year (226th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... ... is the 217th day of the year (218th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... ... is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... (Clockwise from upper left) Time magazine covers from May 7, 1945; July 25, 1969; December 31, 1999; September 14, 2001; and April 21, 2003. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Weekly Standard is an American Conservative political magazine published 48 times per year. ... is the 339th day of the year (340th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see New Republic. ... is the 341st day of the year (342nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Slate (disambiguation). ... is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Wall Street Journal is an influential international daily newspaper published in New York City, New York with an average daily circulation of 1,800,607 (2002). ... is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Paul Berman is a prominent liberal American intellectual. ... March 26 is the 85th day of the year (86th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 60th day of the year (61st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Charles Krauthammer - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (894 words)
Charles Krauthammer (born March 13, 1950 in New York City to Jewish parents but raised in Montreal before returning to the United States), is a syndicated columnist who appears in the Washington Post, Time Magazine as well as other publications.
Krauthammer obtained a first-class honors degree in political science and economics from McGill University in 1970, and was a Commonwealth Scholar in politics at Balliol College, Oxford 1970-71.
Charles Krauthammer: A Pen in Defense of Zion by Bret Stephens - June 13, 2002.
Charles Krauthammer - definition of Charles Krauthammer in Encyclopedia (490 words)
Charles Krauthammer (born 1950, New York) is a columnist for the Washington Post who won the Pulitzer Prize in 1987.
Krauthammer also engaged in research, for example he and his colleague Klerman described the secondary mania as a syndrome with multiple causes.
Krauthammer's articles are usually supportive of Israel, and he frequently accuses those who are uncompromisingly critical of Israel's policy of anti-Semitism or anti-Zionism.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m