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Encyclopedia > Charles Kingsley
Charles Kingsley
A statue of Charles Kingsley at Bideford, Devon (UK)

Charles Kingsley (June 12, 1819January 23, 1875) was an English novelist, particularly associated with the West Country and north-east Hampshire. Charles Kingsley (19th century photograph) This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (984x1850, 317 KB) A statue of the author Charles Kingsley at Bideford, Devon, United Kingdom. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (984x1850, 317 KB) A statue of the author Charles Kingsley at Bideford, Devon, United Kingdom. ... , Bideford is a small port town on the estuary of the River Torridge in north Devon, south-west England. ... For other uses, see Devon (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Charles_Kingsley_-_project_Gutenberg_eText_13103. ... Image File history File links Charles_Kingsley_-_project_Gutenberg_eText_13103. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1819 (MDCCCXIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) in the [[Grhttp://en. ... is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1875 (MDCCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... A novel is an extended work of written, narrative, prose fiction, usually in story form; the writer of a novel is a novelist. ... The West Country is an informal term for the area of south-western England roughly corresponding to the modern South West England government region. ... For other uses, see Hampshire (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Life and character

Kingsley was born in Holne, Devon, the second son of the Rev. Charles Kingsley and his wife Mary. His brother, Henry Kingsley, also became a novelist. He spent his childhood in Clovelly, Devon and Barnack, Northamptonshire and was educated at Helston Grammar School [1] before studying at King's College London, where he met Frances ‘Fanny’ Grenfell, with whom he fell almost immediately in love and married in 1844. In 1842, Charles left for Cambridge to read for Holy Orders at Magdalene College. He was originally intended for the legal profession, but changed his mind and chose to pursue a ministry in the church. From 1844, he was rector of Eversley in Hampshire, and in 1860, he was appointed Regius Professor of Modern History at the University of Cambridge. Church of St Mary Holne is a small village on the southeastern slopes of Dartmoor in Devon, England. ... For other uses, see Devon (disambiguation). ... Henry Kingsley (1830-1876) was an English novelist, brother of the better known Charles Kingsley. ... Clovelly is a village on the north Devon coast, England near Bideford. ... Barnack is a village and civil parish in the City of Peterborough unitary authority of Cambridgeshire, England. ... For other uses, see Kings College. ... The University of Cambridge (often Cambridge University), located in Cambridge, England, is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world and has a reputation as one of the most prestigious universities in the world. ... Full name The College of Saint Mary Magdalene Motto Garde ta Foy Keep your Faith Named after Mary Magdalene Previous names Buckingham College Established 1428 Sister College(s) Magdalen College Master Duncan Robinson Location Magdalene Street Undergraduates 335 Postgraduates 169 Homepage Boatclub Magdalene College (pronounced ) was founded in 1428 as... The word rector (ruler, from the Latin regere) has a number of different meanings, but all of them indicate someone who is in charge of something. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... For other uses, see Hampshire (disambiguation). ... Regius Professor of Modern History is one of the senior professorships in history at Cambridge University, and was founded in 1724 by George I. Regius Professors of History Samuel Harris 1724 Shallet Turner 1735 Laurence Brockett 1762 Thomas Gray 1768 William Smyth 1807 James Stephen 1849 Charles Kingsley 1860 John...


In 1869 Kingsley resigned his professorship and from 1870 to 1873 he was a canon of Chester Cathedral. While in Chester he founded the Chester Society for Natural Science, Literature and Art which played an important part in the establishment of the Grosvenor Museum.[2] In 1872 he accepted the Presidency of the Birmingham and Midland Institute and became its 19th President.[3] Kingsley died in 1875 and was buried in St Mary's Churchyard in Eversley. Canons, Bruges A Canon of the Seminary, Sint Niklaas, Flanders. ... Chester Cathedral is a Church of England cathedral, mother church for the Diocese of Chester, north-west England. ... Birmingham and Midland Institute, current site The Birmingham and Midland Institute (Grid reference SP066870), now on Margaret Street in the city centre of Birmingham, England was a pioneer of adult scientific and technical education (General Industrial, Commercial and Music) and today offers Arts and Science lectures, exhibitions and concerts. ...


In person Charles Kingsley was tall and spare, sinewy rather than powerful, and of a restless excitable temperament. His complexion was swarthy, his hair dark, and his eye bright and piercing. His temper was hot, kept under rigid control; his disposition tender, gentle and loving, with flashing scorn and indignation against all that was ignoble and impure; he was a good husband, father and friend. One of his daughters, Mary St Leger Kingsley (Mrs Harrison), became well known as a novelist under the pseudonym of "Lucas Malet." Lucas Malet is the pseudonym (pen-name) of Mary St Leger Kingsley (1852-1931), Victorian novelist. ...


Kingsley's life was written by his widow in 1877, entitled Charles Kingsley, his Letters and Memories of his Life, and presents a very touching and beautiful picture of her husband, but perhaps hardly does justice to his humour, his wit, his overflowing vitality and boyish fun.


Charles also received letters from Thomas Huxley in 1860 and later in 1863, discussing Huxley's early ideas on Agnosticism. Thomas Henry Huxley PC, FRS (4 May 1825 Ealing – 29 June 1895 Eastbourne, Sussex) was an English biologist, known as Darwins Bulldog for his advocacy of Charles Darwins theory of evolution. ...


Influences and works

Kingsley's interest in history is shown in several of his writings, including The Heroes (1857), a children's book about Greek mythology, and several historical novels, of which the best known are Hypatia (1853), Hereward the Wake (1865), and Westward Ho! (1855). 1857 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the body of stories belonging to the Ancient Greeks concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices. ... // Hereward the Wake, known in his own times as Hereward the Outlaw or Hereward the Exile, was an 11th century leader in England who led resistance to the Norman Conquest, and was consequently labelled an outlaw. ... Westward Ho! is an 1855 British historical novel by Charles Kingsley, inspired in part by the Crimean War. ...


His concern for social reform is illustrated in his great classic, The Water-Babies (1863), a kind of fairytale about a boy chimney-sweep, which retained its popularity well into the 20th century. Furthermore in The Water-Babies he developed in this literary form something of a purgatory, which runs counter to his "Anti-Roman" theology. The story also mentions the main protagonists in the scientific debate over Charles Darwin's On the Origin of Species, gently satirising their reactions. The Water-Babies, A Fairy Tale for a Land Baby is a childrens novel by Charles Kingsley. ... For other people of the same surname, and places and things named after Charles Darwin, see Darwin. ... Charles Darwins Origin of Species (publ. ...


He was sympathetic to the idea of evolution, and was one of the first to praise Darwin's book. He had been sent an advance review copy and in his response of 18 November 1859 (four days before the book went on sale) stated that he had "long since, from watching the crossing of domesticated animals and plants, learnt to disbelieve the dogma of the permanence of species."[4]. Darwin added an edited version of Kingsley's closing remarks to the next edition of his book, stating that "A celebrated author and divine has written to me that 'he has gradually learnt to see that it is just as noble a conception of the Deity to believe that He created a few original forms capable of self-development into other and needful forms, as to believe that He required a fresh act of creation to supply the voids caused by the action of His laws'." [5] This article is about evolution in biology. ...


Kingsley was influenced by Frederick Denison Maurice, and was close to many Victorian thinkers and writers, e.g. George MacDonald. Like many Victorians', his writings contain what today would be called racism, as when he wrote to his wife describing a visit to Ireland, "But I am haunted by the human chimpanzees I saw along that hundred miles of horrible country. I don't believe they are our fault. I believe there are not only many of them than of old, but they are happier, better, more comfortably fed and lodged under our rule than they ever were. But to see white chimpanzees is dreadful; if they were black, one would not feel it so much, but their skins, except where tanned by exposure, are as white as ours." [6] John Frederick Denison Maurice (August 29, 1805 - April 1, 1872) was an English theologian. ... George MacDonald (December 10, 1824 – September 18, 1905) was a Scottish author, poet, and Christian minister. ...


As a novelist his chief power lay in his descriptive faculties. The descriptions of South American scenery in Westward Ho!, of the Egyptian desert in Hypatia, of the North Devon scenery in Two Years Ago, are brilliant; and the American scenery is even more vividly and more truthfully described when he had seen it only by the eye of his imagination than in his work At Last, which was written after he had visited the tropics. His sympathy with children taught him how to secure their interests. His version of the old Greek stories entitled The Heroes, and Water-babies and Madam How and Lady Why, in which he deals with popular natural history, take high rank among books for children. South America South America is a continent crossed by the equator, with most of its area in the Southern Hemisphere. ... The Sahara is the worlds second largest desert (second to Antarctica), over 9,000,000 km² (3,500,000 mi²), located in northern Africa and is 2. ...


Kingsley also wrote poetry and political articles, as well as several volumes of sermons. His argument, in print, with the Venerable John Henry Newman, accusing him of untruthfulness and deceit, prompted the latter to write his Apologia Pro Vita Sua. Newman was widely seen at the time (and still is) seen having handsomely won the debate. He also wrote a preface to the 1859 edition of Henry Brooke's book The Fool of Quality in which he defends their shared belief in universal salvation.[7] A Stained Glass image of Venerable Father Samuel Mazzuchelli in St. ... J H Newman age 23 when he preached his first sermon. ... Apologia Pro Vita Sua (Latin, A defence of ones life) is the classic defence of the religious opinions of John Henry Newman, published in 1864 in response to what he saw as an unwarranted attack on Roman Catholic doctrine by Charles Kingsley. ... This page is about the 18th century writer. ... In comparative religion, a universalist religion is one that holds itself true for all people; it thus allows all to join, regardless of ethnicity. ...


Kingsley's humour has escaped many; perhaps it can be found in another of his historical romances, named after its heroine, Hypatia, in which the arch neo-Platonist of end-of-empire Alexandria converts to Christianity at the moment of her obscene murder. Hypatia, as depicted in Raphaels The School of Athens. ... Neoplatonism (also Neo-Platonism) is an ancient school of philosophy beginning in the 3rd century A.D. It was based on the teachings of Plato and Platonists; but it interpreted Plato in many new ways, such that Neoplatonism was quite different from what Plato taught, though not many Neoplatonists would... This article is about the city in Egypt. ...


Legacy

Charles Kingsley's novel Westward Ho! led to the founding of a town by the same name - the only place name in England which contains an exclamation mark - and even inspired the construction of a railway, the Bideford, Westward Ho! and Appledore Railway. Few authors can have had such a significant effect upon the area which they eulogised. A hotel in Westward Ho! was named for him and it was also opened by him. Westward Ho! is an 1855 British historical novel by Charles Kingsley, inspired in part by the Crimean War. ... Westward Ho! is a seaside town in Torridge, Devon, England, near Bideford. ... The Bideford, Westward Ho! and Appledore Railway (B, WH & A, R) was most unusual amongst British Railways in that although it was built as a standard gauge (4 ft 8½ in (1435 mm)) line, it was not joined to the rest of the railway network, despite the London and South...


A hotel opened in 1897 in Bloomsbury, London, was named after Kingsley. It still exists, but changed name in 2001 to the Thistle Bloomsbury. The original reasons for the chosen name was that the hotel was opened by teetotallers who admired Kingsley for his political and ideas on social reform.


Bibliography

  • Saint's Tragedy, a drama
  • Alton Locke, a novel (1849)
  • Yeast, a novel (1849)
  • Twenty-five Village Sermons (1849)
  • Cheap Clothes and Nasty (1850)
  • Phaeton, or Loose Thoughts for Loose Thinkers (1852)
  • Sermons on National Subjects (1st series, 1852)
  • Hypatia, a novel (1853)
  • Glaucus, or the Wonders of the Shore (1855)
  • Sermons on National Subjects (2nd series, 1854)
  • Alexandria and her Schools (I854)
  • Westward Ho!, a novel (1855)
  • Sermons for the Times (1855)
  • The Heroes, Greek fairy tales (1856)
  • Two Years Ago, a novel (1857)
  • Andromeda and other Poems (1858)
  • The Good News of God, sermons (1859)
  • Miscellanies (1859)
  • Limits of Exact Science applied to History (Inaugural Lectures, 1860)
  • Town and Country Sermons (1861)
  • Sermons on the Pentateuch (1863)
  • The Water-Babies (1863)
  • The Roman and the Teuton (1864)
  • David and other Sermons (1866)
  • Hereward the Wake, a novel (1866)
  • The Ancient Régime (Lectures at the Royal Institution, 1867)
  • Water of Life and other Sermons (1867)
  • The Hermits (1869)
  • Madam How and Lady Why (1869)
  • At Last: A Christmas in the West Indies (1871)
  • Town Geology (1872)
  • Discipline and other Sermons (1872)
  • Prose Idylls (1873)
  • Plays and Puritans (1873)
  • Health and Education (1874)
  • Westminster Sermons (1874)
  • Lectures delivered in America (1875)

Alton Locke is a novel, by Charles Kingsley, written in sympathy with the Chartist movement, in which Carlyle is introduced as one of the personages. ... Westward Ho! is an 1855 British historical novel by Charles Kingsley, inspired in part by the Crimean War. ... The Water-Babies, A Fairy Tale for a Land Baby is a childrens novel by Charles Kingsley. ...

Notes and references

  1. ^ ODNB article by Norman Vance, ‘Kingsley, Charles (1819–1875)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, Sept 2004; online edn, May 2006 [1], accessed 13 April 2008.
  2. ^ Information Sheet: Charles Kingsley. Chester City Council. Retrieved on 2008-03-20.
  3. ^ Presidents of the BMI, BMI, nd (c.2005)
  4. ^ Darwin 1887, p. 287.
  5. ^ Darwin 1860, p. 481.
  6. ^ L. P. Curtis, Jr, Anglo-Saxons and Celts (Bridgeport, Ct; 1968),p.84
  7. ^ Thomas Whittemore. The Modern History of Universalism: Extending from the Epoch of the Reformation to the Present Time. (1860). p. 378.

The Dictionary of National Biography (or DNB) is a standard work of reference on notable figures from British history. ... Chester City Council is the second level of local government for residents of Chester and the surrounding suburban and rural areas which comprise the City of Chester. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 79th day of the year (80th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other people of the same surname, and places and things named after Charles Darwin, see Darwin. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 201st day of the year (202nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other people of the same surname, and places and things named after Charles Darwin, see Darwin. ... Sir Francis Darwin, F.R.S. (August 16th 1848 - 19th September 1925) was the botanist son of Charles Darwin. ... The Autobiography of Charles Darwin is the autobiography of the British naturalist Charles Darwin which was published in 1887, five years after his death. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 201st day of the year (202nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

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This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain. Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... The original Wikisource logo. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... Internet Archive headquarters is in the Presidio, a former US military base in San Francisco. ... Project Gutenberg, abbreviated as PG, is a volunteer effort to digitize, archive and distribute cultural works. ... The Internet Speculative Fiction Database is a database of bibliographic information on science fiction and related genres such as fantasy fiction and horror fiction. ... List of 19th-Century British Childrens Literature Authors (arranged by year of birth): Mary Martha Sherwood (1775-1851) Frederick Marryat (1792-1848) W.H.G. Kingston (1814-1830) Charles Kingsley (1819-1875) Anna Sewell (1820-1878) Thomas Hughes (1822-1896) Charlotte Mary Yonge† (1823-1901) George MacDonald† (1824-1905... Adventures of Herr Baby, The (1881) Alices Adventures in Wonderland (1865) At the Back of the North Wind (1871) Brownies, The (1870) By Sheer Pluck, A Tale of the Ashanti War (1884) Captains Courageous (1897) Carrots: Just a Little Boy (1876) Carved Lions, The (1895) Catriona (1893) Childs... List of 19th-Century British Childrens Literature Illustrators (ordered by year of birth): John Tenniel (1820-1914) Thomas Dalziel (1823-1906) Sydney Prior Hall (1842-1922) Walter Crane (1845-1915) Gordon Browne (1858-1932) Arthur Rackham (1867-1939) ... Encyclopædia Britannica, the eleventh edition The Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition (1910–1911) is perhaps the most famous edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Charles Kingsley - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (698 words)
Charles Kingsley (July 12, 1819 – January 23, 1875) was an English novelist, particularly associated with the West Country.
Charles spent his childhood in Clovelly, Devon and was educated at Magdalene College, Cambridge, before himself going in for the church.
Kingsley's humour has escaped many; perhaps it can be found in another of his historical romances, named after its heroine, Hypatia, in which the arch neo-Platonist of end-of-empire Alexandria converts to Christianity at the moment of her obscene murder.
Biography of Kingsley (1629 words)
The Reverend Charles Kingsley, writer of poetry; novels; historical works; sermons; religious tracts; scientific treatises; and political, social, and literary criticism, was one of the Victorian age's most prolific authors.
Charles Kingsley was born on 12 June 1819 at Holne Vicarage near Dartmoor, Devonshire.
Kingsley's knowledge of science was such that he became a fellow of both the Linnaean and Geological Societies and was even cited by Charles Darwin in The Descent of Man (1871).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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