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Encyclopedia > Charles James Napier
General Sir Charles James Napier

General Sir Charles James Napier GCB (August 10, 1782August 29, 1853) was a British general and Commander-in-Chief in India. The city of Napier, New Zealand, is named after him. He is famous for conquering Sindh province now in present-day Pakistan. He lived in a white house which is now part of Oaklands Catholic School. He is burried in the Royal Garrison church in Southsea. Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Badge of a Companion of the Order of the Bath (Military Division) Ribbon of the Order of the Bath The Most Honourable Order of the Bath (formerly The Most Honourable Military Order of the Bath)[1] is a British order of chivalry founded by George I on May 18, 1725. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1782 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... is the 241st day of the year (242nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1853 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article is in need of attention. ... The T & G Building (Atkin & Mitchell, Wellington, 1936) Napier (Ahuriri in Māori) is an important port city in Hawkes Bay, New Zealand. ... Sindh (Sindhī: سنڌ, Urdū: سندھ) is one of the four provinces of Pakistan and historically is home to the Sindhis. ...


A quote for which Napier is famous involves a delegation of Hindu locals approaching him and complaining about prohibition of Sati, often referred to at the time as suttee, by British authorities. This was the custom of burning widows alive on the funeral pyres of their husbands. The exact wording of his response varies somewhat in different reports, but the following version captures its essence: This article discusses the adherents of Hinduism. ... // Ceremony of Burning a Hindu Widow with the Body of her Late Husband, from Pictorial History of China and India, 1851. ... A widow is a woman whose spouse has died. ... Funeral Pyre was the The Jams thirteenth single released on 6th June 1981. ...

"You say that it is your custom to burn widows. Very well. We also have a custom: when men burn a woman alive, we tie a rope around their necks and we hang them. Build your funeral pyre; beside it, my carpenters will build a gallows. You may follow your custom. And then we will follow ours."[1]

Contents

These gallows in Tombstone Courthouse State Historic Park are maintained by Arizona State Parks. ...

Early life

He was the eldest son of Colonel the Honorable George Napier and his second wife, Lady Sarah Lennox. Born at Whitehall and educated at Celbridge (Ireland), he entered the 33rd Regiment in 1794. Subsequently became a career soldier. Married in 1827. Arrived in India in 1841. Lady Sarah Lennox (February 14, 1745-August 1826) was the most notorious of the famous Lennox sisters, daughters of Charles Lennox, 2nd Duke of Richmond. ...


India

In 1842, at the age of 60, he was appointed as Major-General to the command of the Indian army within the Bombay Presidency. Here Lord Ellenborough's policy led Napier to Sindh, for the purpose of quelling the Muslim rulers of the region, who had made various hostile demonstrations against the British government after the termination of the Afghan war. His campaign against these chieftains resulted, after the victories of Meanee and Hyderabad, in the complete subjugation of the province of Sindh, and its annexation to eastern dominions. This is when he is said to have despatched back to headquarters a short, famous message, "Peccavi"Latin for "I have sinned" - a pun on Sindh. Later proponents of British rule over the East Indians justified the conquest thus: "If this was a piece of rascality, it was a noble piece of rascality!"[citation needed] 1842 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Bombay Presidency was a former province of British India. ... Baron Ellenborough is a title that was created in Peerage of the United Kingdom in 1802 for Edward Law upon his ascent to the Kings Bench. ... Sindh (SindhÄ«: سنڌ, UrdÅ«: سندھ) is one of the four provinces of Pakistan and historically is home to the Sindhis. ... Entrance to the emirs palace in Bukhara. ... Miani or Meeanee was a village in Sindh, Pakistan, six miles north of Hyderabad. ... Hyderabad   or Haidarābād (Urdu/Sindhi: حيدر آباد) is located in the Sindh province of Pakistan (formerly known as Neroon Kot نيرُون ڪوٽ). Formerly the capital of Sindh and known as the city of perfumes, it is now a regional headquarter of the district of Hyderabad. ... Sindh (SindhÄ«: سنڌ, UrdÅ«: سندھ) is one of the four provinces of Pakistan and historically is home to the Sindhis. ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ...


He was appointed governor of the Bombay Presidency by Lord Ellenborough. His administration did not please the directors of the British East India Company, and he accordingly returned home in disgust, but was sent out again by the acclamatory voice of the nation, in the spring of 1849, to reduce the Sikhs to submission. On arriving once more in India, he found that the object of his mission had already been accomplished by Lord Gough. He remained for a time as commander-in-chief (C-in-C); quarrelled with Lord Dalhousie, the governor-general; then throwing up his post, he returned home for the last time. Broken down with infirmities, the result of his former wounds in the Peninsular campaign, he expired about two years later at his seat of Oaklands, near Portsmouth, in August 1853, at the age of 71. The British East India Company, sometimes referred to as John Company, was the first joint-stock company (the Dutch East India Company was the first to issue public stock). ... Religions Sikhism Scriptures Guru Granth Sahib Languages English, Punjabi] A Sikh (English: or ; Punjabi: , , IPA: ) is an adherent to Sikhism. ... Hugh Gough, 1st Viscount Gough (November 3, 1779 - March 2, 1869), British field-marshal, a descendant of Francis Gough who was made bishop of Limerick in 1626, was born at Woodstown, Limerick. ... Commander-in-Chief (in NATO-lingo often C-in-C or CINC pronounced sink) is the commander of all the military forces within a particular region or of all the military forces of a state. ... James Andrew Broun-Ramsay, 1st Marquess of Dalhousie, KT, PC (April 22, 1812 – December 19, 1860) was a British statesman, and a colonial administrator in India. ... Map of the events of the campaign. ... For other places with the same name, see Portsmouth (disambiguation). ... 1853 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...


Views on subduing insurgencies

General Napier put down several insurgencies in India during his reign as Commander-in-Chief in India, and once said of his philosophy about how to do so effectively:

"The best way to quiet a country is a good thrashing, followed by great kindness afterwards. Even the wildest chaps are thus tamed"[2]

He also once said that "the human mind is never better disposed to gratitude and attachment than when softened by fear"[2]


An implementation of this theory would be after the Battle of Miani, where most of the Mirs surrendered. One leader held back and was told by Napier:

"Come here instantly. Come here at once and make your submission, or I will in a week tear you from the midst of your village and hang you""[2]

The reason he felt brutality was necessary for the proper conquest of rebellions may have been his opinion that "so perverse is mankind that every nationality prefers to misgoverned by its own people than to be well ruled by another"[2] Whatever the reason for his views on fighting insurgencies, the fact remains that he was one of Great Britain's most effective generals at doing this in India, often facing well-armed native fighters.


Memorials

The city of Napier in the Hawke's Bay region of New Zealand is named after Sir Charles Napier. The suburb of Meannee commemorates his victory in the Indian sub-continent.


The city of Karachi in Sindh (Pakistan) has a street, Napier Road named after him.   (Urdu: , Sindhi: ) is the largest city in Pakistan and is the provincial capital of Sindh province. ... Sindh (SindhÄ«: سنڌ, UrdÅ«: سندھ) is one of the four provinces of Pakistan and historically is home to the Sindhis. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ...


The Napier Gardens in Argostoli/Kefalonia are named after him. Argostoli (Greek: Modern: Αργοστόλι, Ancient/Katharevousa: -ον, -on) has been the capital and administrative centre of Kefalonia, Greece, since 1757, following a population shift down from the old capital of Agios Georgios (also known as Kastro) to take advantage of the trading opportunities provided by the sheltered bay upon which Argostoli sits. ... Kefalonia, also known as Cephallenia, Cephallonia, Kefallinia, or Kefallonia (Ancient Greek: Κεφαλληνία; Modern Greek: Κεφαλλονιά or Κεφαλονιά), is the largest of the Ionian Islands in western Greece with an area of 350 sq. ...


A statue in honour of Sir Charles Napier by George Cannon Adams is on a pedestal in Trafalgar Square, London. Trafalgar Square viewed from the northeast corner. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...


See also

Col. ... Events Adam Smith is appointed professor of logic at the University of Glasgow March 25 - For the last time, New Years Day is legally on March 25 in England and Wales. ... 1804 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Lady Sarah Lennox (February 14, 1745-August 1826) was the most notorious of the famous Lennox sisters, daughters of Charles Lennox, 2nd Duke of Richmond. ... // Events May 11 - War of Austrian Succession: Battle of Fontenoy - At Fontenoy, French forces defeat an Anglo-Dutch-Hanoverian army including the Black Watch June 4 – Frederick the Great destroys Austrian army at Hohenfriedberg August 19 - Beginning of the 45 Jacobite Rising at Glenfinnan September 12 - Francis I is elected... The oldest surviving photograph, Nicéphore Niépce, circa 1826 1826 (MDCCCXXVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Sir George Thomas Napier (1784 - September 16, 1855), entered the army in 1800, and served with distinction under Sir John Moore and the Duke Wellington in the Peninsula--and lost his right arm at the storming of Badajoz. ... 1784 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1855 (MDCCCLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Sir William Francis Patrick Napier (December 7, 1785 - February 12, 1860), British soldier and military historian, third son of Colonel George Napier (1751-1804) was born at Celbridge, near Dublin. ... 1785 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... 1860 is the leap year starting on Sunday. ...

Further reading

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Charles James Napier

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is a sister project of Wikipedia, using the same MediaWiki software. ...

References

  1. ^ Steyn, Mark. America Alone: The End of the World as We Know It. Page 193.
  2. ^ a b c d Farwell, Byron: Queen Victoria's Little Wars, p. 27-31
Government offices
Preceded by
New office
Commissioner of Sindh
1843–1847
Succeeded by
Richard Pringle
Military offices
Preceded by
The Lord Gough
Commander-in-Chief, India
1849–1851
Succeeded by
Sir William Maynard Gomm

  Results from FactBites:
 
Sir Charles James Napier - LoveToKnow 1911 (1889 words)
SIR CHARLES JAMES NAPIER (1782-1853), British soldier and statesman, was born at Whitehall, London, in 1782, being the eldest son of Colonel George Napier (a younger son of the fifth lord Napier), and of his wife, the Lady Sarah Lennox who had charmed King George III.
Napier thereupon, refusing promotion to the residency of Zante, retired in disgust, living for some years in the south of England and, after the death of his wife in 1833, in Normandy.
He was to be accompanied by James Outram, who had been resident in Sind during the Afghan War, and who felt a great admiration for him, but who had also a warm affection for the amirs, and believed that he could put off the day of their destruction.
Biography of Sir Charles James Napier, British Officer in the 19th century (3791 words)
Charles Napier was born in Whitehall on 10 August 1782.
Charles began his military career as an ensign in the 33rd Regiment in January 1794 and on the 8 May was promoted to lieutenant in the 89th regiment at Netley Camp.
Charles Napier was involved in the battle of Fuentes d'Onoro on 5 May 1811 and the second siege of Badajos.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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