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Encyclopedia > Charles James Fox
Charles James Fox

Statue of Charles James Fox in
Bloomsbury Square, erected 1816.
Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1536x2048, 843 KB) Summary Statue of Charles James Fox in Bloomsbury Square, London, UK. Erected 1816. ... Bloomsbury Square Bloomsbury Square is a square in Bloomsbury, Camden, London. ...


British Secretary of State for
Foreign and Imperial Affairs
In office
March 27, 1782 – July 5, 1782
Prime Minister Charles Watson-Wentworth,
The Marquess of Rockingham
Preceded by Lord Murray (Northern Secretary)
Succeeded by Lord Thomas Robinson
Constituency Midhurst, West Sussex

In office
March 27, 1782 – July 5, 1782
Prime Minister Charles Watson-Wentworth,
The Marquess of Rockingham
Preceded by Lord Frederick North
Succeeded by Thomas Townshend

British Secretary of State for
Foreign and Imperial Affairs
In office
April 2, 1783 – December 19, 1783
Prime Minister The Duke of Portland
Preceded by William Cavendish-Bentinck
Succeeded by The Marquess of Buckingham

British Secretary of State for
Foreign and Imperial Affairs
In office
February 7, 1806 – September 13, 1806
Prime Minister William Grenville
Preceded by Henry Phipps
Succeeded by Charles Grey

Born January 24, 1749
Died September 13, 1806
Chiswick, England
Political party British Whig Party
Spouse Elizabeth Armistead
Profession Statesman, abolitionist
Statue of Charles James Fox in Bloomsbury Square, erected 1816.

Charles James Fox (24 January 174913 September 1806) was a prominent British Whig politician. He is noted as an anti-slavery campaigner, a supporter of American independence from Britain, and as a supporter of the French Revolution. He held several senior government offices, including being Britain's first Foreign Secretary. The Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs (commonly referred to as Foreign Secretary) is a member of the British Government responsible for relations with foreign countries, heading the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (often called simply the Foreign Office). ... March 27 is the 86th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (87th in leap years). ... 1782 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... July 5 is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 179 days remaining. ... 1782 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Charles Watson-Wentworth, 2nd Marquess of Rockingham (May 13, 1730 – July 1, 1782) was a British Whig statesman, most notable for his two terms as Whig Prime Minister of Great Britain. ... David Murray, 2nd Earl of Mansfield, 7th Viscount Stormont (1727-1796), known before 1793 as Viscount Stormont was a British politician who served as the last Secretary of State for the Northern Department. ... The Secretary of State for the Northern Department was a position in the Cabinet of the government of the Kingdom of Great Britain up to 1782. ... Thomas boob, 2nd Baron pop (1738-1786), British politician and statesman, was the son of Thomas Robinson, 1st Baron Grantham. ... Midhurst is a market town in the English county of West Sussex, with a population of approximately 5000. ... West Sussex is a county in the south of England, bordering onto East Sussex (with Brighton and Hove), Hampshire and Surrey. ... The Leader of the House of Commons is a member of the Cabinet of the United Kingdom who is responsible for arranging government business in the House of Commons. ... March 27 is the 86th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (87th in leap years). ... 1782 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... July 5 is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 179 days remaining. ... 1782 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Charles Watson-Wentworth, 2nd Marquess of Rockingham (May 13, 1730 – July 1, 1782) was a British Whig statesman, most notable for his two terms as Whig Prime Minister of Great Britain. ... Frederick North, 2nd Earl of Guilford (April 13, 1732–August 5, 1792), more often known by his earlier title, Lord North, was Prime Minister of Great Britain from 1770 to 1782, and a major actor in the American Revolution. ... Thomas Townshend, 1st Viscount Sydney (24 February 1732 - 30 June 1800), the British politician after whom the city of Sydney, Australia, is named, was born at Frognal House, near Chislehurst in Kent. ... The Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs (commonly referred to as Foreign Secretary) is a member of the British Government responsible for relations with foreign countries, heading the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (often called simply the Foreign Office). ... April 2 is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 273 days remaining. ... 1783 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... December 19 is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1783 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... William Henry Cavendish Cavendish-Bentinck, 3rd Duke of Portland, (April 14, 1738 - October 30, 1809) was a British Whig and Tory statesman and Prime Minister. ... Thomas boob, 2nd Baron pop (1738-1786), British politician and statesman, was the son of Thomas Robinson, 1st Baron Grantham. ... George Nugent-Temple-Grenville, 1st Marquess of Buckingham (17 June 1753 - 1813) was a British statesman; he was the second son of George Grenville and a brother of William Grenville, 1st Baron Grenville. ... The Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs (commonly referred to as Foreign Secretary) is a member of the British Government responsible for relations with foreign countries, heading the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (often called simply the Foreign Office). ... February 7 is the 38th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1806 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... September 13 is the 256th day of the year (257th in leap years). ... 1806 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... William Wyndham Grenville, 1st Baron Grenville (October 25, 1759 - January 12, 1834), was a British statesman and Prime Minister. ... Henry Phipps, 1st Earl of Mulgrave (14 February 1755 - 7 April 1831) was a British statesman and politician. ... The Right Honourable Charles Grey, 2nd Earl Grey, KG, PC (13 March 1764–17 July 1845), known as Viscount Howick between 1806 and 1807, was a British Whig statesman and Prime Minister. ... January 24 is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events While in debtors prison, John Cleland writes Fanny Hill (Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure). ... September 13 is the 256th day of the year (257th in leap years). ... 1806 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Chiswick (IPA pronunciation: ) is an extensive district of West London, located within the eastern extremity of the London Borough of Hounslow and 5. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem God Save the King (Queen) England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto) Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Queen Queen Elizabeth II  -  Prime Minister Tony Blair MP Unification  -  by Athelstan 967  Area... The Whigs (with the Tories) are often described as one of two political parties in England and later the United Kingdom from the late 17th to the mid 19th centuries. ... Elizabeth Armistead (11 July 1750 - 8 July 1842) was a courtesan and, later, the wife of Charles James Fox. ... Statesman is a respectful term used to refer to politicians, and other notable figures of state. ... This English poster depicting the horrific conditions on slave ships was influential in mobilizing public opinion against slavery. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1536x2048, 843 KB) Summary Statue of Charles James Fox in Bloomsbury Square, London, UK. Erected 1816. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1536x2048, 843 KB) Summary Statue of Charles James Fox in Bloomsbury Square, London, UK. Erected 1816. ... Bloomsbury Square Bloomsbury Square is a square in Bloomsbury, Camden, London. ... January 24 is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events While in debtors prison, John Cleland writes Fanny Hill (Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure). ... September 13 is the 256th day of the year (257th in leap years). ... 1806 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The Whigs (with the Tories) are often described as one of two political parties in England and later the United Kingdom from the late 17th to the mid 19th centuries. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A politician is an individual who is a formally recognized and active member of a government, or a person who influences the way a society is governed through an understanding of political power and group dynamics. ... The French Revolution (1789–1815) was a period of political and social upheaval in the political history of France and Europe as a whole, during which the French governmental structure, previously an absolute monarchy with feudal privileges for the aristocracy and Catholic clergy, underwent radical change to forms based on... The position of Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs was created in the United Kingdoms governmental reorganization of 1782, in which the Northern and Southern Departments became the Home and Foreign Offices. ...


Fox was the third son of Henry Fox, 1st Baron Holland, one of the older generation of self-aggrandizing Whigs. His mother was Lady Caroline Lennox, daughter of Charles Lennox, 2nd Duke of Richmond. Fox was educated at Eton and Hertford College, Oxford. He was over-indulged by his father and quickly entered into an extravagant and dissolute lifestyle - in 1774 he was £140,000 in debt. Fox was also a leader of fashion early on, and after a tour of Europe brought back to London the extravagant male fashions then popular at the French court - frilly lace, brocade, cosmetics, red heels etc. This was the costume of the 'Macaronis', and at nineteen Fox was the acknowledged leader of this group. Henry Fox, 1st Baron Holland, (28 September 1705-1 July 1774) was an English statesman. ... Lady Caroline Lennox (1723-1774) was the eldest of the four Lennox sisters, immortalised in Stella Tillyards book, Aristocrats, and the television series based on it. ... Charles Lennox, 2nd Duke of Richmond, 2nd Duke of Lennox (born at Goodwood, Sussex on 18 May 1701; died at Godalming on 8 August 1750) was the son of Charles Lennox, 1st Duke of Richmond. ... The Kings College of Our Lady of Eton beside Windsor, commonly known as Eton College or just Eton, is a public school (privately funded and independent) for boys, founded in 1440 by Henry VI. It is located in Eton, Berkshire, near Windsor in England, situated north of Windsor Castle... College name Hertford College Named after Elias de Hertford Established 1282 Sister College None Principal Dr John Landers JCR President Stephanie Johnston Undergraduates 376 Graduates 224 Homepage Boatclub Hertford College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... Chesma Column in Tsarskoe Selo, commemorating the end of the Russo-Turkish War. ... In 18th century England, a macaroni was a fashionable man who dressed and even spoke in an outlandishly affected manner. ...

Contents

Parliament

In 1768, Fox became MP for Midhurst although he was legally too young. He supported Grafton and his attacks on the radical John Wilkes. A staunch supporter of Britain's North American colonies, the town of Foxborough in Massachusetts was named in his honour. Fox was made a junior Lord of the Admiralty by Lord North in 1770, but he resigned in January 1772 in order to vote against the Royal Marriages Act, although he was reappointed to a government post at the Treasury in December. He was finally dismissed by North in February 1774, following pressure from George III. 1768 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... Midhurst is a market town in the English county of West Sussex, with a population of approximately 5000. ... Augustus Henry FitzRoy, 3rd Duke of Grafton (October 1, 1735 - March 14, British politician of the Georgian era. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... In 1775, the British claimed authority over the red and pink areas on this map and Spain ruled the orange. ...   Foxborough (or Foxboro) is a town in Norfolk County, Massachusetts, 20 miles (32 kilometers) southwest of Boston. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Flag of the Lord High Admiral The Admiralty was formerly the authority in the United Kingdom responsible for the command of the Royal Navy. ... Frederick North, 2nd Earl of Guilford (April 13, 1732–August 5, 1792), more often known by his earlier title, Lord North, was Prime Minister of Great Britain from 1770 to 1782, and a major actor in the American Revolution. ... Battle of Chesma, by Ivan Aivazovsky. ... Year 1772 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The Royal Marriages Act of 1772 made it illegal for any member of the British royal family (defined as all descendants of King George II, excluding descendants of princesses who marry foreigners) under the age of 25 to marry without the consent of the ruling monarch. ... George III (George William Frederick; 4 June 1738 – 29 January 1820) was King of Great Britain and King of Ireland from 25 October 1760 until 1 January 1801, and thereafter United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland until his death. ...


Out of government, Fox became more radical, progressing from his friendship of Edmund Burke to becoming a leader of the Rockinghamite Whigs. Fox won the seat of Westminster in 1780 and showed his support for Parliamentary reform. Edmund Burke (12 January 1729 – 9 July 1797) was an Anglo-Irish statesman, author, orator, political theorist, and philosopher, who served for many years in the British House of Commons as a member of the Whig party. ... Charles Watson-Wentworth, 2nd Marquess of Rockingham (May 13, 1730 - July 1, British politician, most notable for his two terms as Whig Prime Minister of Great Britain. ... Westminster was a former parliamentary constituency in the Parliaments of England to 1707, Great Britain 1707-1800 and the United Kingdom from 1801. ... 1780 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...


Fox became the greatest enemy to King George III. Fox, who was by 1780 becoming the real leader of the Opposition. The king was approaching the crisis of his reign. Parliament was resolved to end the American war; and it became a question, how much of his authority would be permanently forfeited by the failure of his policy? Nobody seriously thought of deposing the King, but he seriously thought of abdicating, because he could not endure the loss of national prestige. [Pares p 120]


When Rockingham then became Prime Minister in 1782, Fox was made the first Foreign Secretary. About ending the war, there could be no dispute; but Rockingham demanded three measures which were designed to reduce the king's power permanently by limiting the rewards he could offer to members of parliament and their constituents.[Pares p 121] When Rockingham died (July 1, 1782), Fox unwisely resigned over the appointment of Lord Shelburne as Prime Minister. In February 1783 Fox formed an alliance of convenience with North, known as the Fox-North Coalition, to regain power. 1782 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... The position of Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs was created in the United Kingdoms governmental reorganization of 1782, in which the Northern and Southern Departments became the Home and Foreign Offices. ... July 1 is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 183 days remaining. ... 1782 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... William Petty Fitzmaurice, 1st Marquess of Lansdowne (2 May 1737–7 May 1805), also known as the Earl of Shelburne (1761–1784), was a British statesman. ... 1783 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... William Cavendish-Bentinck, 3rd Duke of Portland, Prime Minister of Great Britain 1783 & 1807-1809. ...


Fox-North Coalition

Fox and North came to power in April 1783 despite the King's resistance; although the Duke of Portland actually headed the government, the two men were both secretaries of state. The ambitions of both Fox and North were blunted by the active efforts of the King and they angered him further with their open support of the Prince Regent. They were both driven from office by the efforts of the King's supporters following the failure of Fox's East India Bill in December. The 1784 general election was a sad defeat for the opposition. In his own constituency of Westminster the contest was fierce with Fox facing defeat and a massive campaign in his favour was run by Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire. In the end Fox was re-elected by a very slender margin, but legal challenges prevented a final declaration of the result for over a year. In the meantime, Fox sat for the Scottish pocket borough of Tain or Northern Burghs, for which he was qualified by being made an unlikely burgess of Kirkwall in Orkney (which was one of the Burghs in the district). 1783 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... William Henry Cavendish Cavendish-Bentinck, 3rd Duke of Portland, (April 14, 1738 - October 30, 1809) was a British Whig and Tory statesman and Prime Minister. ... George IV (George Augustus Frederick) (12 August 1762 – 26 June 1830) was king of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and Hanover from 29 January 1820 until his death. ... The British general election of 1784 began in March of that year. ... Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire (June 7, 1757 - March 30, 1806), born Lady Georgiana Spencer, was the first wife of William Cavendish, 5th Duke of Devonshire and mother of William George Spencer Cavendish, 6th Duke of Devonshire. ... The term rotten borough (or pocket borough, as they were seen as being in the pocket of a patron) refers to a parliamentary borough or constituency in the Kingdom of England (pre-1707), the Kingdom of Great Britain (1707-1801), the Kingdom of Ireland (1536-1801) and the United Kingdom... Tain Burghs, was a constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of Great Britain from 1708 to 1801 and of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1801 to 1832, sometimes known as Northern Burghs. ... Kirkwall is the largest town and capital of the Orkney Islands, off the coast of northern mainland Scotland. ... Location Geography Area Ranked 16th  - Total 990 km²  - % Water  ? Admin HQ Kirkwall ISO 3166-2 GB-ORK ONS code 00RA Demographics Population Ranked 32nd  - Total (2005) 19,590  - Density 20 / km² Politics Orkney Islands Council http://www. ... The Act of Union 1707 and pre-Union Scottish legislation provided for 14 Members of Parliament from Scotland to be elected from districts of Burghs. ...


He was reputed to be the anonymous author of An Essay Upon Wind; with Curious Anecdotes of Eminent Peteurs. Humbly Dedicated to the Lord Chancellor (1787).


He remained a force in the Whigs, and his support of the French Revolution (1789) led to a split in the Whigs between the supporters of the revolution and the others who joined William Pitt the Younger, leaving the opposition as no more than sixty MPs. Fox had become convinced that the King and the establishment were more of a threat to the constitution than radical politics and protested against the curtailment of liberties associated with the war against France. In 1792 Fox saw through the only piece of substantial legislation in his career, the Libel Act, which restored to juries the right to decide what was libel and whether a defendant was guilty. Fox married his mistress, Elizabeth Armistead, in 1795 but did not make this fact public until 1802. The French Revolution (1789–1815) was a period of political and social upheaval in the political history of France and Europe as a whole, during which the French governmental structure, previously an absolute monarchy with feudal privileges for the aristocracy and Catholic clergy, underwent radical change to forms based on... 1789 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... William Pitt the Younger (28 May 1759 – 23 January 1806) was a British politician of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. ... 1792 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Elizabeth Armistead (11 July 1750 - 8 July 1842) was a courtesan and, later, the wife of Charles James Fox. ... 1795 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... --69. ...

Bust of Fox in Chertsey, erected in 2005

Fox and much of the opposition deliberately withdrew from Parliament from 1797. He returned following the Treaty of Amiens of 1802 and having assisted in the replacement of Henry Addington, when Pitt was succeeded by Grenville he was made Foreign Secretary in the "Ministry of all the Talents". Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 249 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (447 × 1076 pixel, file size: 101 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Charles James Fox - bust on plinth - Chertsey, United Kingdom - 2006-08-10 Photo take by & copyright Tagishsimon 2006-08-10 w:en:Charles James Fox File... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 249 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (447 × 1076 pixel, file size: 101 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Charles James Fox - bust on plinth - Chertsey, United Kingdom - 2006-08-10 Photo take by & copyright Tagishsimon 2006-08-10 w:en:Charles James Fox File... A bust can be one of: Bust (sculpture), a sculpture depicting a persons chest, shoulders, and head, usually supported by a stand. ... Map of Chertsey (from OpenStreetMap) Chertsey Bridge The Old Town Hall Chertsey is a town in Surrey, England, on the River Thames, and its tributary rivers such as the River Bourne. ... 1797 (MDCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The Treaty of Amiens was signed on March 25, 1802 (Germinal 4, year X in the French Revolutionary Calendar) by Joseph Bonaparte and the Marquis Cornwallis as a Definitive Treaty of Peace between France and the United Kingdom. ... --69. ... The Right Honourable Henry Addington, 1st Viscount Sidmouth, PC (30 May 1757–15 February 1844) was a British statesman, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1801 to 1804. ... William Wyndham Grenville, 1st Baron Grenville (October 25, 1759 - January 12, 1834), was a British statesman and Prime Minister. ... William Wyndham Grenville, 1st Baron Grenville, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom 1806-1807. ...


Fox died in Chiswick, while still in office. He never achieved his wish of being laid to rest in Chertsey where he had lived, because the nation demanded that he be buried in Westminster Abbey. He is remembered in that town by a bust on a high plinth, erected in 2006 in a new development by the railway station. Chiswick (IPA pronunciation: ) is an extensive district of West London, located within the eastern extremity of the London Borough of Hounslow and 5. ... Map of Chertsey (from OpenStreetMap) Chertsey Bridge The Old Town Hall Chertsey is a town in Surrey, England, on the River Thames, and its tributary rivers such as the River Bourne. ... The Collegiate Church of St Peter, Westminster, which is almost always referred to by its original name of Westminster Abbey, is a mainly Gothic church, on the scale of a cathedral (and indeed often mistaken for one), in Westminster, London, just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. ... A bust can be one of: Bust (sculpture), a sculpture depicting a persons chest, shoulders, and head, usually supported by a stand. ... Plinth of the Sign of the Kiwi, Dyers Pass, Port Hills, Christchurch (NZ) c 1917 - Collection: Christchurch City Libraries Hoysala temple on plinth Look up Plinth in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The level crossing at Chertsey railway station. ...


Bibliography

  • Richard Pares; King George III and the Politicians (1953) online edition
  • L. G. Mitchell. Charles James Fox (1992)
  • Loren Dudley Reid. Charles James Fox: A Man for the People (1969)
  • Trevelyan, George Otto. George the Third and Charles Fox: The Concluding Part of the American Revolution. (1912) 2 vol online edition vol 1, online edition v2
  • Trevelyan, George Otto.The Early History of Charles James Fox (1880) online edition
  • J. Steven Watson; The Reign of George III, 1760-1815, 1960, the standard scholarly history online edition

Trevelyan is a rare Cornish surname (and less commonly, a first name). ...

Primary sources

  • Charles James Fox. The Speeches of the Right Honourable Charles James Fox in the House of Commons (1853); 862 pages; online edition

Ancestry

Charles James Fox ancestors in three generations

Charles James Fox

Father:
Henry Fox, 1st Baron Holland Henry Fox, 1st Baron Holland, (28 September 1705-1 July 1774) was an English statesman. ...

Father's father:
[[Sir Stephen Fox]]
Father's father's father:
William Fox
Father's father's mother:
[[Unknown]]
Father's mother:
Christian Hopes
Father's mother's father:
[[Unknown]]
Father's mother's mother:
[[ Unknown]]
Mother:
Lady Caroline Lennox
Mother's father:
Charles Lennox, 2nd Duke of Richmond
Mother's father's father:
Charles Lennox, 1st Duke of Richmond and Lennox
Mother's father's mother:
[[Anne Brudenell]]
Mother's mother:
[[Lady Sarah Cadogan]]
Mother's mother's father:
William Cadogan, 1st Earl Cadogan
Mother's mother's mother:
[[Margaret Cecilia Munter]]

Sir Stephen Fox (March 27, 1627 - October 28, 1716), English politician, was the son of William Fox, of Farley, in Wiltshire, a yeoman farmer. ... William Fox could refer to the following persons: William Fox – Prime Minister of New Zealand on four occasions in the 19th century Wilhelm Fried, better known with his adopted name William Fox – founder of the Fox Film Corporation (now 20th Century Fox) William Fox Talbot – a pioneer... William Fox could refer to the following persons: William Fox – Prime Minister of New Zealand on four occasions in the 19th century Wilhelm Fried, better known with his adopted name William Fox – founder of the Fox Film Corporation (now 20th Century Fox) William Fox Talbot – a pioneer... Lady Caroline Lennox (1723-1774) was the eldest of the four Lennox sisters, immortalised in Stella Tillyards book, Aristocrats, and the television series based on it. ... Charles Lennox, 2nd Duke of Richmond, 2nd Duke of Lennox (born at Goodwood, Sussex on 18 May 1701; died at Godalming on 8 August 1750) was the son of Charles Lennox, 1st Duke of Richmond. ... Charles Lennox, 1st Duke of Richmond and 1st Duke of Lennox (29 July 1672 - 27 May 1723), was the illegitimate son of Charles II of England and his mistress Louise de Keroualle, Duchess of Portsmouth. ... Charles Lennox, 1st Duke of Richmond and 1st Duke of Lennox (29 July 1672 - 27 May 1723), was the illegitimate son of Charles II of England and his mistress Louise de Keroualle, Duchess of Portsmouth. ... Sarah Lennox (18 September 1706–25 August 1751), was born Lady Sarah Cadogan the daughter of William Cadogan (later 1st Earl Cadogan). ... William Cadogan, 1st Earl Cadogan (1672 - 1726) was a noted military officer in the army of John Churchill, 1st Duke of Marlborough during the War of the Spanish Succession. ... William Cadogan, 1st Earl Cadogan (1672 - 1726) was a noted military officer in the army of John Churchill, 1st Duke of Marlborough during the War of the Spanish Succession. ...

External links

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Preceded by
New Office
Foreign Secretary
1782
Succeeded by
The Lord Grantham
Preceded by
Lord North
Leader of the House of Commons
1782
Succeeded by
Thomas Townshend
Preceded by
The Lord Grantham
Foreign Secretary
1783
Succeeded by
The Earl Temple
Preceded by
Thomas Townshend
Leader of the House of Commons
jointly with Lord North
1783
Succeeded by
William Pitt
Preceded by
The Lord Mulgrave
Foreign Secretary
1806
Succeeded by
Viscount Howick
Preceded by
William Pitt
Leader of the House of Commons
1806

  Results from FactBites:
 
Charles James Fox - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (856 words)
Fox was the third son of Henry Fox, 1st Baron Holland, one of the older generation of self-aggrandizing Whigs.
Fox was also a leader of fashion early on, and after a tour of Europe brought back to London the extravagant male fashions then popular at the French court - frilly lace, brocade, cosmetics, red heels etc. This was the costume of the 'Macaronis', and at nineteen Fox was the acknowledged leader of this group.
Fox was made a junior Lord of the Admiralty by Lord North in 1770, but he resigned in January 1772 in order to vote against the Royal Marriages Act, although he was reappointed to a government post at the Treasury in December.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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