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Encyclopedia > Charles II of Naples

Charles II, known as the Lame (Fr. le Boiteux) (born c. 1248, died 5 May 1309, Naples) was the King of Naples and Sicily, titular king of Jerusalem, and Prince of Salerno. He was a son of Charles I of Naples. French (français, langue française) is one of the most important Romance languages, outnumbered in speakers only by Spanish and Portuguese. ... Events Louis IX of France departs on the Seventh Crusade for Egypt Kingdom of Castile captures city of Seville from Muslims Cologne cathedral: old cathedral burns down April 30; foundation stone to current cathedral laid August 15 Births Deaths January 4 - King Sancho II of Portugal, in exile in Toledo... May 5 is the 125th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (126th in leap years). ... Events Rhodes falls to forces of the Knights of St. ... Naples (Italian Napoli, Neapolitan Napule, from Greek Νέα Πόλις - Néa Pólis - meaning New City; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is the largest city in southern Italy and capital of Campania Region and the Province of Naples. ... The following is a list of monarchs of the Kingdom of Naples and Sicily: Hauteville Counts of Sicily, 1071-1130 Roger I 1071-1101 Simon 1101-1105 Roger II 1105-1130 Hauteville Kings of Sicily, 1130-1198 Roger II 1130-1154 William I 1154-1166 William II 1166-1189 Tancred... This is a list of Kings of Jerusalem, from 1099 to 1291, as well as claimants to the title up to the present day. ... Map of Italy showing Salerrno southeast of Naples Salerno is a town and a province in Campania, south-western Italy, located on the gulf of the same name on the Tyrrhenian Sea. ... Charles I (March 1227 - January 7, 1285) was the posthumous son of King Louis VIII of France, created Count of Anjou by his elder brother King Louis IX in 1246, thus founding the second Angevin dynasty. ...


He had been captured by Roger of Lauria in the naval battle at Naples in 1284. When his father died, he was still a prisoner of Peter III of Aragon. Roger of Lauria, or Ruggiero di Lauria (c. ... Naples (Italian Napoli, Neapolitan Napule, from Greek Νέα Πόλις - Néa Pólis - meaning New City; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is the largest city in southern Italy and capital of Campania Region and the Province of Naples. ... // Events War and politics King Charles II of Naples is captured in a naval battle off Naples by Roger of Lauria, admiral to King Peter III of Aragon. ... Peter III of Aragon (Catalan: Pere) (1239 – November 11, 1285, also Peter I of Valencia, Peter II of Barcelona), known as the Great, was the king of Aragon and Valencia and count of Barcelona from 1276 to 1285. ...


In 1288 King Edward I of England mediated to make peace, and Charles was liberated only to retain Naples alone. Sicily was left to the Aragonese. Charles was also to induce his cousin Charles of Valois to renounce for twenty thousand pounds of silver the kingdom of Aragon which given him by Pope Martin IV to punish Peter for having invaded Sicily, but which the Valois had never effectively occupied. Events February 22 - Nicholas IV becomes Pope. ... King Edward I of England (June 17, 1239 – July 7, 1307), popularly known as Longshanks because of his 6 foot 2 inch frame and the Hammer of the Scots (his tombstone, in Latin, read, Hic est Edwardvs Primus Scottorum Malleus, Here lies Edward I, Hammer of the Scots), achieved... Charles III of Valois (March 12, 1270 – December 16, 1325) was the third son of Philip III of France and Isabella of Aragon. ... Martin IV, né Simon de Brion (ca. ... The Valois Dynasty succeeded the Capetian Dynasty as rulers of France from 1328- 1589. ...


Charles was then released, leaving three of his sons and sixty Provençal nobles as hostages, promising to pay 30,000 marks and to return a prisoner if the conditions were not fulfilled within three years. He went to Rieti, where the new Pope Nicholas IV, immediately absolved him from all the conditions he had sworn to observe, crowned him King of Sicily in 1289, and excommunicated King Alfonso III of Aragon. Charles of Valois, in alliance with Castile, prepared to take possession of Aragon. Alfonso, being hard pressed, had to promise to withdraw the troops he had sent to help his brother James in Sicily, to renounce all rights over the island, and pay a tribute to the Holy See. Rieti is a town in the Latium, Italy. ... Nicholas IV, né Girolamo Masci (Lisciano, a small village near Ascoli Piceno, September 30, 1227 – April 4, 1292), was pope from February 22, 1288 to April 4, 1292. ... For broader historical context, see 1280s and 13th century. ... Alfons or Alfonso III of Aragon (1265 – June 18, 1291, also Alfons II of Barcelona), surnamed the Liberal, was the king of Aragon and count of Barcelona from 1285 to 1291. ... Flag or Pendón de Castilla A former kingdom of Spain, Castile comprises the two regions of Old Castile in north-western Spain, and New Castile in the centre of the country. ... Capital Zaragoza Area  â€“ Total  â€“ % of Spain Ranked 4th  47 719 km²  9,4% Population  â€“ Total (2003)  â€“ % of Spain  â€“ Density Ranked 11th  1 217 514  2,9%  25,51/km² Demonym  â€“ English  â€“ Spanish  Aragonese  aragonés Statute of Autonomy August 16, 1982 ISO 3166-2 AR Parliamentary representation  â€“ Congress seats  â€“ Senate... James II, King of Aragon (10 August 1267 – 2 November 1327), in Spanish Jaime II, in Catalan Jaume II, also James II of Barcelona, called The Just (Catalan: El Just) was the second son of Peter III of Aragon and Constance of Sicily. ...


Alfonso died childless in 1291 before the treaty could be carried out, and James took possession of Aragon, leaving the government of Sicily to the third brother Frederick. For broader historical context, see 1290s and 13th century. ... Frederick III (or II) (1272 – 1337), King of Sicily, was the third son of King Peter III of Aragon and Sicily, and of Constance, daughter of Manfred. ...


The new Pope Boniface VIII, elected in 1294 at Naples under the auspices of King Charles, mediated between the latter and James, and a most dishonourable treaty was signed: James was to marry Charles’s daughter Bianca and was promised the investiture by the pope of Sardinia and Corsica, while he was to leave the Angevin a free hand in Sicily and even to assist him if the Sicilians resisted. Boniface VIII, né Benedetto Caetani (Anagni, ca. ... For broader historical context, see 1290s and 13th century. ... Naples (Italian Napoli, Neapolitan Napule, from Greek Νέα Πόλις - Néa Pólis - meaning New City; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is the largest city in southern Italy and capital of Campania Region and the Province of Naples. ...


An attempt was made to bribe Frederick into consenting to this arrangement, but being backed up by his people he refused, and was afterwards crowned king of Sicily. The ensuring war was fought on land and sea but Charles, though aided by the pope, his cousin Charles of Valois and James, was unable to conquer the island, and his son the prince of Taranto was taken prisoner at the battle of La Falconara in 1299. Peace was at last made in 1302 at Caltabellotta. Charles gave up all rights to Sicily and agreed to the marriage of his daughter Leonora and King Frederick; the treaty was ratified by the pope in 1303. Charles spent his last years quietly in Naples, which city he improved and embellished. He died in August 1309, and was succeeded by his son Robert the Wise. Philip I of Taranto (1278-1332): of the Anjou family, Prince of Taranto, despot of Epirus, Prince of Achaea, Titular Emperor of Costantinople. ... Events Osman I declares the independence of the Ottoman Principality The County of Holland is annexed by the County of Hainaut April 1, 1299 Kings Towne on the River Hull granted city status by Royal Charter of King Edward I of England. ... Events July 11 - Battle of the Golden Spurs (Guldensporenslag in Dutch), major victory of Flanders over the French occupier. ... // Events On the 20 April, Pope Boniface VIII founds the University of Rome La Sapienza Edward I of England reconquers Scotland (see also: William Wallace, Wars of Scottish Independence) The Khilji Dynasty conquers Chittor Births Saint Birgitta, Swedish saint (died 1373) Gegeen Khan, Mongol emperor of China (died 1323) Deaths... Events Rhodes falls to forces of the Knights of St. ... King Robert I of Naples a. ...


Charles II of Naples is known in Italian history books for one particurlry crude episode, that is for his order to one of his commanders, Giovanni da Barletta, to destroy the town of Lucera, the last surviving Muslim community in Italy, as a way to celebrate the first Jubilaeum proclaimed by Pope Boniface VIII. The entire population of about 20,000 Arabs and Italian Muslims was exterminated in the summer of year 1300, ending five centuries of Muslim presence on Italian soil.


In 1270, he married Maria of Hungary (c. 1257March 25, 1323), the daughter of Stephen V of Hungary. They had fourteen children: For broader historical context, see 1270s and 13th century. ... For broader historical context, see 1250s and 13th century. ... March 25 is the 84th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (85th in leap years). ... Events Canonization of Saint Thomas Aquinas Lithuania: Vilnius becomes capital August 12 - The Treaty of Nöteborg between Sweden and Novgorod (Russia) is signed, regulating the border for the first time Pharos of Alexandira Lighthouse (one of the Seven Wonders of the world) is destroyed by a series of earthquakes... King Stephen V of Hungary (Hungarian: ,Slovak: Štefan V)(1239 or 1240 - August 6, 1272), was the eldest son of Bela IV of Hungary, whom he succeeded in 1270. ...

  1. Charles Martel d'Anjou, titular King of Hungary
  2. Louis (February 9, 1275, Nocera – August 19, 1298, Chateau de Brignoles), Bishop of Toulouse
  3. Robert of Naples, King of Naples
  4. Philip I of Taranto, Prince of Achaea and Taranto, Despot of Romania, Lord of Durazzo, titular Emperor of Constantinople
  5. Raymond Berengar (12811307), Count of Provence, Prince of Piedmont and Andria
  6. John (1283 – aft. March 16, 1308), a priest
  7. Tristan (1284–bef. 1288)
  8. Peter (1291August 29, 1315, Battle of Montecatini), Count of Gravina
  9. John of Gravina (1294April 5, 1336, Naples), Duke of Durazzo, Prince of Achaea, and Count of Gravina, married March 1318 (div 1321) Matilda of Hainault (November 29, 12931336), married November 14, 1321 Agnes of Périgord (d. 1345)
  10. Marguerite (1273December 31, 1299), Countess of Anjou and Maine, married at Corbeil August 16, 1290 Charles of Valois
  11. Blanca (1280October 14, 1310, Barcelona), married at Villebertran November 1, 1295 James II of Aragon
  12. Leonora, (August 1289August 9, 1341, Monastery of St. Nicholas, Arene), married at Messina May 17, 1302 Frederick III of Sicily
  13. Maria (1290 – c. 1346), married at Palma de Majorca September 20, 1304 Sancho I of Majorca, married 1326 Jaime de Ejerica (1298 – April 1335)
  14. Beatrice (1295 – c. 1321), married April 1305 Azzo VIII, Margrave d'Este (d. 1308), married 1309 Bertrand III of Baux, Count of Andria (d. 1351)
Preceded by:
Charles I
King of Naples
1285–1309
Succeeded by:
Robert
Prince of Achaea
1285–1289
Succeeded by:
Isabella
Count of Anjou
1285–1290
Succeeded by:
Charles III

  Results from FactBites:
 
Charles II of Naples - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (659 words)
Charles was also to induce his cousin Charles of Valois to renounce for twenty thousand pounds of silver the kingdom of Aragon which given him by Pope Martin IV to punish Peter for having invaded Sicily, but which the Valois had never effectively occupied.
The ensuring war was fought on land and sea but Charles, though aided by the pope, his cousin Charles of Valois and James, was unable to conquer the island, and his son the prince of Taranto was taken prisoner at the battle of La Falconara in 1299.
Charles gave up all rights to Sicily and agreed to the marriage of his daughter Leonora and King Frederick; the treaty was ratified by the pope in 1303.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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