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Encyclopedia > Charles I of Naples

Charles I (March 1227 - January 7, 1285) was the posthumous son of King Louis VIII of France, created Count of Anjou by his elder brother King Louis IX in 1246, thus founding the second Angevin dynasty.


In 1266 Charles was invested by Pope Clement IV with the kingship of Naples and Sicily, in return for expelling Manfred, son of Holy Roman Emperor Frederick II. In 1261, Sicily alone had been entrusted to his rule.


Manfred's defeat and death in battle were followed (1268) by the defeat and execution of his nephew Conradin, but in 1282 Sicily rose against French officialdom and taxes intended to finance Charles's struggle to restore the Latin Empire at Constantinople.


The island was taken by King Peter III of Aragón, who became also Peter I of Sicily, but Charles remained in possession of mainland Naples until his death, acquiring in addition the now empty title of King of Jerusalem in 1277.


Charles's dynasty went on to rule Hungary and Poland for a time in the following century, but lost Naples in 1442. The main line in Anjou ended in 1481.



Preceded by:
Manfred
King of Sicily Succeeded by:
Peter I
King of Naples Charles II
William II Prince of Achaea
Count of Anjou







  Results from FactBites:
 
Charles I of Naples - LoveToKnow 1911 (866 words)
Charles, in a spirit of the most vindictive cruelty, had large numbers of Conradin's barons put to death and their estates confiscated, and the whole population of several towns massacred.
Charles came to Naples with a new fleet from Provence, and was preparing to invade Sicily again, when he contracted a fever and died at Foggia on the 7th of January 1285.
He was undoubtedly an extremely able soldier and a skilful statesman, and much of his legislation shows a real political sense; but his inordinate ambition, his oppressive methods of government and taxation, and his cruelty created enemies on all sides, and led to the collapse of the edifice of dominion which he had raised.
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