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Encyclopedia > Charles Heywood
Charles Heywood
October 3,1839 - February 26, 1915

9th Commandant of the Marine Corps (1891-1903)
Place of birth Waterville, Maine
Place of death Washington, DC
Allegiance USMC
Years of service 1858-1903
Rank Major General
Commands Commandant of the Marine Corps

Major General Charles Heywood (3 October 1839 - 26 February 1915) was the ninth Commandant of the Marine Corps. Image File history File links MajGenHeywood_USMC.jpg‎ MajGen Charles Heywood, 9th Commandant of the United States Marine Corps; from official USMC biography http://hqinet001. ... United States Marine Corps Emblem The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is the second smallest of the five branches of the United States armed forces, with 170,000 active and 40,000 reserve Marines as of 2002. ... Insignia of a United States Air Force Major General German Generalmajor Insignia Major General is a military rank used in many countries. ... The Commandant of the United States Marine Corps is the highest ranking officer of the United States Marine Corps and a member of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, reporting to the Secretary of the Navy but not to the Chief of Naval Operations. ... Insignia of a United States Air Force Major General German Generalmajor Insignia Major General is a military rank used in many countries. ... October 3 is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1839 (MDCCCXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... February 26 is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... The Commandant of the United States Marine Corps is the highest ranking officer of the United States Marine Corps and a member of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, reporting to the Secretary of the Navy but not to the Chief of Naval Operations. ...


Heywood was born in Waterville, Maine. He was appointed second lieutenant in the Marine Corps from New York, on 5 April 1858. During that year he was stationed at the Marine Barracks, Washington, D.C., and at Brooklyn, New York. Waterville is a city in Kennebec County, Maine on the Kennebec River. ... Official language(s) None (English de facto) Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ... Second Lieutenant is the lowest commissioned rank in many armed forces. ... The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the U.S. military responsible for providing power projection from the sea,[1] utilizing the mobility of the U.S. Navy to rapidly deliver combined-arms task forces to global crises. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... April 5 is the 95th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (96th in leap years). ... 1858 (MDCCCLVIII) is a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Nickname: DC, The District Motto: Justitia Omnibus (Justice for All) Location of Washington, D.C., in relation to the states Maryland and Virginia Coordinates: Federal District District of Columbia Mayor Anthony A. Williams (D) City Council Chairperson: Linda W. Cropp (D) Ward 1: Jim Graham (D) Ward 2: Jack Evans... This article is about the borough of New York City. ...


While on duty in Brooklyn he served in the 1858 quarantine riots at Staten Island, New York. He performed special duty on the Niagara and later on board the St. Louis, of the Home Squadron, the ship seeking filibusters in Central America. He was invalided from Aspinwall (Colón), Panama, in January 1860, and later was ordered to the sloop of war Cumberland, flagship of the Squadron of Observation at Vera Cruz, Mexico. In March 1861, he returned to duty on board the Cumberland and with that vessel took part in the destruction of the Norfolk Navy Yard during the Civil War. 1858 (MDCCCLVIII) is a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Staten Island, in yellow, lies to the southwest of the rest of New York City. ... USS Niagara is the name of several ships of the United States Navy: The first Niagara ws launched in 1812, she served as Oliver Hazard Perry’s flagship during the Battle of Lake Erie US Brig Niagara (replica) A modern replica of the original Niagara The second Niagara was... USS has been the name of six ships in the United States Navy. ... A filibuster is a private individual who engages in unauthorized warfare against a foreign country, often with the intent of overthrowing the existing government. ... Map of Central America Central America is the central geographic region of the Americas. ... Colón as seen from the ocean in January 2000 Colón is a sea port city on the Caribbean Sea coast of Panama. ... USS Constellation, a United States Navy sloop-of-war. ... Two ships of the United States Navy have been named USS Cumberland, after the Cumberland River. ... See: Veracruz (city) (Mexico) Veracruz (state) (Mexico) Vera Cruz, Indiana Vera Cruz, Bahia, Brazil Vera Cruz, São Paulo, Brazil This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ... Aerial View of the Norfolk Naval Shipyard The Norfolk Naval Shipyard, often called the Norfolk Navy Yard, is a U.S. Navy facility in Portsmouth, Virginia, for building, remodeling, and repairing the Navys ships. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total...


In May 1861, 2ndLt Heywood was promoted to first lieutenant, and as such landed with the Marines at Hatteras Inlet, where he was present at the capture of both Fort Clark and Fort Hatteras. He was advanced to captain in November of that year, and during the winter of 1861-62 participated actively in a number of boat expeditions in the James River. First Lieutenant is a military rank. ... Battle of Hatteras Inlet Batteries Conflict American Civil War Date August 28-29, 1861 Place Dare County, North Carolina Result Union victory The Battle of Hatteras Inlet Batteries, also known as the Battle of Forts Clark and Hatteras, took place from August 28-29, 1861 in Dare County, North Carolina... This article concerns the rank and title of Captain. ... The James River is the name of at least two rivers in the United States. ...


In the fight between the Cumberland and the CSS Virginia, in March 1862, his conduct was particularly noteworthy while commanding the after gun deck division, firing the last gun in the fight and saving himself by jumping overboard as the Cumberland went down with her flag flying. He was most favorably mentioned for his gallant conduct and received the brevet rank of major for his services during the engagement. CSS Virginia was an ironclad warship of the Confederate States Navy during the American Civil War (built using the remains of the scuttled USS Merrimack). ... The word brevet has several meanings: In the military, brevet refers to a warrant authorizing a commissioned officer to temporarily hold a higher rank, without a corresponding pay increase. ... Major is a military rank the use of which varies according to country. ...


For some time afterwards he was actively employed, both on shore and at sea in search for the notorious raider Alabama, until he applied for duty on board the flagship Hartford. He was ordered to that vessel as Fleet Marine Officer of the West Gulf Squadron. For other ships named Alabama, see USS Alabama. ... Two ships of the United States Navy have borne the name USS Hartford, named in honor of the Hartford, the capital of Connecticut. ...


Major Heywood served on shore at Pensacola and was on board the Hartford in the Battle of Mobile Bay, where he received the brevet rank of lieutenant colonel for gallant and meritorious services. During that engagement he had charge of two nine-inch guns. His services during the Civil War thus secured for him two brevet ranks for distinguished gallantry in the presence of the enemy. Nickname: The City of Five Flags Location of the city within the state of Florida Country United States State Florida County Escambia County, Florida Mayor John Fogg Area    - City 102. ... Combatants United States of America (U.S. Navy) Confederate States of America (Confederate States Navy) Commanders David Farragut (navy) Gordon Granger (army) Franklin Buchanan (navy) Dabney H. Maury (army) Strength 14 wooden ships (including 2 gunboats) 4 ironclad monitors 5,500 Land Force Three gunboats One ironclad Casualties 322 men... In the U.S. Army, Air Force and Marine Corps, a lieutenant colonel is a commissioned officer superior to a major and inferior to a colonel. ...


From 1865 to 1867, he performed duty on board various ships, serving as Admiral Farragut's Fleet Marine Officer on the European Station and later in the same capacity in the North Atlantic Squadron. During this period he also served for a time at Washington, Norfolk and Brooklyn. In November 1876, he attained regular rank of major to which he had been brevetted more than ten years before, and was ordered to command the Marine Barracks, Washington, D.C. Admiral is the rank, or part of the name of the ranks, of the highest naval officers. ... Admiral David Glasgow Farragut Admiral David Glasgow Farragut David Glasgow Farragut (July 5, 1801 – August 14, 1870) was the commander-in-chief of the U.S. Navy during the American Civil War. ... The European Squadron, also known as the European Station, was a part of the United States Navy in the late 1800s to the early 1900s. ... The North Atlantic Squadron was a section of the United States Navy operating in the North Atlantic. ...


During the serious labor riots of the summer of 1877, Major Heywood commanded a battalion of Marines at Baltimore, Philadelphia, and Reading, Pennsylvania. He was honorably mentioned by General Hancock, U.S. Army, who was in general command, and received thanks from the Navy Department for his services. His next years of duty carried him to widely separated posts — Mare Island, California, and Brooklyn, New York. Flag Seal Nickname: Monument City, Charm City, Mob Town, B-more Motto: Get In On It (formerly The City That Reads and The Greatest City in America; BELIEVE is not the official motto but rather a specific campaign) Location Location of Baltimore in Maryland Coordinates , Government Country State County United... Nickname: City of Brotherly Love, Philly, the Cradle of Liberty, the City That Loves You Back, the Quaker City, The Birthplace of America Motto: Philadelphia maneto - Let brotherly love continue Location in Pennsylvania Coordinates: Country United States State Pennsylvania County Philadelphia Founded October 27, 1682 Incorporated October 25, 1701 Mayor... Location in Pennsylvania Coordinates: Country United States State Pennsylvania County Berks County Founded 1748 Mayor Thomas McMahon Area    - City 26. ... Official language(s) None Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 160 miles (255 km)  - Length 280 miles (455 km)  - % water 2. ... A General is an officer of high military rank. ... Portrait of Winfield S. Hancock during the Civil War Winfield Scott Hancock (February 14, 1824 – February 9, 1886) was a career U.S. Army officer who served with distinction as a general in the American Civil War and ran unsuccessfully for President of the United States in 1880. ... The Army is the branch of the United States armed forces which has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ... Seal The United States Department of the Navy was established by an Act of Congress on April 30, 1798, to provide administrative and technical support, and civilian leadership to the United States Navy. ... Aerial photo of the southern part of Mare Island Mare Island is an island in Vallejo, California, about 30 miles northeast of San Francisco. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ...


In April 1885, he organized, within twenty-four hours from the time of the order, a battalion of 250 Marines for duty on the Isthmus of Panama to open the transit. Subsequently under his command on the Isthmus were 800 Marines in addition to a strong detachment of U.S. Navy and the artillery. For his arduous services the admiral commanding asked Major Heywood to "receive his grateful acknowledgements." The Isthmus of Panama. ... The United States Navy (USN) is the branch of the United States armed forces responsible for naval operations. ... Historically, artillery (from French artillerie) refers to any engine used for the discharge of projectiles during war. ...


Major Heywood was promoted to lieutenant colonel on 9 March 1888, and on January 30, 1891 was appointed Colonel Commandant of the Marine Corps. By special acts of Congress he was promoted to brigadier general in March 1899 and to major general in July 1902. He was the first Marine to hold the rank of major general. March 9 is the 68th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (69th in Leap years). ... 1888 (MDCCCLXXXVIII) is a leap year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar. ... January 30 is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1891 (MDCCCXCI) was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Colonel (IPA: or ) is a military rank of a commissioned officer, with the corresponding ranks existing in nearly every country in the world. ... The Congress of the United States is the legislative branch of the federal government of the United States of America. ... A Brigadier General, or one-star general, is the lowest rank of general officer in the United States and some other countries, ranking just above Colonel and just below Major General. ... Insignia of a United States Air Force Major General German Generalmajor Insignia Major General is a military rank used in many countries. ...


The energy, experience and training which he had shown and obtained in his early days in the Marine Corps were fully brought into play from the moment he assumed command of the Corps. At that time the Marine Corps consisted of 75 officers and 2,100 enlisted men, which gradually rose during his tenure of office until at the time of his retirement in 1903, it had reached the total of 278 officers and 7,532 enlisted personnel, the highest strength up to that point.


He kept in mind the problem of more closely associating the Corps with the Navy so that the work of the two could be in the closet harmony. He was the first to establish a regular system of examinations for officers for promotion and set up the system of officers' schools, which has continued with slight interruption since then.


By increasing the efficiency of the Corps he tried to demonstrate to the Navy how absolutely essential it was as an auxiliary to the naval service. Under his administration the number of Marine Corps posts were increased from twelve to twenty-one. There was scarcely a regular post at which MajGen Heywood was not able to provide new barracks or officers' quarters.


He caused the regular system of target practice to be established and adopted good conduct medals for the betterment of the discipline in the Marine Corps. The declaration of war with Spain in 1898 found the Marine Corps well prepared. President Franklin D. Roosevelt signs a declaration of war against the Empire of Japan on December 8, 1941, one day after the attack on Pearl Harbor. ... 1898 (MDCCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


Major General Heywood closed a most distinguished career of over forty-five years as a commissioned officer in the Marine Corps, when on 3 October 1903, in accordance with law, having attained the age of 64 years, he was placed on the retired list. October 3 is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1903 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Friday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ...


His death occurred in Washington, D.C., on February 26, 1915, and his remains were interred in Arlington National Cemetery. February 26 is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... [[ Historical Information Arlington National Cemetery Section 27 Facts Pvt. ...


See also

United States Marine Corps Portal

Image File history File links USMC_logo. ...

References

This article includes text from the public domain Marine Corps History Division website. The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...

  • Major General Charles Heywood, USMC. Who's Who in Marine Corps History. History Division, United States Marine Corps. Retrieved on 2006-11-19.
Preceded by
Col Charles McCawley
Commandant of the United States Marine Corps
1891–1903
Succeeded by
MajGen George F. Elliott

  Results from FactBites:
 
Charles Heywood, Major General, United States Marine Corps (968 words)
Major General Charles Heywood was born in Maine on October 3, 1839, and was appointed a second lieutenant in the Marine Corps from New York, on April 5, 1858.
General Heywood was promoted to lieutenant colonel on March 9, 1888, and on January 30, 1891 was appointed the ninth Colonel Commandant of the Marine Corps.
General Heywood closed a most distinguished career of over forty-five years as a commissioned officer in the Marine Corps, when on October 3, 1903, in accordance with law, having attained the age of 64 years, he was placed on the retired list.
Heywood - Hutchinson encyclopedia article about Heywood (244 words)
Heywood has a range of industries, including the manufacture of machinery, carpets, wallpaper, and chemicals, as well as engineering works.
Thomas Heywood, a sort of journalist before the days of newspapers, produced an enormous amount of work in various literary forms; in the drama he claimed to have had 'an entire hand, or at least a maine finger' in no less than two hundred and twenty plays.
After a vociferous consultation, which was, at times, deafened by bursts of savage joy, they again separated, filling the air with the name of a foe, whose body, Heywood could collect from their expressions, they hoped to find concealed in some crevice of the island.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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