FACTOID # 29: 73.3% of America's gross operating surplus in motion picture and sound recording industries comes from California.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Charles Hector, comte d'Estaing
Comte Jean Baptiste Charles Henri Hector d' Estaing
Enlarge
Comte Jean Baptiste Charles Henri Hector d' Estaing
Portrait by Benson John Lossing in The pictorial field-book of the revolution
Enlarge
Portrait by Benson John Lossing in The pictorial field-book of the revolution
Comte Jean Baptiste Charles Henri Hector d' Estaing
Comte Jean Baptiste Charles Henri Hector d' Estaing

Comte Jean Baptiste Charles Henri Hector d' Estaing (November 1729 - April 28, 1794) was a French admiral. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Benson John Lossing (1813-1891) was an American historian and wood engraver, known best for his illustrated books on the American Revolution and American Civil War. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Events July 30 - Baltimore, Maryland is founded. ... April 28 is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 247 days remaining. ... 1794 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Admiral is a word from the Arabic term Amir-al-bahr (Lord of the bay). ...


He was born at the château of Codignat, in Ravel, Auvergne. He entered the army as a colonel of infantry, and in 1757 he accompanied count de Lally to the East Indies, with the rank of brigadier-general. In 1759 he was taken prisoner at the siege of Madras, but was released on parole. Before the ratification of his exchange he entered the service of the French East Indian Company, and (with two vessels) destroyed the British factories in Sumatra and the Persian Gulf. Auvergne coat of arms Auvergne (Occitan: Auvèrnha) was the name of an historically independent county in the center of France, as well as later a province of France. ... Infantry of the 36th Ulster Division, in the First World War Infantry are soldiers who fight primarily on foot, mainly with small arms and operate within organized military units. ... The Indies, on the display globe of the Field Museum, Chicago The Indies or East Indies (or East India) is a term used to describe lands of South and South-East Asia, occupying all of the former British India, the present Indian Union, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Myanmar, Sri Lanka, Maldives, and... Parole can have different meanings depending on the context. ... The French East India Company (French Compagnie des Indes Orientales) was a commercial enterprise, founded in 1664 to compete with the British and Dutch East India companies. ...


On his way back to France in 1760 he fell, accidentally, into the hands of the English. He was, on the ground of having broken his parole, thrown into prison at Portsmouth but as the charge could not be substantiated, he was soon afterwards released. In 1763 he was named lieutenant-general in the navy, and in 1777 vice-admiral;. One year later, he left Toulon in command of a fleet of twelve battleships and fourteen frigates with the intention of assisting the American colonies against Great Britain. He sailed on April 13, and between the 11th and the 22nd of July, blockaded Lord Howe at Sandy Hook, but did not venture to attack him, though greatly superior in force. 1760 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... This article is about the English city of Portsmouth. ... 1763 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... 1777 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 13 April is the 103rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (104th in leap years). ... Richard Howe, 1st Earl Howe (March 8, 1726 – August 5, 1799) was a British admiral. ...


In collusion with the American generals, he planned an attack on Newport, Rhode Island, preparatory to which he compelled the British to destroy some war vessels that were in the harbour; but before the concerted attack could take place, he put to sea against the English fleet, under Lord Howe, when owing to a violent storm, which arose suddenly and compelled the two fleets to separate before engaging in battle, many of his vessels were so shattered that he found it necessary to put into Boston for repairs. He then sailed for the West Indies on November 4. After a feeble attempt to retake Santa Lucia from Admiral Barrington, he captured St Vincent and Grenada. A side street in Newport, Rhode Island, showing the historic buildings near the waterfront Newport is a city located in Newport County, Rhode Island, about 30 miles (48 km) south of Providence. ... Nickname: City on a Hill, Beantown, The Hub (of the Solar System), Athens of America Motto: {{{motto}}} Official website: www. ... The Caribbean or the West Indies is a group of islands in the Caribbean Sea. ... November 4 is the 308th day of the year (309th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 57 days remaining. ... Samuel Barrington (1729 — 1800), British admiral, was the fourth son of the 1st Viscount Barrington. ... Saint Vincent is an island in the Caribbean, part of Saint Vincent and the Grenadines. ...


On July 6, 1779 he fought a drawn battle with Admiral Byron, who retired to St Christopher. Though superior in force, D'Estaing would not attack the English in the roadstead, but set sail to attack Savannah. All his attempts, as well as those of the Americans, against the town were repulsed with heavy loss, and he was finally compelled to retire. July 6 is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 178 days remaining. ... 1779 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... John Byron (November 8, 1723 – April 10, 1786) was a British vice-admiral. ... Savannah may refer to the following articles Cities Savannah, Georgia Savannah, Missouri Savannah, New York Savannah, Tennessee Other An alternate spelling of savanna - a type of grassland GNU Savannah - an aggregation of software development projects affiliated with the GNU project Savannah (film actress) - a pornographic film star SS Savannah, the...


He returned to France in 1780 but he fell into disfavour at the court. Three years later, however, he was placed at the head of the Franco-Spanish fleet assembled before Cádiz but the peace was signed and no operations took place. From that time his chief attention was devoted to politics, he was first made a grandee of Spain and in 1787 he was elected to the Assembly of Notables. When the French Revolution broke out, he favoured the new ideas. In 1789 he was appointed National Guard at Versailles and in 1792 he was chosen admiral by the National Assembly. Though in favour of national reform, he remained loyal to the royal family, and on the trial of Marie Antoinette in 1793 bore testimony in her favour. On this account, and because of certain friendly letters which had passed between him and the queen, he was himself brought to trial charged with being a reactionary. He was sent to the gallows on 28 April 1794. In his moments of leisure, he wrote a poem, "Le Rêve" (1755), a tragedy "Les Thermopyles" (1789), and a book on the colonies. 1780 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... City nickname: Tacita de plata (little silver cup) Official website: http://www. ... 1787 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Assembly of Notables In 1783 Charles Alexandre de Calonne, a provincial noble, became royal finance minister. ... During the French Revolution (1789-1799) democracy and republicanism replaced the absolute monarchy in France, and the French sector of the Roman Catholic Church was forced to undergo radical restructuring. ... 1789 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1792 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Marie-Antoinette, Queen of France and Archduchess of Austria (born November 1755 – executed 16 October 1793) Daughter of Maria Theresa of Austria, wife of Louis XVI and mother of Louis XVII. She was guillotined at the height of the French Revolution. ... 1793 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... These gallows in Tombstone Courthouse State Historic Park are maintained by Arizona State Parks. ... April 28 is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 247 days remaining. ... 1794 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ...


Reference


 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m