FACTOID # 14: North Carolina has a larger Native American population than North Dakota, South Dakota and Montana combined.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Charles Grandison Finney
Charles G. Finney
Charles G. Finney

Charles Grandison Finney (August 29, 1792August 16, 1875), often called "America's foremost revivalist," was a major leader of the Second Great Awakening in America, which had a great impact on the social history of the United States of America. Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... is the 241st day of the year (242nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1792 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1875 (MDCCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... The Second Great Awakening  (1800–1830s) was the second great religious revival in United States  history and consisted of renewed personal salvation experienced in revival meetings. ...

Contents

Life and theology

Born in Warren, Connecticut as the youngest of seven children, Finney had humble beginnings. His parents were farmers and Finney himself never attended college. However, his six foot three inch stature, piercing blue eyes, musical skill, and leadership abilities gained him good standing in his community. He studied as an apprentice to become a lawyer, but after a dramatic conversion experience in Adams, New York at the age of 29, Finney became a minister in the Presbyterian Church. Finney moved to New York City in 1832 where he pastored the Free Presbyterian Chatham Street Chapel and later founded and pastored the Broadway Tabernacle, known today as Broadway United Church of Christ [1]. Finney's logical, clear presentation of his Gospel message reached thousands and promised renewing power and the love of Jesus. Some historians estimate his preaching led to the conversion of over 500,000 people. Image File history File links Unbalanced_scales. ... Image File history File links Emblem-important. ... Warren is a town located in Litchfield County, Connecticut. ... Presbyterianism is part of the Reformed churches family of denominations of Christian Protestantism based on the teachings of John Calvin which traces its institutional roots to the Scottish Reformation, especially as led by John Knox. ... The only known image of the Chatham Garden Theatres exterior For the other theatre of this name, see Chatham Theatre. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Gospel, from the Old English good tidings is a calque of Greek () used in the New Testament (see Etymology below). ...


Finney was known for his innovations in preaching and conducting religious meetings, such as allowing women to pray in public and the development of the "anxious bench," a place where those considering becoming Christians could come to receive prayer. Finney was also known for his use of extemporaneous preaching. Extemporaneous preaching is a style of preaching that was popular in the late 1800s among Baptist (Primitive Baptist especially), Methodist, Unitarian, and some Presbyterians preachers. ...


In addition to being a successful Christian evangelist, Finney was involved with the abolitionist movement and frequently denounced slavery from the pulpit. Beginning in the 1830s, he denied communion to slaveholders in his churches. Prior to his conversion, he had been (as most lawyers of the time were) a Freemason, but became a staunch opponent of Masonry, and wrote an extensive book attacking it, entitled "The Character, Claims, and Practical Workings of Freemasonry". This article is about the abolition of slavery. ...


In 1835, he moved to Ohio where he would become a professor, and later President of Oberlin College from 1851 – 1866. Oberlin was a major cultivation ground for the early movement to end slavery, and among the first American colleges to coeducate blacks and women with white men. Oberlin College is a small liberal arts college in Oberlin, Ohio, in the United States. ...


Finney's place in the social history of the United States

As a new nation, the United States was undergoing massive social flux during the 19th century, and this period birthed quite a large number of independent, trans-denominational religious movements such as Mormonism(1830) as well as Millerism (1830's and beyond) and its offshoots the Jehovah's Witnesses (1870), and the Seventh-day Adventist Church (1863). The nation's westward expansion brought about untold opportunities and a readiness to dispense with old thinking, an attitude that influenced people's religious understanding. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The Latter Day Saint movement (a subset of Restorationism) is a group of religious denominations and adherents who follow at least some of the teachings and revelations of Joseph Smith, Jr. ... William Miller The Millerite tradition is a diverse family of denominations and Bible study movements that have arisen since the middle of the 19th century, traceable to the Adventist movement sparked by the teachings of William Miller. ... The Seventh-day Adventist (abbreviated Adventist[1]) Church is a Christian denomination which is distinguished by its observance of Saturday, the seventh day of the week, as the Sabbath. ... This article is about the history and influence of the concept. ...


What Finney managed to achieve was to be the most successful religious revivalist during this period, and in this particular area. While groups such as the Jehovah's Witnesses, Mormons and Seventh-day Adventists became closed and exclusivist, Finney was widely admired and influential amongst more mainstream Christians. Finney never started his own denomination or church, and never claimed any form of special prophetic leadership that elevated himself above other evangelists and revivalists.


More flexible Christian denominations, such as the Baptists and Methodists, were able to draw many of Finney's converts into their churches while more established denominations, such as the Presbyterians, were not as successful. Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Baptist is... For other uses, see Methodism (disambiguation). ...


Finney's theology

Finney was a primary influence on the "revival" style of theology which emerged in the 19th century. Though coming from a Calvinistic background, Finney rejected several tenets of "Old Divinity" Calvinism which he felt were unbiblical and counter to evangelism and Christian mission. Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Revival in... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Calvinism... Look up evangelist in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Finney's theology was opposed to Calvinism, as can be read in his masterwork Religious Revivals. In this work, he holds that salvation is bent on a human's will to repent and not forced on people against their will by God. [2]


The rejection of Calvinism was not total. In his Systematic Theology, Finney fully embraced the Calvinist doctrine of the "Perseverance of the Saints." although he remarks in that work that "I have felt greater hesitancy in forming and expressing my views upon this [Perseverance of the saints], than upon almost any other question in theology"[3] At the same time, he took the presence of unrepented sin in the life of a professing Christian as evidence that they must immediately repent or be lost. Support for this position comes from Peter's treatment of the baptized Simon (see Acts 8) and Paul's instruction of discipline to the Corinthian Church (see 1 Corinthians 5). This type of teaching underscores the strong emphasis on personal holiness found in Finney's writings.


While some theologians have attempted to associate Finney with Pelagian thought, it is important to note that Finney strongly affirmed salvation by faith, not by works or by obedience.[4] [5]. Finney affirmed, however, that works were the evidence of faith. The presence of sin thus evinced that a person never had saving faith. Pelagianism is the belief that original sin did not taint human nature (which, being created from God, was divine), and that mortal will is still capable of choosing good or evil without Divine aid. ...


There are also questions over Finney's understanding of the meaning of Jesus' death on the Cross. His view is complex.


Besides making Christ's death the centerpiece of justification rather than Christ's obedience, Finney's understanding of the atonement was that it satisfied "public justice" and that it opened up the way for God to pardon people of their sin. This was the view of the disciples of Jonathan Edwards' followers, the so-called New Divinity which was popular at that time period. In this view, Christ's death satisfied public justice rather than retributive justice. As Finney put it, it was not a "commercial transaction." This view, typically known as the governmental view or moral government view, differs from the Calvinistic view where Jesus' sufferings equal the amount of suffering that Christians would experience in hell, i.e., instead of "paying" off a debt we owe, the atonement made it possible for sinners to be pardoned without weakening the effect of the Law of God against sin. For other persons named Jonathan Edwards, see Jonathan Edwards (disambiguation). ... The governmental view of the atonement (also known as the moral government theory) is a doctrine in Christian theology concerning the meaning and effect of the death of Jesus Christ and has been traditionally taught in Arminian circles that draw primarily from the works of Hugo Grotius, the governmental theory...


References

  1. ^ Broadway United Church of Christ
  2. ^ "Charles Grandison Finney" at Electronic Oberlin Group
  3. ^ "Perseverance of the Saints"
  4. ^ "Just By Faith"
  5. ^ Charles G. Finney, "Letters to Professing Christians Lecture VI: Sanctification By Faith", 1837 []

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Charles Grandison Finney - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1125 words)
Charles Grandison Finney (1792–1875), often called "America's foremost revivalist," was a major leader of the Second Great Awakening in America that had a profound impact on the history of the United States.
Finney was known for his innovations in preaching and conducting religious meetings, such as allowing women to pray in public and the development of the "anxious bench," a place where those considering becoming Christians could come to receive prayer.
Finney was a primary influence on the "revival" style of theology which emerged in the 19th century.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m