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Encyclopedia > Charles Gore
Statue of Charles Gore, outside St Philip's Cathedral, Birmingham

Charles Gore (born 1853 in Wimbledon; died January 17 (though usually commemorated on January 23), 1932) was an English divine and Anglican bishop. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1512 × 2016 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1512 × 2016 pixel, file size: 1. ... St Philips Cathedral St Philips Cathedral is a Church of England cathedral, in Colmore Row, Birmingham, England, dedicated to St Philip. ... 1853 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Wimbledon (pronounced ) is a suburb of London, part of the London Borough of Merton and located seven miles (11. ... January 17 is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1932 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... see also Holy Orders The following terms have traditional meanings for the Anglican Church, and possibly beyond: A churchman is in principle a member of a church congregation, in practice someone in holy orders. ... The term Anglican describes those people and churches following the religious traditions of the Church of England, especially following the Reformation. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      This article is about a title...

Contents

Oxford

Born the third son of the Honourable Charles Alexander Gore, brother of the fourth Earl of Arran. His mother was a daughter of the fourth Earl of Bessborough. He was educated at Harrow and at Balliol College, Oxford and was elected fellow of Trinity College, Oxford in 1875. From 1880 to 1883 he was vice-principal of the theological college at Cuddesdon and when, in 1884, Pusey House was founded at Oxford as a home for Dr Pusey's library and a centre for the propagation of his principles he was appointed the principal, a position which he held until 1893. As principal of Pusey House Gore exercised a wide influence over undergraduates and the younger clergy and it was largely, if not mainly, under this influence that the Oxford Movement underwent a change which to the survivors of the old school of Tractarians seemed to involve a break with its basic principles. Puseyism had been in the highest degree conservative, basing itself on authority and tradition and repudiating any compromise with the modern critical and liberalizing spirit. Gore, starting from the same basis of faith and authority, soon found from his practical experience in dealing with the doubts and difficulties of the younger generation that this uncompromising attitude was untenable and set himself the task of reconciling the principle of authority in religion with that of scientific authority by attempting to define the boundaries of their respective spheres of influence. To him the divine authority of the Catholic Church was an axiom and in 1889 he published two works, the larger of which, The Church and the Ministry, is a learned vindication of the principle of Apostolic Succession in the episcopate against the Presbyterians and other Protestant bodies, while the second, Roman Catholic Claims, is a defence, couched in a more popular form, of the Anglican Church and Anglican orders against the attacks of the Romanists. Earl of Arran is a title in the Peerage of Ireland, and also in the Peerage of Scotland. ... Earl of Bessborough is a title in the Peerage of Ireland. ... Harrow School, (originally: The Free Grammar School of John Lyon; generally: Harrow), is one of the worlds most famous schools. ... Full name Balliol College Motto - Named after John de Balliol Previous names - Established 1263 Sister College St Johns College, Cambridge Master Andrew Graham (academic) Location Broad Street Undergraduates 403 Graduates 228 Homepage Boatclub Balliol College, founded in 1263, is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... College name The College of the Most Holy and Undivided Trinity and Sir Thomas Pope (Knight) Named after The Holy Trinity Established 1555 Sister College Churchill College President Sir Ivor Roberts KCMG MA JCR President Richard Appleton Undergraduates 298 MCR President Andrew Ng Graduates 105 Homepage Boatclub See also Trinity... Ripon College Cuddesdon, is an Anglican theological college (seminary) located in Cuddesdon, a small village a short distance from Oxford. ... Front of Pusey House Pusey House (pronounced Pewsey) was opened in 1884 in part as a memorial to Dr. Edward Pusey, professor of Hebrew at Oxford University, canon of Christ Church Cathedral in Oxford and for forty years the figure head of the Oxford Movement, a movement of the nineteenth... For the 20th century Oxford Movement or Group see Moral Rearmament The Oxford Movement was a loose affiliation of High Church Anglicans who sought to demonstrate that the Church of England was a direct descendant of the Christian church established by the Apostles. ... In Christianity, the doctrine of Apostolic Succession (or the belief that the Church is apostolic) maintains that the Christian Church today is the spiritual successor to the original body of believers in Christ, composed of the Apostles. ... Presbyterianism is part of the Reformed churches family of denominations of Christian Protestantism based on the teachings of John Calvin which traces its institutional roots to the Scottish Reformation, especially as led by John Knox. ... The Anglican Communion is a world-wide organisation of Anglican Churches. ...


So far his published views had been in complete consonance with those of the older Tractarians but, in 1890, a great stir was created by the publication, under his editorship, of Lux Mundi, a series of essays by different writers, being an attempt to succour a distressed faith by endeavouring to bring the Christian creed into its right relation to the modern growth of knowledge, scientific, historic, critical; and to modern problems of politics and ethics. Gore himself contributed an essay on The Holy Spirit and Inspiration and from the tenth edition one of Gore's sermons, On the Christian Doctrine of Sin, was included as an appendix. The book, which ran through twelve editions in a little over a year, met with a somewhat mixed reception. Orthodox churchmen, Evangelical and Tractarian alike, were alarmed by views on the incarnate nature of Christ that seemed to them to impugn his Divinity, and by concessions to the Higher Criticism in the matter of the inspiration of Holy Scripture which appeared to them to convert the impregnable rock, as Gladstone had called it, into a foundation of sand; sceptics, on the other hand, were not greatly impressed by a system of defence which seemed to draw an artificial line beyond which criticism was not to advance. None-the-less the book produced a profound effect far beyond the borders of the English Church and it is largely due to its influence, and to that of the school it represents, that the High Church movement developed on Modernist rather than Tractarian lines from then on. Lux Mundi was a collection of essays from liberal Anglo-Catholic theologians edited by the future bishop of Oxford, Charles Gore, in 1889. ...


In 1891 Gore was chosen to deliver the Bampton lectures and took for his subject the Incarnation. In these lectures he developed the doctrine, the enunciation of which in Lux Mundi had caused so much heart-searching. This is an attempt to explain how it came that Christ, though incarnate God, could err, e.g. in his citations from the Old Testament. The orthodox explanation was based on the principle of accommodation. This, however, ignored the difficulty that if Christ on earth was not subject to human limitations, especially of knowledge, he was not as other men, not subject to their trials and temptations. This difficulty Gore sought to meet through the Kenotic Theory of the Incarnation. Theologians had attempted to explain what St. Paul meant when he wrote of Christ (Phil. ii.7) that he emptied himself (kenosis) and took upon him the form of a servant. According to Gore this means that Christ, on his incarnation, became subject to all human limitations and had stripped himself of all the attributes of the Godhead, including the Divine omniscience, the Divine nature being hidden under the human.[1] John Bampton (1690 - June 2, 1751) was an English churchman, for some time canon of Salisbury. ... St. ... Kenosis is a Greek word for emptiness, which is used as a theological term. ... In Christianity, the Godhead is a unit consisting of God the Father, Jesus Christ (the Son), and the Holy Spirit. ...


The Bampton lectures led to a tense situation which was relieved when in 1893 Gore resigned his principalship and became vicar of Radley, a small parish near Oxford. In 1894 he became a canon of Westminster. Here he gained commanding influence as a preacher and in 1898 was appointed one of the court chaplains. Radley is a small village located about 6 miles (10 km) south of Oxford, in the county of Oxfordshire, in the United Kingdom named after Kevin Radley. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ...


Worcester, Birmingham and Oxford

In 1902 he succeeded JJS Perowne as Bishop of Worcester and in 1905 was installed as the first Bishop of Birmingham, a new see the creation of which (by dividing his see of Worcester) had been mainly due to his efforts. The second parish church of Birmingham, St Philip, became the cathedral. While adhering rigidly to his views on the divine institution of episcopacy as essential to the Christian Church, Dr Gore from the first cultivated friendly relations with the ministers of other denominations, and advocated co-operation with them in all matters when agreement was possible. In social questions he became one of the leaders of the considerable group of High Churchmen known, somewhat loosely, as Christian Socialists, and helped found the Christian Social Union at Pusey House in 1889. He worked actively against the sweating system, pleaded for European intervention in Macedonia, and was a keen supporter of the Licensing Bill of 1908. In 1911 he succeeded Francis Paget as Bishop of Oxford. He resigned in June 1919 and retired to London, where he died in 1932. His body was cremated, and the ashes taken to Mirfield for burial in the church of the Community of the Resurrection. John James Stewart Perowne (March 3rd 1823 - November 6th 1904) was English bishop. ... The Bishop of Worcester is the ordinary in the see of Worcester and has his seat in Worcester Cathedral. ... 1905 (MCMV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar). ... Arms of the Bishop of Birmingham The Bishop of Birmingham is the Ordinary of the Church of England Diocese of Birmingham in the Province of Canterbury The diocese covers the north west of the traditional county of Warwickshire and has its see in the City of Birmingham, West Midlands, where... St Philips Cathedral St Philips Cathedral is a Church of England cathedral, in Colmore Row, Birmingham, England, dedicated to St Philip. ... The Christian Social Union was an organisation within the Church of England devoted to the study of social conditions and the remedying of social injustice, which flourished in the latter part of the nineteenth century and continued into the early twentieth. ... 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Year 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The Bishop of Oxford is the Ordinary of the Church of England Diocese of Oxford in the Province of Canterbury. ...


Community of the Resurrection

In 1892 he had founded a clerical fraternity, known as the Community of the Resurrection, at Pusey House. He became their first Superior, only resigning when appointed Bishop of Worcester. Its members were priests, who were bound by the obligation of celibacy, lived under a common rule and with a common purse. Their work was pastoral, evangelistic, literary and educational. They followed him to Radley in 1893, most of them remaining there when he moved to London in 1894. In 1898 the House of the Resurrection at Mirfield, near Huddersfield, became the centre of the community; in 1903 a college for training candidates for the Anglican priesthood (College of the Resurrection), was established there, and in the same year a branch house, for missionary work, was set up in Johannesburg in South Africa. 1892 (MDCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... The Community of the Resurrection is an Anglican religious community for men. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Year 1898 (MDCCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The Community of the Resurrection is an Anglican religious community for men. ... Mirfield is a town in West Yorkshire, England, near Dewsbury. ... Huddersfield is a large town in England near the confluence of the River Colne and the River Holme. ... 1900 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Friday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... An Anglo-Catholic Anglican Theological School for the training of ordinands at Mirfield, West Yorkshire. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Works

  • Lux Mundi (editor) (1889)
  • The Incarnation (Bampton Lectures, 1891)
  • The Creed of the Christian (1895)
  • The Sermon on the Mount (1896)
  • The Epistle to the Ephesians (1898)
  • Romans (1899)
  • The Body of Christ (1901)
  • The New Theology and the Old Religion (1908)
  • Orders and Unity (1910)
  • Belief in God (1921)
  • Belief in Christ (1922)
  • The Holy Spirit and the Church (1924)
  • The Doctrine of the Infallible Book (1924)
  • Christ and Society (Halley Stewart Lectures, 1927) (pub. 1928)

Belief in God, Belief in Christ and The Holy Spirit and the Church were reissued in a single volume as The Reconstruction of Belief in 1926.


See also

Kenosis is a Greek word for emptiness, which is used as a theological term. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Cf. the Lutheran theologian Ernst Sartorius in his Lehre von der heiligen Liebe (1844), Lehre ii. pp. 21 et seq.: the Son of God veils his all-seeing eye and descends into human darkness and as child of man opens his eye as the gradually growing light of the world of humanity, until at the right hand of the Father he allows it to shine forth in all its glory. See G. F. Loofs, Art. Kenosis in Herzog-Hauck, Realencyklopädie (ed. 1901), x. 247.

Jan. ... Kenosis is a Greek word for emptiness, which is used as a theological term. ...

References

  • This article incorporates text from the Encyclop√¶dia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain.

Encyclopædia Britannica, the eleventh edition The Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition (1910–1911) is perhaps the most famous edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Charles Gore - LoveToKnow 1911 (774 words)
CHARLES GORE (1853-), English divine, was born in 1853, the 3rd son of the Hon.
Charles Alexander Gore, brother of the 4th earl of Arran.
As principal of Pusey House Mr Gore exercised a wide influence over undergraduates and the younger clergy, and it was largely, if not mainly, under this influence that the "Oxford Movement" underwent a change which to the survivors of the old school of Tractarians seemed to involve a break with its basic principles.
Gore - LoveToKnow 1911 (190 words)
The word is used for a tapering strip of land, in the "common or open field" system of agriculture, where from the shape of the land the acre or half-acre strips could not be portioned out in straight divisions.
Similarly "gore" is used in the United States, especially in Maine and Vermont, for a strip of land left out in surveying when divisions are made and boundaries marked.
The triangular sections of material used in forming the covering of a balloon or an umbrella are also called "gores," and in dressmaking the term is used for a triangular piece of material inserted in a dress to adjust the difference in widths.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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