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Encyclopedia > Charles G. Dawes
Charles G. Dawes


In office
March 4, 1925 – March 4, 1929
President Calvin Coolidge
Preceded by Calvin Coolidge
Succeeded by Charles Curtis

Born August 27, 1865
Marietta, Ohio, USA
Died April 23, 1951 (aged 85)
Evanston, Illinois, USA
Political party Republican
Spouse Caro Blymyer Dawes
Children Rufus Fearing Dawes, Carolyn Dawes, Dana McCutcheon (adopted), Virginia (adopted)

Charles Gates Dawes (August 27, 1865April 23, 1951) was an American banker and politician who was the 30th Vice President of the United States. For his work on the Dawes Plan for World War I reparations he was a co-recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize. He served in the First World War, was U.S. Comptroller of the Currency and the first director of the Bureau of the Budget, and in later life the U.S. ambassador to the United Kingdom. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (3177x4152, 1874 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Vice President of the United States Charles G. Dawes ... Seal of the office of the Vice-President of the United States The Vice President of the United States is the first in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the President. ... March 4 is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... March 4 is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... John Calvin Coolidge Jr. ... John Calvin Coolidge Jr. ... This article is about the former Vice President of the United States. ... August 27 is the 239th day of the year (240th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1865 (MDCCCLXV) is a common year starting on Sunday. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Downtown Marietta and the Muskingum River in July 2006 Marietta is a city in Washington County, Ohio, United States. ... Official language(s) None Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Largest metro area Cleveland Area  Ranked 34th  - Total 44,825 sq mi (116,096 km²)  - Width 220 miles (355 km)  - Length 220 miles (355 km)  - % water 8. ... April 23 is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday; see its calendar. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Incorporated City in 1872. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (149,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... August 27 is the 239th day of the year (240th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1865 (MDCCCLXV) is a common year starting on Sunday. ... April 23 is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday; see its calendar. ... For other uses, see Bank (disambiguation). ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A politician is an individual who is a formally recognized and active member of a government, or a person who influences the way a society is governed through an understanding of political power and group dynamics. ... Seal of the office of the Vice-President of the United States The Vice President of the United States is the first in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the President. ... At the conclusion of World War I the Allies imposed in the Treaty of Versailles a plan for reparations to be paid by Germany. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... World War I reparations refers to the payments and transfers of property and equipment that the German state was forced to make following its defeat during World War I. Article 231 of the Treaty (the war guilt clause) held Germany solely responsible for all loss and damage suffered by the... Lester B. Pearson after accepting the Nobel Peace Prize The Nobel Peace Prize (Swedish and Norwegian: Nobels fredspris) is the name of one of five Nobel Prizes bequeathed by the Swedish industrialist and inventor Alfred Nobel. ... Look up comptroller in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) is a body within the Executive Office of the President of the United States (EOP) which is tasked with coordinating United States Federal agencies. ...


Dawes was married to Caro Blymyer on January 24, 1889, and they had two biological children, Rufus Fearing Dawes and Carolyn Dawes, and two more adopted children, Dana McCutcheon and Virginia (Waller 1998: 273). January 24 is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...

Contents

Early life, family, and career

Born in Marietta, Washington County, Ohio, Dawes graduated from Marietta College in 1884, and from the Cincinnati Law School in 1886. While attending Marietta College he joined The Delta Upsilon Fraternity. He was admitted to the bar and practiced in Lincoln, Nebraska between 1887 and 1894. When Lt. John Pershing, the future Army general, was appointed military instructor at the University of Nebraska while attending the law school, he and Dawes became acquainted, forming a lifelong friendship. Downtown Marietta and the Muskingum River in July 2006 Marietta is a city in Washington County, Ohio, United States. ... Washington County is a county located in the state of Ohio. ... Marietta College is a co-educational private college in Marietta, Ohio, which was the first permanent settlement of the Northwest Territory. ... Year 1884 (MDCCCLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The University of Cincinnati College of Law has a long and distinguished history. ... Marietta College is a co-educational private college in Marietta, Ohio, which was the first permanent settlement of the Northwest Territory. ... Delta Upsilon (ΔΥ) is a non-secret international gentlemens fraternity founded on November 4, 1834 at Williams College. ... Nickname: Location in Nebraska Coordinates: Country   State     County United States   Nebraska     Lancaster Founded[1]   Renamed   Incorporated 1856   July 29, 1867   April 1, 1869 Government  - Mayor Chris Beutler Area  - City 195. ... John Joseph Black Jack Pershing (September 13, 1860 – July 15, 1948) was an officer in the United States Army. ... Seal of the University of Nebraska The University of Nebraska is one of two public university systems in the state of Nebraska, USA. The system has four universities and a technical college: University of Nebraska-Lincoln University of Nebraska at Omaha University of Nebraska at Kearney University of Nebraska Medical...


Dawes' lineage made him the great-great-grandson of the Revolutionary War figure William Dawes and the son of Brigadier General Rufus Dawes, who commanded the 6th Wisconsin regiment of the Iron Brigade from 1863-1864 during the U.S. Civil War. His brothers were Rufus C. Dawes, Beman Gates Dawes, and Henry May Dawes, all prominent businessmen or politicians. Combatants American Patriots France Spanish Empire Dutch Republic Oneida and Tuscarora tribes Polish volunteers Prussian volunteers United Kingdom of Great Britain Iroquois Confederacy Hessian mercenaries Loyalists Commanders George Washington Nathanael Greene Gilbert de La Fayette Comte de Rochambeau Bernardo de Gálvez Tadeusz Kościuszko Friedrich Wilhelm von Steuben King... William Dawes William Dawes, Jr. ... Rufus Robinson Dawes (July 4, 1838 – August 2, 1899) was a military officer in the United States Army during the American Civil War. ... The Iron Brigade was an infantry brigade in the Union Army during the American Civil War, consisting primarily of Western regiments, that was noted for its ability to withstand almost any fire, and its regiments combined took the highest casualty percentage of the war. ... The American Civil War was fought in the United States from 1861 until 1865 between the northern states, popularly referred to as the U.S., the Union, the North, or the Yankees; and the seceding southern states, commonly referred to as the Confederate States of America, the CSA, the Confederacy... Rufus Cutler Dawes (July 30, 1867 – January 8, 1940) was a American businessman from a prominent Ohio family. ... Beman Gates Dawes (January 14, 1870 – May 15, 1953) was a politician and oil executive who served two terms as a Republican Congressman from Ohio. ... Henry May Dawes was an American businessman and banker from a prominent Ohio family. ...


In 1894, Dawes acquired interests in a number of midwestern gas plants and became president of both the Lacrosse Gas Light Company in LaCrosse, Wisconsin and the Northwestern Gas Light and Coke Company in Evanston, Illinois. 1894 (MDCCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... La Crosse is a city located in La Crosse County, Wisconsin. ... Official language(s) None Capital Madison Largest city Milwaukee Area  Ranked 23rd  - Total 65,498 sq mi (169,790 km²)  - Width 260 miles (420 km)  - Length 310 miles (500 km)  - % water 17  - Latitude 42°30N to 47°3N  - Longitude 86°49W to 92°54W Population  Ranked... Incorporated City in 1872. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (149,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ...


Early political career

Those prominent positions caught the attention of Republican party leaders, who put Dawes in charge of managing the Illinois portion of William McKinley's bid for U.S. President in 1896. Following McKinley's election, Dawes was rewarded for his efforts by being named Comptroller of the Currency, United States Department of the Treasury. Serving in that position from 1898-1901, he collected more than $25 million from banks that had failed during the Panic of 1893, and also changed banking practices to try and prevent a similar event in the future. William McKinley Jr. ... For the pop band, see Presidents of the United States of America. ... Look up comptroller in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The U.S. Treasury building today. ... The Panic of 1893 was a serious decline in the economy of the United States that began in 1893 and was precipitated in part by a run on the gold supply. ...


In October 1901, Dawes left the Department of the Treasury in order to pursue a US Senate seat from the State of Illinois. Dawes believed that with the help of the McKinley Administration, he could win the Senate seat, however after McKinley's assassination, Dawes's hopes of winning faded because President Theodore Roosevelt preferred Dawes's opponent (Waller 1998:274). In 1902, following this unsuccessful attempt at elective office, Dawes declared that he was done with politics. He organized the Central Trust Company of Illinois, serving as president of the company until 1921. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... Theodore Roosevelt, Jr. ...


In 1912, Dawes' son, Rufus, drowned in Geneva Lake while on summer break from Princeton University. In his memory, Dawes created residence homes for down-and-out individuals in both Chicago and Boston.-1... Princeton University is a private coeducational research university located in Princeton, New Jersey, in the United States of America. ... Nickname: Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: Country United States State Illinois County Cook & DuPage Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City  234. ... Nickname: City on the Hill, Beantown, The Hub (of the Universe)1, Athens of America, The Cradle of Revolution, Puritan City, Americas Walking City Location in Massachusetts, USA Counties Suffolk County Mayor Thomas M. Menino(D) Area    - City 232. ...


World War I participation

During the First World War, Dawes was commissioned Major, Lieutenant Colonel, and Brigadier General of the Seventeenth Engineers. He served with the American Expeditionary Force as chief of supply procurement and was a member of the Liquidation Commission, United States War Department. After the war, the U.S. Senate held hearings on overcharges by military suppliers, and during heated testimony, Dawes burst out, "Hell and Maria, we weren't trying to keep a set of books over there, we were trying to win a war!" He was later known as "Hell and Maria Dawes" (although he always insisted the expression was "Helen Maria"). “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Officers of the American Expeditionary Forces and the Baker mission The American Expeditionary Forces or AEF was the United States military force sent to Europe in World War I.(In France, AEF is a news agency specialised in Education and Formation) The AEF fought alongside allied forces against imperial German... The United States Department of War was the military department of the United States governments executive branch from 1789 until 1949, when it became part of the United States Department of Defense. ...


After his resignation from the Army in 1919, and upon the creation of the Bureau of the Budget was appointed its first Director in 1921. He was appointed to the Allied Reparations Commission in 1923. For his work on the Dawes Plan, a program to enable Germany to restore and stabilize its economy, Dawes shared the Nobel Peace Prize in 1925. Unfortunately, the Dawes Plan was unworkable and was replaced with the Young Plan. The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) is a body within the Executive Office of the President of the United States (EOP) which is tasked with coordinating United States Federal agencies. ... At the conclusion of World War I the Allies imposed in the Treaty of Versailles a plan for reparations to be paid by Germany. ... Lester B. Pearson after accepting the Nobel Peace Prize The Nobel Peace Prize (Swedish and Norwegian: Nobels fredspris) is the name of one of five Nobel Prizes bequeathed by the Swedish industrialist and inventor Alfred Nobel. ...


Vice Presidency

Dawes and Calvin Coolidge.

At the 1924 Republican National Convention, Calvin Coolidge was quickly selected almost without opposition to be the Republican Presidential Nominee.[1] The Vice Presidential Nominee, on the other hand, was more contested. At first Illinois Governor Frank Lowden was nominated for the Vice Presidency, but he declined the nomination. Coolidge's next choice was Idaho Senator William Borah, but he also declined the nomination. The Republican National Chairman, William Butler, pledged to nominate then Commerce Secretary Herbert Hoover, but he proved to be too unpopular to garner the nod.[2] Eventually, the delegates chose Dawes to be the Vice Presidential Nominee. Though Coolidge had already sent a congratulatory statement to Lowden, Coolidge quickly accepted the delegates' choice and felt that Dawes would be loyal to him and make a strong addition to his campaign.[3] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 290 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (391 × 808 pixel, file size: 52 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) This image is in the public domain in the United States. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 290 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (391 × 808 pixel, file size: 52 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) This image is in the public domain in the United States. ... John Calvin Coolidge Jr. ... The 1924 Republican National Convention was held in Cleveland, Ohio. ... John Calvin Coolidge Jr. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... Frank Orren Lowden (1861 - 1943) was a U.S. political figure. ... William Edgar Borah (NSHC statue) William Edgar Borah (June 29, 1865 – January 19, 1940) was an American politician. ... Herbert Clark Hoover (August 10, 1874 – October 20, 1964), the 31st President of the United States (1929–1933), was a world-famous mining engineer and humanitarian administrator. ...


Dawes was elected Vice President of the United States on November 5, 1924 with more popular votes than the candidates from the Democratic and Progressive parties combined.[4] Dawes and Coolidge were inaugurated March 4, 1925 for the term ending March 4, 1929. November 5 is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 56 days remaining. ... 1924 (MCMXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar). ... The Democratic Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... The United States Progressive Party of 1924 was a national ticket created by Robert M. La Follette, Sr. ... March 4 is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... March 4 is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


I should hate to think that the Senate was as tired of me at the beginning of my service as I am of the Senate at the end. — Charles G. Dawes[5]


Dawes' Vice Presidency was one of the most disastrous on record. Soon after his election he sent an insulting letter to President Coolidge informing him that he would not be attending cabinet meetings. This is believed to be the beginning of a feud between the two which brought the Vice Presidency to its nadir for the 20th century.


Having insulted the President, he then proceeded to publicly insult the entire US Senate. The inauguration of the Vice President was held in the Senate Chamber in those days, and the VP would give an inaugural address before everyone headed on to the outside platform where the President would take the oath. Dawes made a fiery, half-hour address denouncing the rules of the Senate, the seniority system and many other things that Senators held dear.[6]


Eveyone was so shocked at the speech that President Coolidge's own inaugural address was completely overshadowed, leaving him even angrier at Dawes than ever before.


Both the President Coolidge and members of the Senate would have their revenge on Dawes. On March 10, only days after Dawes started presiding over the Senate, the president's nomination of Charles Warren to be attorney general was being debated. In the wake of the Teapot Dome scandal and other business-related scandals, Democrats and Progressive Republicans objected to the nomination because of Warren's close association with the "Sugar Trust." At midday six speakers were scheduled to address Warren's nomination. Desiring to return to his room at the Willard Hotel for a nap, Dawes consulted the majority and minority leaders, who assured him that no vote would be taken that afternoon. After Dawes left the Senate, however, all but one of the scheduled speakers decided against making formal remarks, and a vote was taken. When it became apparent that the vote would be tied, Republican leaders hastily called Dawes at the Willard. The roused vice president jumped in a taxi and sped toward the Capitol. But enough time intervened to persuade the only Democratic senator who had voted for Warren to switch his vote against him. By the time Dawes arrived there was no longer a tie to break, and the nomination had failed by a single vote—the first such rejection in nearly sixty years. [7] Teapot Dome is a reference to an oil field on public land in Wyoming, so named because of a mass boulder that looks like a teapot overlooking the field. ...


Dawes convinced the Senate to pass the McNary-Haugen farm relief bill; Coolidge vetoed the bill.[8]


In 1928 the Republican nomination went to Commerce Secretary Herbert Hoover, whose supporters considered putting Dawes on their ticket as vice president. But President Coolidge let it be known that he would consider Dawes' nomination to be a personal affront. Instead the nod went to Senate Majority Leader Charles Curtis of Kansas. This article is about the former Vice President of the United States. ...


The Court of St. James and the RFC

After Dawes finished his term as Vice President, he became the U.S. ambassador to the Court of St. James (ie, to the United Kingdom), an office that he held from 1929 to 1932. However, Dawes found his duties as Ambassador, which included introducing American girls to the King, to be insulting. He further alienated his hosts by refusing to wear the customary knee breeches. The office of United States Ambassador (or Minister) to the United Kingdom (also known as Ambassador to the Court of St. ... Look up breech in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


As the Great Depression continued to ravage the country, a desperate President Hoover asked Dawes to head up the Reconstruction Finance Corporation, and for a few months he chaired the agency. However, he was forced to resign because the board of the City National Bank and Trust Co., Chicago, of which he was a board member, was going under and he had to save it. This marked the end of his career in public service. The Great Depression was a time of economic down turn, which started after the stock market crash on October 29, 1929, known as Black Tuesday. ... Herbert Clark Hoover (August 10, 1874 – October 20, 1964) is best known as being the 31st (1929-1933) President of the United States. ... The Reconstruction Finance Corporation (RFC) was an independent agency of the United States government chartered during the administration of Herbert Hoover in 1932. ... Nickname: Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: Country United States State Illinois County Cook & DuPage Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City  234. ...


Later life

Dawes resumed a role in the banking business, becoming chairman of the board of the City National Bank and Trust Co. from 1932 until his death in Evanston. He is interred in Rosehill Cemetery, Chicago. His landmark lakeshore home in Evanston is owned by Northwestern University and operated by the Evanston Historical Society as a museum. Incorporated City in 1872. ... Main entrance of Rosehill Cemetery Rosehill Cemetery is a 350 acre (1. ... Northwestern University is a private, coeducational, non-sectarian research university located in Evanston and Chicago, Illinois. ...


Dawes was also a self-taught pianist and composer. His 1912 composition "Melody in A Major," became a well-known piano and violin piece, and was played at many official functions as his signature tune. It was transformed into a pop song ("It's All In The Game") in 1951, when Carl Sigman added lyrics. The song was a number one hit in 1958, for Tommy Edwards (Hatfield 1997: 360), and has since become a pop standard recorded hundreds of times by artists including The Four Tops, Van Morrison, Cliff Richard, Brook Benton, Elton John, Barry Manilow, and Keith Jarrett. Its All in the Game is the name of a song written by Carl Sigman. ... Carl Sigman ( September 24, 1909 – September 26, 2000) was a major American songwriter. ... Tommy Edwards (born 17 February 1922 - died 22 October 1969) was an American singer. ... The Four Tops are an American Motown musical quartet, whose repertoire has included doo-wop, jazz, soul music, R&B, disco, adult contemporary, and showtunes. ... George Ivan Morrison OBE (generally known as Van Morrison) (born August 31, 1945) is a singer-songwriter from Belfast, Northern Ireland. ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... Brooke Benton is an African-American singer. ... Sir Elton Hercules[1] John CBE [2] (born Reginald Kenneth Dwight on 25 March 1947) is a multiple Grammy and Academy Award-winning English pop/rock singer, composer and pianist. ... Barry Manilow (born Barry Alan Pincus, June 17, 1943[1] in Brooklyn, New York) is an American singer and songwriter best known for his recordings I Write the Songs, Mandy and Copacabana. His career achievements include selling more than 75 million records worldwide. ... Keith Jarrett (born May 8, 1945 in Allentown, Pennsylvania) is an American pianist and composer. ...


Selected Bibliography

The list below was retrieved from Haberman's 1972 Nobel Lectures, Peace 1901-1925. This list can also be obtained here.

  • Dawes, C. G. (1894). The Banking System of the United States and Its Relation to the Money and the Business of the Country. Chicago: Rand McNally.
  • Dawes, C. G. (1915). Essays and Speeches. New York: Houghton.
  • Dawes, C. G. (1921). Journal of the Great War. 2 vols. New York: Houghton.
  • Dawes, C. G. (1923). The First Year of the Budget of the United States. New York: Harper.
  • Dawes, C. G. (1935). Notes as Vice President, 1928-1929. Boston: Little, Brown.
  • Dawes, C. G. (1937). How Long Prosperity? New York: Marquis.
  • Dawes, C. G. (1939). Journal as Ambassador to Great Britain. New York: Macmillan.
  • Dawes, C. G. (1939). A Journal of Reparations. New York: Macmillan.
  • Dawes, C. G. (1950). A Journal of the McKinley Years. B. N. Timmons (Ed.). La Grange, IL: Tower.

References

  • Haberman, F. W. (Ed.). (1972). Nobel Lectures, Peace 1901-1925. Amsterdam: Elsevier Publishing. [1]
  • Hatfield, M. O. (1997). Vice Presidents of the United States, 1789-1993. Senate Historical Office. Washington: United States Government Printing Office [2]PDF (66.0 KiB)
  • Pixton, J. E. (1952). The Early Career of Charles G. Dawes. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
  • Sortland, R. A. (1958). Charles G. Dawes: Businessman in Politics. Unpublished manuscript, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH.
  • Timmons, B. N. (1953). Portrait of an American: Charles G. Dawes. New York: Holt.
  • Waller, R. A. (1998). The Vice Presidents: A Biographical Dictionary. Purcell, L. E. (Ed.). New York: Facts On File.

Portable Document Format (PDF) is a file format created by Adobe Systems in 1993 for desktop publishing use. ... A kibibyte (a contraction of kilo binary byte) is a unit of information or computer storage, commonly abbreviated KiB (never kiB). 1 kibibyte = 210 bytes = 1,024 bytes The kibibyte is closely related to the kilobyte, which can be used either as a synonym for kibibyte or to refer to...

Notes

  1. ^ Hatfield 1997: 363
  2. ^ Hatfield 1997: 363
  3. ^ Hatfield 1997: 363
  4. ^ Hatfield 1997: 364
  5. ^ Hatfield, M. O. (1997). Vice Presidents of the United States, 1789-1993. Senate Historical Office. Washington: United States Government Printing Office
  6. ^ Hatfield, M. O. (1997).Vice Presidents of the United States, 1789-1993. Senate Historical Office. Washington: United States Government Printing Office
  7. ^ Hatfield, M. O. (1997). Vice Presidents of the United States, 1789-1993. Senate Historical Office. Washington: United States Government Printing Office
  8. ^ Hatfield, M. O. (1997).Vice Presidents of the United States, 1789-1993. Senate Historical Office. Washington: United States Government Printing Office

External links

Preceded by
(none)
Director of the United States Office of Management and Budget
June 23, 1921June 30, 1922
Succeeded by
Herbert Lard
Preceded by
Calvin Coolidge
Republican Party vice presidential candidate
1924 (won)
Succeeded by
Charles Curtis
Vice President of the United States
March 4, 1925March 4, 1929
Preceded by
Alanson B. Houghton
U.S. Ambassador to the United Kingdom
1929–1932
Succeeded by
Andrew W. Mellon

  Results from FactBites:
 
U.S. Senate: Art & History Home > Charles G. Dawes, 30th Vice President (1925-1929) (5643 words)
Dawes became a highly decorated military officer during the First World War, was the president of a prestigious financial institution, was the first director of the Bureau of the Budget, and devised the "Dawes Plan" to salvage Europe's postwar economy, for which he received the Nobel Peace Prize.
Dawes similarly bristled over the social requirements of the vice-presidency, and as one Washington hostess recorded, "his social tactics, no less than his insubordination to the Senate, brought down blame upon him in Washington." Although he frequently dined out and entertained generously, it was always on his own terms.
Dawes, whose early career was shaken by the panic of 1893, was now confronted by an even greater financial crisis, one that shook his natural self-confidence and ended whatever remaining political chances he might have had.
Charles G. Dawes - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (407 words)
Dawes, a great-grandson of the Revolutionary War figure William Dawes, was born in Marietta, Washington County, Ohio, and graduated from Marietta College in 1884 and from the Cincinnati Law School in 1886.
Dawes was interested in public utilities and banking 1894-1897, Comptroller of the Currency, United States Department of the Treasury 1898-1901.
Dawes was elected on November 5, 1924, Vice President on the Republican ticket with President Calvin Coolidge and was inaugurated March 4, 1925, for the term ending March 4, 1929.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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