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Encyclopedia > Charles E. Leiserson

Charles E. Leiserson is a computer scientist, specializing in the theory of parallel computing and distributed computing, and particularly practical applications thereof; as part of this effort, he developed the Cilk multithreaded language. He invented the fat tree interconnection network, a hardware-universal interconnection network used in many supercomputers, including the Connection Machine CM5, for which he was network architect. He helped pioneer the development of VLSI theory, including the retiming method of digital optimization with James B. Saxe and systolic arrays with H. T. Kung. He conceived of the notion of cache-oblivious algorithms, which are algorithms that have no tuning parameters for cache size or cache-line length, but nevertheless use cache near-optimally. Computer science (informally: CS or compsci) is, in its most general sense, the study of computation and information processing, both in hardware and in software. ... Parallel computing is the simultaneous execution of the same task (split up and specially adapted) on multiple processors in order to obtain results faster. ... Distributed computing is a programming paradigm focusing on designing distributed, open, scalable, transparent, fault tolerant systems. ... Cilk is a general-purpose programming language designed for multithreaded parallel programming. ... The Fat-Tree network, invented by Charles Leiserson of MIT, is a universal network for provably efficient communication. ... Thinking Machines CM-2 at the Computing Museum in San Jose. ... Retiming is the technique of moving the structural location of latches or registers in a digital circuit to improve its performance, area, and/or power characteristics in such a way that preserves its functional behavior at its outputs. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... H. T. Kung is a computer scientist. ... In computing, the cache-oblivious model is an abstract machine similar to many modern machines, featuring random access and a two-level cache. ...


Leiserson received a B.S. degree in computer science and mathematics from Yale University in 1975, and a Ph.D. degree in computer science from Carnegie Mellon University in 1981, where his advisors were Jon Bentley and H. T. Kung. A Bachelor of Science (B.S., B.Sc. ... Yale redirects here. ... 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday. ... Doctor of Philosophy (Ph. ... Carnegie Mellon University is a private research university located in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. ... 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Jon Louis Bentley (?–?) is a researcher in the field of computer science. ... H. T. Kung is a computer scientist. ...


He then joined the faculty of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he is now a Professor. In addition, he is a principal in the Theory of Computation research group in the MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, and he was formerly Director of Research for Akamai Technologies. The Massachusetts Institute of Technology, or MIT, is a private coeducational research university located in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. MIT has five schools and one college, containing 32 academic departments,[2] with a strong emphasis on theoretical, applied, and interdisciplinary scientific and technological research. ... A professor giving a lecture The meaning of the word professor (Latin: one who claims publicly to be an expert) varies. ... MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, or CSAIL, is an interdisciplinary research laboratory at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, formed on July 1, 2003 by the merger of MIT Laboratory for Computer Science and MIT Artificial Intelligence Laboratory. ... Akamai Technologies, Inc. ...


Leiserson's dissertation, Area-Efficient VLSI Computation, won the first ACM Doctoral Dissertation Award. In 1985, the National Science Foundation awarded him a Presidential Young Investigator Award. In 2006 he was inducted as a Fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery. This article is about the thesis in dialectics and academia. ... The Association for Computing Machinery, or ACM, was founded in 1947 as the worlds first scientific and educational computing society. ... 1985 (MCMLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The logo of the National Science Foundation The National Science Foundation (NSF) is an independent United States government agency that supports fundamental research and education in all the non-medical fields of science and engineering. ... 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A fellow in the broadest sense is someone who is an equal or a comrade. ... The Association for Computing Machinery, or ACM, was founded in 1947 as the worlds first scientific and educational computing society. ...


Leiserson coauthored the standard algorithms textbook Introduction to Algorithms together with Thomas H. Cormen, Ronald Rivest, and Clifford Stein. Cover of the second edition Introduction to Algorithms is a book by Thomas H. Cormen, Charles E. Leiserson, Ronald L. Rivest, and Clifford Stein. ... Thomas H. Cormen is the co-author of Introduction to Algorithms, along with Charles Leiserson, Ron Rivest, and Cliff Stein. ... Professor Ron Rivest Professor Ronald Linn Rivest (born 1947, Schenectady, New York) is a cryptographer, and is the Viterbi Professor of Computer Science at MITs Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. ... Clifford Stein is a computer scientist, currently working as a professor at Columbia University in New York, NY. He earned his BSE from Princeton University in 1987, a MS from Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1989, and a PhD from Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1992. ...


See also

Thinking Machines Corporation was a supercomputer manufacturer founded in Waltham, Massachusetts in 1982 by W. Daniel Hillis and Sheryl Handler to turn Hilliss doctoral work at MIT on massively parallel computing architectures into a commercial product called the Connection Machine. ... Thomas H. Cormen is the co-author of Introduction to Algorithms, along with Charles Leiserson, Ron Rivest, and Cliff Stein. ... Professor Ron Rivest Professor Ronald Linn Rivest (born 1947, Schenectady, New York) is a cryptographer, and is the Viterbi Professor of Computer Science at MITs Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. ... Clifford Stein is a computer scientist, currently working as a professor at Columbia University in New York, NY. He earned his BSE from Princeton University in 1987, a MS from Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1989, and a PhD from Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1992. ...

Further reading

Thomas H. Cormen is the co-author of Introduction to Algorithms, along with Charles Leiserson, Ron Rivest, and Cliff Stein. ... Professor Ron Rivest Professor Ronald Linn Rivest (born 1947, Schenectady, New York) is a cryptographer, and is the Viterbi Professor of Computer Science at MITs Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. ... Cover of the second edition Introduction to Algorithms is a book by Thomas H. Cormen, Charles E. Leiserson, Ronald L. Rivest, and Clifford Stein. ... Thomas H. Cormen is the co-author of Introduction to Algorithms, along with Charles Leiserson, Ron Rivest, and Cliff Stein. ... Professor Ron Rivest Professor Ronald Linn Rivest (born 1947, Schenectady, New York) is a cryptographer, and is the Viterbi Professor of Computer Science at MITs Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. ... Clifford Stein is a computer scientist, currently working as a professor at Columbia University in New York, NY. He earned his BSE from Princeton University in 1987, a MS from Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1989, and a PhD from Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1992. ... Cover of the second edition Introduction to Algorithms is a book by Thomas H. Cormen, Charles E. Leiserson, Ronald L. Rivest, and Clifford Stein. ...

External links

  • Home page
    • Brief Biography

  Results from FactBites:
 
Big O notation - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1710 words)
Unlike most other computational problems, in graphs, there are two relevant parameters describing the size of the input, V and E; V is the number of vertices in the graph, while E is the number of edges in the graph.
Keep in mind that the symbols V and E are never used inside asymptotic notation with their literal meaning, so there is no risk of ambiguity.
Thomas H. Cormen, Charles E. Leiserson, Ronald L. Rivest, and Clifford Stein.
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