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Encyclopedia > Charles Bulfinch
The Massachusetts State House, designed by Charles Bulfinch and completed in 1798.
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Plan and elevation of the Tontine Crescent, designed by Charles Bulfinch, built 1793-1794. (No longer extant).
The Hollis Street Church, built 1788.

Charles Bulfinch (August 8, 1763April 15, 1844) was an early American architect, and regarded by many as the first native-born American to practice architecture as a profession. That distinction is also claimed for Robert Mills. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2560x1920, 1068 KB) Massachusetts State House, the capitol of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, located on the Common in Boston, Massachusetts. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2560x1920, 1068 KB) Massachusetts State House, the capitol of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, located on the Common in Boston, Massachusetts. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (8165x6652, 3275 KB) Tontine Crescent, Boston, Massachusetts - Elevation and Plan. ... Image File history File links Hollis_Street_Church,_Boston,_Massachusetts_(1788). ... Image File history File links Hollis_Street_Church,_Boston,_Massachusetts_(1788). ... is the 220th day of the year (221st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1763 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jan. ... Section of the dome of Florence Cathedral. ... An architect at his drawing board, 1893 An architect is a person who is involved in the planning, designing and oversight of a buildings construction. ... Robert Mills (1781 - 1855) is sometimes called the first native born American to become a professional architect; Charles Bulfinch perhaps has a clearer claim to this honor. ...


Bulfinch split his career between his native Boston and Washington, D.C., where he served as Commissioner of Public Building and built the original rotunda and dome of the U.S. Capitol. His works are notable for their simplicity, balance, and good taste, and were the origin of a distinctive Federal style of classical domes, columns, and ornament that dominated early 19th-century American architecture. Nickname: Location in Massachusetts, USA Coordinates: , Country United States State Massachusetts County Suffolk County Settled 1630 Incorporated (city) 1822 Government  - Mayor Thomas M. Menino (D) Area  - City  89. ... Nickname: Motto: Justitia Omnibus (Justice for All) Location of Washington, D.C., in relation to the states Maryland and Virginia Coordinates: , Country United States Federal District District of Columbia Government  - Mayor Adrian M. Fenty (D)  - D.C. Council Chairperson: Vincent C. Gray (D) Ward 1: Jim Graham (D) Ward 2... United States Capitol The United States Capitol is the building which serves as home for the legislative branch of the United States government. ... Federal style architecture occurred in the United States between 1780 and 1830, particularly from 1785 to 1815. ...


Bulfinch was born in Boston to Thomas Bulfinch, a prominent physician, and educated at Boston Latin School and Harvard University, from which he graduated with an AB in 1781 and Master's degree in 1784. He then made a grand tour of Europe from 1785-1787, where he was influenced by the classical architecture in Italy and the neoclassical buildings of Sir Christopher Wren, Robert Adam, and others in England. Thomas Jefferson became something of a mentor in Europe, as he would later be to Robert Mills. Upon his return to the United States in 1787, he became a promoter of the ship Columbia's voyage around the world under command of Captain Robert Gray (1755-1806). It was the first American ship to circumnavigate the globe. In 1788 he married Hannah Apthorp. Motto Sumus Primi Founded April 23, 1635 Head Master Lynne Mooney Teta Affiliation Boston Public Schools Curriculum College-Preparatory Grades 7-12 Enrollment c. ... Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA and a member of the Ivy League. ... 1781 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1784 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... World map showing the location of Europe. ... 1785 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1787 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Sir Christopher Wren, (20 October 1632–25 February 1723) was a 17th century English designer, astronomer, geometrician, and the greatest English architect of his time. ... Robert Adam Robert Adam (3 July 1728 - 3 March 1792) was a Scottish architect, interior designer and furniture designer, born in Kirkcaldy, Fife, Scotland. ... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... Robert Mills (1781 - 1855) is sometimes called the first native born American to become a professional architect; Charles Bulfinch perhaps has a clearer claim to this honor. ... Robert Gray (May 10, 1755 – July, 1806) was an American merchant sea-captain and explorer. ...


Among Bulfinch's first works were his very first building, the Hollis Street Church (1788); a memorial column on Beacon Hill (1789), the first monument to the American Revolution; the Federal Street theater (1793); the Tontine Crescent (built 1793-1794, now demolished), fashioned after John Wood's Royal Crescent; the Old State House in Hartford, Connecticut (1796); and the Massachusetts State House (1798). Over the course of ten years, Bulfinch built a remarkable number of private dwellings in Boston, including a series of three houses in Boston for Harrison Gray Otis (1796, 1800, 1806), and the John Phillips House (1804). He built several churches in Boston, of which New North (built 1802-1804) is the last standing. Cutting down Beacon Hill, about 1800; a view from the north toward the Massachusetts State House. ... John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence, showing the five-man committee in charge of drafting the Declaration in 1776 as it presents its work to the Second Continental Congress The American Revolution refers to the period during the last half of the 18th century in which the Thirteen Colonies that... John Wood, the Younger (February 25, 1728, Bath-June 18, 1782, Batheaston) was an English architect, working principally in the city of Bath, England. ... Aerial view of the Royal Crescent Royal Crescent, seen from a hot air balloon. ... The Old State House, Hartford, Connecticut. ... Nickname: Location in Hartford County, Connecticut Coordinates: , Country State NECTA Hartford Region Capitol Region Named 1637 Incorporated (city) 1784 Consolidated 1896 Government  - Type Mayor-council  - Mayor Eddie Perez Area  - City  18. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... There are three houses named the Harrison Gray Otis House in Boston, Massachusetts. ... 2nd Harrison Gray Otis House, Beacon Hill, Boston, Massachusetts. ... Bulfinchs sketch of the interior. ...


Serving from 1791 to 1795 on Boston's board of selectmen, he resigned due to business pressures but returned in 1799. From 1799 to 1817 he was the chairman of Boston's board of selectmen continuously, and served as a paid Police Superintendent, improving the city's streets, drains, and lighting. Under his direction, both the infrastructure and civic center of Boston were transformed into a dignified classical style. Bulfinch was responsible for the design of the Boston Common, the remodeling and enlargement of Faneuil Hall (1805), and the construction of India Wharf. In these Boston years he also designed the Massachusetts State Prison (1803); University Hall for Harvard University (1813-1814); the Meeting House in Lancaster, Massachusetts (1815-17); and the Bulfinch Building of Massachusetts General Hospital (1818). Despite this great activity and civic involvement, Bulfinch was insolvent several times starting in 1796, including at the start of his work on the statehouse, and was jailed for the month of July 1811 for debt (in a prison he had designed himself). There was no payment for his services as selectman, and he received only $1,400 for designing and overseeing the construction of the State House. Image:Boston common Boston Massachusetts USA.jpg Boston Common in 2005, with the State House looming in the background 1890 Map of Boston Common and the adjacent Public Garden View of the Water Celebration, on Boston Common, October 25th 1848 Boston Common Engraving For the television series, see Boston Common... Faneuil Hall, located near the waterfront and todays Government Center in Boston, Massachusetts, has been a marketplace and a meeting hall since 1742. ... Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA and a member of the Ivy League. ... Meeting House, designed by noted architect Charles Bulfinch, built 1815-1817. ... Massachusetts General Hospital (often abbreviated to Mass General or just MGH) is a teaching hospital of Harvard Medical School and biomedical research facility in Boston, Massachusetts. ...

Charles Bulfinch

In the summer of 1817, Bulfinch's roles as selectman, designer and public official blended during a visit by President James Monroe. The two men were almost constantly in each other's company for the week-long visit, and a few months later (1818) Monroe appointed Bulfinch the Architect of the Capitol in Washington, D.C., which had been burned by the British in 1814, succeeding Benjamin Henry Latrobe (1764-1820). In this position he was paid a salary of $2,500 per year plus expenses. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... James Monroe (April 28, 1758 – July 4, 1831) was the fifth President of the United States (1817-1825), and the fourth Virginian to hold the office. ... United States Capitol The Architect of the Capitol is responsible to the United States Congress for the maintenance, operation, development, and preservation of the United States Capitol Complex, which includes the Capitol, the congressional office buildings, the Library of Congress buildings, the United States Supreme Court building, the United States... Nickname: Motto: Justitia Omnibus (Justice for All) Location of Washington, D.C., in relation to the states Maryland and Virginia Coordinates: , Country United States Federal District District of Columbia Government  - Mayor Adrian M. Fenty (D)  - D.C. Council Chairperson: Vincent C. Gray (D) Ward 1: Jim Graham (D) Ward 2... Benjamin Henry Latrobe (May 1, 1764 - September 3, 1820) was an architect best known for his design of the United States Capitol. ...


As Commissioner of Public Building, Bulfinch completed the Capitol's wings and central portion, designed the western approach and portico, and constructed the Capitol's original low wooden dome to his own design (replaced by the present cast-iron dome in the mid-1850s). In 1829 Bulfinch completed the construction of the Capitol, 36 years after its cornerstone was laid. During his interval in Washington, Bulfinch also drew plans for the State House in Augusta, Maine (1829-32). He returned to Boston in 1830, where he died on April 15, 1844, aged 80, and was buried in King's Chapel Burial Ground in Boston. His tomb was later moved to Mount Auburn Cemetery in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Location in Maine Coordinates: County Kennebec County Established 1754 Government  - Mayor William E. Dowling Area  - City 150. ... is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jan. ... Mount Auburn Cemetery Mount Auburn Cemetery Hunnewell family obelisk Civil War memorial Founded in 1831 as Americas first garden cemetery, Mount Auburn Cemetery is an Elysium where, traditionally, chaste classical monuments were set in rolling landscaped terrain. ... Location in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country United States State Massachusetts County Middlesex County Settled 1630 Incorporated 1636 Government  - Type Mayor-council city  - Mayor Kenneth Reeves (D) Area  - City  7. ...


Bulfinch married Hannah Apthorp, his first cousin. Their sons include Thomas Bulfinch (1796-1867) of Bulfinch's Mythology, and Stephen Greenleaf Bulfinch (1809-1870), Unitarian clergyman and author. Thomas Bulfinch (July 15, 1796 - May 27, 1867) was an American writer, born in Newton, Massachusetts to a highly-educated but not rich Bostonian merchant family. ...


In 1943, a United States Liberty ship named the SS Charles Bulfinch was launched. She was scrapped in 1971. Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Liberty ships were cargo ships built in the United States during World War II. They were cheap and quick to build, and came to symbolize U.S. wartime industrial output. ... The SS Charles Bulfinch (Hull Number 999) was a Liberty ship built in the United States during World War II. She was named after Charles Bulfinch, an American architect whose major works include Massachusetts State House in Boston and the completion of the United States Capitol in Washington, D.C... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

Wikisource has an original article from the 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica about:
Bulfinch, Charles

Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... The original Wikisource logo. ... Encyclopædia Britannica, the eleventh edition The Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition (1910–1911) is perhaps the most famous edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. ... Faneuil Hall, located near the waterfront and todays Government Center in Boston, Massachusetts, has been a marketplace and a meeting hall since 1742. ... There are three houses named the Harrison Gray Otis House in Boston, Massachusetts. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Old State House, Hartford, Connecticut. ... The Maine State House, located in Augusta, Maine, was completed in 1832, one year after Augusta became the capital of Maine. ...

References

  • Charles Bulfinch: Architect and Citizen, C. A. Place, Da Capo Press, 1968
  • The Architecture of Charles Bulfinch, H. Kirker, Harvard University Press, 1998

External links

  • Charles Bulfinch's Photo & Gravesite

  Results from FactBites:
 
Charles Bulfinch (205 words)
Bulfinch constructed the Capitol's central section (shown in blue), including the Rotunda and the original dome.
Bulfinch was among the first American-born architects of distinction.
In 1829 Bulfinch completed the construction of the Capitol, 36 years after the cornerstone was laid.
Charles Bulfinch - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (723 words)
Charles Bulfinch (August 8, 1763-April 15, 1830) was a fine early American architect, and regarded by many as the first native-born American to practice architecture as a profession.
Bulfinch was born in Boston to Thomas Bulfinch, a prominent physician, and educated at Boston Latin School and Harvard University from which he graduated with an AB in 1781 and Masters in 1784.
Bulfinch was responsible for the design of the Boston Common, the remodeling and enlargement of Faneuil Hall (1805), and the construction of India Wharf.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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