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Encyclopedia > Charles Baudelaire
Charles Pierre Baudelaire

Charles Baudelaire (portrait by Etienne Carjat, ca. 1863)
Born: April 9, 1821
Paris, France
Died: August 31, 1867 (aged 46)
Paris, France
Occupation: poet, art critic
Nationality: French
Writing period: 1844–1866
Literary movement: Symbolist, Modernist
Influences: Théophile Gautier, E.T.A. Hoffmann, Joseph de Maistre, Edgar Allan Poe
Influenced: Walter Benjamin, Jorge Luis Borges, T.S. Eliot, Stefan George, Michel Houellebecq, Joris-Karl Huysmans, Jules Laforgue, Comte de Lautréamont, Stéphane Mallarmé, Arthur Rimbaud, Paul Verlaine
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20th century - Contemporary Baudelaire may refer to: Charles Baudelaire, (1821–1867) one of the most influential French poets of the nineteenth century Several characters characters from A Series of Unfortunate Events, most notably the Baudelaire orphans: Violet Baudelaire, the eldest child Klaus Baudelaire, the middle child Sunny Baudelaire, the youngest child Their parents... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 469 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1800 × 2302 pixel, file size: 2. ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1821 (MDCCCXXI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the capital of France. ... is the 243rd day of the year (244th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Cunt BAg Twat Fuk suck my penis ring 0778851865!!!!!!Year 1867 (MDCCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the capital of France. ... This article is about work. ... In English usage, nationality is the legal relationship between a person and a country. ... ... La mort du fossoyeur (The death of the gravedigger) by Carlos Schwabe is a visual compendium of Symbolist motifs. ... For Christian theological modernism, see Liberal Christianity and Modernism (Roman Catholicism). ... Pierre Jules Théophile Gautier (August 30, 1811 – October 23, 1872) was a French poet, dramatist, novelist, journalist, and literary critic. ... ETA Hoffman Ernst Theodor Amadeus Hoffmann (January 24, 1776 - June 25, 1822), was a German romantic and fantasy author and composer. ... Joseph de Maistre (portrait by Karl Vogel von Vogelstein, 1810) Joseph-Marie, Comte de Maistre (April 1, 1753- February 26, 1821) was a French-speaking Savoyard lawyer, diplomat, writer, and philosopher. ... Edgar Allan Poe (January 19, 1809 – October 7, 1849) was an American poet, short story writer, playwright, editor, literary critic, essayist and one of the leaders of the American Romantic Movement. ... Walter Bendix Schönflies Benjamin (July 15, 1892 – September 27, 1940) was a German Marxist literary critic, essayist, translator, and philosopher. ... Jorge Luis Borges (August 24, 1899 – June 14, 1986) was an Argentine writer. ... Thomas Stearns Eliot (September 26, 1888 - January 4, 1965), was a major Modernist Anglo-American poet, dramatist, and literary critic. ... Stefan George (1910) Stefan George (Bingen, Hesse, July 12, 1868 – Locarno, December 4, 1933) was a German poet and translator. ... Michel Houellebecq (pronounced ) (real name Michel Thomas), born 26 February 1958, on the French island of Réunion is a controversial, award-winning French novelist. ... Joris-Karl Huysmans. ... Jules Laforgue (August 16, 1860–August 20, 1887) was a French poet born in Montevideo, Uruguay. ... Lautréamont Comte de Lautréamont was the pen name of Isidore Lucien Ducasse (April 4, 1846 – November 24, 1870), a French poet whose only work, Les Chants de Maldoror, had a major influence on modern literature, and in particular on the Surrealist movement. ... Portrait of Stéphane Mallarmé by Édouard Manet. ... Rimbaud redirects here. ... Paul Verlaine Paul-Marie Verlaine (IPA: ; March 30, 1844–January 8, 1896) was a French poet associated with the Symbolist movement. ... French literature is, generally speaking, literature written in the French language, particularly by citizens of France; it may also refer to literature written by people living in France who speak other traditional non-French languages. ... Medieval French literature is, for the purpose of this article, literature written in Oïl languages (including Old French and early Middle French) during the period from the eleventh century to the end of the fifteenth century. ... French Renaissance literature is, for the purpose of this article, literature written in French (Middle French) from the French invasion of Italy in 1494 to 1600, or roughly the period from the reign of Charles VIII of France to the ascension of Henri IV of France to the throne. ... 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Charles Pierre Baudelaire (IPA: ['bəʊdəlɛə]; French IPA: [ʃaʁl bod'lɛʁ]) (April 9, 1821August 31, 1867) was an influential nineteenth century French poet, critic, and acclaimed translator. Articles with similar titles include the NATO phonetic alphabet, which has also informally been called the “International Phonetic Alphabet”. For information on how to read IPA transcriptions of English words, see IPA chart for English. ... Articles with similar titles include the NATO phonetic alphabet, which has also informally been called the “International Phonetic Alphabet”. For information on how to read IPA transcriptions of English words, see IPA chart for English. ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1821 (MDCCCXXI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 243rd day of the year (244th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Cunt BAg Twat Fuk suck my penis ring 0778851865!!!!!!Year 1867 (MDCCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... French poetry is a category of French literature. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Look up Translator in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...



Baudelaire was born in Paris. His father, a senior civil servant and amateur artist, died early in Baudelaire's life in 1827. In the following year, his mother married a lieutenant colonel Jacques Aupick, who later became a French ambassador to various courts. Baudelaire was educated in Lyon and at the Collège Louis-le-Grand in Paris. Upon gaining his degree in 1839, he decided to embark upon a literary career, and for the next two years led an irregular life. He may have contracted syphilis during this period. In the hope of reforming him, his guardians sent him on a voyage to India in 1841, but he never arrived. When he returned to Paris, after less than a year's absence, he received a small inheritance, but he spent it within a few years. His family obtained a decree to place his property in trust. During this time he met Jeanne Duval, who was to become his longest romantic association. This article is about the capital of France. ... The Byzantine civil service in action. ... The definition of an artist is wide-ranging and covers a broad spectrum of activities to do with creating art, practicing the arts and/or demonstrating an art. ... In the U.S. Army, Air Force and Marine Corps, a lieutenant colonel is a commissioned officer superior to a major and inferior to a colonel. ... An ambassador, rarely embassador, is a diplomatic official accredited to a foreign sovereign or government, or to an international organization, to serve as the official representative of his or her own country. ... A royal or noble court, as an instrument of government broader than a court of justice, comprises an extended household centered on a patron whose rule may govern law or be governed by it. ... This article is about the French city. ... The Lycée Louis-le-Grand, in Paris is one of the most famous lycées providing preparatory classes for grandes écoles. ... A B.A. issued as a certificate A degree is any of a wide range of status levels conferred by institutions of higher education, such as universities, normally as the result of successfully completing a program of study. ... Syphilis is a sexually transmitted disease caused by Treponema pallidum. ... A legal guardian is a person who has the legal authority (and the corresponding duty) to care for the personal and property interests of another person, called a ward. ... Jeanne Duval was the lifelong romantic association of French poet and art critic Charles Baudelaire. ...


His art reviews of 1845 and 1846 attracted immediate attention for their boldness; many of his critical opinions were novel in their time, but have since been generally accepted. He took part in the Revolutions of 1848, and for some years was interested in republican politics, but his political convictions spanned the anarchism of Pierre-Joseph Proudhon, the history of the Raison d'Ėtat of Giuseppe Ferrari, and ultramontane critique of liberalism of Joseph de Maistre. This article is about the philosophical concept of Art. ... Painting of a barricade on Rue Soufflot (with the Panthéon behind), Paris, June 1848. ... Republicanism is the ideology of governing a nation as a republic, with an emphasis on liberty, rule by the people, and the civic virtue practiced by citizens. ... Pierre Joseph Proudhon. ... Giuseppe Ferrari (7 March 1812 - 2 July 1876) was an Italian philosopher, historian and politician. ... Ultramontanism is a religious philosophy within the Roman Catholic community that places strong emphasis on the prerogatives and powers of the pope. ... Joseph de Maistre (portrait by Karl Vogel von Vogelstein, 1810) Joseph-Marie, Comte de Maistre (April 1, 1753- February 26, 1821) was a French-speaking Savoyard lawyer, diplomat, writer, and philosopher. ...


Baudelaire was a slow and fastidious worker, and it was not until 1857 that he published his first and most famous volume of poems, Les Fleurs du mal ("The Flowers of Evil"). Some of these poems had already appeared in the Revue des deux mondes (Review of Two Worlds), when they were published by Baudelaire's friend Auguste Poulet Malassis, who had inherited a printing business at Alençon. The poems found a small appreciative audience, but greater public attention was given to their subject matter. The principal themes of sex and death were considered scandalous, and the book became a byword for unwholesomeness among mainstream critics of the day. Baudelaire, his publisher, and the printer were successfully prosecuted for creating an offence against public morals. In the poem "Au lecteur" ("To the Reader") that prefaces Les fleurs du mal, Baudelaire accuses his readers of hypocrisy and of being as guilty of sins and lies as the poet: Poetry (ancient Greek: poieo = create) is an art form in which human language is used for its aesthetic qualities in addition to, or instead of, its notional and semantic content. ... Les Fleurs du Mal (literal trans. ... The Revue des Deux Mondes is a monthly literary and cultural affairs magazine published in the French language. ... Paul Emmanuel Auguste Poulet-Malassis (1825-1878) was a French printer and publisher, friend of Charles Baudelaire. ... For other uses, see Print. ... Alençon is a town in Normandy, France, préfecture (capital) of the Orne département. ... This article is about human sexual perceptions. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A publisher is a person or entity which engages in the act of publishing. ... The word printer is used to describe a company that provides commercial printing services, involving typesetting, printing and book-binding. ... Criminal law (also known as penal law) is the body of law that regulates governmental sanctions (such as imprisonment and/or fines) as retaliation for crimes against the social order. ... Morality (from the Latin manner, character, proper behaviour) has three principal meanings. ... Hypocrisy is the act of condemning or calling for the condemnation of another person when the critic is guilty of the act for which he demands that the accused be condemned. ... For other uses, see Sin (disambiguation). ...

... If rape or arson, poison, or the knife
Has wove no pleasing patterns in the stuff
Of this drab canvas we accept as life—
It is because we are not bold enough!
(Roy Campbell's translation)

Six of the poems were suppressed, but printed later as Les Épaves ("The Wrecks") (Brussels, 1866). Another edition of Les fleurs du mal, without these poems, but with considerable additions, appeared in 1861. The Skyline Parkway Motel in Afton, Virginia after an arson fire on July 9, 2004. ... The skull and crossbones symbol (Jolly Roger) traditionally used to label a poisonous substance. ... This article is about the tool. ... Look up Canvas in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Roy Campbell (1901-1957) Roy Campbell (2 October 1901 – 22 April 1957) was a South African poet and satirist. ... Look up translate in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other places with the same name, see Brussels (disambiguation). ...


His other works include Petits Poèmes en prose ("Small Prose poems"); a series of art reviews published in the Pays, Exposition universelle ("Country, World Fair"); studies on Gustave Flaubert (in L'Artiste, October 18, 1857); on Théophile Gautier (Revue contemporaine, September, 1858); various articles contributed to Eugene Crepet's Poètes francais; Les Paradis artificiels: opium et haschisch ("French poets; Artificial Paradises: opium and hashish") (1860); and Un Dernier Chapitre de l'histoire des oeuvres de Balzac ("A Final Chapter of the history of works of Balzac") (1880), originally an article entitled "Comment on paye ses dettes quand on a du génie" ("How one pays one's debts when one has genius"), in which his criticism turns against his friends Honoré de Balzac, Théophile Gautier, and Gérard de Nerval. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... // Prose poetry is usually considered a form of poetry written in prose that breaks some of the normal rules associated with prose discourse, for heightened imagery or emotional effect, among other purposes. ... Gustave Flaubert Gustave Flaubert (December 12, 1821 – May 8, 1880) was a French writer who is counted among the greatest Western novelists. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1857 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Pierre Jules Théophile Gautier (August 30, 1811 – October 23, 1872) was a French poet, dramatist, novelist, journalist, and literary critic. ... “Balzac” redirects here. ... Pierre Jules Théophile Gautier (August 30, 1811 – October 23, 1872) was a French poet, dramatist, novelist, journalist, and literary critic. ... Gérard de Nerval (May 22, 1808 – January 26, 1855) was the nom-de-plume of the French poet, essayist and translator Gérard Labrunie, the most essentially Romantic among French poets. ...

Jeanne Duval, in a painting by Edward Manet

Baudelaire learned English in his childhood, and Gothic novels, such as Lewis's The Monk, became some of his favourite reading matter. In 1846 and 1847 he became acquainted with the works of Edgar Allan Poe, in which he found tales and poems which had, he claimed, long existed in his own brain but never taken shape. From this time until 1865, he was largely occupied with translating Poe's works; his translations were widely praised. These were published as Histoires extraordinaires ("Extraordinary stories") (1852), Nouvelles histoires extraordinaires ("New extraordinary stories") (1857), Aventures d'Arthur Gordon Pym (see The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym), Eureka, and Histoires grotesques et sérieuses ("Grotesque and serious stories") (1865). Two essays on Poe are to be found in his Oeuvres complètes ("Complete works") (vols. v. and vi.). Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Jeanne Duval was the lifelong romantic association of French poet and art critic Charles Baudelaire. ... Édouard Manet (portrait by Nadar). ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Strawberry Hill, an English villa in the Gothic revival style, built by seminal Gothic writer Horace Walpole The gothic novel was a literary genre that belonged to Romanticism and began in the United Kingdom with The Castle of Otranto (1764) by Horace Walpole. ... Matthew Gregory Lewis (July 9, 1775 - May 14, 1818) was an English novelist and dramatist, often referred to as Monk Lewis, because of the success of his Gothic novel, The Monk. ... The Monk is a Gothic novel by Matthew Gregory Lewis that first appeared in 1796. ... Edgar Allan Poe (January 19, 1809 – October 7, 1849) was an American poet, short story writer, playwright, editor, literary critic, essayist and one of the leaders of the American Romantic Movement. ... The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket is Edgar Allan Poes longest novel, published in 1838. ... 1865 (MDCCCLXV) is a common year starting on Sunday. ... For other uses, see Essay (disambiguation). ...


His financial difficulties increased, particularly after his publisher Poulet Malassis went bankrupt in 1861, and in 1864 he left Paris for Belgium, partly in the hope of selling the rights to his works. For many years he had a long-standing relationship with a mixed-race woman, Jeanne Duval, whom he helped to the end of his life. He smoked opium, and in Brussels he began to drink to excess. He suffered a massive stroke in 1866 and paralysis followed. The last two years of his life were spent in "maisons de santé" in Brussels and in Paris, where he died on August 31, 1867. Many of his works were published posthumously. Finance studies and addresses the ways in which individuals, businesses, and organizations raise, allocate, and use monetary resources over time, taking into account the risks entailed in their projects. ... Not to be confused with copywriting. ... Jeanne Duval was the lifelong romantic association of French poet and art critic Charles Baudelaire. ... This article is about the drug. ... Alcoholism is the consumption of, or preoccupation with, alcoholic beverages to the extent that this behavior interferes with the drinkers normal personal, family, social, or work life, and may lead to physical or mental harm. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... is the 243rd day of the year (244th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Cunt BAg Twat Fuk suck my penis ring 0778851865!!!!!!Year 1867 (MDCCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


He is buried in the Cimetière du Montparnasse, Paris. The Cimetière du Montparnasse is a famous cemetery in the Montparnasse quarter of Paris, France. ...

Contents

Influence

Portrait by Gustave Courbet, 1848.

Baudelaire's influence on the direction of modern French- and English-language literature was considerable. The most significant French writers to come after him were generous with tributes; four years after his death, Arthur Rimbaud praised him in a letter as 'the king of poets, a true God'.[1] In 1895, Stéphane Mallarmé published a sonnet in Baudelaire's memory, 'Le Tombeau de Charles Baudelaire'. Marcel Proust, in an essay published in 1922, stated that along with Alfred de Vigny, Baudelaire was 'the greatest poet of the nineteenth century'.[2] Download high resolution version (1414x1200, 256 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (1414x1200, 256 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Jean Désiré Gustave Courbet (10 June 1819 – 31 December 1877) was a French painter who led the Realist movement in 19th-century French painting. ... Rimbaud redirects here. ... Year 1895 (MDCCCXCV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Portrait of Stéphane Mallarmé by Édouard Manet. ... “Proust” redirects here. ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Alfred de Vigny, 1832 Alfred Victor de Vigny (March 27, 1797 – September 17, 1863) was a French poet, playwright, and novelist. ...


In the English-speaking world, Edmund Wilson credited Baudelaire as providing an initial impetus for the Symbolist movement, by virtue of his translations of Poe.[3] In 1930 T.S. Eliot, while asserting that Baudelaire had not yet received a 'just appreciation' even in France, claimed that the poet had 'great genius' and asserted that his 'technical mastery which can hardly be overpraised ... has made his verse an inexhaustible study for later poets, not only in his own language.'[4] Edmund Wilson (May 8, 1895 – June 12, 1972) was an American writer, noted chiefly for his literary criticism. ... La mort du fossoyeur (The death of the gravedigger) by Carlos Schwabe is a visual compendium of Symbolist motifs. ... Year 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display 1930 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Thomas Stearns Eliot (September 26, 1888 - January 4, 1965), was a major Modernist Anglo-American poet, dramatist, and literary critic. ...


At the same time that Eliot was affirming Baudelaire's importance from a broadly conservative and explicitly Christian viewpoint,[5] left-wing critics such as Wilson and Walter Benjamin were able to do so from a dramatically different perspective. Benjamin translated Baudelaire's Tableaux Parisiens into German and published a major essay on translation[6] as the foreword. In the late 1930s, Benjamin used Baudelaire as a starting point and focus for his monumental attempt at a materialist assessment of 19th century culture, Das Passagenwerk.[7] For Benjamin, Baudelaire's importance lay in his anatomies of the crowd, of the city and of modernity.[8] Ths article deals with conservatism as a political philosophy. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is... “Leftism” redirects here. ... Walter Bendix Schönflies Benjamin (July 15, 1892 – September 27, 1940) was a German Marxist literary critic, essayist, translator, and philosopher. ... The 1930s (years from 1930–1939) were described as an abrupt shift to more radical and conservative lifestyles, as countries were struggling to find a solution to the Great Depression, also known as the World Depression. ... Historical materialism is the methodological approach to the study of society, economics, and history which was first articulated by Karl Marx (1818-1883), although Marx himself never used the term (he referred it as philosophical materialism, a term he used to distinguish it from what he called popular materialism). Historical... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A throng of people returning from a show of fireworks spill in to the street stopping traffic at the intersection of Fulton Street and Gold Street in Lower Manhattan. ... Look up city, City in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Modernity is a term used to describe the condition of being modern. Since the term modern is used to describe a wide range of periods, modernity must be understood in its context. ...


Baudelaire was also an influence on HP Lovecraft, serving as a model for Lovecraft's decadent and evil characters in both The Hound and Hypnos.


See also

Charles Baudelaire, photograph taken by Nadar.
  • Épater la bourgeoisie

Charles Baudelaire, from the French Wikipedia 19th century photo by Nadar This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Charles Baudelaire, from the French Wikipedia 19th century photo by Nadar This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Nadar (self-portrait). ... Epater la bourgeoisie or épater le bourgeois is a French phrase that became a rallying cry for the French Decadent poets of the late 19th century including Baudelaire and Rimbaud. ...

Bibliography

1845 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1846 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... // Ralph Waldo Emersons Poems Walter Savage Landors The Hellenics Henry Francis Lyte composes Abide with Me Alfred Lord Tennysons The Princess, including Tears, Idle Tears Henry Wadsworth Longfellows Evangeline September 22 — Alice Meynell, née Thompson Julia A. Moore (died 1920 in poetry), American poet, famed... Les Fleurs du Mal (literal trans. ... // Frederick Locker Lampson, London Lyrics (12 re-editions to 1893) Charles Baudelaire - Les Fleurs du mal (Flowers of Evil) Jane Barlow, Irish poet Hubert N. W. Church, Australian poet John Davidson (died 1909), Scotish poet Benjamin Franklin King, American poet May 2 - Alfred de Musset, French poet and novelist December... Les paradis artificiels (Artificial Paradises) is a book by French poet Charles Baudelaire, first published in 1860, about the state of being under the influence of opium and hashish. ... // Charles Baudelaire, Les paradis artificiels (Artificial Paradise) Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Poems Before Congress Coventry Patmore, Faithful For Ever Helena Jane Coleman (Canada) Hamlin Garland (US) Harriet Monroe (US) Charles G. D. Roberts (Canada) Clinton Scollard (US) Richard Croly James Kirke Paulding Poetry List of years in poetry Schools of Poetry... // Julia Ward Howe composes Battle Hymn of the Republic Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Last Poems (posthumous) Francis Turner Palgrave, The Golden Treasury (a poetic anthology revised in 1897 and since then by others) Annie Louisa Walker, Leaves from the Backwoods Bliss Carman (Canada) Mary Elizabeth Coleridge Walter Alexander Raleigh Louise Imogen... // April 29 — Constantine P. Cavafy Greek poet George Essex Evans (Australia) Robert Fuller Murray Stuart Merrill (US) George Santayana Ernest Lawrence Thayer (US) Gamaliel Bradford (US) Clement Moore William Makepeace Thackeray Poetry List of years in poetry Schools of Poetry Categories: | ... // Frederick James Furnivall founds the Chaucer Society Robert Browning, The Ring and the Book, in 12 Books and over 21,000 lines (1868-69) William Morris, The Earthly Paradise, I (completed in 1870) Edgar Lee Masters (US) Adah Isaacs Monken Poetry List of years in poetry Schools of Poetry Categories... // Frederick James Furnivall founds the Chaucer Society Robert Browning, The Ring and the Book, in 12 Books and over 21,000 lines (1868-69) William Morris, The Earthly Paradise, I (completed in 1870) Edgar Lee Masters (US) Adah Isaacs Monken Poetry List of years in poetry Schools of Poetry Categories... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... // Charles Baudelaire, Le Spleen de Paris/Petits Poémes en Prose (Paris Spleen) W. S. Gilbert, Bab Ballads Dante Gabriel Rossetti, Poems Alfred Lord Tennyson, The Holy Grail and Other Poems, with The Coming of Arthur, The Holy Grail, Pelleas and Ettarre, and The Passing of Arthur Laurence Binyon Olivia... 1887 (MDCCCLXXXVII) is a common year starting on Saturday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. ... Year 1907 (MCMVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... // Edwin Arlington Robinson, The Children of the Night Stéphane Mallarmé, Divagations and Un coup de dés jamais nabolira le hasard Louise Bogan Kenneth Burke Isabella Banks Jean Ingelow James Joseph Sylvester Poetry List of years in poetry Schools of Poetry Categories: | | ... // Edwin Arlington Robinson, The Children of the Night Stéphane Mallarmé, Divagations and Un coup de dés jamais nabolira le hasard Louise Bogan Kenneth Burke Isabella Banks Jean Ingelow James Joseph Sylvester Poetry List of years in poetry Schools of Poetry Categories: | | ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ...

Online texts

References

  1. ^ Rimbaud, Arthur: Oeuvres complètes, p. 253, NRF/Gallimard, 1972.
  2. ^ 'Concerning Baudelaire' in Proust, Marcel: Against Sainte-Beuve and Other Essays, p. 286, trans. John Sturrock, Penguin, 1994.
  3. ^ Wilson, Edmund: Axel's Castle,p. 20, Fontana, 1962 (originally published 1931).
  4. ^ 'Baudelaire', in Eliot, T.S.: Selected Essays, pp. 422 and 425, Faber & Faber, 1961.
  5. ^ cf. Eliot, 'Religion in Literature', in Eliot, op. cit., p.388.
  6. ^ 'The Task of the Translator', in Benjamin, Walter: Selected Writings Vol. 1: 1913-1926, pp. 253-263, Belknap/Harvard, 1996.
  7. ^ Benjamin, Walter: The Arcades Project, trans. Howard Eiland and Kevin McLaughlin, Belknap/Harvard, 1999.
  8. ^ 'The Paris of the Second Empire in Baudelaire' in Benjamin, Walter: Selected Writings Vol. 4 1938-1940, pp. 3-92, Belknap/Harvard, 2003.

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Persondata
NAME Baudelaire, Charles
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Baudelaire, Charles Pierre
SHORT DESCRIPTION
DATE OF BIRTH April 9, 1821
PLACE OF BIRTH Paris, France
DATE OF DEATH August 31, 1867
PLACE OF DEATH Paris

is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1821 (MDCCCXXI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the capital of France. ... is the 243rd day of the year (244th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Cunt BAg Twat Fuk suck my penis ring 0778851865!!!!!!Year 1867 (MDCCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the capital of France. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Poets.org - Poetry, Poems, Bios & More - Charles Baudelaire (829 words)
The son of Joseph-Francois Baudelaire and Caroline Archimbaut Dufays, Charles Baudelaire was born in Paris in 1821.
Baudelaire was very close with his mother (much of what is known of his later life comes from the letters he wrote her), but was deeply distressed when she married Major Jacques Aupick.
Baudelaire enhanced this reputation by flaunting his eccentricities; for instance, he once asked a friend in the middle of a conversation "Wouldn't it be agreeable to take a bath with me?" Because of the abundance of stories about the poet, it is difficult to sort fact from fiction.
Charles Baudelaire - Picture - MSN Encarta (87 words)
Nineteenth-century French poet Charles Baudelaire wrote musical verse as one of the most prominent of the French symbolists.
Baudelaire provoked the wrath of the French government for offending public morals with his only major book of poetry, the 1857 work Fleurs du mal (Flowers of Evil).
Baudelaire’s notoriously decadent life led to his premature death at the age of 46.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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