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Encyclopedia > Charles Barkley
Charles Barkley
Position Power forward
Nickname Sir Charles
The Round Mound of Rebound
The Chuckster
Height 6 ft 6 in (1.98 m)
Weight 252 lb (114 kg)
Nationality United States
Born February 20, 1963 (1963-02-20) (age 44)
Leeds, Alabama, U.S.
College Auburn University
Draft 5th overall, 1984
Philadelphia 76ers
Pro career 1984–2000
Former teams Philadelphia 76ers (1984–1992)
Phoenix Suns (1992–1996)
Houston Rockets (1996–2000)
Awards SEC Player of the Year (1984)
SEC Player of the Decade (1980s)
NBA MVP (1993)
NBA All-Star MVP (1991)
11-time NBA All-Star
All-NBA First Team (1988–'91, '93)
All-NBA Second Team (1986, '87, '92, '94, '95)
All-NBA Third Team (1996)
All-Rookie Team (1984)
Olympic gold medalist (1992, '96)
One of 50 Greatest Players in NBA History
Hall of Fame 2006

Charles Wade Barkley (born February 20, 1963) is a retired American professional basketball player. Commonly nicknamed "Sir Charles" and "The Round Mound of Rebound", Barkley established himself as one of the most dominating power forwards in the history of the National Basketball Association (NBA). He was selected to both the All-NBA First Team and All-NBA Second Team five times, and named to the All-NBA Third Team once. In 1993, he was voted the league's Most Valuable Player and during the NBA's 50th anniversary, named one of the 50 Greatest Players in NBA History. He competed in the 1992 and 1996 Olympic games, and won two gold medals as a member of the United States' Dream Team. In 2006, he was inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. Charles E. Charlie Barkley (born October 16, 1950) is an American politician from Maryland and a member of the Democratic Party. ... Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Alabama. ... Leeds is a city located in Jefferson County, Alabama. ... Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from... Auburn University (AU or Auburn) is a state university located in Auburn, Alabama, USA. With more than 24,100 students and 1,200 faculty, it is the largest university in the state,[5] and according to U.S. News & World Report, has a selectivity rating of more selective. ... The 1984 NBA Draft saw the selection of four players who would be named among the 50 Greatest Players in NBA History at the leagues 50th anniversary in 1996: Hakeem Olajuwon, Michael Jordan, Charles Barkley and John Stockton. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Phoenix Suns are a professional basketball team, based in Phoenix, Arizona. ... The Houston Rockets are an American professional basketball team based in Houston, Texas. ... The Southeastern Conference (SEC) Mens Basketball Player of the Year is an award given to the player who has has proven himself, throughout the season, to be the most exceptional talent in the Southeastern Conferenc. ... The National Basketball Association first named a Most Valuable Player after the 1955-56 NBA season. ... The National Basketball Association (NBA) holds an All-Star Weekend every February, with a variety of basketball-related events, exhibitions, and performances culminating in the NBA All-Star Game held on Sunday night. ... The Associated Press All-NBA Team, also known simply as the All-NBA Team, is an annual honor bestowed on the best players in the league following every NBA season. ... The 50 Greatest Players in National Basketball Association History (commonly referred to as the NBAs 50th Anniversary All-Time Team) were chosen in 1996 on the occasion of the fiftieth anniversary of the founding of the National Basketball Association (NBA) to comprise the fifty best and most influential players... is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the sport. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... “NBA” redirects here. ... The Associated Press All-NBA Team, also known simply as the All-NBA Team, is an annual honor bestowed on the best players in the league following every NBA season. ... The National Basketball Association first named a Most Valuable Player after the 1955-56 NBA season. ... The 50 Greatest Players in National Basketball Association History (commonly referred to as the NBAs 50th Anniversary All-Time Team) were chosen in 1996 on the occasion of the fiftieth anniversary of the founding of the National Basketball Association (NBA) to comprise the fifty best and most influential players... Final results for the Basketball competition at the 1992 Summer Olympics. ... Final results for the Basketball competition at the 1996 Summer Olympics: Medal summary Final table, men USA Yugoslavia Lithuania Australia Greece Brazil Croatia China Argentina Puerto Rico Angola South Korea Categories: | | ... Basketball has been played consistently at the Summer Olympic Games since 1936, with a demonstration event in 1904. ... Dream Team or The Dream Team may refer to: Dream Team: the unofficial nickname of several United States mens basketball teams. ... The Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame honors players who have shown exceptional skill at basketball, all-time great coaches and referees, and other major contributors to the game. ...


As an eleven time NBA All-Star, Barkley was known for his aggressive play and outspoken demeanor. He was popular with fans and the media, and made the NBA's All-Interview Team for each of his last thirteen seasons in the league.[1] His tenacity and strength made him one of the most dominant rebounders in the league, despite his relative lack of height for playing the power forward position. Barkley was also a very versatile player, with the ability to score, rebound, assist, and defend; in 2000, he retired as one of only four players in NBA history to accumulate at least 20,000 points, 10,000 rebounds, and 4,000 assists in their career.[2] The National Basketball Association (NBA) holds an All-Star Weekend every February, with a variety of basketball-related events, exhibitions, and performances culminating in the NBA All-Star Game held on Sunday night. ... A rebound in basketball is the act of successfully gaining possession of the basketball after a missed field goal or free throw. ... In basketball, an assist is attributed to a player who passes the ball to a teammate in a way that leads to a score by field goal, meaning that he or she was assisting in the basket. ... The slam dunk by LeBron James is a field goal worth 2 points. ...


Since retiring as a player, Barkley has had a highly successful career as a color commentator on basketball. He currently works with Turner Network Television (TNT) as a studio analyst for their coverage of NBA games.[3] A color commentator (colour commentator in Canada), sometimes known as a color analyst, is a member of the broadcasting team for a sporting event who assists the play-by-play announcer by filling in any time when play is not in progress. ... Turner Network Television, usually referred to as TNT, is an American cable TV network created by media mogul Ted Turner and currently owned by the Turner Broadcasting System division of Time Warner. ...

Contents

Early life

Barkley was born and raised in rural Leeds, Alabama, ten miles outside of Birmingham, and attended Leeds High School. As a junior, Barkley measured 5 feet 10 inches and weighed 220 pounds. Due to his lack of height, he failed to make the varsity team and was named as a reserve. However, during the summer Barkley grew to 6 feet 4 inches, 240 pounds, and earned a starting position on the varsity team in his senior year. He averaged 19.1 points and 17.9 rebounds per game, and led his team to a 26–3 record en route to the state semifinals.[4] Despite his play, Barkley did not garner any attention from college scouts until the state high school semifinals, where he scored 26 points against Alabama's most highly recruited player, Bobby Lee Hurt.[4] An assistant to Auburn University's head coach, Sonny Smith, was at the game and reported seeing "a fat guy... who can play like the wind."[5] Barkley was soon recruited by Smith, and majored in business management while attending Auburn.[4] Leeds is a city located in Jefferson County, Alabama. ... Nickname: Location in Jefferson County in the state of Alabama Coordinates: , Country State County Jefferson, Shelby Government  - Mayor Bernard Kincaid (D) Area  - City  151. ... In the United States and Canada, varsity sports teams are the principal athletic teams representing a college, university, or high school or other secondary school. ... The Auburn Tigers mens basketball program has often taken second place to the gridiron, thanks to Tigers Football immense popularity in the state and the SEC. But Tiger basketball has had flashes of brilliance under coaches Joel Eaves (.681), Sonny Smith (.529) and Cliff Ellis (.598). ... Sonny Smith (born November 15, 1936) is a retired mens college basketball head coach. ... An academic major, major concentration, concentration, or simply major is a mainly U.S. and Canadian term for a college or university students main field of specialization during his or her undergraduate studies. ... Management (from Old French ménagement the art of conducting, directing, from Latin manu agere to lead by the hand) characterises the process of leading and directing all or part of an organization, often a business, through the deployment and manipulation of resources (human, financial, material, intellectual or intangible). ...


College

Barkley played collegiate basketball at Auburn University for three years. Although he struggled with weight problems, sometimes weighing over 300 pounds (136 kg), he excelled as a player and led the league in rebounding each year.[1] He became a popular crowd-pleaser, exciting the fans with dunks and blocked shots that belied his lack of height and overweight frame. It was not uncommon to see the hefty Barkley grab a defensive rebound and, instead of passing, dribble the entire length of the court and finish at the opposite end with a rim-rattling two-handed dunk. His physical size and skills ultimately earned him the nickname, "The Round Mound of Rebound."[3] College basketball most often refers to the American basketball competitive governance structure established by the National Collegiate Athletic Association, or NCAA. Game between Illinois State Redbirds & Ball State Cardinals, February 17, 2007 in an ESPN Bracketbuster contest. ... A slam dunk in a college basketball game between the Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets and the Centenary Gentlemen. ... Oscar Torres (13) is in position to block this shot. ... Jerec is a fictional character of the Star Wars universe, appearing in the computer game Jedi Knight: Dark Forces II. Jerec is the leader of the seven Dark Jedi that the player must face in the game. ...


During his college career, Barkley played the center position, despite being significantly shorter than the average center. His height, frequently listed as 6 feet 6 inches, is actually closer to 6 feet 4 inches, as stated in his book I May Be Wrong but I Doubt It. He received numerous awards, including Southeastern Conference (SEC) Player of the Year (1984), two All-SEC (1983–84) selections, two Second Team All-SEC (1982–83) selections, and one Third Team All-American selection (1984).[6] In addition, Barkley was later named SEC Player of the Decade for the 1980s by the Birmingham Post-Herald.[7] This article does not cite any references or sources. ... I May Be Wrong but I Doubt It is NBA Legend Charles Barkleys first sports memoir. ... The Southeastern Conference (SEC) is a college athletic conference headquartered in Birmingham, Alabama, which operates in the southeastern part of the United States. ... The Southeastern Conference (SEC) Mens Basketball Player of the Year is an award given to the player who has has proven himself, throughout the season, to be the most exceptional talent in the Southeastern Conferenc. ... An All-America team is a sports team composed of star players. ... The Birmingham Post-Herald is a newspaper in Birmingham, Alabama, published for over fifty years under that name, a history that ended on September 23, 2005 when the paper published its last edition. ...


In Barkley's three year college career, he averaged 14.1 points on 65.2% field goal shooting, 9.6 rebounds, 1.6 assists, and 1.7 blocks per game.[7] In 1984, he made his only appearance in the NCAA Tournament and finished with 23 points on 80% field goal shooting, 17 rebounds, 4 assists, 2 steals, and 2 blocks.[6] In honor of his career achievements, Barkley's number 34 Auburn jersey was officially retired on March 3, 2001.[7] Field goal percentage in basketball is the ratio of field goals made to field goals attempted. ... The 1984 NCAA Mens Division I Basketball Tournament involved 53 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of mens NCAA Division I college basketball. ... // Final four redirects here. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ...


NBA career

Philadelphia 76ers

Barkley left before his final year at Auburn and made himself eligible for the 1984 NBA Draft. He was selected with the fifth pick in the first round by the Philadelphia 76ers, two slots after the Chicago Bulls drafted Michael Jordan. He joined a veteran team that included Julius Erving, Moses Malone, and Maurice Cheeks; players who took Philadelphia to the 1983 NBA championship. Under the tutelage of Malone, Barkley was able to manage his ongoing weight problems, and learned to prepare and condition himself properly for a game. He averaged 14.0 points and 8.6 rebounds per game during the regular season and earned a berth on the All-Rookie Team.[2] In the postseason, the Sixers advanced into the Eastern Conference Finals but were defeated in five games by the Boston Celtics.[8] As a rookie in the postseason, Barkley averaged 14.9 points and 11.1 rebounds per game.[1] The 1984 NBA Draft saw the selection of four players who would be named among the 50 Greatest Players in NBA History at the leagues 50th anniversary in 1996: Hakeem Olajuwon, Michael Jordan, Charles Barkley and John Stockton. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... For other persons named Michael Jordan, see Michael Jordan (disambiguation). ... Julius Winfield Erving II (born February 22, 1950 in Roosevelt, New York), commonly known by the nickname Dr. J, is a former American basketball player who helped launch a modern style of play that emphasizes leaping and play above the rim. ... Moses Eugene Malone (born March 23, 1955 in Petersburg, Virginia) is an American former National Basketball Association (NBA) basketball player who also played in the American Basketball Association (ABA), as well as on the NBAs Atlanta Hawks, Houston Rockets, Milwaukee Bucks, Philadelphia 76ers, San Antonio Spurs and Washington Bullets. ... Maurice Mo Edward Cheeks (born September 8, 1956, in Chicago, Illinois) is a retired American professional basketball player. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The 1985 NBA Playoffs was the postseason tournament of the National Basketball Associations 1984-85 season. ... The Eastern Conference of the National Basketball Association is made up of fifteen teams, and organized in three divisions of five teams each. ... The Boston Celtics are a professional basketball team based in Boston, Massachusetts. ...


During his second year, Barkley became the team's leading rebounder and number two scorer, averaging 20.0 points and 12.8 rebounds per game.[2] He became the starter for the Sixers' power forward position and was named to the All-NBA Second Team.[1] He helped lead his team into the playoffs and averaged 25.0 points on 57.8% shooting from the field and 15.8 rebounds.[2] Despite his efforts, Philadelphia was eliminated by the Milwaukee Bucks, four games to three, in the Eastern Conference Semifinals. In the 1986-87 season, Moses Malone was traded to the Washington Bullets and Barkley began to assume control as the team leader. He earned his first rebounding title, averaging 14.6 rebounds per game, and also led the league in offensive rebounds with 5.7 per game.[2] He averaged 23.0 points on 59.4% shooting from the field,[2] earning his first trip to an NBA All-Star game and All-NBA Second Team honors for the second straight season. In the playoffs, Barkley averaged 24.6 points and 12.6 rebounds in a losing effort,[9] for the second straight year, to the Bucks in a five-game first round playoff series.[10] The 1985-86 NBA Season was the 40th season of the National Basketball Association. ... The Associated Press All-NBA Team, also known simply as the All-NBA Team, is an annual honor bestowed on the best players in the league following every NBA season. ... The 1986 NBA Playoffs was the postseason tournament of the National Basketball Associations 1985-86 season. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The 1986-87 NBA Season was the 41st season of the National Basketball Association. ... Washington Bullets may refer to either the former name of the Washington Wizards basketball team or the song by The Clash, Washington Bullets (song). ... The National Basketball Association staged its first All-Star Game in the Boston Garden on March 2, 1951. ... The 1987 NBA Playoffs was the postseason tournament of the National Basketball Associations 1986-1987 season. ...

Charles Barkley making his first appearance on the cover of Sports Illustrated in 1988.

The following season, Julius Erving announced his retirement and Barkley became the Sixers' franchise player.[1] Playing in 80 games and 300 more minutes than his nearest teammate, Barkley had his most productive season, averaging 28.3 points on 58.7% field goal shooting and 11.9 rebounds per game.[2] He appeared in his second All-Star Game and was named to the All-NBA First Team for the first time in his career. His singular celebrity status as the Sixers franchise player led to his first appearance on the cover of Sports Illustrated.[1] But, for the first time since the 1974-75 season, the 76ers failed to make the playoffs.[1] In the 1988-89 season, Barkley continued to play well, averaging 25.8 points on 57.9% shooting and 12.5 rebounds per game.[2] He earned his third straight All-Star Game appearance and was named to the All-NBA First team for the second straight season. However, despite Barkley contributing 27.0 points on 64.4% field goal shooting, 11.7 rebounds and 5.3 assists,[9] the 76ers were swept in the first round of the playoffs by the New York Knicks. Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... The first issue of Sports Illustrated, August 16, 1954, showing Milwaukee Braves star Eddie Mathews at bat in Milwaukee County Stadium. ... The 1987-88 NBA Season was the 42nd season of the National Basketball Association. ... Franchise Player is a modern term used in sports to describe an elite athlete who is usually considered to be the best player, and most recognizable figure, on his team. ... The first issue of Sports Illustrated, August 16, 1954, showing Milwaukee Braves star Eddie Mathews at bat in Milwaukee County Stadium. ... The 1974-75 NBA Season was the 29th season of the National Basketball Association. ... The 1988 NBA Playoffs was the postseason tournament of the National Basketball Associations 1987-1988 season. ... The 1988-89 NBA season was the 43rd season of the National Basketball Association. ... Look up sweep in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The 1989 NBA Playoffs was the postseason tournament of the National Basketball Associations 1988-1989 season. ... “Knicks” redirects here. ...


During the 1989-90 season, despite receiving more first-place votes,[11] Barkley finished second in MVP voting behind the Los Angeles Lakers' Magic Johnson. He was named Player of the Year by both The Sporting News and Basketball Weekly.[1] He averaged 25.2 points and 11.5 rebounds per game and a career high 60% field-goal percentage.[2] He was named to the All-NBA First Team for the third consecutive year and earned his fourth All-Star selection. He helped Philadelphia win 53 regular season games, only to lose to the Chicago Bulls in a five-game Eastern Conference Semifinals series.[12] Barkley averaged 24.7 points and 15.5 rebounds in another postseason loss.[9] His exceptional play continued into his seventh season, where he averaged 27.6 points on 57% field goal shooting and 10.1 rebounds per game.[2] His fifth straight All-Star Game appearance proved to be his best yet. He led the East to a 116–114 win over the West with 17 points and 22 rebounds, the most rebounds in an All-Star Game since Wilt Chamberlain recorded 22 in 1967.[1] For his efforts, Barkley was presented with Most Valuable Player honors at the All-Star Game, and at the end of the season, named to the All-NBA First Team for the fourth straight year.[1] In the postseason, Philadelphia lost again to Jordan's Chicago Bulls in the Eastern Conference Semifinals, with Barkley contributing 24.9 points and 10.5 rebounds per game.[9] The 1989-90 NBA Season was the 44th season of the National Basketball Association. ... In sports, a Most Valuable Player (MVP) award is an honor typically bestowed upon the best performing player or players on a specific team, in an entire league, or for a particular contest or series of contests. ... The Los Angeles Lakers are a National Basketball Association (NBA) team based in Los Angeles, California. ... “Earvin Johnson” redirects here. ... The Sporting News (TSN) is an American-based sports newspaper. ... The 1990 NBA Playoffs was the postseason tournament of the National Basketball Associations 1989-1990 season. ... The 1990-91 NBA Season was the 45th season of the National Basketball Association. ... The Western Conference of the National Basketball Association is made up of fifteen teams, and organized in three divisions of five teams each. ... Wilton Norman Wilt Chamberlain (August 21, 1936–October 12, 1999), nicknamed Wilt the Stilt and The Big Dipper, was an American professional National Basketball Association (NBA) basketball player for the Philadelphia / San Francisco Warriors, the Philadelphia 76ers and the Los Angeles Lakers; and also played for the Harlem Globetrotters. ... The 1966-67 NBA Season was the 21st season of the National Basketball Association. ... NBA Playoffs Categories: | ...


The 1991-92 season was Barkley's final year in Philadelphia. In his last season, he wore number 32 instead of his 34 to honor Magic Johnson,[13] who announced prior to the start of the season that he was HIV-positive. Although the 76ers initially retired the number 32 in honor of Billy Cunningham, it was unretired for Barkley to wear. Following Johnson's announcement, Barkley also apologized for having made light of his condition. Responding to concerns that players may contract HIV by contact with Johnson, Barkley flippantly stated, "We're just playing basketball. It's not like we're going out to have unprotected sex with Magic."[14] The 1991-92 NBA Season was the 46th season of the National Basketball Association. ... “Earvin Johnson” redirects here. ... Species Human immunodeficiency virus 1 Human immunodeficiency virus 2 Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a retrovirus that causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS, a condition in humans in which the immune system begins to fail, leading to life-threatening opportunistic infections). ... William John Billy Cunningham (born June 3, 1943 in Brooklyn, New York) is a former pro basketball player, who was nicknamed the Kangaroo Kid, and coach. ...


In his final season with the Sixers, averaging 23.1 points on 55.2% shooting and 11.1 rebounds per game,[2] Barkley earned his sixth straight All-Star appearance and was named to the All-NBA Second Team; his seventh straight appearance on either the first or second team. He ended his 76ers career ranked fourth in team history in total points (14,184), third in scoring average (23.3 ppg), third in rebounds (7,079), eighth in assists (2,276), and second in field-goal percentage (.576).[1] He led Philadelphia in rebounding and field-goal percentage for seven consecutive seasons and in scoring for six straight years.[2] However, after several early-round playoff defeats, and with the Sixers failing to make the postseason in the 1991-92 season with a 35–47 record,[15] Barkley demanded a trade out of Philadelphia.[3] On July 17, 1992, he was traded to the Phoenix Suns in exchange for Jeff Hornacek, Tim Perry and Andrew Lang.[3] The 1992 NBA Playoffs was the postseason tournament following the National Basketball Associations 1991-1992 season. ... is the 198th day of the year (199th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... The Phoenix Suns are a professional basketball team, based in Phoenix, Arizona. ... Jeffrey John Hornacek (IPA: ); (born May 3, 1963 in Elmhurst, Illinois) attended Komarek grade School in North Riverside Illinois, is a former NBA basketball player who played at the shooting guard position from 1986–2000. ... Timothy D. Perry (born June 4, 1965 in Freehold, New Jersey) is an American former professional basketball player in the NBA. Following a college career at Temple University, Perry was selected seventh overall by the Phoenix Suns in the 1988 NBA Draft. ... For the former National Basketball Association player, see Andrew Lang (basketball). ...


During Barkley's eight seasons in Philadelphia, he became a household name, and was one of the few NBA players to have a figure published by Kenner's Starting Lineup toy line and also had his own signature shoe line with Nike. However, his outspoken and aggressive play also caused a few scandals, notoriously a fight with Detroit Pistons center Bill Laimbeer in 1990, an event which drew record fines,[16] and the infamous spitting incident. Kenner Products was a toy company founded in 1947 by three brothers, Albert, Phillip, and Joseph L. Steiner, in Cincinnati, Ohio, United States, and was named after the street where the original corporate offices were located. ... A starting lineup in sports refers to the set of players actively participating in the event when the game begins. ... Nike, Inc. ... The Detroit Pistons are a team in the National Basketball Association based in the Detroit metropolitan area. ... Bill Laimbeer at the White House after winning the WNBA Championship with the Detroit Shock. ...


Spitting incident

In March 1991, during an overtime game in New Jersey, a courtside heckler had been yelling racial epithets throughout the game at Barkley.[17] Upset by the heckler's remarks, Barkley turned to spit at him, but, as he later described, did not "get enough foam", missed and mistakenly spat on a young girl.[17] Rod Thorn, the then-NBA's president of operations, suspended Barkley without pay and fined him $10,000 for spitting and using abusive language at the fan.[18] It became a national story and Barkley was vilified for it.[17] However, Barkley eventually developed a friendship with the girl and her family.[3] He apologized, and among other things, provided tickets to future games.[19] Overtime is an additional period of play specified under the rules of a sport in order to bring the game to a decision and avoid declaring the contest a tie or draw. ... ‹ The template below (Taginfo) is being considered for deletion. ... A heckler is a person who shouts an uninvited comment, usually disparaging, at a performance or event, or interrupting set-piece speeches, for example at a political meeting. ... Rodney King Rod Thorn (born May 23, 1941 in Princeton, West Virginia) is the president and general manager of the NBAs New Jersey Nets. ... The National Basketball Association of the United States and Canada, commonly known as the NBA, is the premier professional basketball league in North America. ...


Upon retirement, Barkley was later quoted as stating, "I was fairly controversial, I guess, but I regret only one thing—the spitting incident. But you know what? It taught me a valuable lesson. It taught me that I was getting way too intense during the game. It let me know I wanted to win way too bad. I had to calm down. I wanted to win at all costs. Instead of playing the game the right way and respecting the game, I only thought about winning."[20]


Phoenix Suns

The trade to Phoenix in the 1992-93 season went well for both Barkley and the Suns. He averaged 25.6 points on 52% shooting, 12.2 rebounds, and a career high 5.1 assists per game,[2] leading the Suns to an NBA best 62–20 record.[21] For his efforts, Barkley won the league's Most Valuable Player Award and was named to his seventh straight All-Star appearance. He became the third player ever to win league MVP honors in the season immediately after being traded, established multiple career highs, and led Phoenix to their first NBA Finals appearance since 1976.[1] Despite Barkley's proclamation to Jordan, that it was "destiny" for the Suns to win the title, they were defeated in six games by the Bulls. He averaged 26.6 points and 13.6 rebounds per game during the postseason.[9] The 1992-93 NBA season was the 47th season of the National Basketball Association. ... The 1993 NBA Finals was the championship round of the 1992-1993 NBA season. ... The 1975-76 NBA Season was the 30th season of the National Basketball Association. ...


As a result of severe back pains, Barkley began to speculate his last year in Phoenix during the 1993-94 season.[1] Playing through the worst injury problems of his career, Barkley managed 21.6 points on 49.5% shooting and 11.2 rebounds per game.[2] He was selected to his eighth consecutive All-Star game, but did not play because of a torn right quadriceps tendon,[1] and was named to the All-NBA Second Team. With Barkley fighting injuries, the Suns still managed a 56–26 record and made it to the Western Conference Semifinals. But despite holding a 2–0 lead in the series,[22] the Suns lost in seven games to the eventual champion Houston Rockets.[22] Despite his injuries, in Game 3 of a first-round playoff series against the Golden State Warriors, Barkley hit 23 of 31 field-goal attempts and finished with 56 points, the then-third-highest total ever in a playoff game.[1][9] After contemplating retirement in the offseason,[1] Barkley returned for his eleventh season and continued to battle injuries.[3] He struggled during the first half of the season,[1] but managed to gradually improve, earning his ninth consecutive appearance in the All-Star Game. He averaged 23 points on 48.6% field goal shooting and 11.1 rebounds per game,[2] while leading the Suns to a 59–23 record.[23] In the postseason, despite having a 3–1 lead in the series,[23] the Suns once again lost to the defending champion Rockets in seven games.[23] Barkley averaged 25.7 points on 50% field goal shooting and 13.4 rebounds per game in the postseason,[9] but was limited in Game 7 of the Semifinals by a leg injury.[1] The 1993-94 NBA season was the 48th season of the National Basketball Association. ... In human anatomy, the quadriceps tendon connects the quadriceps femoris muscles to the superior aspects of the patella on the anterior of the thigh. ... The Houston Rockets are an American professional basketball team based in Houston, Texas. ... The Golden State Warriors are a professional basketball team based in Oakland, California. ... The 1994-95 NBA season was the 49th season of the National Basketball Association. ... The 1995 NBA Playoffs was the postseason tournament of the National Basketball Associations 1994-1995 season. ...


The 1995-96 season was Barkley's last on the Phoenix Suns. He led the team in scoring, rebounds, and steals, averaging 23.3 points on 50% field goal shooting, 11.6 rebounds, and a career high 77.7% free throw shooting.[2] He earned his tenth appearance in an All-Star Game as the top vote-getter among Western Conference players and posted his 18th career triple-double on November 22.[9] He also became just the tenth player in NBA history to reach 20,000 points and 10,000 rebounds in their career.[1][2] In the postseason, Barkley averaged 25.5 points and 13.5 rebounds per game in a four-game first round playoff loss to the San Antonio Spurs.[24][9] After the Suns closed out the season with a 41–41 record and a first-round playoff loss, Barkley was traded to Houston in exchange for Sam Cassell, Robert Horry, Mark Bryant, and Chucky Brown.[25] The 1995-96 NBA season was the 50th season of the National Basketball Association, although the league didnt celebrate this anniversary until the following season. ... is the 326th day of the year (327th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The San Antonio Spurs are an American professional basketball team based in San Antonio, Texas. ... Samuel (Sam) James Cassell (born November 18, 1969 in Baltimore, Maryland) is an American professional basketball player who currently plays point guard for the NBAs Los Angeles Clippers. ... Robert Horry (born August 25, 1970 in Harford County, Maryland) is an American National Basketball Association basketball player. ... Mark Craig Bryant (born April 25, 1965, in Glen Ridge, New Jersey) is an African-American former professional basketball player who was selected by the Portland Trail Blazers in the 1st round (21st overall pick) of the 1988 NBA Draft. ... Clarence Chucky Brown (b. ...


During his career with the Suns, Barkley excelled as a player, earning All-NBA and All-Star honors in each of his four seasons. However, the always outspoken Barkley continued to stir up controversy during the 1993 season, when he famously claimed that sports figures should not be role models.[26]


Role model controversy

Throughout his career, Barkley had been arguing that athletes should not be considered role models.[3] He stated, "A million guys can dunk a basketball in jail, should they be role models?" In 1993, his argument prompted national news when he wrote the text for his "I am not a role model" Nike commercial. Dan Quayle, the former Vice President of the United States called it a "family-values message" for Barkley's oft-ignored call for parents and teachers to quit looking to him to "raise your kids" and instead be role models themselves.[25] Don Imus, The term role model was introduced by Robert K. Merton[1]. Merton says that individuals compare themselves with reference groups of people who occupy the social role to which the individual aspires. ... James Danforth Dan Quayle (born February 4, 1947) was the forty-fourth Vice President of the United States under George H. W. Bush (1989–1993). ... The Vice President of the United States (sometimes referred to as VPOTUS[1] or Veep) is the first in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the president. ...


Barkley's message sparked a great public debate about the nature of role models. He argued,

I think the media demands that athletes be role models because there's some jealousy involved. It's as if they say, this is a young black kid playing a game for a living and making all this money, so we're going to make it tough on him. And what they're really doing is telling kids to look up to someone they can't become, because not many people can be like we are. Kids can't be like Michael Jordan.[25]

Thirteen years later, on May 23, 2006, ESPN Classic aired a "The Top 5 Reasons You Can't Blame..." episode on Barkley's controversial commercial. The show discussed five main reasons why they agreed with Barkley's "I am not a role model" message. The number one reason stated was, "He really wasn't a role model. Although many fans believed Barkley's candor made him one of the NBA's most lovable players, his behavior occasionally backed up his claims, like in the aforementioned 1991-92 season game where he spat on a 9-year old girl, and an incident in Orlando in which he threw a man through a window." is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... ESPN Classic features reruns of famous sporting events, sports documentaries, and sports themed movies. ... The Top 5 Reasons You Cant Blame. ...


Houston Rockets

The trade to the Houston Rockets in the 1996-97 season was Barkley's last chance at capturing an NBA championship title. He joined a veteran team that included two of the NBA's 50 Greatest Players, Hakeem Olajuwon and Clyde Drexler. He continued to battle injuries throughout the season and played only 53 games, missing fourteen because of a laceration and bruise on his left pelvis, eleven because of a sprained right ankle, and four due to suspensions.[1] He became the team's second leading scorer, averaging 19.2 points on 48.4% shooting;[2] the first time since his rookie year that he averaged below 20 points per game. With Olajuwon taking most of the shots, Barkley focused primarily on rebounding, averaging 13.5 per game, the second best in his career.[2] The Rockets ended the regular season with a 57–25 record and advanced to the Western Conference Finals, where they were defeated in six games by the Utah Jazz.[1] Barkley averaged 17.9 points and 12.0 rebounds per game in another postseason loss.[27] The 1996-97 NBA season was the 51st season of the National Basketball Association. ... The 50 Greatest Players in National Basketball Association History (also referred to as the NBAs 50th Anniversary All-Time Team) were chosen in 1996 on the occasion of the fiftieth anniversary of the founding of the National Basketball Association (NBA). ... Hakeem Abdul Olajuwon (born Akeem Abdul Olajuwon on January 21, 1963) is a retired Nigerian-American professional basketball player in the National Basketball Association (NBA). ... Clyde Austin Drexler (born June 22, 1962 in New Orleans, Louisiana) is a former National Basketball Association shooting guard. ... Definition A cut is an injury that results in a break or opening in the skin. ... The Utah Jazz is a professional basketball team based in Salt Lake City, Utah. ... The 1997 NBA Playoffs was the postseason tournament of the National Basketball Associations 1996-1997 season. ...


The 1997-98 season was another injury plagued year for Barkley. He averaged 15.2 points on 48.5% shooting and 11.7 rebounds per game.[2] The Rockets ended the season with a 41–41 record and were eliminated in five games by the Utah Jazz in the first round of the playoffs. Limited by injuries, Barkley played four games and averaged career lows of 9.0 points and 5.3 rebounds in 21.8 minutes per game.[9] During the league-lockout shortened season, Barkley played 42 regular season games and managed 16.1 points on 47.8% field goal shooting and 12.3 rebounds per game.[2] He became the second player in NBA history, following Wilt Chamberlain, to accumulate 23,000 points, 12,000 rebounds and 4,000 assists in their career.[1] The Rockets concluded the shortened season with a 31–19 record and advanced to the playoffs.[28] In his last postseason appearance, Barkley averaged 23.5 points on 52.9% field goal shooting and 13.8 rebounds per game in a first round playoff loss to the Los Angeles Lakers.[9] He concluded his postseason career averaging 22.1 points on 54.1% field goal shooting, 11.7 rebounds and 3.9 assists per game.[1] The 1997-98 NBA season was the 52nd season of the National Basketball Association. ... The 1998 NBA Playoffs was the postseason tournament of the National Basketball Associations 1997-1998 season. ... The 1998-99 NBA season was the 53rd season of the National Basketball Association. ... The 1999 NBA Playoffs was the postseason tournament of the National Basketball Associations 1999 season. ...


In his final year in the NBA, Barkley's season and career ended prematurely after rupturing his left quadriceps tendon on December 8, 1999 in Philadelphia, where his career began.[29] Before the injury, Barkley averaged 14.5 points on 47.7% field goal shooting and 10.5 rebounds per game.[2] Refusing to allow his injury to be the last image of his career, Barkley returned after four months for one final game. On April 19, 2000, in a home game against the Vancouver Grizzlies, Barkley scored a memorable basket on an offensive rebound and putback, a common trademark during his career. He accomplished what he set out to do after being activated from the injured list, and walked off the court to a standing ovation.[30] He stated, "I can't explain what tonight meant. I did it for me. I've won and lost a lot of games, but the last memory I had was being carried off the court. I couldn't get over the mental block of being carried off the court. It was important psychologically to walk off the court on my own."[30] After the basket, Barkley immediately retired and concluded his sixteen year NBA Hall of Fame career. The 1999-2000 NBA season was the 54th season of the National Basketball Association. ... is the 342nd day of the year (343rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... is the 109th day of the year (110th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Basketball moves are generally individual actions used by players to pass by defenders to gain access to the basket or to get a clean pass to a teammate. ...


Olympic career

Olympic medal record
Men's Basketball
Gold 1992 Barcelona United States
Gold 1996 Atlanta United States

Barkley competed in the 1992 and 1996 Olympic games and won two gold medals as a member of the United States men's basketball team. In 1992, international rules, which had previously prevented NBA players from playing in the Olympics were changed, allowing Barkley and fellow NBA players to compete in the Olympics for the first time. The result was the legendary Dream Team, which went 6–0 in the Olympic qualifying tournament and 8–0 against Olympic opponents. The team averaged an Olympic record 117.3 points a game and won games by an average of 43.8 points.[31] Barkley led the team with 18.0 points on 71.1% field goal shooting and set a then-Olympic single game scoring record with 30 points in a 127–83 victory over Brazil.[31] He also set a U.S. Men's Olympic record for highest three point field goal percentage with 87.5% and added 4.1 rebounds and 2.6 steals per game.[32] This article is about the sport. ... The 92 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXV Olympiad, were held in 1992 in Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. ... The 1996 Summer h Olympics, formally known as the Games of the XXVI Olympiad and informally known as the Centennial Olympics, were held in 1996 in Atlanta, Georgia, United States. ... The 92 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXV Olympiad, were held in 1992 in Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. ... The 1996 Summer h Olympics, formally known as the Games of the XXVI Olympiad and informally known as the Centennial Olympics, were held in 1996 in Atlanta, Georgia, United States. ... Basketball has been played consistently at the Summer Olympic Games since 1936, with a demonstration event in 1904. ... Gold Medal is an album by American band The Donnas, released in 2004. ... This article or section is incomplete and may require expansion and/or cleanup. ... This article or section is incomplete and may require expansion and/or cleanup. ...


At the 1996 Atlanta Summer Olympic Games, Barkley led the team in scoring, rebounds, and field goal percentage. He averaged 12.4 points on 81.6% field goal shooting and 6.6 rebounds per game, as the team once again compiled a perfect 8–0 record and captured gold medal honors.[33]


Player profile

Barkley primarily played the power forward position. He was known for his unusual build as a basketball player, stockier than most small forwards, yet shorter than the league's power forwards. However, Barkley was still capable of outplaying bigger players and overpowering smaller opponents.[1] He was fluid on the fast break, a powerful jumper, an accurate shooter, and one of the NBA's premier clutch players.[1] He was a prolific scorer who averaged 22.1 points per game for his career,[9] with the ability to score on the perimeter or finish inside with a powerful dunk. He scored with great efficiency and averaged 54.1% field goal accuracy for his career, including a career high 60% during the 1989-90 NBA season.[9] This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Reeses Fast Break is a candy bar similar to the Reeses Peanut Butter Cup. ... In American sports terminology, clutch means performing well under extreme pressure. ... The 1989-90 NBA Season was the 44th season of the National Basketball Association. ...


Frequently listed as 6 feet 6 inches, but measuring a shade under 6 feet 5 inches,[34][35] Barkley was the shortest player in NBA history to lead the league in rebounding, and averaged a career high 14.6 rebounds per game during the 1986-87 season.[36] His tenacious and aggressive play helped cement his legacy as one of the greatest rebounders in NBA history, as he averaged 11.7 rebounds per game and totaled 12,546 rebounds for his career.[9] He topped the NBA in offensive rebounding for three straight years,[3] and was capable of controlling a defensive rebound, dribbling the length of the court, and finishing at the rim with a powerful dunk.[36] His defensive talents were also equally impressive. He concluded his career as the second All-Time leader in steals for the power forward position,[37] and despite being undersized, also finished among the All-Time leaders in blocked shots.[38] The 1986-87 NBA Season was the 41st season of the National Basketball Association. ...


Barkley's talents were perhaps best summarized by NBA Hall-of-Famer Bill Walton. In a SLAM magazine issue ranking NBA greats, he stated, "Barkley is like Magic [Johnson] and Larry [Bird] in that they don't really play a position. He plays everything; he plays basketball. There is nobody who does what Barkley does. He's a dominant rebounder, a dominant defensive player, a three-point shooter, a dribbler, a playmaker."[3] William Theodore Walton III, better known as Bill Walton (born November 5, 1952), is a former American basketball player and current television sportscaster. ... The first issue of SLAM, featuring cover athlete Larry Johnson. ... “Earvin Johnson” redirects here. ... Larry Joe Bird (born December 7, 1956) is a retired American NBA basketball player, widely considered one of the greatest players of all time, and one of the best clutch performers in the history of sports. ...


Legacy

During his sixteen year NBA career, Barkley was regarded as one of the most controversial, outspoken, and dominating players in the history of basketball. His impact on the sport went far beyond his rebounding titles, assists, scoring, and consistent play.[19] His larger than life persona and confrontational mannerisms often led to technical fouls and fines, and sometimes gave rise to national controversy; such as when he was featured in ads that rejected pro athletes as role models and famously declared, "I am not a role model."[39] Although his words often lead to controversy, according to Barkley his mouth never caused trouble because it always spoke the truth.[19] He stated, "I don't create controversies. They're there long before I open my mouth. I just bring them to your attention."[3] In basketball, a technical foul is an infraction of the rules usually concerning unsportsmanlike non-contact behavior. ... Don Imus, The term role model was introduced by Robert K. Merton[1]. Merton says that individuals compare themselves with reference groups of people who occupy the social role to which the individual aspires. ...


Barkley was frequently fined for on-court fights with NBA players, such as Shaquille O'Neal, Bill Laimbeer, and Charles Oakley, among others.[40] He was also equally confrontational off the court. He was arrested for breaking a man's nose during a fight after a game with the Milwaukee Bucks [41] and also for throwing a man through a plate-glass window after being struck with a glass of ice.[42] Notwithstanding these occurrences, Barkley continued to remain popular with the fans and media. In 1993, he was approached in a bar by a woman who wanted an autograph. She then asked for more than one, but after Barkley refused to sign more, she tore the first one and threw it into Barkley's face. He reacted by pouring a beer over her head.[43] After the incident, the media and fans placed the blame on the woman, who later admitted to being "out of line."[43] Shaquille Rashaun ONeal (pronounced shak-KEEL) (born March 6, 1972 in Newark, New Jersey), frequently referred to simply as Shaq, is an American professional basketball player, generally regarded as one of the most dominant in the National Basketball Association (NBA). ... Bill Laimbeer at the White House after winning the WNBA Championship with the Detroit Shock. ... Charles Oakley (born December 18, 1963 in Cleveland, Ohio) is a retired American professional basketball player who played power forward in the National Basketball Association as a member of the Chicago Bulls, New York Knicks, Toronto Raptors, Washington Wizards and Houston Rockets. ...


As a player, Barkley was a perennial All-Star who earned league MVP honors in 1993.[3] He employed a bruising physical style of play that earned him the nicknames "Sir Charles" and "The Round Mound of Rebound."[44] He was named to the All-NBA team eleven times and earned two gold medals as a member of the United States Olympic Basketball team. He led both teams in scoring and was instrumental in helping the 1992 "Dream Team" and 1996 Men's Basketball team compile a perfect 16–0 record.[31][33] He retired as one of only four players in NBA history to record at least 20,000 points, 10,000 rebounds, and 4,000 assists in their career.[3] The National Basketball Association (NBA) holds an All-Star Weekend every February, with a variety of basketball-related events, exhibitions, and performances culminating in the NBA All-Star Game held on Sunday night. ... National Basketball Association Most Valuable Player Award was first awarded after the 1955-56 NBA season. ... The Associated Press All-NBA Team, also known simply as the All-NBA Team, is an annual honor bestowed on the best players in the league following every NBA season. ...


In recognition of his collegiate and NBA achievements, Barkley's number 34 jersey was officially retired by the University of Auburn on March 3, 2001. In the same month, the Philadelphia 76ers also officially retired Barkley's jersey.[45] Several years later, the Phoenix Suns honored Barkley as well by retiring his jersey and including him within the "Suns Ring of Honor." He joined Alvan Adams, Connie Hawkins, Tom Chambers, Dan Majerle, Walter Davis, Dick Van Arsdale, Paul Westphal and Kevin Johnson as the only players included in the "Suns Ring of Honor."[46] is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Alvan Leigh Adams (b. ... Hawkins dazzled crowds from playgrounds to arenas with his highflying acrobatic moves. ... Some people with the name Tom Chambers include the following: Tom Chambers, the former professional NBA basketball player from Utah Tom R. Chambers, a portraiture and visual artist Tom Chambers, a Virginia-based photographer Tom Chambers, a San Diego journalist Tom Chambers, an English actor Tom Chambers, a Washington State... Daniel Lewis Majerle (surname pronounced MAR-lee; b. ... Walter Paul Davis (born September 9, 1954 in Pineville, North Carolina) is a former professional basketball player. ... Richard Albert (Dick) Van Arsdale (born February 22, 1943 in Indianapolis, Indiana) is a former professional basketball player and coach, and a current NBA executive. ... Paul Westphal (born November 30, 1950 in Torrance, California) is a former basketball player and coach in the NBA. A native of California, Westphal has had a storied career in the NBA, both as a player and as a head coach. ... Kevin Maurice Johnson (born March 4, 1966 in Sacramento, California) is an American former National Basketball Association point guard who played for the Cleveland Cavaliers and the Phoenix Suns. ...


Career statistics

Career averages
Year Team GP MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
1984-85 PHI 82 28.6 .545 .167 .733 8.60 1.9 1.16 .98 14.0
1985-86 PHI 80 36.9 .572 .227 .685 12.80 3.9 2.16 1.56 20.0
1986-87 PHI 68 40.3 .594 .202 .761 14.60 4.9 1.75 1.53 23.0
1987-88 PHI 80 39.6 .587 .280 .751 11.90 3.2 1.25 1.29 28.3
1988-89 PHI 79 39.1 .579 .216 .753 12.50 4.1 1.59 .85 25.8
1989-90 PHI 79 39.1 .600 .217 .749 11.50 3.9 1.87 .63 25.2
1990-91 PHI 67 37.3 .570 .284 .722 10.10 4.2 1.64 .49 27.6
1991-92 PHI 75 38.4 .552 .234 .695 11.10 4.1 1.81 .59 23.1
1992-93 PHO 76 37.6 .520 .305 .765 12.20 5.1 1.57 .97 25.6
1993-94 PHO 65 35.4 .495 .270 .704 11.20 4.6 1.55 .57 21.6
1994-95 PHO 68 35.0 .486 .338 .748 11.10 4.1 1.62 .66 23.0
1995-96 PHO 71 37.1 .500 .280 .777 11.60 3.7 1.61 .79 23.2
1996-97 HOU 53 37.9 .484 .283 .694 13.50 4.7 1.30 .47 19.2
1997-98 HOU 68 33.0 .485 .214 .746 11.70 3.2 1.04 .41 15.2
1998-99 HOU 42 36.3 .478 .160 .719 12.30 4.6 1.02 .31 16.1
1999-00 HOU 20 31.0 .477 .231 .645 10.50 3.2 .70 .20 14.5
Career 1,073 36.7 .541 .266 .735 11.70 3.9 1.54 .83 22.1
Playoff 123 39.4 .513 .255 .717 12.90 3.9 1.57 .88 23.0
All-Star 9 23.2 .495 .250 .625 6.70 1.8 1.33 .44 12.6
Career totals
Year Team MIN FGM-A 3PM-A FTM-A TRB AST STL BLK PTS
1984-85 PHI 2,347 427-783 1-6 293-400 703 155 95 80 1,148
1985-86 PHI 2,952 595-1,041 17-75 396-578 1,026 312 173 125 1,603
1986-87 PHI 2,740 557-937 21-104 429-564 994 331 119 104 1,564
1987-88 PHI 3,170 753-1,283 44-157 714-951 951 254 100 103 2,264
1988-89 PHI 3,088 700-1,208 35-162 602-799 986 325 126 67 2,037
1989-90 PHI 3,085 706-1,177 20-92 557-744 909 307 148 50 1,989
1990-91 PHI 2,498 665-1,167 44-155 475-658 680 284 110 33 1,849
1991-92 PHI 2,881 622-1,126 32-137 454-653 830 308 136 44 1,730
1992-93 PHO 2,859 716-1,376 67-220 445-582 928 385 119 74 1,944
1993-94 PHO 2,298 518-1,046 48-178 318-452 727 296 101 37 1,402
1994-95 PHO 2,382 554-1,141 74-219 379-507 756 276 110 45 1,561
1995-96 PHO 2,632 580-1,160 49-175 440-566 821 262 114 56 1,649
1996-97 HOU 2,009 335-692 58-205 288-415 716 248 69 25 1,016
1997-98 HOU 2,243 361-744 18-84 296-397 794 217 71 28 1,036
1998-99 HOU 1,526 240-502 4-25 192-267 516 192 43 13 676
1999-00 HOU 620 106-222 6-26 71-110 209 63 14 4 289
Career 39,330 8,435-15,605 538-2,020 6,349-8,643 12,546 4,215 1,648 888 23,757
Playoff 4,849 1,009-1,965 64-251 751-1,048 1,582 482 193 108 2,833
All-Star 209 45-91 3-12 20-32 60 16 12 4 113

Post-basketball life

Turner Network Television (TNT)

Barkley currently works as a studio analyst for Turner Network Television (TNT). He appears on the network's NBA coverage during pre-game and halftime shows, in addition to special NBA events. He also appears on an original program for the Network entitled Inside the NBA, a post-game show during which Barkley, Ernie Johnson Jr., and Kenny Smith recap and comment on NBA games that have occurred during the day and also on general NBA affairs. Turner Network Television, usually referred to as TNT, is an American cable TV network created by media mogul Ted Turner and currently owned by the Turner Broadcasting System division of Time Warner. ... Inside the NBA is the postgame show for NBA on TNT broadcasts. ... A post-game show or postgame show is a TV presentation that occurs immediately after the live broadcast of a major sporting event. ... Ernie Johnson Jr. ... To see the football player see Kenny Smith (American football) Kenny The Jet Smith (born March 8, 1965, in Queens, New York) is a retired American professional basketball player and current TV announcer. ...


During the broadcast of a game, in which Barkley was courtside with Marv Albert, Barkley poked fun at NBA official Dick Bavetta's age. Albert replied to Barkley, "I believe Dick would beat you in a footrace." In spite of the remark, Barkley went on to challenge Bavetta to a race at the 2007 NBA All-Star Weekend for $50,000. The winner was to choose a charity to which the money would be donated. The pair raced for three and a half lengths of the basketball court until Barkley ultimately won. After the event, the two embraced in a show of good sportsmanship.[47] Marv Albert (born Marvin Philip Aufrichtig on June 12, 1940, in Brooklyn, New York) is an American television and radio sportscaster, honored for his work as a member of the Basketball Hall of Fame and is commonly referred to as the voice of basketball. ... Dick Bavetta (born December 10, 1939) is an American referee for the National Basketball Association. ... 2007 NBA All-Star Game logo The 2007 NBA All-Star Game was played on Sunday, February 18, 2007 at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas Thomas and Mack Center in Las Vegas, Nevada. ...


Gambling

Barkley is well known for his compulsive gambling. In an interview with ESPN's Trey Wingo, he revealed that he lost approximately $10 million through gambling.[48] In addition, he also admitted to losing $2.5 million "in a six hour period" while playing blackjack.[48] Although Barkley openly admits to his problem, he claims it is not serious since he can afford to support the habit.[48] When approached by fellow TNT analyst Ernie Johnson about the issue, Barkley replied, "It's not a problem. If you're a drug addict or an alcoholic, those are problems. I gamble for too much money. As long as I can continue to do it I don't think it's a problem. Do I think it's a bad habit? Yes, I think it's a bad habit. Am I going to continue to do it? Yes, I'm going to continue to do it."[49] Compulsive gambling is an urge or addiction to gamble despite harmful negative consequences or a desire to stop. ... ESPN/ESPN-DT, formerly an acronym for Entertainment and Sports Programming Network, is an [[United States|Amer<nowiki>Insert non-formatted text here--68. ... Hal Chapman Wingo III or Trey Wingo is the co-host of ESPNs SportsCenter from time to time but is best known as host of NFL Live alongside football analysts Mark Schlereth, Sean Salisbury, Merrill Hoge, Mike Golic and Tom Jackson, among others. ... “$” redirects here. ... Caravaggio, The Cardsharps, c. ... This article is about the gambling game. ... Ernie Johnson could refer to two baseball players: Ernie Johnson (1888-1952), a MLB short stop in 1912, 1915-1918, and 1921-1925, most notable with the Chicago White Sox Ernie Johnson (1924-), a MLB relief pitcher in 1950, 1952-1959, most notable with the Milwaukee Braves World Series team...


Despite suffering big losses, Barkley also claims to have won on several occasions. During a trip to Las Vegas, he claims to have won $700,000 from playing blackjack and betting on the Indianapolis Colts to defeat the Chicago Bears in Super Bowl XLI.[48] However, he went on to state, "No matter how much I win it ain't a lot. It's only a lot when I lose. And you always lose. I think it's fun, I think it's exciting. I'm gonna continue to do it but I have to get to a point where I don't try to break the casino 'cause you never can." Vegas redirects here. ... This article is about the gambling game. ... City Indianapolis, Indiana Other nicknames The Horseshoes Team colors Speed Blue and White Head Coach Tony Dungy Owner Jim Irsay General manager Bill Polian Mascot Blue League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1953–present) Western Conference (1953-1969) Coastal Division (1967-1969) American Football Conference (1970-present) AFC East (1970... City Chicago, Illinois Other nicknames Da Bears, The Monsters of the Midway Team colors Navy Blue and Orange Head Coach Lovie Smith Owner Virginia Halas McCaskey Chairman Michael McCaskey General manager Jerry Angelo Fight song Bear Down, Chicago Bears Mascot Staley Da Bear League/Conference affiliations Independent (1919) National Football... Date February 4, 2007 Stadium Dolphin Stadium City Miami Gardens, Florida MVP Peyton Manning, Quarterback, Colts Favorite Colts by 6. ...


Politics

Barkley spoke for many years of his Republican Party affiliation and in 1995 considered running as a G.O.P. candidate for Alabama's governorship in the 1998 election.[50] In 2006, he altered his political stance, stating: The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... The Republican Party (often referred to as the GOP, for Grand Old Party) is one of the two major political parties in the United States two-party system, along with the Democratic Party. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... The Alabama gubernatorial election of 1998 was held on 3 November 1998 to select the governor of the state of Alabama. ...

I was a Republican until they lost their minds, "The word 'conservative' means 'discriminatory,' practically. It's a form of political discrimination. What do the Republicans run on? Against gay marriage and for a war that makes no sense. A war that was based on faulty intelligence. That's all they ever talk about. That and immigration. Another discriminatory argument for political gain.[51]

At a July 2006 meeting of the Southern Regional Conference of the National School Boards Association in Destin, Florida, Barkley lent credence to the idea of his running for Governor of Alabama, stating: Early elections in November are announced in the Netherlands. ... Destin is a city in Okaloosa County, Florida, commonly known as The Worlds Luckiest Fishing Village. ...

I'm serious. I've got to get people to realize that the government is full of it. Republicans and Democrats want to argue over stuff that's not important, like gay marriage or the war in Iraq or illegal immigration... When I run - if I run - we're going to talk about real issues like improving our schools, cleaning up our neighborhoods of drugs and crime and making Alabama a better place for all people.[52]

In September 2006, Barkley once again reiterated his desire to run for Governor. He noted, "I can't run until 2014...I have to live there for seven years, so I'm looking for a house there as we speak."[53] In September 2007, during a broadcast on Monday Night Football, Barkley announced that he bought a house in Alabama to satisfy residency requirements for a 2014 campaign for governor. In addition, Barkley declared himself an Independent and not Democratic as previously reported. "The Republicans are full of it", Barkley said. "The Democrats are a little less full of it."[53] September 2006 is the ninth month of 2006 and has begun on a Friday. ... September 2007 is the ninth month of that year. ... Monday Night Football (MNF) is a live television broadcast of the National Football League. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic...


Books

In 2000, Barkley wrote the foreword for Sports Illustrated columnist Rick Reilly's book The Life of Reilly. In it, Barkley quipped, "Of all the people in sports I'd like to throw through a plate glass window, Reilly's not one of them. It's a shame though, skinny white boy looks real aerodynamic." A foreword is a literary device that is often found in the beginning of a piece of literature, before the introduction. ... The first issue of Sports Illustrated, August 16, 1954, showing Milwaukee Braves star Eddie Mathews at bat in Milwaukee County Stadium. ... Richard Rick Paul Reilly (born February 3, 1958 in Boulder, Colorado) is the back-page sportswriter for Sports Illustrated. ...


In 2002, Barkley released the book I May Be Wrong, But I Doubt It, which included editing and commentary by close friend Michael Wilbon. In 2005, Barkley released Who's Afraid of a Large Black Man?, which is a collection of interviews with leading figures in entertainment, business, sports, and government. Michael Wilbon also contributed to this book and was present at many of the interviews. I May Be Wrong but I Doubt It is NBA legend Charles Barkleys first sports memoir. ... Michael R. Wilbon (born November 19, 1958) is an American sportswriter and columnist. ...


References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y nba.com, Charles Barkley: Original Bio, accessed March 6, 2007
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v nba.com/stats, Charles Barkley Career Statistics, accessed March 7, 2007
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l nba.com/history, Charles Barkley: Historical Biography, accessed March 5, 2007
  4. ^ a b c Charles Barkley. (n.d.). Contemporary Black Biography. Answers.com, Charles Barkley, accessed May 16, 2007
  5. ^ Michael Wilbon, "Barkley: the Great Wide Hope", The Washington Post, April 23, 1984
  6. ^ a b sportsstats.com, Barkley College Statistics, accessed February 10, 2007
  7. ^ a b c auburntigers.cstv.com, Official Site of Auburn Athletics: Men's Basketball, accessed April 5, 2007
  8. ^ databasebasketball.com, 76ers 1984-85 Game Log and Scores, accessed March 11, 2007
  9. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n basketballreference.com, Charles Barkley Career Stats, accessed February 10, 2007
  10. ^ databasebasketball.com, 76ers 1986-87 Game Log and Scores, accessed March 11, 2007
  11. ^ espn.com, MVP Controversy, accessed March 27, 2007
  12. ^ databasebasketball.com, 76ers 1989-90 Game Log and Scores, accessed March 11, 2007
  13. ^ New York Times, SPORTS PEOPLE: PRO BASKETBALL; Barkley Will Switch To Johnson's No. 32, November 13, 1991
  14. ^ Chris Weiskopf, Return of HIV-positive Magic Johnson -Column, National Review, April 22, 1996, accessed March 6, 2007
  15. ^ databasebasketball.com, Philadelphia 76ers: 1991 Stats, History, Awards, and More, accessed April 30, 2007
  16. ^ Sam Goldpaper, Basketball; Pistons and 76ers Receive 162,500 fine and 3 Bans, New York Times, accessed March 6, 2007
  17. ^ a b c Larry Platt, People: Charles Barkley, accessed March 8, 2007
  18. ^ nytimes.com, Pro Basketball: Barkley Fined and Suspended, accessed March 8, 2007
  19. ^ a b c nba.com/encyclopedia, You're a Good Man Charles Barkley!, accessed March 8, 2007
  20. ^ sportsillustrated.com, SI's Jack McCallum: Sir Charles speaks, accessed March 8, 2007
  21. ^ nba.com/history, 1992-93 SEASON IN REVIEW, accessed 1 June 2007
  22. ^ a b databasebasketball.com, Phoenix Suns 1993-94 Game Log and Scores, accessed March 6, 2007
  23. ^ a b c databasebasketball.com, Suns 1994-95 Game Log and Scores, accessed March 11, 2007
  24. ^ databasebasketball.com, Suns 1995-96 Game Log and Scores, accessed March 6, 2007
  25. ^ a b c nytimes.com, Barkley Confirms Trade, accessed March 13, 2007
  26. ^ salon.com, Charles Barkley, accessed March 13, 2007
  27. ^ databasebasketball.com, Barkley Stats, accessed March 16, 2007
  28. ^ basketballreference.com, 1998-99 Season: Houston Rockets, accessed March 29, 2007
  29. ^ clutchfans.net, Barkley's Career Over: Chuck ruptures quadriceps tendon, season, career officially over, accessed March 6, 2007
  30. ^ a b sportsillustrated.cnn.com, Barkley Retires, accessed April 5, 2007
  31. ^ a b c usabasketball.com, USA Basketball: Men's Olympics History (1992), accessed April 5, 2007
  32. ^ usabasketball.com, USA Basketball: USA Men's Olympic Records, accessed April 5, 2007
  33. ^ a b usabasketball.com, USA Basketball: Men's Olympic History (1996), accessed April 5, 2007
  34. ^ nba.com, Sixers History retired numbers, accessed, May 2, 2007
  35. ^ sportsillustrated.com, The day after Barkley 'down and depressed' after injury ends career, accessed May 2, 2007
  36. ^ a b hoophall.com, Charles Barkley Hall of Fame Bio, accessed March 6, 2007
  37. ^ basketball-reference.com, Career Leaders for Steals, accessed March 28, 2007
  38. ^ basketball-reference.com, Career Leaders for Blocks, accessed April 8, 2007
  39. ^ Bob Carter, Sir Charles led the NBA in dunks, interviews, accessed April 15, 2007
  40. ^ Mike Wise, "Barkley Fight Costs Oakley Two Games and $11,000", The New York Times, October 29, 1996
  41. ^ nytimes.com, Barkley Arrested After Fight, accessed April 15, 2007
  42. ^ chronicle.augusta.com, The Augusta Chronicle: Barkley arrested after bar scuffle, accessed April 15, 2007
  43. ^ a b phoenixnewtimes.com, The Most Popular Man in Phoenix, accessed April 23, 2007
  44. ^ "Charles Barkley." The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. Columbia University
  45. ^ Bob Ford, Lovefest for Charles Barkley, whose jersey number is retired. (Knight-Ridder/Tribune News Service report), The Philadelphia Inquirer, accessed March 6, 2007
  46. ^ nba.com, Phoenix Suns Legends: Ring of Honor, accessed July 10, 2007.
  47. ^ Misener, Darren. "Bavetta vs. Barkley: Sir Charles Reigns". February 19, 2007. NBA.com. Accessed March 6, 2007
  48. ^ a b c d espn.com Barkley admits huge losses, big gains while gambling (AP report), accessed March 6, 2007
  49. ^ espn.com, Barkley: Gambling has cost me $10M, accessed July 22, 2007.
  50. ^ msnbc.com, Barkley renews talk of running for Ala. governor (AP article), accessed January 12, 2007.
  51. ^ Chris Baldwin, Charles Barkley: John Mellencamp right, "Conservative means discriminatory", July 17, 2006
  52. ^ Charles J. Dean, Barkley may run in 2010, July 26, 2006
  53. ^ a b espn.com, Barkley serious about running for Alabama governor (AP article), accessed January 12, 2007

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Bibliography

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External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Charles Barkley
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Charles Barkley
  • Charles Barkley: NBA.com Profile
  • Charles Barkley: NBA.com Historical Biography
  • Charles Barkley: Hall of Fame Profile
  • Charles Barkley at the Internet Movie Database
Preceded by
AP: Dale Ellis
UPI: Jeff Malone
SEC Men's Basketball Player of the Year
1984
Succeeded by
Kenny Walker
Preceded by
Magic Johnson
NBA All-Star Game Most Valuable Player
1991
Succeeded by
Magic Johnson
Preceded by
Michael Jordan
NBA Most Valuable Player
1993
Succeeded by
Hakeem Olajuwon
1992 Olympic Champions Men's Basketball – "Dream Team"
Charles Barkley | Larry Bird | Clyde Drexler | Patrick Ewing | Magic Johnson | Michael Jordan
Christian Laettner | Karl Malone | Chris Mullin | Scottie Pippen | David Robinson | John Stockton
Coach: Chuck Daly
1996 Olympic Champions Men's BasketballUnited States
Charles Barkley | Penny Hardaway | Grant Hill | Karl Malone | Reggie Miller | Hakeem Olajuwon
Shaquille O'Neal | Gary Payton | Scottie Pippen | Mitch Richmond | David Robinson | John Stockton
Coach: Lenny Wilkins

  Results from FactBites:
 
Charles Barkley - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2399 words)
Barkley was then traded to the Houston Rockets, where he joined Hakeem Olajuwon, Clyde Drexler, and for one season, Scottie Pippen in their quest to win championships.
Barkley appeared in a thought sequence of comedian Dave Chappelle, who was embracing a female doll in a sexual position.
Barkley was already known to be a heavy gambler, but the scope of his losses was not known until the interview.
Charles Barkley - MSN Encarta (436 words)
Charles Barkley, born in 1963, American professional basketball player, known to fans as Sir Charles.
Charles Wade Barkley was born in Leeds, Alabama.
That year Barkley left college to enter the NBA draft and was chosen by the Philadelphia 76ers.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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