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Encyclopedia > Charles, Prince of Wales
Prince Charles
Prince of Wales; Scotland: Duke of Rothesay
Issue
Prince William of Wales
Prince Henry of Wales
Full name
Charles Philip Arthur George[2]
Titles
HRH The Prince of Wales
HRH The Duke of Rothesay
HRH The Duke of Cornwall
HRH Prince Charles of Edinburgh
Royal house House of Windsor
Father Philip, Duke of Edinburgh
Mother Elizabeth II
Born 14 November 1948 (1948-11-14) (age 58)
Buckingham Palace, London, England
Baptised 15 December 1948
Buckingham Palace, London, England
British Royalty
Royal Family
HM The Queen
HRH The Duke of Edinburgh

This box: view  talk  edit
Styles of
The Prince of Wales
Reference style His Royal Highness
Spoken style Your Royal Highness
Alternative style Sir

The Prince Charles, Prince of Wales (Charles Philip Arthur George;[2] born 14 November 1948), is the eldest son of Elizabeth II and Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh. He has held the title of Prince of Wales since 1958, and is styled His Royal Highness The Prince of Wales, except in Scotland, where he is styled His Royal Highness The Prince Charles, Duke of Rothesay. The title Duke of Cornwall is often used for the Prince in relation to Cornwall. Prince Charles may refer to: Charles, Prince of Wales, current heir-apparent to the British throne Any of the previous British royals named Charles, Prince of Wales Charles Edward Stuart Bonnie Prince Charlie The former Belgian regent, Prince Charles of Belgium Charles Prince Charles Alexander, a funk musician Prince Charles... This article is about the country. ... Image File history File links From [1] File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... “Prince William” redirects here. ... Prince Henry of Wales (Henry Charles Albert David; born 15 September 1984), commonly known as Prince Harry, is the younger son of Charles, Prince of Wales and his first wife, the late Diana, Princess of Wales. ... A Royal House or Dynasty is a sort of family name used by royalty. ... The House of Windsor is the current Royal House of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland and each of the other Commonwealth Realms. ... “Prince Philip” redirects here. ... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Buckingham Palace and the Victoria Memorial. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Buckingham Palace and the Victoria Memorial. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article is about the monarchy of the United Kingdom, one of sixteen that share a common monarch; for information about this constitutional relationship, see Commonwealth realm; for information on the reigning monarch, see Elizabeth II. For information about other Commonwealth realm monarchies, as well as other relevant articles, see... Members of the Royal Family on the balcony of Buckingham Palace after the Trooping the Colour ceremony The British Royal Family is shared between the Commonwealth Realms; this article focuses on the perspective of United Kingdom. ... Image File history File links Royal_Standard_of_England. ... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ... “Prince Philip” redirects here. ... Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall (Camilla Rosemary; formerly Parker Bowles; née Shand, born 17 July 1947) is the second wife of Charles, Prince of Wales, heir apparent to the thrones of the United Kingdom and the other 15 Commonwealth Realms. ... “Prince William” redirects here. ... Prince Henry of Wales (Henry Charles Albert David; born 15 September 1984), commonly known as Prince Harry, is the younger son of Charles, Prince of Wales and his first wife, the late Diana, Princess of Wales. ... The Prince Andrew, The Duke of York (Andrew Albert Christian Edward; born 19 February 1960) is a member of the British Royal Family, the third child and second son of Queen Elizabeth II. He has held the title of Duke of York since 1986. ... “Princess Beatrice” redirects here. ... Princess Eugenie of York (Eugenie Victoria Helena; born 23 March 1990) is a member of the British Royal Family and a granddaughter of Queen Elizabeth II. Princess Eugenie is sixth in the Line of succession to the British Throne and has been since her birth in 1990. ... The Prince Edward, Earl of Wessex, KG, KCVO, SOM (Edward Antony Richard Louis Mountbatten-Windsor; born 10 March 1964) is a member of the British Royal Family, the youngest child and third son of Queen Elizabeth II. He has held the title of Earl of Wessex since 1999. ... The Countess of Wessex (Sophie Helen; neé Rhys-Jones, born 20 January 1965), is a member of the British Royal Family, the wife of Prince Edward, Earl of Wessex, the youngest son of Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh. ... The Lady Louise Windsor (Louise Alice Elizabeth Mary; born 8 November 2003) is a member of the British Royal Family. ... The Princess Anne, Princess Royal (Anne Elizabeth Alice Louise; born 15 August 1950), is a member of the British Royal Family and the only daughter of Elizabeth II. She is the seventh holder of the title Princess Royal, and is currently ninth in the line of succession to the British... Prince Richard, Duke of Gloucester KG GCVO (Richard Alexander Walter George Windsor; born 26 August 1944) is a member of the British Royal Family, a grandson of King George V. He has been Duke of Gloucester since his fathers death in 1974. ... The Duchess of Gloucester (born 20 June 1946), is a member of the British Royal Family, the wife of Prince Richard, Duke of Gloucester, a grandchild of King George V. The Duchess of Gloucester, with her husband, undertakes royal duties on behalf of the Dukes cousin, Queen Elizabeth II... Field Marshal Prince Edward, Duke of Kent (Edward George Nicholas Patrick Paul; born 9 October 1935) is a member of the British Royal Family, a grandchild of George V. He has held the title of Duke of Kent since 1942. ... The Duchess of Kent (Katharine Lucy Mary; born Worsley, 22 February 1933) is a member of the British Royal Family, the wife of Prince Edward, Duke of Kent, a grandson of King George V and cousin of Queen Elizabeth II. The Duchess of Kent gained attention for her conversion to... Prince Michael of Kent, GCVO (Michael George Charles Franklin Windsor; born 4 July 1942) is a member of the British Royal Family, a grandson of King George V and Queen Mary. ... Princess Michael of Kent (née Baroness Marie-Christine Agnes Hedwig Ida von Reibnitz, 15 January 1945), is a member of the British Royal Family. ... Princess Alexandra, The Honourable Lady Ogilvy (Alexandra Helen Elizabeth Olga Christabel; born 25 December 1936), is a member of the British Royal Family, a granddaughter of George V. She was married to the late Sir Angus Ogilvy. ... A style of office, or honorific, is a form of address which by tradition or law precedes a reference to a person who holds a title or post, or to the political office itself. ... Royal Highness (abbreviation HRH) is a style (His Royal Highness or Her Royal Highness); plural Royal Highnesses (abbreviation TRH, Their Royal Highnesses). ... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ... “Prince Philip” redirects here. ... This article is about the title Prince of Wales. ... A style of office, or honorific, is a form of address which by tradition or law precedes a reference to a person who holds a title or post, or to the political office itself. ... This article is about the country. ... Banner of the Duke of Rothesay, the quarterings represent the Great Steward of Scotland and the Lord of the Isles. ... The Dukedom of Cornwall was the first dukedom created in the peerage of England. ... For other uses, see Cornwall (disambiguation). ...


Charles is Heir Apparent, equally and separately, to the thrones of 16 sovereign states known as the Commonwealth Realms; he will most likely reside in and be directly involved with the United Kingdom. He will not, however, necessarily inherit the title Head of the Commonwealth.[3] If Charles ascends to the throne, he will be the first British monarch to be descended from Queen Victoria through two lines: First, from his mother's side, through Edward VII, George V and George VI. And, second, through his paternal grandmother, Princess Alice of Battenberg who is the eldest daughter of Princess Victoria of Hesse and by Rhine, who as a daughter of Princess Alice, Grand Duchess of Hesse and by Rhine is a female line grandchild of Queen Victoria. Though the Prince is first in line to the Thrones, in the United Kingdom order of precedence he is third, after his parents, and is not included in the other Realms' precedence orders at all, though typically he would be fourth or fifth, following his mother, the relevant vice-regal representative(s), and his father. Contrasting with heir presumptive, an heir apparent is one who cannot be prevented from inheriting by the birth of any other person. ... The thrones for The Queen of Canada, and the Duke of Edinburgh in the Canadian Senate, Ottawa is usually occupied by the Governor General and her spouse at the annual State Opening of Parliament. ... The Commonwealth Realms, shown in pink A Commonwealth Realm is any one of the sixteen sovereign states within the Commonwealth of Nations that recognise Elizabeth II as their respective monarch. ... The present British Monarch, Queen Elizabeth II, is the second to be recognised as Head of the Commonwealth in the 53 member states of the Commonwealth of Nations. ... Victoria Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, Empress of India Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria) (24 May 1819–22 January 1901) was a Queen of the United Kingdom, reigning from 20 June 1837 until her death. ... Edward VII (Albert Edward; 9 November 1841 – 6 May 1910) was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, of the British Dominions beyond the Seas, and Emperor of India from 22 January 1901 until his death on 6 May 1910. ... George V (George Frederick Ernest Albert; 3 June 1865 – 20 January 1936) was the first British monarch belonging to the House of Windsor, which he created from the British branch of the German House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha. ... George VI (Albert Frederick Arthur George; 14 December 1895 – 6 February 1952) was King of the United Kingdom and the British Dominions from 11 December 1936 until his death. ... Princess Alice of Battenberg Princess Alice of Battenberg, later Princess Andrew of Greece and Denmark (25 February 1885 - 5 December 1969) was a great-granddaughter of the British Queen Victoria who married into the royal house of Greece. ... Princess Victoria of Hesse and by Rhine, later Victoria Mountbatten, Marchioness of Milford Haven (Victoria Alberta Elisabeth Mathilde Marie) (5 April 1863-24 September 1950), was the eldest daughter of Ludwig IV, Grand Duke of Hesse and by Rhine (1837-1892) and his wife Princess Alice of the United Kingdom... Her Royal Highness The Princess Alice (Alice Maud Mary), (25 April 1843 - 14 December 1878, was a member of the British Royal Family, the third child and second daughter of Queen Victoria. ... Victoria Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, Empress of India Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria) (24 May 1819–22 January 1901) was a Queen of the United Kingdom, reigning from 20 June 1837 until her death. ... The Order of precedence in the United Kingdom is different for each region. ... A viceroy is a royal official who governs a country or province in the name of and as representative of the monarch. ...


The Prince of Wales is well known for his extensive charity work, particularly for the Prince's Trust, the Prince's Regeneration Trust, and the Prince's Foundation for the Built Environment. He also carries out a full schedule of royal duties and, increasingly, is taking on more duties from his elderly parents as official representative of the Queen and deputy for his father. The Prince is also well known for his marriages to the late Diana, Princess of Wales and, subsequently, to Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall. The Princes Trust is a UK based charity headed by HRH The Prince of Wales. ... The Princes Foundation for the Built Environment is an educational charity established by Charles, Prince of Wales to teach and demonstrate in practice those principles of traditional urban design and architecture which put people and the communities of which they are part at the centre of the design process. ... “Diana Spencer” redirects here. ... HRH The Duchess of Cornwall The Duchess of Cornwall (Camilla Rosemary Mountbatten-Windsor, formerly Parker Bowles, née Shand) (born 17 July 1947) is a member of the British Royal Family. ...

Contents

Birth

Prince Charles was born on 14 November 1948 at Buckingham Palace, London, England, son of the then Princess Elizabeth, Duchess of Edinburgh, now Queen Elizabeth II, and The Duke of Edinburgh. is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Buckingham Palace and the Victoria Memorial. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ... “Prince Philip” redirects here. ...


Prince Charles was baptised in the Music Room of Buckingham Palace on 15 December 1948, by the Archbishop of Canterbury, Dr Geoffrey Fisher. The Prince's godparents were: King George VI, Queen Mary, Princess Margaret, the Dowager Marchioness of Milford Haven, David Bowes-Lyon, Lady Brabourne, King Haakon VII of Norway (for whom the Earl of Athlone stood proxy), and Prince George of Greece (for whom Prince Philip stood proxy). Buckingham Palace and the Victoria Memorial. ... is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Archbishop of Canterbury is the spiritual leader and senior clergyman of the Church of England, recognized by convention as the head of the worldwide Anglican Communion. ... Geoffrey Worth Fisher, Baron Fisher of Lambeth (May 5, 1887 – September 15, 1972) was Archbishop of Canterbury from 1945 to 1961. ... George VI (Albert Frederick Arthur George) (December 14, 1895 - February 6, 1952) was the third British monarch of the House of Windsor, reigning from December 11, 1936 to February 6, 1952. ... Mary of Teck (Victoria Mary Augusta Louise Olga Pauline Claudine Agnes; 26 May 1867 – 24 March 1953) was the Queen Consort of George V. Queen Mary was also the Empress of India. ... Princess Margaret redirects here. ... Victoria, Marchioness of Milford Haven, née Princess Victoria of Hesse and by Rhine (Victoria Alberta Elisabeth Mathilde Marie) (5 April 1863-24 September 1950) was the eldest daughter of Ludwig IV, Grand Duke of Hesse and by Rhine (1837-1892) and his wife Alice, Princess of Great Britain and... Sir David Bowes-Lyon KCVO (2 May 1902–13 September 1961) was a son of the 14th Earl of Strathmore and Kinghorne and a brother of Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother. ... The Right Honourable Patricia Edwina Victoria Knatchbull, 2nd Countess Mountbatten of Burma (born 14 February 1924) is a British peeress. ... Haakon VII, (Prince Carl of Denmark, born Christian Frederik Carl Georg Valdemar Axel) (August 3, 1872 – September 21, 1957), was the first king of Norway after the 1905 dissolution of the personal union with Sweden. ... Major-General Alexander Augustus Frederick William Alfred George Cambridge, 1st Earl of Athlone, KG, GCB, GCMG, GCVO, DSO, PC, FRS, born His Serene Highness Prince Alexander of Teck (14 April 1874–16 January 1957), was a member of the British Royal Family, the younger brother of Queen Mary. ... His Royal Highness Prince George of Greece and Denmark (24 June 1869, Corfu – 25 November 1957, St Cloud) was the third child of King George I of Greece and Grand Duchess Olga. ...


Under letters patent issued by the Prince's great grandfather, King George V, the title of a British prince or princess and the style Royal Highness was only available to the children and grandchildren in the male-line of the sovereign and children of the eldest son of the Prince of Wales. As Charles was a female-line grandchild of the sovereign, he would have taken his title from his father, the Duke of Edinburgh, and would have been styled by courtesy as Earl of Merioneth. However, the title of Prince and Princess, with the style Royal Highness was granted to all the children of Princess Elizabeth and Philip by letters patent of George VI on 22 October 1948. In this way the children of the heiress presumptive had a royal and princely status not thought necessary for the children of King George VI's other daughter, Princess Margaret. Thus, from birth Charles was known as His Royal Highness Prince Charles of Edinburgh. Letters Patent by Queen Victoria creating the office of Governor-General of Australia Letters patent are a type of legal instrument in the form of an open letter issued by a monarch or government granting an office, a right, monopoly, title, or status to someone or some entity such as... George V (George Frederick Ernest Albert; 3 June 1865 – 20 January 1936) was the first British monarch belonging to the House of Windsor, which he created from the British branch of the German House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha. ... This is a list of British princes from the accession of King George I in 1714. ... HRH is an abbreviation for the style His Royal Highness or Her Royal Highness. ... ... Letters Patent by Queen Victoria creating the office of Governor-General of Australia Letters patent are a type of legal instrument in the form of an open letter issued by a monarch or government granting an office, a right, monopoly, title, or status to someone or some entity such as... An heir presumptive is one who is first in line to inherit a title or property, such as a monarchy, because there is not yet an heir apparent. ... George VI (Albert Frederick Arthur George; 14 December 1895 – 6 February 1952) was King of the United Kingdom and the British Dominions from 11 December 1936 until his death. ... Princess Margaret redirects here. ...


Early life

In 1952, his mother assumed the throne, becoming Queen Elizabeth II. Prince Charles immediately became Duke of Cornwall under a charter of King Edward III, which gave that title to the Sovereign's eldest son, and was then referred to as His Royal Highness The Duke of Cornwall. He also became, in the Scottish Peerage, Duke of Rothesay, Earl of Carrick and Baron of Renfrew, Lord of the Isles, and Prince and Great Steward of Scotland. Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ... The Dukedom of Cornwall was the first dukedom created in the peerage of England. ... This article is about the King of England. ... Banner of the Duke of Rothesay, the quarterings represent the Great Steward of Scotland and the Lord of the Isles. ... MacDonald, Lord of the Isles For the series of fantasy novels by David Drake, see Lord of the Isles (David Drake). ... Prince and Great Steward of Scotland are two of the titles of the heir apparent to the throne of the United Kingdom. ...


The Duke of Cornwall was now the heir apparent to the throne. He attended his mother’s coronation at Westminster Abbey, sitting with his grandmother, Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother and his aunt, The Princess Margaret. The Collegiate Church of St Peter, Westminster, which is almost always referred to by its original name of Westminster Abbey, is a mainly Gothic church, on the scale of a cathedral (and indeed often mistaken for one), in Westminster, London, just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. ... Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon, later Queen Elizabeth (Elizabeth Angela Marguerite; 4 August 1900 – 30 March 2002), was the Queen Consort of King George VI of the United Kingdom and the British Dominions from 1936 until his death in 1952. ... Princess Margaret redirects here. ...


School

As with royal children before him, a governess, Catherine Peebles, was appointed to look after the Prince. The governess was responsible for educating the Prince between the ages of 5 and 8. In a break with tradition, Buckingham Palace announced in 1955 that the Prince would attend school, rather than have a private tutor, the first heir apparent to do so. He first attended Hill House School in West London, and later the Cheam Preparatory School in Berkshire which the Duke of Edinburgh had also attended. A governess is a female employee from outside of the family who teaches children within the family circle. ... Hill House School is a large pre-prep day school located in Knightsbridge, London, behind the department store Harrods. ... Cheam School is a Preparatory school in Headley, Berkshire, England. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


The Prince finished his education at Gordonstoun, a private boarding school in the north east of Scotland. It is often reported that the Prince despised his time at the school, where he was a frequent target for bullies. ("Colditz in kilts" he reportedly said.) The Prince would later send his own children to Eton College rather than Gordonstoun. Gordonstoun House Gordonstoun (originally in full, the British Salem School[] in Gordonstoun) is a Scottish co-educational independent school. ... This article is about the country. ... Colditz is a city in Saxony, Germany, located at the banks of the river Mulde. ... Formal black tie Highland regalia, kilt and Prince Charlie jacket. ... The Kings College of Our Lady of Eton beside Windsor, commonly known as Eton College or just Eton, is a public school (privately funded and independent) for boys, founded in 1440 by King Henry VI. It is located in Eton, near Windsor in England, north of Windsor Castle, and...


In 1966 Charles spent two terms at Geelong Grammar School in Victoria, Australia during which time he visited Papua New Guinea on a history trip with his tutor Michael Collins Persse. On his return to Gordonstoun he followed in his father's footsteps by becoming Head Boy. In 1967 he left Gordonstoun with two A levels, in History and French. Geelong Church of England Grammar School is an Anglican co-educational boarding and day-boarding Public School. ... “VIC” redirects here. ... Head Boy and Head Girl are terms commonly used in the British education system, and in private schools throughout the Commonwealth. ... The A-level, short for Advanced Level, is a General Certificate of Education qualification in the United Kingdom, usually taken by students during the optional final two years of secondary school (Years 12 & 13, commonly called the Sixth Form), or at a separate sixth form college or further education college...


University

Traditionally, the heir to the throne would go straight into the military after finishing school. However, in a break with tradition, Charles attended university at Trinity College, Cambridge, despite only gaining a B and a C in his A-levels where he studied anthropology and archaeology, and later history, earning a 2:2 (lower second class) Bachelor of Arts (BA) degree on 23 June 1970,[4] making Charles the third member of the Royal Family to earn a university degree. For a term he also attended the Old College, part of the University of Wales, Aberystwyth, where he studied the Welsh language and Welsh History. The intention was specifically to learn the Welsh language, and as such he was the first English-born Prince (of Wales) ever to make a serious attempt to do so. He subsequently learnt enough to be able to deliver his investiture speech in Welsh. Representation of a university class, 1350s. ... Full name The College of the Holy and Undivided Trinity Motto Virtus vera nobilitas Virtue is true Nobility Named after The Holy Trinity Previous names King’s Hall and Michaelhouse (until merged in 1546) Established 1546 Sister College(s) Christ Church Master The Lord Rees of Ludlow Location Trinity Street... Anthropology (from Greek: ἀνθρωπος, anthropos, human being; and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is the study of humanity. ... For the magazine about archaeology, see Archaeology (magazine). ... History studies time in human terms. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A B.A. issued from the University of Tennessee. ... is the 174th day of the year (175th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Affiliations University of Wales AMBA ACU Universities UK HiPACT Website http://www. ... Welsh redirects here, and this article describes the Welsh language. ...


On 2 August 1975,[4] per Cambridge tradition, the Prince was awarded a Master's degree, entitling him to use the postnominal MA (Cantab.). The University of Cambridge (often Cambridge University), located in Cambridge, England, is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world and has a reputation as one of the worlds most prestigious universities. ... In the Universities of Oxford, Cambridge and Dublin, the degree of Master of Arts (MA) is awarded to Bachelors of Arts of those universities on application after seven years seniority as members of the university. ...


Created Prince of Wales

Queen Elizabeth II formally invests The Prince of Wales with the Prince of Wales crown
Queen Elizabeth II formally invests The Prince of Wales with the Prince of Wales crown

Prince Charles was created The Prince of Wales and Earl of Chester on 26 July 1958,[5] though his actual investiture did not take place until 1 July 1969. This was a ceremony with symbolically political overtones, held at Caernarfon Castle in north Wales. The ceremony at Caernarfon has traditionally been associated with the subjugation and humiliation of Welsh people since the 13th century when Edward I of England cruelly deposed the last native Prince of Wales, Llywelyn ap Gruffudd. Previous investitures had taken place at various locations, including the Palace of Westminster, the seat of Parliament. The Welsh borough of Swansea was granted city status to mark the occasion. Image File history File links [1] File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links [1] File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The Crown of Charles, Prince of Wales was the crown used by Charles, Prince of Wales at his investiture as Prince of Wales in 1969. ... This article is about the title Prince of Wales. ... The Earldom of Chester is one of the few palatine earldoms in England. ... is the 207th day of the year (208th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Investiture, from the Latin (preposition in and verb vestire, dress from vestis robe) is a rather general term for the formal installation of an incumbent (heir, elect of nominee) in public office, especially by taking possession of its insignia. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... Caernarfon (the original Welsh spelling is now almost always used in preference to the anglicised forms, Caernarvon or Carnarvon) is a royal town in north-west Wales. ... This article is about the country. ... Edward I (17 June 1239 – 7 July 1307), popularly known as Longshanks[1], also as Edward the Lawgiver because of his legal reforms, and as Hammer of the Scots,[2] achieved fame as the monarch who conquered Wales and who tried to do the same to Scotland. ... Arms used by Llywelyn ap Gruffydd Llywelyn ap Gruffydd or Gruffudd (c. ... “Houses of Parliament” redirects here. ... For other places with the same name, see Swansea (disambiguation). ... Historically, city status in England and Wales was associated with the presence of a cathedral, such as York Minster. ...


The investiture also aroused considerable hostility among many Welsh people, and some were under constant police surveillance and were the subject of much intimidation from the secret services. Threats of violence ensued and a short bombing campaign, although these acts were generally more related to the greater nationalist campaign for Welsh independence. The nationalist campaign against the investiture culminated with an attempted bombing of the Royal Train by two members of the Mudiad Amddiffyn Cymru as it passed through Abergele on the eve of the investiture, resulting in the two bombers' deaths. Mudiad Amddiffyn Cymru (Welsh Defence Movement), abbreviated as MAC, was a Welsh terrorist organisation, modelled to some degree on the Provisional Irish Republican Army, which was responsible for a number of bombing incidents between 1963 and 1969. ... Abergele is an old Roman trading town, situated near the north Wales coast between the popular holiday resorts of Colwyn Bay and Rhyl, in the county borough of Conwy, traditional county of Denbighshire. ...


In the late 1970s, The Prince of Wales established another first when he became the first member of the Royal Family since King George I to attend a British cabinet meeting, being invited to attend by Labour Prime Minister James Callaghan so as to see the workings of cabinet government at first hand. George I (George Louis; 28 May 1660 – 11 June 1727)[1] was King of Great Britain and Ireland, from 1 August 1714 until his death. ... Leonard James Callaghan, Baron Callaghan of Cardiff, KG, PC (27 March 1912 – 26 March 2005), was Labour Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1976 to 1979. ...

Charles during a visit to the United States in 1981.
Charles during a visit to the United States in 1981.

In the early 1980s, Charles privately expressed an interest in becoming Governor-General of Australia. Commander Michael Parker explained: "The idea behind the appointment was for him to put a foot on the ladder of Monarchy, or being the future King and start learning the trade. However, nothing came of the proposal. The Prince accepted the decision of his mother's Australian ministers, if not without some regret; he reportedly stated: "What are you supposed to think when you are prepared to do something to help and you are told you are not wanted?"[6] Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 517 pixelsFull resolution (2801 × 1809 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 517 pixelsFull resolution (2801 × 1809 pixel, file size: 1. ... The Governor-General of the Commonwealth of Australia is the representative of Queen Elizabeth II, Queen of Australia. ...


The British expert in Romanian politics and history and Encyclopaedia Britannica editor Tom Gallagher,[7][8] wrote that Charles was offered the Romanian throne, supposedly by Romanian monarchists, an offer which he reportedly turned down.[9][10] ...


If he ascends to the British throne after 20 September 2013, the Prince, who turned 58 in November 2006, would become the oldest successor to do so. Only William IV and Edward VII were older than Charles is now when they became monarchs of the United Kingdom. He is both the third-longest serving heir apparent and third-longest serving Prince of Wales in British history, in each case behind Edward VII and George IV This article is about the monarchy of the United Kingdom, one of sixteen that share a common monarch; for information about this constitutional relationship, see Commonwealth realm; for information on the reigning monarch, see Elizabeth II. For information about other Commonwealth realm monarchies, as well as other relevant articles, see... is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... William IV (William Henry; 21 August 1765 – 20 June 1837) was King of the United Kingdom and of Hanover from 26 June 1830 until his death. ... Edward VII (Albert Edward; 9 November 1841 – 6 May 1910) was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, of the British Dominions beyond the Seas, and Emperor of India from 22 January 1901 until his death on 6 May 1910. ... George IV (George Augustus Frederick) (12 August 1762 – 26 June 1830) was king of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and Hanover from 29 January 1820 until his death. ...


Romances

The Prince of Wales, on the cover of Time in 1978

The Prince of Wales's love life has always been the subject of speculation and press fodder. In his youth he was linked to a number of women including: Georgiana Russell (daughter of the British Ambassador to Spain); Lady Jane Wellesley (daughter of the 8th Duke of Wellington); Davina Sheffield; Penthouse model Fiona Watson; the actress Susan George; Lady Sarah Spencer; Princess Marie-Astrid of Luxembourg; Dale, Baroness Tryon (wife of Anthony Tryon, 3rd Baron Tryon); Janet Jenkins; and divorcée Jane Ward, among others. Irrespective of the truth of the romantic rumours, the hurdles of marriage made some of these matches manifestly implausible. This image is a TIME magazine cover. ... This image is a TIME magazine cover. ... Time (whose trademark is capitalized TIME) is a weekly American newsmagazine, similar to Newsweek and U.S. News & World Report. ... The following is a partial list of Spain. ... Brigadier Arthur Valerian Wellesley, 8th Duke of Wellington, KG, LVO, OBE, MC, DL, (born 2 July 1915), is a British peer and a retired Brigadier in the British Army. ... Jesse Capelli on Penthouse magazine cover Penthouse is a mens magazine founded by Bob Guccione, combining urban lifestyle articles and soft-core pornographic pictorials, that eventually, in the 1990s evolved into hard-core. ... Susan Margaret George was born on July 26, 1950, in London, England, UK. // Susan George has been acting since the age of four, appearing on both television and film. ... The Lady Elizabeth Sarah Lavinia McCorquodale (born 19 March 1955) is the eldest daughter of Edward Spencer, 8th Earl Spencer, and his first wife, Frances (formerly the Honourable Frances Burke Roche). ... Archduchess Marie-Astrid, Princess Imperial of Austria, Princess Royal of Hungary and Bohemia, Princess of Luxembourg, Nassau and Parma, Princess of Habsburg-Lorraine (Marie-Astrid Charlotte Léopoldine Wilhelmine Ingeborg Antoinette Elisabeth Anna Alberta von Habsburg-Lothringen) (born 17 February 1954 at Castle Betzdorf), is the oldest daughter and the...


As heir-apparent to the Throne, the Prince of Wales would be expected to father future monarchs; also, like other members of the royal family, he was legally obliged to obtain his mother's approval before marriage.[11] Apart from her support, his choice of a future wife would also need to survive the immense popular interest it would immediately arouse. The term Heir Apparent is most often used to refer to someone who is first in the order of succession to a throne and who, unlike an Heir Presumptive, cannot lose this status by the birth of any other person. ... Succession to the British Throne has generally been according to the rules of male-preference primogeniture. ...


Amanda Knatchbull

Charles was given written advice on dating and selection of a future consort from his father's "Uncle Dickie", Louis, Earl Mountbatten of Burma: Admiral of the Fleet Louis Francis Albert Victor Nicholas George Mountbatten, 1st Earl Mountbatten of Burma, KG, GCB, OM, GCSI, GCIE, GCVO, DSO, PC (25 June 1900–27 August 1979) was a British admiral and statesman and an uncle of Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh. ...

In a case like yours, the man should sow his wild oats and have as many affairs as he can before settling down, but for a wife he should choose a suitable, attractive, and sweet-charactered girl before she has met anyone else she might fall for...it is disturbing for women to have experiences if they have to remain on a pedestal after marriage.

[12] Mountbatten had a unique qualification for offering advice to this particular heir to the throne; he had invited George VI and Queen Elizabeth to visit Dartmouth Royal Naval College with their daughters on 22 July 1939, having also detailed Cadet Prince Philip of Greece to keep the young Princesses Elizabeth and Margaret company. This was the first recorded meeting of Charles's future parents.[13] Mountbatten began corresponding with Charles about a potential marriage to his granddaughter, Hon. Amanda Knatchbull, early in 1974.[14] It was at this time he also recommended that the 25 year-old prince get on with sowing some wild oats. Charles dutifully wrote to Amanda's mother (who was also his godmother), Patricia Brabourne, about his interest. She replied approvingly, while suggesting that a courtship was premature.[14] Britannia Royal Naval College (BRNC), Dartmouth, is the location of initial officer training in the Royal Navy, and is located on a hill overlooking the town of Dartmouth in the county of Devon, England. ... A cadet is a future officer in the military. ... The Right Honourable Patricia Edwina Victoria Knatchbull, 2nd Countess Mountbatten of Burma (born 14 February 1924) is a British peeress. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


But before Charles departed alone for India, Mountbatten was assassinated, in August 1979. When Charles finally proposed marriage to Amanda (who had been with her grandfather when he, her paternal grandmother, and her youngest brother, Nicholas, were fatally wounded) she declined immediately.[15] In June 1980, Charles officially turned down Chevening House as his future residence. A stately home in Kent, Chevening was bequeathed to the British nation by the last Earl Stanhope, Amanda's childless great-uncle, in the hope that Charles would eventually occupy it. Assassin and Assassins redirect here. ... The Honourable Nicholas Timothy Charles Knatchbull (18 November 1964–27 August 1979) was the son of the 7th Baron Brabourne and his wife, formerly Lady Patricia Mountbatten (now 2nd Countess Mountbatten of Burma), twin brother of Timothy Knatchbull, and grandson of the 1st Earl Mountbatten of Burma. ... Chevening, also known as Chevening House, is a country house in the parish of Chevening, Kent, in the United Kingdom. ... A stately home is, strictly speaking, one of about 500 large properties built in England between the mid-16th century and the early part of the 20th century, as well as converted abbeys and other church property (after the Dissolution of the Monasteries). ... The Kent coat of arms For other uses, see Kent (disambiguation). ... James Richard Stanhope, 13th Earl of Chesterfield and 7th Earl Stanhope (1880-1967) was a British politician in the late 1930s as The Earl Stanhope. ...


First marriage

The Prince and Princess of Wales return to Buckingham Palace following their wedding in St Paul's Cathedral. Source: BBCNews archive

On 29 July 1981, The Prince of Wales and Lady Diana Spencer were married at St Paul's Cathedral before 3,500 invited guests and an estimated worldwide television audience of 750 million people. All of Europe's crowned heads attended (except for Juan Carlos I of Spain, who was advised not to attend because the couple's honeymoon would involve a stop-over in the disputed territory of Gibraltar). So, too, did most of Europe's elected heads of state, with the notable exceptions of President of Greece Constantine Karamanlis, who declined to go because Greece's exiled King, Constantine II, a personal friend of the Prince, had been described in his invitation as "King of the Hellenes"[16] and the President of Ireland, Patrick Hillery, who was advised by taoiseach Charles Haughey, not to attend because of the dispute over the status of Northern Ireland.[17] Image File history File links Commonly distributed picture of the wedding. ... Image File history File links Commonly distributed picture of the wedding. ... Buckingham Palace and the Victoria Memorial. ... This article is about the cathedral church of the diocese of London. ... is the 210th day of the year (211th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... Lady Diana Spencer is a name shared by several members of the Spencer family, an aristocratic English family related to the Churchills of Blenheim Palace. ... This article is about the cathedral church of the diocese of London. ... Juan Carlos I (baptized as Juan Carlos Alfonso Víctor María de Borbón y Borbón-Dos Sicilias; born January 5, 1938, Rome, Italy) is the reigning King of Spain. ... This is a list of presidents of Greece. ... This article is about the former Greek president who lived from 1907 to 1998. ... Constantine of Greece, formerly Constantine II, King of the Hellenes (born June 2, 1940) was King of Greece from 1964 until the abolition of the monarchy in 1974. ... -1... Dr. Patrick John Hillery (born May 2, 1923) is an Irish Fianna Fáil politician and the sixth President of Ireland from 1976 until 1990. ... The Taoiseach (IPA: or ) — plural: Taoisigh ( or ), also referred to as An Taoiseach[1], is the head of government of Ireland or prime minister. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Northern Ireland (Irish: ) is a part of the United Kingdom lying in the northeast of the island of Ireland, covering 5,459 square miles (14,139 km², about a sixth of the islands total area). ...


By marriage to the heir apparent, Lady Diana received both the title of the Princess of Wales and the style of "Her Royal Highness". She was popularly known as Princess Diana, although her correct title was, until the couple's divorce, Her Royal Highness The Princess of Wales. The couple made their home at Highgrove, near Tetbury in Gloucestershire and at Kensington Palace. Almost immediately, the Princess of Wales became a star attraction, chased by the paparazzi, her every move (including every change in hairstyle) closely followed by millions. Contrasting with heir presumptive, an heir apparent is one who cannot be prevented from inheriting by the birth of any other person. ... Princess of Wales is a courtesy title given to the wife of the Prince of Wales since the first English Prince of Wales in 1282. ... A style of office, or honorific, is a form of address which by tradition or law precedes a reference to a person who holds a title or post, or to the political office itself. ... Highgrove is the country home of HRH The Prince of Wales, in Gloucestershire. ... Tetbury is a town and civil parish located in Cotswold (district), Gloucestershire, England. ... Gloucestershire (pronounced ; GLOSS-ter-sher) is a county in South West England. ... Kensington Palace Park Kensington Palace is a royal residence set in Kensington Gardens in the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea in London, England. ... For the 2006 game, see Paparazzi (game). ... “Haircut” redirects here. ...

Charles and Diana's wedding commemorated on a 1981 British twenty-five pence coin

However, the marriage soon became troubled. The continued presence of Mrs. Parker-Bowles in the events and circumstances of the couple became intolerable to the Princess. Allies of the Prince who spoke publicly if anonymously against the Princess alleged that Her Royal Highness was unstable and temperamental; one by one she sacked each of the Prince of Wales's longstanding staff members and fell out with numerous friends and members of her family -- her father, her mother, her brother, and The Duchess of York. The Princess sought counsel outside of the generally acceptable sources of advice, to the chagrin of the palace, and in response to the succor sought by the Prince, responded in kind. Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... The commemorative British decimal Twenty-Five Pence (25p) coin was issued in four designs between 1972 and 1981. ... Edward John Spencer, 8th Earl Spencer (January 24, 1924 - March 29, 1992) was born at 24 Sussex Square, London, England, the son of Albert Edward John Spencer, 7th Earl Spencer (1892-1975) and his wife, the former Cynthia Elinor Beatrix Hamilton (1897-1972), daughter of the 3rd Duke of Abercorn. ... The Honourable Frances Ruth Shand Kydd (20 January 1936 - 3 June 2004) was the mother of Diana, Princess of Wales. ... Charles Edward Maurice Spencer, 9th Earl Spencer, DL, (born May 20, 1964), is the second and only surviving son of Edward Spencer, 8th Earl Spencer by his first wife, the Honourable Frances Ruth Burke Roche (later Shand Kydd), daughter of Maurice Roche, the 4th Baron Fermoy. ... Sarah, Duchess of York (born Sarah Margaret Ferguson, 15 October 1959) is the former wife of Prince Andrew, Duke of York, fourth in line to the British throne. ...


The Prince of Wales, too, was blamed for the marital troubles, as he resumed his adulterous affair with Camilla Parker-Bowles. Within five years of the wedding the "fairytale" marriage was already on the brink of collapse. Ironically, the Prince and Princess of Wales were similar in some respects: both had had troubled childhoods, both took their public roles seriously and devoted much of their time to charity work, becoming highly regarded for it. (The Princess of Wales notably devoted much time to helping AIDS sufferers, while The Prince of Wales devoted much effort to marginalised groups in urban centres through The Prince's Trust charity and to victims of mines.) This article is about the act of adultery. ... For other uses, see AIDS (disambiguation). ... The Princes Trust is a UK based charity headed by HRH The Prince of Wales. ...


Though they remained publicly a couple, they had effectively separated by the late 1980s, he living in Highgrove, she in Kensington Palace. The media noted their increasing periods apart and their obvious discomfort at being in each other's presence. Evidence and recriminations of infidelity aired in the news media. By 1992, it was obvious that the marriage was over in all but name. The couple formally separated, with media sources taking different sides in what became known as the War of the Waleses. News media satellite up-link trucks and photojournalists gathered outside the Prudential Financial headquarters in Newark, New Jersey in August, 2004 following the announcement of evidence of a terrorist threat to it and to buildings in New York City. ... The Prince and Princess of Wales return to Buckingham Palace following their wedding in St Pauls Cathedral The War of the Waleses, was a term coined by the British and International media, to describe the collapsing marriage of the then Prince and Princess of Wales. ...


The marriage of The Prince and Princess of Wales formally ended in divorce on 28 August 1996. It had produced two sons, Prince William of Wales, and Prince Henry of Wales who is known as Harry. is the 240th day of the year (241st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... “Prince William” redirects here. ... Prince Henry of Wales (Henry Charles Albert David; born 15 September 1984), commonly known as Prince Harry, is the younger son of Charles, Prince of Wales and his first wife, the late Diana, Princess of Wales. ...


Death of Diana, Princess of Wales

Diana, Princess of Wales, was killed in a car accident while being chased by paparazzi in Paris on August 31, 1997. The Prince of Wales was praised by some for his handling of the events and their aftermath, [citation needed] in particular his over-ruling of palace protocol experts (and indeed the Queen) who argued that as Diana, Princess of Wales, was no longer a member of the Royal Family, the responsibility for her funeral arrangements belonged to her blood relatives, the Spencers. The Prince of Wales, against advice, flew to Paris along with Diana's sisters to accompany his ex-wife's body home and insisted that she be given a formal royal funeral; a new category of formal funeral was especially created for her. For the 2006 game, see Paparazzi (game). ... This article is about the capital of France. ... In international politics, protocol is the etiquette of diplomacy and affairs of state. ...

For more details on this topic, see Death of Diana, Princess of Wales.

The Pont de lAlma tunnel, where Diana was fatally injured. ...

Relationship with Camilla Parker Bowles

During a 1994 television interview, Charles admitted that he had committed adultery "once it was clear the marriage had broken down." The timing of the affair's resumption may or may not be accurate by the Prince's account; Prince Charles also held during the same interview that his own father The Duke of Edinburgh approved of the taking of a mistress. This assertion was vehemently denied by the Duke, and the implication of condoned adultery caused a significant rift between father and son. It was later confirmed that the third party was Mrs. Parker-Bowles. This public confession by Charles resulted in Andrew Parker-Bowles' immediate demand for divorce from Mrs. Parker-Bowles, although he had heretofore remained silent on the subject of his wife's ongoing affair with the Prince. In fact in 1993, the British tabloids got hold of tapes (still unexplained) of a 1989 mobile telephone conversation allegedly between Prince Charles and Mrs Parker Bowles, in which Prince Charles expressed regret for all the indignities she endured because of their relationship. That same taped conversation also revealed rather graphic expressions of an undeniable physical relationship between the two. [2] “Prince Philip” redirects here. ...


After his divorce from Diana, Princess of Wales, The Prince of Wales's relationship with Camilla Parker Bowles eventually became openly acknowledged, and she became his unofficial companion. With the death of Diana in 1997, Camilla's gradual emergence in the public eye came to a temporary halt. However, in 1999, after a party celebrating the 50th birthday of Camilla's sister Annabel Elliott, Charles and Camilla were photographed in public together. Many saw this as a sign that their relationship was now regarded as "official". In a further effort to gain acceptance of the relationship, in June 2000 Camilla met the Queen. Eventually in 2003, Camilla moved into Charles's homes at Highgrove and Clarence House, although Buckingham Palace points out that public funds were not used in the decoration of her suites. Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall (Camilla Rosemary; formerly Parker Bowles; née Shand, born 17 July 1947) is the second wife of Charles, Prince of Wales, heir apparent to the thrones of the United Kingdom and the other 15 Commonwealth Realms. ... Clarence House, London Clarence House is a royal home in London, situated in The Mall. ...


Marriage remained elusive, with two main issues requiring resolution and acceptance. As future Supreme Governor of the Church of England, the prospect of his marrying Mrs Parker Bowles, with whom he had had a relationship while both were married, was seen as controversial by some. Both the Prince and Camilla had divorced their spouses, but as her former husband was still alive (although re-married to his long-time mistress), her remarriage was likely to be problematic. Over time, opinion—both public and within the Church—shifted somewhat to a point where a civil marriage would be acceptable. Henry VIII was the founder of the Church of England yet did not hold the title of Supreme Governor. ... Brigadier Andrew Henry Parker Bowles OBE, (born December 27, 1939) is a retired English military officer. ... Marriage is an interpersonal relationship with governmental, social, or religious recognition, usually intimate and sexual, and often created as a contract, or through civil process. ...


Second marriage

See also: Wedding of Charles, Prince of Wales and Camilla Parker Bowles

On 10 February 2005, it was announced by Clarence House [3] that the Prince of Wales and Camilla Parker Bowles would marry on 8 April of that year, in a civil ceremony at Windsor Castle, with a subsequent religious blessing at the castle's St George's Chapel. Subsequently, the location was changed to the Guildhall, Windsor, possibly because of the discovery that Windsor Castle might have to become available for other people's weddings, should theirs be performed there. On Monday 4 April, it was announced that the wedding would be delayed for one day to 9 April to allow the Prince of Wales and some of the invited dignitaries to attend the funeral of Pope John Paul II. The Prince of Wales and the Duchess of Cornwall emerge from their blessing service. ... is the 41st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Clarence House, London Clarence House is a royal home in London, situated in The Mall. ... April 8 is the 98th day of the year (99th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the castle in Windsor. ... St Georges Chapel, Windsor St. ... The Guildhall in Windsor, Berkshire is the town hall. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The body of Pope John Paul II. April 5, 2005 The funeral of Pope John Paul II was held on April 8, 2005, six days after his death on April 2. ...


It was announced by Royal authorities that after the marriage, as the wife of the Prince of Wales, Mrs. Parker Bowles would be styled Her Royal Highness The Duchess of Cornwall and that upon the Prince's accession to the throne, she would not be known as Queen Camilla but as Her Royal Highness The Princess Consort. This form of address is believed to be based on that used by Queen Victoria's husband Prince Albert, who was styled as Prince Consort. Some constitutional experts, however, believe that the wishes of Camilla and the Prince create a constitutional confusion.[citation needed] The British Department of Constitutional Affairs has stated that unless parliament passes legislation dictating her status, Camilla will become Queen Camilla upon her husband's succession. A spokesman for the Prince concedes that the government may have to formalise Camilla's status at the time of the succession. The current Tampon of Cornwall after her wedding to the Prince of Wales The Duchess of Cornwall is the title held by the wife of the Duke of Cornwall. ... A princess consort is the female equivalent to a prince consort. ... “Queen Victoria” redirects here. ... Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha (Francis Charles Augustus Albert Emmanuel, of the Saxe-Coburg-Gotha branch of the House of Wettin) (26 August 1819 - 14 December 1861) was the husband and consort of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... A prince consort, generally speaking, is the husband of a Queen regnant, unless he himself is a king. ...


The Prince of Wales and the Duchess of Cornwall spent their first wedding anniversary in Scotland. In Scotland they are styled the Duke and Duchess of Rothesay. Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall (Camilla Rosemary; formerly Parker Bowles; née Shand, born 17 July 1947) is the second wife of Charles, Prince of Wales, heir apparent to the thrones of the United Kingdom and the other 15 Commonwealth Realms. ... This article is about the country. ...


Personal interests

The Prince of Wales and The Duchess of Cornwall are greeted by President George W. Bush and First Lady Laura Bush on a November 2005 visit to the United States.

The Prince of Wales has a wide array of interests and activities, some of which have not been fully appreciated by the public. His popularity has fluctuated,[citation needed] but he is one of the most active Princes of Wales for centuries,[citation needed] and has devoted his time and effort to charity work and working with local communities. ImageMetadata File history File links Dubya_n_royals. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Dubya_n_royals. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... Laura Lane Welch Bush (born November 4, 1946) is the wife of the forty-third and current President of the United States George W. Bush and is thereby the First Lady of the United States. ...


The Prince is President of 18 charities, 16 of which he personally founded. Together these 18 not-for-profit organisations form a loose alliance called the Prince's Charities, which claim to raise over £110 million annually.[18]


The Prince is also Patron of over 350 other charities. [19] The Prince has ties with at least one associated charity - and sometimes several, in each of his main areas of interest described below. Generally, patronage is the act of supporting or favoring some person, group, or institution. ...


This activity is not confined to the UK. For example, as heir to the Canadian Throne, he has aimed to use his tours of that country as a way to help draw attention to relevant issues, including youth, the disabled, the environment, the arts, medicine, the elderly, heritage conservation and education.[20] This article is about the monarchy of Canada, one of sixteen that share a common monarch; for information about this constitutional relationship, see Commonwealth realm; for information on the reigning monarch, see Elizabeth II. For information about other Commonwealth realm monarchies, as well as other relevant articles, see Commonwealth realm...

Further information: Royal visits to Canada

The Prince is regarded by some as an effective advocate for the United Kingdom. On a visit to the Republic of Ireland, for example, he delivered a personally researched and written speech on Anglo-Irish affairs that was warmly received by Irish politicians and the media. // 18th Century Members of the Royal Family have visited Canada numerous times since the late 18th century. ... Anglo-Irish was a term used historically to describe a ruling class inhabitants of Ireland who were the descendants and successors of the Protestant Ascendancy[1], mostly belonging to the Anglican Church of Ireland or to a lesser extent one of the English dissenting churches, such as the Methodist church. ...


Alternative medicine

The Prince has long been known to be interested in greater exploration of alternative medicine,[21] drawing fire from the medical establishment and those who consider such "complementary therapies" to be pseudoscience at best and outright fraud at worst. Alternative medicine is defined as any of various systems of healing or treating disease (as chiropractic, homeopathy, or faith healing) not included in the traditional medical curricula taught in the United States and Britain.[1] Complementary medicine is defined as any of the practices (as acupuncture) of alternative medicine accepted... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Alternative medicine. ... A typical 18th century phrenology chart. ...


However, his charity The Prince’s Foundation for Integrated Health has been closely involved in a government drive to improve regulation and quality standards in the sector.[22]


Architecture

Charles has frequently shared his views about the built environment in public forums. In essence, these views might be thought of as being part of the intellectual tradition of English town planning that descends from Ebenezer Howard and Raymond Unwin.[citation needed] The Prince claims to "care deeply about issues such as the environment, architecture, inner-city renewal, and the quality of life" and is known for being an advocate of the neo-traditional ideas of architects such as Christopher Alexander and Leon Krier. In 1984, he delivered a blistering attack on the profession of architecture in a speech given to the Royal Institute of British Architects, describing the proposed extension to the National Gallery in London as a "monstrous carbuncle." Despite criticism from the professional architectural press, he has continued to put forward his views in numerous speeches and articles on traditional urbanism, the need for human scale, concern to restore historic buildings as an integrated element in new developments and green design. These ideas are furthered through two of the Prince's Charities in particular: The Prince's Regeneration Trust and The Prince's Foundation for the Built Environment. His Regeneration Through Heritage and Phoenix Trust merged in 2006 to form The Prince's Regeneration Trust, which develops his ideas about historic buildings and heritage-led regeneration by supporting and carrying out exemplar projects. Ebenezer Howard (29 January 1850 [1]–May 1, 1928[2]) was a prominent British urban planner. ... Raymond Unwin was born in Rotherham, Yorkshire but grew up in Oxford after his father sold up his business and moved there to study. ... Personal life (or everyday life or human existence) is an individual humans personal, private career (including, but not the same as, their employment career), and is a common notion in modern existence -- although more so in more prosperous parts of the world, such as Western Europe and North America... Christopher Alexander (born October 4, 1936 in Vienna, Austria) is an architect noted for his theories about design, and for more than 200 building projects in California, Japan, Mexico and around the world. ... Leon Krier (born 1946) is an architect and urban planner from Luxembourg. ... This article is about building architecture. ... The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) is a professional body for architects in the United Kingdom. ... In 1984 Charles, Prince of Wales famously described the proposed Sainsbury Wing extension to the National Gallery in London as a monstrous carbuncle on the face of a much-loved and elegant friend,[1] a term now widely used to describe architecture, particularly modernist architecture, unsympathetic to its surroundings. ... It has been suggested that Green design be merged into this article or section. ...


To put his ideas on architecture and urban planning into practice, the Prince of Wales is developing the village of Poundbury, in Dorset, which is built from a master plan by Krier. Prior to commencing work on Poundbury, Prince Charles published a book and produced a documentary entitled A Vision for Britain, both being critiques of modern architecture. In 1992, he also established The Prince of Wales's Institute of Architecture, and began the publication of a magazine dealing with architecture, but the latter has since ceased independent operation after being merged with another charity to create the Prince's Foundation for the Built Environment in 2001. Urban planning is concerned with the ordering and design of settlements, from the smallest towns to the worlds largest cities. ... View of Poundbury, Dorset. ... Dorset (pronounced DOR-sit or [dɔ.sət], and sometimes in the past called Dorsetshire) is a county in the south-west of England, on the English Channel coast. ... The Princes Foundation for the Built Environment (formerly The Prince of Waless Institute of Architecture) is an educational charity established by Charles, Prince of Wales to teach and demonstrate in practice those principles of traditional urban design and architecture which put people and the communities of which they... The Princes Foundation for the Built Environment is an educational charity established by Charles, Prince of Wales to teach and demonstrate in practice those principles of traditional urban design and architecture which put people and the communities of which they are part at the centre of the design process. ...


Prince Charles assisted with the establishment of a National Trust for the built environment in Canada, after lamenting the unbridled destruction of many of Canada's historic urban cores when in the country in 1996. He offered to help the Department of Canadian Heritage create a trust modelled after the British National Trust. With the passing of the 2007 federal budget by his mother's representative in Canada, a National Trust was finally fully implemented.[23] Since 1999, Heritage Canada has awarded The Prince of Wales Prize for Municipal Heritage Leadership, given annually to a municipal government that has shown sustained commitment to the conservation of its historic places.[24] The Department of Canadian Heritage, also referred to as Heritage Canada or simply Department of Heritage, is the department of the government of Canada with responsibility for policies regarding the arts, culture, media, communications networks, and sports and multiculturalism. ... The Canadian federal budget for the 2007-2008 fiscal year was presented to the Canadian House of Commons by Finance Minister Jim Flaherty on March 19, 2007. ... The Governor General of Canada (French (feminine): Gouverneure générale du Canada or (masculine) Gouverneur général du Canada) is the vice-regal representative in Canada of the Canadian monarch, who is the head of state; Canada is one of sixteen Commonwealth realms, all of which share the... The Heritage Canada Foundation (also known as Heritage Canada; in French, La fondation Héritage Canada also known as Héritage Canada) is a registered charity with the mandate to encourage the protection and promotion of the built, natural, historic and scenic heritage of Canada. ...


The Prince also has had a particular interest in the Romanian countryside since the 1980s, when, under the rule of the Communist dictator Nicolae Ceauşescu, Romanian villages were destroyed to move farmers to apartment buildings in cities. Since 1997 he has been visiting Romania regularly and has shown a great personal interest in Romania's Orthodox monasteries[25][26] as well as in the fate of the Saxon villages of Transylvania[27][28] where he purchased a house.[29][30] He is patron to two built environment organisations that are active in Romania: the Mihai Eminescu Trust,[31] which manages the restoration of Romanian architecture and INTBAU (the International Network for Traditional Building, Architecture, and Urbanism), an advocate of architecture that respects cultural tradition and identity. PCR hammer and sickle symbol The Romanian Communist Party (Romanian: Partidul Comunist Român, PCR) was a Communist political party in Romania. ... Nicolae CeauÅŸescu (IPA , in English, sometimes (and erroneously) ) (January 26, 1918–December 25, 1989) was the leader of Romania from 1965 until December 1989. ... The Transylvanian Saxons (German: ; Hungarian: ; Romanian: ) are a people of German origin who settled in Transylvania (German: ) from the 12th century onwards. ... Map of Romania with Transylvania in yellow Transylvania (Romanian: or ; Hungarian: ; German: ; Bulgarian: ; Serbian: / or / ) is a historical region in central and western Romania. ... Mihai Eminescu (pronunciation in Romanian: ) (January 15, 1850 – June 15, 1889), born Mihail Eminovici, was a late Romantic poet, the best-known and most influential Romanian poet celebrated in both Romania and Moldova. ...


In November, 2005, the Prince of Wales and the Duchess of Cornwall, visited the United States. Besides visiting Washington D.C. and President George W. Bush, the Prince and Duchess toured southern Mississippi and New Orleans to highlight the need for financial assistance in rebuilding these areas damaged by Hurricane Katrina. Prior to their visit to New Orleans, the Prince received National Building Museum’s Vincent Scully Prize in Washington D.C. The Prince donated $25,000 (£14,000) of the Scully Prize to help restore communities damaged by Hurricane Katrina. Look up November in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United... President is a title held by many leaders of nothing, companies, trade unions, universities, and countries. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... New Orleans is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ... This article is about the Atlantic hurricane of 2005. ... Categories: Museum stubs | Museums in Washington, DC | Architecture museums ... The Vincent Scully Prize was established in 1999 to recognize exemplary practice, scholarship or criticism in architecture, historic preservation and urban design. ... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United... This article is about the Atlantic hurricane of 2005. ...


Arts

Prince Charles is a watercolour artist, having exhibited and sold a number of paintings, and a published writer. He is also reportedly a fan of Canadian singer and song writer Leonard Cohen.[32] Watercolor is a painting technique making use of water-soluble pigments that are either transparent or opaque and are formulated with gum to bond the pigment to the paper. ... Leonard Norman Cohen, CC (born September 21, 1934 in Westmount, Montreal, Quebec) is a Canadian singer-songwriter, poet and novelist. ...


Cars

The Prince is known to have a keen interest in cars, particularly the British marque Aston Martin. He has collected numerous Aston models over the years and has tight connections with the brand, so much so that special "Prince of Wales" Edition Aston Martins have been created over the years, sporting his favourite colour and trim combinations. He is a frequent visitor to the factory and its service department, and has been a guest of honour at most of the company's special launch events. Aston Martin Lagonda Limited is a British manufacturer of luxury performance cars, whose headquarters are at Gaydon, Warwickshire, England. ...


Canadian First Nations

As Prince of Wales, Prince Charles has paid seventeen visits to Canada, beginning in 1970. Five years later, while serving aboard HMS Hermes in Canadian waters, the prince spent a week in the Northwest Territories; the Canadian North remains an area that holds a special attraction for him. Reflecting the Prince's interest in aboriginal peoples, members of the First Nations community have conferred on him special titles: In Winnipeg, Cree and Ojibway students named the Prince "Leading Star" in 1996, and in 2001 he was named Pisimwa Kamiwohkitahpamikohk, or "the sun looks at him in a good way," during his first visit to the province of Saskatchewan in 2001. Charles also meets with aboriginal leaders; sometimes taking time to walk and meditate with tribal elders.[33] Three ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Hermes, after Hermes, the messenger god of Greek mythology: The first Hermes was a converted cruiser that was used as an experimental seaplane tender by the Royal Naval Air Service shortly before World War I. She was sunk by a... For other geographical names that include Northwest, see Northwest. ... Aboriginal people in Canada are Indigenous Peoples recognized in the Canadian Constitution Act, 1982, sections 25 and 35, respectively, as Indians (First Nations), Métis, and Inuit. ... First Nations is a Canadian term of ethnicity which refers to the aboriginal peoples located in what is now Canada, and their descendants who are neither Inuit nor Métis. ... For other uses, see Winnipeg (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Cree (disambiguation). ... For other uses of Chippewa, see Chippewa (disambiguation). ... Motto: Multis E Gentibus Vires (Latin: The Strength of Many Peoples) Capital Regina Largest city Saskatoon Official languages English Government - Lieutenant-Governor Gordon Barnhart - Premier Lorne Calvert (NDP) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 14 - Senate seats 6 Confederation September 1, 1905 (Split from NWT) (9th (province)) Area  Ranked...


Environment

The Prince has taken a keen interest in environmental issues, and has taken a leadership role in promoting environmentally sensitive thinking, within business practice as well as urban planning and design. The latter ties in with his Prince's Foundation for the Built Environment.


In 2007, Charles received the 10th annual Global Environmental Citizen Award from Harvard Medical School's Centre for Health and the Global Environment, by former US Vice President Al Gore and actress Meryl Streep. Eric Chivian, director of the Centre, stated: "For decades The Prince of Wales has been a champion of the natural world... He has been a world leader in efforts to improve energy efficiency and in reducing the discharge of toxic substances on land, and into the air and the oceans."[34] The Prince's travel to the United States via commercial airliner caused some controversy amongst environmental activists - with the Plane Stupid climate change action group's campaigner Joss Garman saying: ""It is frustrating and disappointing that someone who styles himself as a green leader and should be leading an example, behaves in such a manner when everyone else is doing their best to cut emissions."[35] Harvard Medical School (HMS) is one of the graduate schools of Harvard University. ... The Vice President of the United States (sometimes referred to as VPOTUS)[1] is the first in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the President. ... This article is about the former Vice President of the United States. ... Mary Louise Streep, mostly known as Meryl Streep (born June 22, 1949) is an Academy Award-winning American actress who has worked in theatre, television, and film. ... Top: Increasing atmospheric CO2 levels as measured in the atmosphere and ice cores. ...


In December, 2006, Charles announced plans to make his household's travel plans more eco-friendly. Later in 2007 he will also have published in his annual accounts the details of his own carbon footprint, as well as targets for reducing his household's carbon emissions.[35] Per capita greenhouse gas emissions A carbon footprint is the total amount of CO2 and other greenhouse gases emitted over the full life cycle of a product or service. ... Top: Increasing atmospheric CO2 levels as measured in the atmosphere and ice cores. ...


Charles attended The British School - Al Khubairat's Environmental Exhibition hosted by a number of companies on February 27, 2007. The British School - Al Khubairat or commonly known and referred to as Al Khubairat or BSAK or The British School or formerly known as Al Khubairat Community School (AKCS) is a school for English speaking children and teenagers in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. ... is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ...


On Friday 23 March 2007, Prince Charles opened a climate change exhibition at The Peacocks shopping centre in Woking. The exhibition, a joint venture by Business in the Community and the British Council of Shopping Centres (BCSC) endorsed by the Climate Group, features displays with information on "issues of recycling, energy use, transport, waste reduction and locally sourced food."[36] is the 82nd day of the year (83rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... Variations in CO2, temperature and dust from the Vostok ice core over the last 450,000 years For current global climate change, see Global warming. ... The Peacocks, a large multi-storey shopping centre, was opened in 1992 in Woking. ... , See Woking (borough) for the administrative district. ... The Climate Group is an independent, non-profit organization with 17 (as of August 2006) full-time staff and a network of associates based in the US, Europe and Australia. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... World power usage in terawatts (TW), 1965-2005. ... This article or section seems not to be written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia entry. ... It has been suggested that Local food network be merged into this article or section. ...


Organic products

The Prince grows and promotes organic food, although he drew some ridicule when he joked about sometimes talking to his house plants.[37]


In the early 1980s, the Prince moved to the Highgrove country estate in Gloucestershire, and became increasingly interested in organic farming - particularly in how to make it more economically viable. This culminated in 1992 in the launch of his own organic brand Duchy Originals - the name reflects his title as the Duke of Cornwall.[38] The company sells a range of more than 200 organic and sustainably-produced products, from garden furniture to food. All the profits go to The Prince's Charities Foundation, raising £6 million so far.[39] He is also patron of Garden Organic (the Henry Doubleday Research Association), a campaigning UK charity dedicated to promoting organic growing and living. The Prince Charles, Prince of Wales (Charles Philip Arthur George[2]; born 14 November 1948), is the eldest son of Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh. ... The Henry Doubleday Research Association (HDRA) is a UK organisation dedicated to researching and promoting organic gardening, farming and food. ...


The Prince regularly meets with farmers to discuss their trade. In Saskatchewan in 2001 the foot-and-mouth epidemic in the UK prevented Charles from visiting farms, however organic farmers came specifically to meet him at the Assiniboia town hall.[33] Motto: Multis E Gentibus Vires (Latin: The Strength of Many Peoples) Capital Regina Largest city Saskatoon Official languages English Government - Lieutenant-Governor Gordon Barnhart - Premier Lorne Calvert (NDP) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 14 - Senate seats 6 Confederation September 1, 1905 (Split from NWT) (9th (province)) Area  Ranked... Not to be confused with hand, foot and mouth disease. ... Assiniboia is a town in south central Saskatchewan, Canada. ...


He is co-author, with Charles Clover, environment editor of the Daily Telegraph (London), of Highgrove: An Experiment in Organic Gardening and Farming, published by Simon & Schuster in 1993. This article deals with The Daily Telegraph in Britain, see The Daily Telegraph (Australia) for the Australian publication The Daily Telegraph is a British broadsheet newspaper founded in 1855. ... Jean-François Millet Le Semeur (The Sower) Simon & Schuster logo, circa 1961. ...


The Orthodox Church

Prince Charles is also interested in Eastern Orthodoxy.[40][41] Each year he spends time in the Orthodox monasteries of Mount Athos in Greece[42] and of Romania.[43][44] With his father, Prince Philip, who was born and raised Greek Orthodox, he is a patron of the "The Friends of Mount Athos" organisation. Prince Charles was also the patron of the "21st International Congress of Byzantine Studies,"[45] a forum dedicated to the study of the history and art of the former Orthodox Roman Empire, also known as the Eastern Roman or Byzantine Empire. Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Coptic Orthodox Pope · Roman Catholic Pope Archbishop of Canterbury · Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      Faith... Monastery of St. ... Capital Karyes Official languages Koine Greek, Church Slavonic, Modern Greek, Russian, Serbian, Georgian, Bulgarian, Romanian (both liturgical and civil use), Modern Greek (civil use) Government  -  Head of State2 Dora Bakoyannis  -  Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew I Area  -  Total 390 km²  150 sq mi  Population  -   estimate 2,250  Demonyms: Athonite, Hagiorite (English); Αθωνίτης, Αγιορίτης (Greek). ... HRH The Duke of Edinburgh His Royal Highness The Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh (Philip Mountbatten), styled HRH The Duke of Edinburgh (born June 10, 1921), is the consort of Queen Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. ... The Byzantine Empire is the term conventionally used to describe the Roman Empire during the Middle Ages, centered at its capital in Constantinople. ... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ... “Byzantine” redirects here. ...


Philosophy

Another of the Prince's greatest areas of interest continues to be philosophy, especially the philosophy of Asian and Middle Eastern nations, as well as so-called New Age theology. He had a friendship with author Sir Laurens van der Post, whom outsiders called the "guru to Prince Charles," starting in 1977 until van der Post's death in 1996; such was his friendship with van der Post that the author was named godfather to Prince William. In 2006, the Prince praised "that wonderful Kabbalistic diagram of the Tree of Life", as expounded by Warren Kenton, a teacher at the Temenos Academy.[46] For other uses, see Philosophy (disambiguation). ... New Age describes a broad movement characterized by alternative approaches to traditional Western culture. ... Sir Laurens Jan van der Post by Frances Baruch Sir Laurens Jan van der Post (aka Laurens van der Post) December 13, 1906 – December 16, 1996. ... A godparent, in many denominations of Christianity, is someone who sponsors a childs baptism. ... “Prince William” redirects here. ... This article is about traditional Jewish Kabbalah. ... Category:Sephiroth      Main article: Sephirot (Kabbalah) Tree of life is a mystical concept within the Kabbalah of Judaism which is used to understand the nature of God and the manner in which He created the world ex nihilo (out of nothing). ... Warren Kenton (Hebrew name Zev ben Shimon Halevi) is an author of books on the Kabbalah and a teacher of the discipline with a worldwide following. ... The Temenos Academy is a teaching organisation in London dedicated to creative spirituality. ...


Youth

The Prince's Trust, which he founded, is a charity that works mainly with young people, offering loans to groups, businesses and people (often in deprived areas) who had difficulty receiving outside support. Fundraising concerts are regularly held for the Prince's Trust, with leading pop, rock, and classical musicians taking part. Charles also supports the FARA Foundation,[47] which runs Romanian orphanages. The Princes Trust is a UK based charity headed by HRH The Prince of Wales. ... The Princes Trust is a UK based charity headed by HRH The Prince of Wales. ...


During Charles's tour of Canada in 1998, with his two sons, he participated in the ceremonies marking the International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination.[48] Later, in 2001, he drew attention to youth and education while touring Saskatchewan, where he helped launch the Canadian Youth Business Foundation in Saskatchewan, and he visited Scott Collegiate, an inner-city school in Regina.[33] The International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination is observed annually on 21 March. ... Nickname: Motto: Floreat Regina (Let Regina Flourish) Location of Regina in the SE quadrant of Saskatchewan Coordinates: , Country Province District Municipality of Sherwood Established 1882 Government  - City Mayor Pat Fiacco  - Governing body Regina City Council  - MPs Dave Batters Ralph Goodale Tom Lukiwski Andrew Scheer  - MLAs Joanne Crofford Doreen Hamilton Ron...


Personality and image

Prince Charles has been a prominent figure in the media since his youth, his public actions and comments attracting both praise and criticism, and sometime ridicule. The British tabloid media became particularly obsessed with Charles after his marriage to Lady Diana Spencer, casting him in a favourable light. Coverage continued through the couple's separation and divorce, with Charles often portrayed negatively. This press exposure affected the Prince's public image and popularity. This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Prince Charles is also well known in the media as a keen environmentalist and gardener and has vociferously spoken on many green issues from the need to combat climate change[4] to his love of talking to his plants to help them grow[5].


During a visit to Canada in 2001 it was remarked by the Saskatchewan officer for protocol and the Prince's personal staff, that people were first beginning to see "the real Prince Charles."[33] Motto: Multis E Gentibus Vires (Latin: The Strength of Many Peoples) Capital Regina Largest city Saskatoon Official languages English Government - Lieutenant-Governor Gordon Barnhart - Premier Lorne Calvert (NDP) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 14 - Senate seats 6 Confederation September 1, 1905 (Split from NWT) (9th (province)) Area  Ranked...


Military career

On 8th March 1971, the Prince flew himself to Royal Air Force (RAF) Cranwell in Lincolnshire, to train as a jet pilot. At his own request, The Prince had received flying instruction from the RAF during his second year at Cambridge.


In September 1971, after the passing out parade at Cranwell, the Prince embarked on a naval career, following in the footsteps of his father, grandfather and both his great-grandfathers.


The six-week course at the Royal Naval College, Dartmouth, was followed by service on the guided missile destroyer HMS Norfolk and two frigates. Six ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Norfolk, from an 80-gun third-rate to todays powerful and sleek Type 23 frigate. ...


The Prince qualified as a helicopter pilot, in 1974, before joining 845 Naval Air Squadron, which operated from the Commando carrier HMS Hermes. On 9th February 1976, the Prince took command of the coastal minehunter HMS Bronington for his last nine months in the Navy. Three ships of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Hermes, after Hermes, the messenger god of Greek mythology: The first Hermes was a converted cruiser that was used as an experimental seaplane tender by the Royal Naval Air Service shortly before World War I. She was sunk by a... HMS Bronington (M1115) is a Ton-class minesweeper of the Royal Navy, launched on 1953- 03-19, the former command of Charles, Prince of Wales. ...


With both qualification as a helicopter and fighter pilot, the Prince served in both the Royal Air Force and Royal Navy. He came to fly the following aircraft (the WWII vintage Spitfire arguably having more of a historical/symbolic value than practical importance): “RAF” redirects here. ... This article is about the navy of the United Kingdom. ...

  • Chipmunk basic pilot trainer
  • Harrier T Mk.4 V/STOL fighter
  • BAC Jet Provost jet pilot trainer
  • Nimrod maritime patrol aircraft
  • F-4 Phantom II fighter jet
  • Avro Vulcan jet bomber
  • Spitfire classic WWII fighter

Prince Charles served in the Royal Navy for five years: The de Havilland Canada DHC-1 Chipmunk is a tandem, two-seat, single-engined primary trainer aircraft which was the standard primary trainer for the Royal Canadian Air Force, Royal Air Force and several other air forces through much of the post-Second World War years. ... See also BAE Sea Harrier The Hawker Siddeley Harrier and the AV-8A are the first generation of the Harrier series, a successful close-support and reconnaissance fighter aircraft with V/STOL capabilities. ... The Hunting Percival (later BAC) Jet Provost was a jet-powered training aircraft used by the RAF from 1955 to 1993. ... The BAE Systems (formerly Hawker-Siddeley) Nimrod maritime patrol aircraft is derived from the De Havilland Comet, the worlds first jet airliner. ... “F-4” redirects here. ... The Avro Vulcan was a British delta wing subsonic bomber, operated by the Royal Air Force from 1953 until 1984. ... The Supermarine Spitfire was an iconic British single-seat fighter, which was used by the Royal Air Force and many other Allied countries during the Second World War, and into the 1950s. ... This article is about the navy of the United Kingdom. ...

  • 1971–72: HMS Norfolk
  • 1972–73: HMS Minerva
  • 1974: HMS Jupiter
  • 1974–75: Helicopter flying training at RNAS Yeovilton
  • 1975: Pilot with 845 NAS on HMS Hermes
  • 1976: Captain, HMS Bronington

The Prince's involvement as Colonel-in-Chief of Canadian Forces regiments permits him to be informed of their activities, and allows him opportunity to pay visits while in Canada or overseas. In 2001, Charles placed a specially-commissioned wreath, made from vegetation taken from French battlefields, at the Canadian Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. The Prince also became patron of Canadian Warplane Heritage Museum in 1981. The Prince serves as Colonel-in-Chief, Air-Commodore-in-Chief, or Honorary Air Commodore of various regiments throughout the Commonwealth Realms. The fifth HMS Norfolk (D21) was laid down on 15 March 1966 by Swan Hunter and launched by Lavinia, Duchess of Norfolk in November 1967. ... HMS Minerva (F45) was a Leander-class frigate of the Royal Navy. ... HMS Jupiter (F60) was a Leander-class frigate of the Royal Navy (RN). ... RNAS Yeovilton is an air station of the Royal Navy, sited a few miles north of Yeovil in Somerset. ... The second HMS Hermes (R12) was a Centaur-class aircraft carrier, the last of the postwar conventional aircraft carriers commissioned into the Royal Navy. ... HMS Bronington (M1115) is a Ton-class minesweeper of the Royal Navy, launched on the 19th March 1953, the former command of Charles, Prince of Wales. ... In the British and other Commonwealth armies, the Colonel-in-Chief of a regiment is its (usually Royal) patron. ... The Canadian Forces (French: Forces canadiennes), abbreviated as CF (French: FC), are the unified armed forces of Canada. ... The Canadian Tomb of the Unknown Soldier is located at the National War Memorial in Confederation Square, Ottawa. ... Museum building with a CF-104 Starfighter mounted as a monument The Canadian Warplane Heritage Museum is one of the major aviation museums in Canada. ... In the British and other Commonwealth armies, the Colonel-in-Chief of a regiment is its (usually Royal) patron. ... An Air Commodoress sleeve/shoulder insignia Air Commodore is the fourth most senior rank active in the Royal Air Force today, after the deactivation of Marshal of the Royal Air Force as a substantive rank in peacetime during defence cuts of the 1990s. ... The Commonwealth Realms, shown in pink A Commonwealth Realm is any one of the sixteen sovereign states within the Commonwealth of Nations that recognise Elizabeth II as their respective monarch. ...


In the United Kingdom, Prince Charles also holds the ranks of General (British Army), Admiral (Royal Navy) and Air Chief Marshal (Royal Air Force), having been promoted, to these ranks on his 58th birthday. UK insignia for a full General General is a rank in the British Army and Royal Marines. ... The British Army is the land armed forces branch of the British Armed Forces. ... Admiral is a senior rank of the Royal Navy of the United Kingdom, outranked only by the rank Admiral of the Fleet. ... This article is about the navy of the United Kingdom. ... Air Chief Marshal Sir Richard Johns in RAF No 1 Dress uniform Air Chief Marshal (Air Chf Mshl or ACM) is a senior air officer rank in the Royal Air Force of the United Kingdom As well as the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF), and air forces of many Commonwealth... “RAF” redirects here. ...

See also: Honorary military positions of Charles, Prince of Wales
Further information: List of Canadian organizations with royal patronage

This is a list of awards, decorations, honours, orders and titles belonging to Charles, Prince of Wales, the eldest son of, and heir to, Queen Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom. ... This is a list of Canadian organizations with designated royal status and/or under the patronage of members of the Canadian Royal Family, listed by the king or queen who granted the designation. ...

Official residence

The Prince of Wales's official London residence is Clarence House, former London residence of the late Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother (the nineteenth century building has undergone major restoration and renovation to equip it for use by him, his wife, and their personal and office staffs). His previous official residence was an apartment in St. James's Palace. He also has a private estate, Highgrove in Gloucestershire and in Scotland he has use of the Birkhall estate near Balmoral Castle which was previously owned by Queen Elizabeth. Clarence House, London Clarence House is a royal home in London, situated in The Mall. ... Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon, later Queen Elizabeth (Elizabeth Angela Marguerite; 4 August 1900 – 30 March 2002), was the Queen Consort of King George VI of the United Kingdom and the British Dominions from 1936 until his death in 1952. ... St Jamess Palace and The Mall by Jan Kip, 1715. ... Highgrove is the country home of HRH The Prince of Wales, in Gloucestershire. ... Gloucestershire (pronounced ; GLOSS-ter-sher) is a county in South West England. ... Birkhall is a 53,000 acre estate in Royal Deeside, Aberdeenshire, Scotland. ... Balmoral Castle. ...


Some previous Princes of Wales resided in Marlborough House. It is no longer a royal residence. After its last royal resident,George V's widow Queen Mary, died in 1953, Queen Elizabeth II gave it to the Commonwealth Secretariat, which has used the building as its headquarters since 1965.[6] Marlborough House, London Marlborough House is a mansion in Westminster, London. ... George V (George Frederick Ernest Albert; 3 June 1865 – 20 January 1936) was the first British monarch belonging to the House of Windsor, which he created from the British branch of the German House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha. ... Mary of Teck (Victoria Mary Augusta Louise Olga Pauline Claudine Agnes; 26 May 1867 – 24 March 1953) was the Queen Consort of George V. Queen Mary was also the Empress of India. ... The Commonwealth of Nations as of 2006 Headquarters Marlborough House, London, UK Official languages English Membership 53 sovereign states Leaders  -  Queen Elizabeth II  -  Secretary-General Don McKinnon (since 1 April 2000) Establishment  -  Balfour Declaration 18 November 1926   -  Statute of Westminster 11 December 1931   -  London Declaration 28 April 1949  Area  -  Total...


In 2007, Charles bought a property in Carmarthenshire. Charles applied for permission to convert his newly-purchased farm, although according to their neighbours the application clearly flouted local planning regulations. The application is pending while a report is drafted on how the changes would affect the local bat population.[49] Carmarthenshire (Welsh: ) is a one of thirteen historic counties and a principal area in Wales. ...


Titles, styles, honours and arms

Titles

Further information: List of titles and honours of Charles, Prince of Wales

is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 207th day of the year (208th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 207th day of the year (208th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in May, 2000. ... This is a list of awards, decorations, honours, orders and titles belonging to Charles, Prince of Wales, the eldest son of, and heir to, Queen Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom. ...

Styles

The Prince's style in full (rarely used): His Royal Highness The Prince Charles Philip Arthur George, Prince of Wales and Earl of Chester, Duke of Cornwall, Duke of Rothesay, Earl of Carrick, Baron of Renfrew, Lord of the Isles, Prince and Great Steward of Scotland, Knight Companion of the Most Noble Order of the Garter, Knight of the Most Ancient and Most Noble Order of the Thistle, Great Master and First and Principal Knight Grand Cross of the Most Honourable Order of the Bath, Member of the Order of Merit, Knight of the Order of Australia, Companion of the Queen's Service Order, Honorary Member of the Saskatchewan Order of Merit, Chief Grand Commander of the Order of Logohu, Member of Her Majesty's Most Honourable Privy Council, Aide-de-Camp to Her Majesty.[50]


In Canada, the Inuit gave Prince Charles the distinctive title Attaniout Ikeneego, meaning "The Son of the Big Boss,"[51] serving as a reasonable equivalent to the term "heir apparent" in the Inuktitut language of Nunavut. The Cree and Ojibway in Winnipeg named Prince Charles Leading Star.[52] For other uses, see Inuit (disambiguation). ... Note: This page contains phonetic information presented in the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) using Unicode. ... Motto: Nunavut Sannginivut (Inuktitut: Nunavut our strength or Our land our strength) Capital Iqaluit Largest city Iqaluit Official languages Inuktitut, Inuinnaqtun, English, French Government - Commissioner Ann Meekitjuk Hanson - Premier Paul Okalik (Consensus government) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 1 (Nancy Karetak-Lindell) - Senate seats 1 (Willie Adams) Confederation... For other uses, see Cree (disambiguation). ... This article is about the native North American people. ...


If Prince Charles succeeds his mother as monarch and uses his first given name as his regnal name, he would become known as Charles III. However, Prince Charles has considered rejecting that style when he accedes to the throne, because of its associations with Britain's bloody past. The move away from Charles stems from its associations with Charles I, who was beheaded in 1649 following the English Civil War, at the start of Oliver Cromwell's short-lived republic. The executed monarch's son, Charles II, spent 18 years in exile and returned to England in 1660 but was nicknamed "The Merry Monarch" because of his string of mistresses. Charles III is partially associated with the Catholic Jacobite pretender, Charles Edward Stuart (called Bonnie Prince Charlie), an enduring Scottish romantic figure, who claimed the throne as that style in the 18th century. The move would not be a first - three of the past six British monarchs chose a regnal name different from their first given name.[53] The most discussed alternative style has been "George VII", in honour of Charles's grandfather.[54] A regnal name, or reign name, is a formal name used by some popes and monarchs during their reigns. ... Charles I (19 November 1600 – 30 January 1649) was King of England, King of Scotland and King of Ireland from 27 March 1625 until his execution in 1649. ... For other uses, see English Civil War (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Oliver Cromwell (disambiguation). ... Charles II (29 May 1630 – 6 February 1685) was the King of England, Scotland, and Ireland. ... Charles Edward Stuart, Bonnie Prince Charlie, wearing the Jacobite blue bonnet Jacobitism was (and, to a very limited extent, remains) the political movement dedicated to the restoration of the Stuart kings to the thrones of England and Scotland. ... This article is about pretender as applied to a monarchy. ... Charles Edward Stuart (31 December 1720 – 31 January 1788), known in Scots Gaelic as Teàrlach Eideard Stiùbhairt, was the exiled claimant to the thrones of England, Scotland, and Ireland, and was commonly known as Bonnie Prince Charlie. ... This article is about the Scottish as an ethnic group. ... A regnal name, or reign name, is a formal name used by some popes and monarchs during their reigns. ...


Honours

Main articles: List of titles and honours of Charles, Prince of Wales#Commonwealth honours and Honours of Charles, Prince of Wales

This is a list of awards, decorations, honours, orders and titles belonging to Charles, Prince of Wales, the eldest son of, and heir to, Queen Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom. ... This is a list of awards, decorations, honours, orders and titles belonging to Charles, Prince of Wales, the eldest son of, and heir to, Queen Elizabeth II. In full: His Royal Highness The Prince Charles, Prince of Wales and Earl of Chester, Duke of Cornwall, Duke of Rothesay and Earl...

Arms

The Prince's own coat of arms are those of the Royal coat of arms of the United Kingdom with a label for difference. The version used everywhere but Scotland is blazoned Quarterly (by quarters): A modern coat of arms is derived from the medi val practice of painting designs onto the shield and outer clothing of knights to enable them to be identified in battle, and later in tournaments. ... The Royal Arms as used in England, Wales and Northern Ireland The Royal Coat of Arms of the United Kingdom is the official coat of arms of the British monarch, currently Queen Elizabeth II. These arms are used by the Queen in her official capacity as monarch, and are officially...

1st and 4th, Gules three Lions passant guardant in pale Or (England). (The first and fourth quarters display the three lions, representing England.)
2nd quarter is of a lion rampant within a Double Tressure floury counterflory Gules (Scotland). (The second quarter, displays a red lion in a yellow field with a double border coloured red, this represents Scotland.)
3rd, Azure a Harp Or stringed Argent (Ireland). (The third quarter shows a harp against a blue background, this represents Ireland.)

The whole differenced by a plain Label of three points Argent, as the eldest child of the sovereign, and an inescutcheon of the ancient Coat of Arms of the Principality of Wales. Escutcheon is the term used in heraldry for the shield displayed in a coat of arms. ... The Coat of Arms of the Principality of Wales is a coat of arms used by the Prince of Wales. ...


Controversy

The prince has been involved in a number of controversial incidents through the years.


In 1999, the League Against Cruel Sports accused him of making a 'Political statement' after Charles took Princes William and Harry with him on the Beaufort Hunt at a time when the government were trying to ban fox hunting with hounds.[55][56] “Prince William” redirects here. ... Prince Henry of Wales (Henry Charles Albert David; born 15 September 1984), commonly known as Prince Harry, is the younger son of Charles, Prince of Wales and his first wife, the late Diana, Princess of Wales. ...


In 2004, doctors were widely reported speaking out against the Prince’s backing of coffee enemas as a treatment for cancer.[57] His defence of controversial therapies, London’s The Guardian reported more recently on 23 May 2007, had prompted Edzard Ernst, professor of complementary medicine at Exeter’s Peninsula Medical School to say: "It has been wholly inappropriate because it is not his role as Prince of Wales to mingle in health politics."[7] This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The Guardian is a British newspaper owned by the Guardian Media Group. ... The city of Exeter is the county town of Devon, in the southwest of England, also known as the West Country. ...


An open microphone on 31 March 2005 caught him muttering to his sons about the media during an officially-arranged press photo-call: "I hate doing this...These bloody people." About the BBC's royal reporter Nicholas Witchell in particular, he confided: "I can't bear that man. I mean, he's so awful, he really is."[58] For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Nicholas Newton Henshall Witchell (born September 23, 1953) is a British journalist. ...


Even the Prince's organic farming efforts have attracted media criticism. According to London's The Independent daily in October, 2006 '... the story of Duchy Originals has involved compromises and ethical blips, wedded to a determined merchandising programme'.[59] For other uses, see The Independent (disambiguation). ...


February 2007 saw Duchy products themselves under attack, with the tabloid Daily Mail claiming that Prince Charles' own brand food was "unhealthier than Big Macs".[60]


Ancestry

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
16. Christian IX of Denmark
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
8. George I of Greece
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
17. Louise of Hesse-Kassel
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
4. Prince Andrew of Greece and Denmark
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
18. Grand Duke Konstantine Nicholaievich of Russia
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
9. Olga Konstantinovna of Russia
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
19. Alexandra Iosifovna of Altenburg
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
2. Prince Philip of Greece and Denmark
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
20. Prince Alexander of Hesse and by Rhine
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
10. Louis Mountbatten, 1st Marquess of Milford Haven
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
21. Julia von Hauke
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
5. Princess Alice of Battenberg
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
22. Louis IV, Grand Duke of Hesse
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
11. Princess Victoria of Hesse and by Rhine
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
23. Princess Alice of the United Kingdom
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
1. Charles, Prince of Wales
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
24. Edward VII of the United Kingdom
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
12. George V of the United Kingdom
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
25. Alexandra of Denmark
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
6. George VI of the United Kingdom
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
26. Francis, Duke of Teck
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
13. Mary of Teck
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
27. Princess Mary Adelaide of Cambridge
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
3. Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
28. Claude Bowes-Lyon, 13th Earl of Strathmore and Kinghorne
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
14. Claude Bowes-Lyon, 14th Earl of Strathmore and Kinghorne
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
29. Frances Dora Smith
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
7. Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
30. Charles William Frederick Cavendish-Bentinck
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
15. Cecilia Cavendish-Bentinck
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
31. Caroline Louisa Burnaby
 
 
 
 
 
 

Christian IX of Denmark (April 8, 1818 – January 29, 1906) was King of Denmark from November 15, 1863 to January 29, 1906. ... George I, King of the Hellenes (Greek: Γεώργιος A, Βασιλεύς των Ελλήνων) (December 24, 1845 – March 18, 1913) was King of the Hellenes (Greece) from 1863 to 1913. ... Louise of Hesse-Cassel, Luise Wilhelmine Friederike Caroline Auguste Julie von Hessen-Kassel (in Danish, Louise Wilhelmine Frederikke Caroline Auguste Julie), b Kassel 7 Sep 1817, d Bernstorff 29 Sep 1898, was a daughter of ancient German princely family, the Landgraves of Hesse, and became Queen of Denmark, being the... Prince Andrew of Greece and Denmark (20 January 1882(O.S.) - 3 December 1944), of the House of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg, was the son of George I (1845-1913), King of the Hellenes, and of Grand Duchess Olga Konstantinova (1851-1926) of Russia. ... Grand Duke Konstantine Nikolaievich of Russia Grand Duke Konstantine Nikolaievich of Russia (September 9, 1827 – January 13, 1892) was the second son of Tsar Nicholas I of Russia. ... Olga, Queen of Greece Olga Konstantinovna of Russia later Queen Olga of Greece (in Russian Великая Княжна Ольга Константиновна in Greek Βασίλισσα Όλγα της Ελλάδος) (3 September 1851 - 18 June 1926), was the queen consort of King George I of Greece and briefly in 1920, Regent of Greece. ... Alexandra painted by Franz Xaver Winterhalter, c. ... “Prince Philip” redirects here. ... Alexander of Hesse and by Rhine Prince Alexander of Hesse GCB (15 July 1823 - 15 December 1888), was the third son and fourth child of Louis II, Grand Duke of Hesse and Wilhelmina of Baden. ... Admiral of the Fleet Prince Louis of Battenberg, later Louis Mountbatten, 1st Marquess of Milford Haven (24 May 1854-11 September 1921) was a minor German prince who married into the British Royal Family and pursued a distinguished career in the Royal Navy, eventually serving as First Sea Lord from... Alexander of Hesse and by Rhine with his wife, Julia von Hauke Julia von Hauke (November 12, 1825 (O.S.)/November 24, 1825 (N.S.) - September 19, 1895) was the wife of Prince Alexander of Hesse and by Rhine (1823-1888), the mother of Alexander of Bulgaria, and ancestress to... Princess Alice of Battenberg Princess Alice of Battenberg, later Princess Andrew of Greece and Denmark (25 February 1885 - 5 December 1969) was a great-granddaughter of the British Queen Victoria who married into the royal house of Greece. ... Ludwig IV, Grand Duke of Hesse and by Rhine Louis IV (Friedrich Wilhelm Ludwig Karl) (12 September 1837 - 13 March 1892), was the fourth Grand Duke of Hesse and by Rhine, reigning from 13 June 1877 until his death. ... Princess Victoria of Hesse and by Rhine, later Victoria Mountbatten, Marchioness of Milford Haven (Victoria Alberta Elisabeth Mathilde Marie) (5 April 1863-24 September 1950), was the eldest daughter of Ludwig IV, Grand Duke of Hesse and by Rhine (1837-1892) and his wife Princess Alice of the United Kingdom... Princess Alice (Alice Maud Mary; later The Grand Duchess of Hesse; April 25, 1843 – December 14, 1878), was a member of the British Royal Family, the third child and second daughter of Queen Victoria. ... Edward VII (Albert Edward; 9 November 1841 – 6 May 1910) was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, of the British Dominions beyond the Seas, and Emperor of India from 22 January 1901 until his death on 6 May 1910. ... George V (George Frederick Ernest Albert; 3 June 1865 – 20 January 1936) was the first British monarch belonging to the House of Windsor, which he created from the British branch of the German House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha. ... Princess Alexandra of Denmark (Alexandra Carolina Marie Charlotte Louise Julia; 1 December 1844 – 20 November 1925) was Queen Consort to Edward VII of the United Kingdom and thus Empress of India during her husbands reign. ... George VI (Albert Frederick Arthur George; 14 December 1895 – 6 February 1952) was King of the United Kingdom and the British Dominions from 11 December 1936 until his death. ... His Highness Prince Francis, Duke of Teck (Francis Paul Charles Louis Alexander) (August 28, 1837 - January 21, 1900)), was a member of the British Royal Family, the father of Queen Mary. ... Mary of Teck (Victoria Mary Augusta Louise Olga Pauline Claudine Agnes; 26 May 1867 – 24 March 1953) was the Queen Consort of George V. Queen Mary was also the Empress of India. ... Princess Mary Adelaide of Cambridge (Mary Adelaide Wilhelmina Elizabeth; 27 November 1833 – 27 October 1897) was a member of the British Royal Family, a granddaughter of George III. She later held the title of Duchess of Teck by marriage. ... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ... Claude Bowes-Lyon, 13th Earl of Strathmore and Kinghorne (July 21, 1824 - February 16, 1904) was a British peer. ... Claude George Bowes-Lyon, 14th and 1st Earl of Strathmore and Kinghorne (14 March 1855–7 November 1944) was the maternal grandfather of Queen Elizabeth II. He was born at Lowndes Square in London, the son of Claude Bowes-Lyon, 13th Earl of Strathmore and Kinghorne and his wife, the... Frances Dora Bowes-Lyon, Countess of Strathmore and Kinghorne (née Smith; 29 July 1832 – 5 February 1922) was a British noblewoman. ... Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon, later Queen Elizabeth (Elizabeth Angela Marguerite; 4 August 1900 – 30 March 2002), was the Queen Consort of King George VI of the United Kingdom and the British Dominions from 1936 until his death in 1952. ... Reverend Charles William Frederick Cavendish-Bentinck (8 November 1817 - 17 August 1865) was grandfather of Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom. ... Cecilia Nina Bowes-Lyon née Cavendish-Bentinck, (11 September 1862 – 23 June 1938) was the mother of Queen Elizabeth (later Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother) and maternal grandmother and godmother of Queen Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom. ... (Caroline) Louisa Cavendish-Bentinck (née Caroline Louisa Burnaby) (1832 - 1918) was the second wife of The Reverend Charles Cavendish-Bentinck, and the grandmother of Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother and great grandmother of Queen Elizabeth II. She was the daughter of Edwyn Burnaby and Anne Caroline Salisbury. ...

Legacy

Popular culture

Charles wrote a children's book, The Old Man of Lochnagar, and even read it on the BBC's Jackanory programme. The Old Man of Lochnagar is a childrens novel written by Prince Charles and published in 1980. ... Jackanory is a long-running BBC childrens television series that was designed to stimulate an interest in reading. ...


He is the subject of the song "Charles Windsor" by McCarthy. McCarthy were a British indie pop band, formed in Barking, Essex, England in 1985 by schoolmates Malcolm Eden (voice and guitar) and Tim Gane (lead guitar) with John Williamson (bass guitar) and Gary Baker (drums). ...


Charles has a keen interest in illusionism, and is a member of The Magic Circle. He passed his audition by performing the cups and balls effect.[61] The Magic Circle is a British organisation dedicated to magic. ... The cups and balls trick is an old magic effect that has spawned a variety of adaptations. ...


In the late 1950s, Mad Magazine ran an article of "comic strips" in which there was a closeup of young Charles (then about ten years old). The drawing by cartoonist Wally Wood suggested a resemblance to the magazine's mascot Alfred E. Neuman. But what got unfortunate attention from the British was the dialogue in the strip, the last two part of which (in comic-strip balloons)-- was: Charles: Why can't I be an ordinary boy, Mother? Why can't I play with ordinary boys and have fun once in a while?
Elizabeth: Hold your tongue, Charlie! You're beginning to sound like your Father!
A London tabloid reproduced Wood's artwork under the bold headline "A Stupid Insult!" And years later, when the paperback The Voodoo Mad, which included the article, was shipped to Great Britain, the page with the Prince Charles strip had to be torn by hand out of 25,000 copies before they could be sold there. (Fittingly, the article on the other side was about Wernher von Braun, whose V-2 rockets had bombed London during World War II.) Harvey Kurtzmans cover for the first issue of the comic book Mad Mad is an American humor magazine founded by publisher William Gaines and editor Harvey Kurtzman in 1952. ... Wallace Wally Wood (born June 17, 1927, Menahga, Minnesota, United States; died November 2, 1981), was an American writer-artist best known for his work in EC Comics and Mad. ... What, me worry? Alfred E. Neuman is the fictional mascot of EC Publications Mad magazine. ... Balloons are often used or given on special occasions, like cards or flowers. ... For other uses of von Braun, see von Braun (disambiguation). ... German test launch. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


A character based on Prince Charles appears in Tom Clancy's bestseller Patriot Games (1987) as the target of an assassination attempt. In the book, he is referred to only as "The Prince of Wales." In the later film version however, the character was extensively rewritten with his name and rank changed to Lord Nottingham. Patriot Games (1987) is a novel by Tom Clancy. ...


The Prince of Wales also appeared as a character in the Ben Elton novel Chart Throb'


He and Diana are the models for Mark Helprin's title characters in Freddy and Fredericka (2005). Mark Helprin (born on June 28, 1947) is an award-winning American novelist and journalist, best known for his novel Winter’s Tale and his writing for The New Yorker. ...


In 2000, he made an appearance in the UK soap, Coronation Street, to celebrate the show's 40th anniversary on ITV1.[62] Coronation Street is an award winning British soap opera. ... ITV1 is the name, in England, Wales and the Scottish borders, for a terrestrial, free-to-air television channel, broadcast in the United Kingdom by the ITV network. ...


An unnamed monarch, very similar to Charles, is the new King of the United Kingdom in Michael Dobbs's book To Play the King. In the TV adaptation, Michael Kitchen portrayed the monarch (still unnamed) as a very close approximation of Charles in voice and mannerism. Michael Dobbs (born 1948) was a British politician and is author of books and TV, mainly political fiction. ... Prime Minister Francis Urquhart (Ian Richardson) and the King (Michael Kitchen) in the BBC Television Drama To Play the King. ... Michael Kitchen (born October 31, 1948 in Leicester) is an English actor. ...


In 2005, Prince Charles appeared as himself in the New Zealand adult cartoon series Bro'Town. The episode aired on TV3 on Wednesday 26 October and was the final episode in the second series of the popular show. Prince Charles agreed to record some impromptu audio for Series Two while attending a performance from the show's creators during a visit to New Zealand. After some enthusiastic encouragement from Prime Minister Helen Clark (who also appears in the episode), the Prince gave a royal rendition of the Bro'Town catch-cry "Morningside 4 Life!" broTown is New Zealands first adult-targeted animated series. ... TV3 is a commercial television station in New Zealand. ... is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Prime Minister of New Zealand is New Zealands head of government and is the leader of the party or coalition with majority support in the Parliament of New Zealand. ... For other persons named Helen Clark, see Helen Clark (disambiguation). ... broTown is New Zealands first adult-targeted animated series. ...


In 2006, a court case was filed by Prince Charles against the Mail on Sunday after publication of extracts from his personal journals. Lawyers for the Prince argued that he was as entitled to keep private documents as any other person. Various revelations were made, including his opinions on the takeover of Hong Kong by the People's Republic of China in 1997, in which he described Chinese government officials as "appalling old waxworks". His ex-private secretary also alleged that the Prince considers himself a dissident, working against majority political opinions.[63] The Daily Mail is a British newspaper and the oldest tabloid, first published in 1896. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


On Saturday 20 May 2006, ITV presented the 30th birthday of The Prince's Trust. It included songs from Embrace and their song 'World at our Feet' and Annie Lennox and also an interview with Prince Charles, Prince Harry and Prince William by Ant and Dec. is the 140th day of the year (141st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Independent Television (generally known as ITV, but also as ITV Network) is a public service network of British commercial television broadcasters, set up under the Independent Television Authority (ITA) to provide competition to the BBC. ITV is the oldest commercial television network in the UK. Since 1990 and the Broadcasting... The Princes Trust is a UK based charity headed by HRH The Prince of Wales. ... Embrace are an English guitar band from Brighouse near Huddersfield, West Yorkshire. ... Annie Lennox (born Ann Lennox on 25 December 1954) is a Scottish musician and vocalist. ... Prince Henry of Wales (Henry Charles Albert David; born 15 September 1984), commonly known as Prince Harry, is the younger son of Charles, Prince of Wales and his first wife, the late Diana, Princess of Wales. ... “Prince William” redirects here. ... Ant (left) and Dec appearing in an ITV 1 ident. ...


Prince Charles is sometimes referred to in the popular press as "Chazza" (along the lines of "Gazza", "Hezza" and similar coinages of the 1990s). Paul John Gascoigne (born 27 May 1967 in Gateshead, England), often referred to as Gazza, is a retired English football player who is widely regarded as one of the most gifted footballers of his generation. ... Michael Ray Dibdin Heseltine, Baron Heseltine, CH, PC (born 21 March 1933) is a British businessman and Conservative Party politician. ...


Mancunian singer and songwriter Morrissey often criticised Prince Charles in interviews and in his songs. Once, Morrissey said about Prince Charles that "he had no intelligence whatsoever". [64] Morrissey also claimed that "the very idea of Charles being king is laughable. You might as well say Ronnie Corbett will be king one day. I think that would give people more pleasure." Back in 1986 the controversial artist pondered: "Charles, don't you ever craze to appear on the front of the Daily Mail, dressed in your mother's bridal veil?", which is a lyric of the song The Queen Is Dead, recorded by Morrissey's former band The Smiths.[65] This article is about the city in England. ... For other uses, see Morrissey (disambiguation). ... The Daily Mail is a British newspaper and the oldest tabloid, first published in 1896. ... The Queen Is Dead is the third studio album of The Smiths. ... The Smiths were an English rock band active from 1982 to 1987. ...


The film Children of Men, released in 2006, shows London Metropolitan Police officers wearing cap badges that show a Royal Cypher comprised of the letters "GR". This can be assumed to be referring to Prince Charles, as he has indicated that he has a preference for the name George upon his accession to the throne. As the film is based in 2027, this assumes that Prince Charles would live to at least 79 years of age. Children of Men is a 2006 dystopian science fiction film loosely adapted from P.D. James 1992 novel The Children of Men. ... Metropolitan Police redirects here. ... The Royal Cypher of Queen Elizabeth II, surmounted with a crown. ...


Prince Charles has been criticised for publishing a memo on ambition and opportunity.[66] This memo was widely understood to criticise meritocracy for creating a competitive society. In humorist Lynne Truss's critique of British manners entitled Talk to the Hand,[67] Charles's memo is evaluated with respect to the putative impact of meritocracy on British boorishness. Truss came to the conclusion that the prince might have a point, that the positive motivational impact of meritocracy might be balanced against the negative impact of a competitive society. Lynne Truss is a British writer and journalist. ...


In late 2006, The Queen arrived in theatres, depicting Prince Charles, played by Alex Jennings, shortly after the death of Diana. Jennings portrayed Charles as genuinely distraught over the death of his ex-wife, although still calculating in his role as a royal and, at times, cowardly in his fears of what the public might do to him. The Queen. ... Alex Jennings (born 10 May 1957) is an award-winning English actor. ...


In 2007, Charles is depicted as King in the controversial novel, 'Pieces of a paki' by British writer Yusuf Misdaq. Set around 15 years into the future, 'King Charles' is ruling the country and enjoys the popular support of the people. He is at odds with the right-wing government of the time who are intent on waging war against Brazil. Y.Misdaq aka Yoshi (Born in Brighton, UK) is a multimedia artist and founder of the arts website- Nefisa, which also doubles as an independent media label- Nefisa UK. He is known primarily through his music. ...


The Prince of Wales Hospital in Hong Kong was named in his honour in 1984. Prince of Wales Hospital (威爾斯親王醫院), located in Sha Tin, Hong Kong, is a public hospital and the teaching hospital of the Medical Faculty of the Chinese University of Hong Kong. ... This article is about the year. ...


See also

Bibliography of HRH Charles, Prince of Wales. ...

References

  1. ^ Charles and Diana Timeline (BBC)
  2. ^ a b As a titled royal, Charles holds no surname, but, when one is used, it is Mountbatten-Windsor, although, according to letters patent dated February 1960, his official surname was Windsor
  3. ^ The Commonwealth Secretariat
  4. ^ a b Prince of Wales - Education
  5. ^ a b c Princes of Wales's site on previous PoWs
  6. ^ Australian Broadcasting Corporation: Time Frame; We Did But See Them Passing By
  7. ^ "The Balkans In The New Millennium," Radio Romania International
  8. ^ Encyclopaedia Britannica articles on Romania by Tom Gallagher - Google results
  9. ^ (Romanian) "The European Scapegoat," by Tom Gallagher, Romania Libera, June 30, 2006
  10. ^ (Romanian) "Prince Charles Bought A House among The Gypsies," Libertatea, September 24, 2006
  11. ^ Marriage to a Roman Catholic, furthermore, would automatically debar him and the marriage's Catholic issue from succession.
  12. ^ Junor, Penny (2005). "The Duty of an Heir", The Firm: the troubled life of the House of Windsor. New York: Thomas Dunne Books, p. 72. ISBN 9780312352745. OCLC 59360110. Retrieved on 2007-May-13. 
  13. ^ Edwards, Phil (2000-10-31). The Real Prince Philip (TV documentary). Real Lives: channel 4's portrait gallery. Channel 4. Retrieved on 2007-05-12.
  14. ^ a b Dimbleby, Jonathan (1994). The Prince of Wales: A Biography. New York: William Morrow and Company, pp. 204-206. 
  15. ^ Dimbleby, Jonathan (1994). The Prince of Wales: A Biography. New York: William Morrow and Company, pp. 263-265. 
  16. ^ The use of a deposed monarch's former constitutional title as a courtesy title, though standard internationally, was viewed as unacceptable by the Greek government.
  17. ^ The period when the advice was given coincided with a change of government. The new taoiseach, Dr. Garret FitzGerald, indicated that he was unaware of his predecessor's advice. Traditionally Irish presidents and British royalty did not meet publicly because of the Northern Ireland issue. That changed in 1991 when the Duke of Edinburgh and Hillery's successor Mary Robinson met in what was the first of a constant series of meetings between presidents and royals.
  18. ^ The Prince's Charities web page lists the 18 core charities and provides links to their web sites
  19. ^ Official list of all the organisations the Prince of Wales is Patron or President of.
  20. ^ Department of Canadian Heritage: His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales
  21. ^ Barnaby J Feder, 9 January 1985, "More Britons trying holistic medicine", New York Times, retrieved on 3 August 2007. Quotes a speech the Prince made in December 1982 to the British Medical Association
  22. ^ UK Department of Health announcement of funding to Prince's charity for regulation scheme
  23. ^ Copps, Sheila; Toronto Sun: Cheer for Tories' heritage cash; March 21, 2007
  24. ^ The Heritage Canada Foundation: The Prince of Wales Prize for Municipal Heritage Leadership
  25. ^ "Miscellaneous," Evenimentul Zilei, May 13, 2003
  26. ^ "Prince Charles Tours Monasteries in Southern Romania", Jurnalul National, May 12, 2005
  27. ^ BBC News
  28. ^ IHBC
  29. ^ "A Little Bite of Transylvania," Daily Mail, 10-06-2006
  30. ^ "How Are Prince Charles's Romanian Businesses Doing?" (in Romanian), euROpeanul, October 19, 2006
  31. ^ "Prince of Wales - Royal visit, 2006", The "Mihai Eminescu" Trust
  32. ^ CBC News: Leonard Cohen a wonderful chap: Prince Charles; May 19, 2006
  33. ^ a b c d Jackson, Michael; Canadian Monarchist News: Saskatchewan Honours Future King; Summer 2001
  34. ^ The Prince of Wales: The Prince of Wales is presented with the 10th Global Environmental Citizen Award in New York; January 28, 2007
  35. ^ a b March 30, 2007
  36. ^ Prince to open climate change roadshow that will be rolled out at more than 50 shopping centres. Laura Chesters, Property Week, 20 March 2007.
  37. ^ She's a natural The Independent; Adams, Guy; March 8, 2007; accessed 25 June 2007
  38. ^ Duchy - Our Story Duchy Originals; Accessed 03-08-07
  39. ^ Duchy - Charity and sponsorship Duchy Originals; Accessed 03-08-07
  40. ^ "Is HRH the Prince of Wales considering entering the Orthodox Church?", Orthodox England on the web, 2002
  41. ^ THE PRINCE AND THE MOUNTAIN: WHAT PRICE SPIRITUAL FREEDOM? - Orthodox England on the web, 2004
  42. ^ "Has Prince Charles found his true spiritual home on a Greek rock?", The Guardian, May 12, 2004
  43. ^ "Miscellaneous," Evenimentul Zilei, May 13, 2003
  44. ^ "Prince Charles Tours Monasteries in Southern Romania", Jurnalul National, May 12, 2005
  45. ^ 21st International Congress of Byzantine Studies
  46. ^ Sacred Web Conference: An introduction from His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales. sacredweb.com. Retrieved on 2006-01-13.
  47. ^ FARA Charity
  48. ^ Department of Canadian Heritage: His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales
  49. ^ http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/wales/south_west/6727951.stm
  50. ^ Prince of Wales - Titles
  51. ^ Are You an "Ace" at Kings and Queens?: A children's quiz on monarchy in Canada
  52. ^ Royal Involvement With Canadian Life
  53. ^ Victoria's first given name was Alexandrina, but she was known as "Princess Victoria" before her accession; Edward VII and George VI were both known as "Prince Albert", and altered their regnal names out of respect for Albert, Prince Consort, who was denied the title of "king" in his lifetime.
  54. ^ "Call me George, suggests Charles", The Times, 24 December 2005. Retrieved 19 September 2007.
  55. ^ "Prince Charles takes sons hunting", BBC News, 1999-10-30. Retrieved on 2007-06-19. 
  56. ^ Jeremy Watson. "Prince : I'll leave Britain over fox hunt ban", Scotland on Sunday, 2002-09-22. Retrieved on 2007-06-19. 
  57. ^ "Now Charles backs coffee cure for cancer", The Observer, 2004-06-27. Retrieved on 2007-06-19. 
  58. ^ "Transcript: Princes' comments", BBC News, 2005-03-31. Retrieved on 2007-06-19. 
  59. ^ John Walsh, 7 October 2006, " Oatcakes at dawn: The truth about Duchy Originals", The Independent, retrieved on 3 August 2007. Asks "But are his business practices as wholesome as his stoneground bread?"
  60. ^ Sean Poulter, 27 February 2007, "Hypocrite Prince Charles' own brand food unhealthier than Big Macs", Daily Mail, retrieved on 3 August 2007. Claims "The Duchy Originals Cornish Pasty carries more calories, fat and salt on a gram for gram basis than a Big Mac."
  61. ^ [1]
  62. ^ Prince stars in live soap. bbc.co.uk. Retrieved on 2006-09-02.
  63. ^ BBC News.
  64. ^ [The Importance of Being Morrissey, BBC documentary 2003]
  65. ^ The Independent, Mar 30, 2006.
  66. ^ BBC Article Regarding the Prince's Memo on Ambition & Opportunity
  67. ^ Humorist Lynn Truss, (Reviewed Charles's Memo)

*Dimbleby, Jonathan. The Prince of Wales: A Biography. ISBN 0-316-91016-3 This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... The Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 132nd day of the year (133rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jonathan Dimbleby, (born 31 July 1944, Aylesbury) is a British presenter of current affairs and political radio and television programmes, a political commentator and a writer. ... Jonathan Dimbleby, (born 31 July 1944, Aylesbury) is a British presenter of current affairs and political radio and television programmes, a political commentator and a writer. ... A courtesy title is a form of address in the British peerage system used for wives, children, and other close relatives of a peer. ... Garret FitzGerald (Irish: ; born February 9, 1926) was the seventh Taoiseach of the Republic of Ireland, serving two terms in office; July 1981 to February 1982, and December 1982 to March 1987. ... For the poet, see Mary Robinson (poet). ... For other uses, see The Independent (disambiguation). ... is the 67th day of the year (68th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... January 13 is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... “Queen Victoria” redirects here. ... Edward VII (Albert Edward; 9 November 1841 – 6 May 1910) was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, of the British Dominions beyond the Seas, and Emperor of India from 22 January 1901 until his death on 6 May 1910. ... George VI (Albert Frederick Arthur George; 14 December 1895 – 6 February 1952) was King of the United Kingdom and the British Dominions from 11 December 1936 until his death. ... Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha (Francis Augustus Charles Albert Emanuel, later HRH The Prince Consort) (26 August 1819 – 14 December 1861) was the husband and consort of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom since 1788. ... is the 358th day of the year (359th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 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  • Paget, Gerald. The Lineage and Ancestry of H.R.H. Prince Charles, Prince of Wales. 2v. Edinburgh: Charles Skilton, 1977.
  • Pierce, Andrew & Gibb, Frances (Feb. 14, 2005). "Camilla might still become Queen". The Times.

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Charles, Prince of Wales
Wikisource has original works written by or about:
Charles, Prince of Wales
  • Official website of HRH The Prince of Wales
  • Monarchy Wales - leading campaign organisation
  • Military Career
  • Family Ties to the Royal Wedding April 9 2005
  • Official website of 'The Prince's Trust'
  • View an image of an official portrait of Prince Charles by David Griffiths
  • The Prince's Official Canadian Visit (2001)
  • "Saskatchewan Honours Future King" (2001)
  • Significance of Treaties Reaffirmed Through Historic Royal Visit (2001)
  • View clip from Prince Charles interview by David Frost in 1969
  • Sympathetic appraisal of the Prince's contributions to architecture
  • Text of the Prince's 1984 speech criticizing Modern architecture
  • Charles, Prince of Wales at the Internet Movie Database
Charles, Prince of Wales
Cadet branch of the House of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg
Born: 14 November 1948
British royalty
Preceded by
Princess Elizabeth, Duchess of Edinburgh
later became Queen Elizabeth II
Heir to the Throne
as heir apparent
1952 – present
Incumbent
Designated heir:
presumably William, Prince of Wales
Preceded by
First
(Heir-apparent)
Line of succession to the British Throne Succeeded by
Prince William of Wales
Order of precedence in the United Kingdom
Preceded by
The Duke of Edinburgh
Gentlemen Succeeded by
The Duke of York
Gentlemen
in current practice
Succeeded by
Prince William of Wales
Heraldic offices
Preceded by
The Duke of Gloucester
Great Master of the Order of the Bath
10 June 1974 – present
Incumbent
Peerage of the United Kingdom
Vacant
Title last held by
Edward
Prince of Wales
26 July 1958 – present
Incumbent
Designated heir:
Likely William
Persondata
NAME Wales, Charles
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Mounbatten-Windsor, Charles Philip Arthur George
SHORT DESCRIPTION Heir apparent and Prince of Wales
DATE OF BIRTH 14 November 1948
PLACE OF BIRTH London, United Kingdom
DATE OF DEATH
PLACE OF DEATH

Contrasting with heir presumptive, an heir apparent is one who cannot be prevented from inheriting by the birth of any other person. ... This article is about the title Prince of Wales. ... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Charles, Prince of Wales - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (4638 words)
The Prince Charles, Prince of Wales (Charles Philip Arthur George Mountbatten-Windsor; born 14 November 1948), is the eldest son of Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh.
The Prince of Wales was born on 14 November 1948 at Buckingham Palace.
The Lineage and Ancestry of H.R.H. Prince Charles, Prince of Wales.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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