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Encyclopedia > Channel Islands
This article is about the British dependencies. For the islands off Southern California, please see Channel Islands of California.

The Channel Islands (Norman: Îles d'la Manche, French: Îles Anglo-Normandes/Îles de la Manche) are a group of islands in the English Channel, off the French coast of Normandy, but dependent on the British Crown. They comprise two separate bailiwicks: the Bailiwick of Guernsey and the Bailiwick of Jersey, and have a total population of about 160,000. The respective capitals, Saint Peter Port and Saint Helier have populations of 16,488 and 28,310) Channel Islands Adapted from map from CIA World Factbook File links The following pages link to this file: Channel Islands Categories: CIA World Factbook images ... The Channel Islands of California, also called the Santa Barbara Islands, are a chain of eight islands located in the Pacific Ocean off the coast of Southern California along the Santa Barbara Channel in the United States of America. ... Norman is a Romance language and one of the Oïl languages. ... Satellite view of the English Channel The English Channel (French: (IPA: ), the sleeve; Dutch: Het Kanaal) is the part of the Atlantic Ocean that separates the island of Great Britain from northern France and joins the North Sea to the Atlantic. ... Flag of Normandy Normandy (in French: Normandie, and in Norman: Normaundie) is a geographical region in northern France. ... The Isle of Man is situated in the Irish Sea between Great Britain and Ireland, and the bailiwicks of Jersey and Guersey are situated in the English Channel to the west of the Cotentin Crown dependencies are possessions of The Crown in Right of the United Kingdom, as opposed to... A bailiwick is the area of jurisdiction of a bailiff. ... This article is about a city that serves as a center of government and politics. ... This is a map of Guernsey. ... Saint Helier (Jèrriais: St Hélyi) is one of the twelve parishes and the largest town on Jersey, the largest of the Channel Islands in the English Channel. ...

Contents

Geography

Viewed from Jersey's north coast, Jethou, Herm and Sark are hazy outlines on the horizon
Viewed from Jersey's north coast, Jethou, Herm and Sark are hazy outlines on the horizon

The inhabited islands of the Channel Isles are Jersey, Guernsey, Alderney, Sark, Herm (the main islands); Jethou, Brecqhou (Brechou), and Lihou. All of these except Jersey are in the Bailiwick of Guernsey, but the Minquiers, Écréhous, Les Dirouilles and Les Pierres de Lecq (the Paternosters), uninhabited groups of islets, are part of the Bailiwick of Jersey. Burhou and the Casquets lie off Alderney. As a general rule, the larger islands have the -ey suffix, and the smaller ones have the -hou suffix; this is believed to be from the Old Norse ey and holmr respectively. Download high resolution version (1560x707, 631 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (1560x707, 631 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Capital St Anne Status Part of Guernsey, Crown dependency of the UK Official language(s) English Head of Government Sir Norman Browse Population 2,400 Currency Pound sterling (GBP). ... Flag of Sark The location of the Channel Islands in Europe An aerial view of Sark Sark (French: Sercq; Sercquiais: Sèr) is a small island in the English Channel. ... This article is about the island. ... This is a map of the Bailiwick of Guernsey. ... This is a map of the Bailiwick of Guernsey. ... Lihou is a small tidal island (95 vergees; 7ha) that is part of the Channel Islands. ... The Minquiers (Les Minquiers; in Jèrriais: Les Mîntchièrs; nicknamed the Minkies in local English) are a group of islands and rocks situated 9 miles south of Jersey forming part of the Bailiwick of Jersey. ... The Écréhous (or Les Écréhous; in Jèrriais: Êcrého) are a groups of islands and rocks situated 6 miles north-east of Jersey (8 miles from France). ... Les Dirouilles (Jèrriais: Les Dithouïlyes) are a range of rocks to the North-East of Jersey. ... The Pierres de Lecq (or Paternosters) at high tide seen from Jersey looking towards Sark. ... This is a map of the Bailiwick of Guernsey. ... The Casquets (49° 43. ... This is a map of the Bailiwick of Guernsey -hou is a suffix found commonly in Channel Islands and Norman names. ... Old Norse or Danish tongue is the Germanic language once spoken by the inhabitants of the Nordic countries (for instance during the Viking Age). ...


The Chausey islands south of Jersey are not generally included in the geographical definition of the Channel Islands but occasionally described as 'French Channel Islands' in English in view of their French jurisdiction. They were historically linked to the Duchy of Normandy, but they are part of the French territory along with continental Normandy, and not part of the British Isles or of the Channel Islands in a political sense. They are an incorporated part of the commune of Granville (Manche), and although popular with visitors from France, they are rarely visited by Channel Islanders, as there are no direct transport links from the other islands. Chausey forms part of the Channel Islands from a geographical point of view, but because it is under French jurisdiction it is almost never mentioned in the context of the other Channel Islands. ... Location of the British Isles The British Isles are a group of islands off the north west coast of continental Europe comprising Great Britain, Ireland and a number of smaller islands. ... Manche is a French département in Normandy named after La Manche (the sleeve), which is the French name of the English Channel. ...


In official Channel Island French (see Jersey Legal French), the Islands are called 'Îles de la Manche', while in France, the term 'Îles anglo-normandes' (Anglo-Norman isles) is used to refer to the British 'Channel Islands' in contrast to other islands in the channel. Chausey is referred to as an 'Île normande' (as opposed to anglo-normande). 'Îles Normandes' and 'Archipel Normand' have also, historically, been used in Channel Island French to refer to the islands as a whole. This official stone which marks the inauguration of a municipal office in 1999 bears the names of the Connétable and the Procureurs du Bien Public of Saint Helier. ...


The very large tidal variation provides an environmentally rich inter-tidal zone around the islands.


History

Main articles: History of Jersey and History of Guernsey

The Islands were annexed to the Duchy of Normandy in 933. In 1066 the Duke William the Conqueror invaded and conquered England, becoming the English monarch. Since 1204, the loss of the rest of the monarch's lands in mainland Normandy has meant that the Channel Islands have been governed as separate possessions of the Crown. The island of Jersey and the other Channel Islands represent the last remnants of the medieval Duchy of Normandy that held sway in both France and England. ... For the garment with this name, see guernsey. ... The Duchy of Normandy stems from the Viking invasions of France in the 8th century. ... William I of England (c. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem God Save the King (Queen) England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto) Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Queen Queen Elizabeth II  -  Prime Minister Tony Blair MP Unification  -  by Athelstan 967  Area... Throughout the Commonwealth Realms The Crown is an abstract concept which represents the legal authority for the existence of any government. ...


The Bailiwicks have been administered separately from each other since the late 13th century, and although those unacquainted with the Islands often assume they form one political unit, common institutions are the exception rather than the rule. The two Bailiwicks have no common laws, no common elections, and no common representative body (although their politicians consult regularly). There is no common newspaper or radio station, but a common television station, ITV Channel Television. The current Channel TV ident Channel Television (CTV) is a British television station which has served as an Independent Television (ITV), contractor to the Channel Islands since 1962. ...


The Islands acquired commercial and political interests in the North American colonies. Islanders became involved with the Newfoundland fisheries in the 17th century. In recognition for all the help given to him during his exile in Jersey in the 1640s, Charles II gave George Carteret, Bailiff and governor, a large grant of land in the American colonies, which he promptly named New Jersey, now part of the United States of America. Edmund Andros of Guernsey was an early colonial governor in North America, and head of the short-lived Dominion of New England. World map showing North America A satellite composite image of North America. ... For other uses, see Newfoundland (disambiguation). ... Charles II (29 May 1630 – 6 February 1685) was the King of England, King of Scots, and King of Ireland from 30 January 1649 (de jure) or 29 May 1660 (de facto) until his death. ... Sir George Carteret, 1st Baronet (c. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles. ... Sir Edmund Andros Sir Edmund Andros (December 6, 1637 - February 24, 1714), was an early colonial governor in North America, and head of the short-lived Dominion of New England. ... The Dominion of New England was the name of a short-lived administrative union of English colonies in the New England region of North America. ...

During the Second World War, the Islands were the only part of the British Commonwealth occupied by Germany (excepting that part of Egypt occupied by the Afrika Korps at the time of the Second Battle of El Alamein). The German occupation 1940–1945 was harsh, with some island residents being taken for slave labour on the Continent; native Jews sent to concentration camps; partisan resistance and retribution; accusations of collaboration; and slave labour (primarily Russians and eastern Europeans) being brought to the islands to build fortifications. The Royal Navy blockaded the islands from time to time, particularly following the liberation of mainland Normandy in 1944. Intense negotiations resulted in some Red Cross humanitarian aid, but there was considerable hunger and privation during the five years of German occupation particularly in the final months when the population were close to starvation. The German troops on the islands surrendered only a few days after the final surrender in mainland Europe. As part of the Atlantic Wall, between 1940 and 1945 the occupying German forces and the Organisation Todt constructed fortifications round the coasts of the Channel Islands such as this observation tower at Les Landes, Jersey The Occupation of the Channel Islands refers to the Military occupation of the Channel... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The Commonwealth of Nations as of 2006 Headquarters Marlborough House, London Leaders  -  Queen Elizabeth II  -  Secretary-General Don McKinnon (since 1999)  -  Ransford Smith Establishment  -  as British Commonwealth 1926   -  as the Commonwealth 1949  Membership 53 sovereign states Website thecommonwealth. ... As part of the Atlantic Wall, between 1940 and 1945 the occupying German forces and the Organisation Todt constructed fortifications round the coasts of the Channel Islands such as this observation tower at Les Landes, Jersey The Occupation of the Channel Islands refers to the Military occupation of the Channel... The seal of Afrikakorps The German Afrika Korps (German: Deutsches Afrikakorps, DAK  ) was the corps-level headquarters controlling the German Panzer divisions in Libya and Egypt during the North African Campaign of World War II. Since there was little turnover in the units attached to the corps, the term is... For the Battle of Alam Halfa, which is also often termed the Second Battle of El Alamein, see Battle of Alam Halfa Combatants British Eighth Army Panzer Army Africa Commanders Bernard Montgomery Erwin Rommel Strength 220,000 men 1,100 tanks[1] 116,000 men[1] 559 tanks(220 panzers... Unfree labour is a generic or collective term for those work relations, especially in modern or early modern history, in which people are employed against their will by the threat of destitution, detention, violence (including death), or other extreme hardship to themselves, or to members of their families. ... It has been suggested that Internment be merged into this article or section. ... Look up partisan in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Collaboration is a process defined by the recursive interaction of knowledge[1] and mutual learning between two or more people working together[2] toward a common goal typically creative in nature. ... Table of Fortification, from the 1728 Cyclopaedia. ... The Royal Navy of the United Kingdom is the oldest of the British armed services (and is therefore the Senior Service). ... A blockade is any effort to prevent supplies, troops, information or aid from reaching an opposing force. ... Combatants United States United Kingdom Canada Free France Poland Germany Commanders Dwight Eisenhower (Supreme Allied Commander) Bernard Montgomery (land) Bertram Ramsay (sea) Trafford Leigh-Mallory (air) Omar Bradley (US 1st Army) Miles Dempsey (UK 2nd Army) Harry Crerar (Canadian 1st Army) Gerd von Rundstedt (OB WEST) Erwin Rommel (Heeresgruppe B... The Anarchist Black Cross was originally called the Anarchist Red Cross. The band Redd Kross was originally called Red Cross. This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...


Politics

The Channel Islands fall into two separate self-governing Bailiwicks. Both the Bailiwick of Guernsey and the Bailiwick of Jersey are British crown dependencies, but neither is part of the United Kingdom. They have been part of the Duchy of Normandy since the 10th century and Queen Elizabeth II is often referred to by her traditional and conventional title of Duke of Normandy. However, pursuant to the Treaty of Paris (1259) she is not the Duke in a constitutional capacity and instead governs in her right as Queen. This notwithstanding, it is a matter of local pride by monarchists to treat the situation otherwise; the Loyal Toast at formal dinners is to 'The Queen, our Duke', rather than 'Her Majesty, the Queen' as in the UK. The Government of the Bailiwick of Jersey, the nation being a crown dependency of the United Kingdom, is composed of the Queen of the United Kingdom, the Lieutenant Governor, the Bailiff, the Assembly of the States, and since December 2005, the Chief Minister of Jersey and his cabinet. ... For the garment with this name, see guernsey. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Federation. ... The Isle of Man is situated in the Irish Sea between Great Britain and Ireland, and the bailiwicks of Jersey and Guersey are situated in the English Channel to the west of the Cotentin Crown dependencies are possessions of The Crown in Right of the United Kingdom, as opposed to... The Duchy of Normandy stems from the Viking invasions of France in the 8th century. ... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ... Bold textInsert non-formatted text here This statue of Rollo the Viking (founder of the fiefdom of Normandy) stands in Falaise, Calvados, birthplace of his descendant William I the Conqueror (the Duke of Normandy who became King of England). ... The Treaty of Paris (also known as the Treaty of Albeville) was a treaty between Louis IX of France and Henry III of England, agreed to on December 4, 1259. ... The Loyal Toast is the first toast to be given at a formal gathering to the presiding person. ...

Entrance to the public gallery of the States Chamber in Jersey
Entrance to the public gallery of the States Chamber in Jersey

The Channel Islands are not represented in the UK Parliament and each Island has its own primary legislature, known as the States of Guernsey and the States of Jersey, with Chief Pleas in Sark and the States of Alderney. Laws passed by the States are given Royal Sanction by the Queen in Council, to which the Islands' governments are responsible. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1236x767, 564 KB) Public entrance to States Chamber in St. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1236x767, 564 KB) Public entrance to States Chamber in St. ... The Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is the supreme legislative institution in the United Kingdom and British overseas territories (it alone has parliamentary sovereignty). ... The States of Guernsey (French: États de Guernesey) is the parliament of the Bailiwick of Guernsey. ... The States of Jersey (French: États de Jersey) is the parliament of Jersey. ... Flag of Sark The location of the Channel Islands in Europe An aerial view of Sark Sark (French: Sercq; Sercquiais: Sèr) is a small island in the English Channel. ... The word States-General, or Estates-General, refers in English to : the Etats-Généraux of France before the French Revolution the Staten-Generaal of the United Provinces and present-day Netherlands. ... Capital St Anne Status Part of Guernsey, Crown dependency of the UK Official language(s) English Head of Government Sir Norman Browse Population 2,400 Currency Pound sterling (GBP). ... Her Majestys Most Honourable Privy Council is a body of advisors to the British Sovereign. ...


The systems of government date from Norman times, which accounts for the names of the legislatures, the States, derived from the Norman 'États' or 'estates' (i.e. the Crown, the Church, and the people). The States have evolved over the centuries into democratic parliaments. Norman conquests in red. ... A legislature is a type of representative deliberative assembly with the power to adopt laws. ... Norman is a Romance language and one of the Oïl languages. ... In several different regions of medieval Europe, and continuing in some countries[] down to the present day, the estates of the realm were broad divisions of society, usually distinguishing nobility, clergy, and commoners; this last group was, in some regions, further divided into burghers (also known as bourgeoisie) and peasants. ... A parliament is a legislature, especially in those countries whose system of government is based on the Westminster system modelled after that of the United Kingdom. ...


A bailiwick is a territory administered by a bailiff. The Bailiff in each bailiwick is the civil head, presiding officer of the States, and also head of the judiciary. In the Channel Islands of Guernsey the Bailiff is the first civil officer, serving as president of the legislature and the Royal Court. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      In law, the judiciary or judicial is the system of courts which administer justice in the name of the sovereign or state, a mechanism for the resolution of disputes. ...


In 2001, responsibility for links between the Channel Islands (together with the Isle of Man) and the Crown passed from the Home Secretary to the Lord Chancellor's Department, replaced in 2003 by the Department of Constitutional Affairs. The Secretary of State for the Home Department (the Home Secretary) is the chief United Kingdom government minister responsible for law and order in England and Wales; his or her remit includes policing, the criminal justice system, the prison service, internal security, and matters of citizenship and immigration. ... The Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain, or Lord Chancellor and prior to the Union the Chancellor of England and the Lord Chancellor of Scotland, is a senior and important functionary in the government of the United Kingdom, and its predecessor states. ... The Department for Constitutional Affairs (DCA) is a United Kingdom government department. ...


In addition, Acts of the UK Parliament may be extended to any of the Channel Islands by Order-in-Council (thus giving the UK Government the ultimate responsibility for good government in the Islands). By constitutional convention this is only done at the request of the Insular Authorities, and has become a rare option, the Islands usually preferring nowadays to pass localised versions of laws giving effect to international treaties.


Matters reserved to the Crown (i.e. the United Kingdom government) are limited to defence, citizenship, and diplomatic representation. The Islands are not bound by treaties concluded by the United Kingdom (unless they so request) and may separately conclude treaties with foreign governments (except concerning matters reserved to the Crown). The United Kingdom conceded at the end of the 20th century that the Islands may establish direct political (non-diplomatic) contacts with foreign governments to avoid the situation whereby British Embassies were obliged to pass on communications from the governments of the Bailiwicks that were in conflict with United Kingdom government policy.


The Islands are not part of the European Union, but are part of the Customs Territory of the European Community, by virtue of Protocol Three to the Treaty on European Union. The European Community (EC), more important of two European Communities, was originally founded on March 25, 1957 by the signing of the Treaty of Rome under the name of European Economic Community. ... The Maastricht treaty (formally, the Treaty on European Union) was signed on 7 February 1992 in Maastricht between the members of the European Community and entered into force on 1 November 1993. ...


Islanders are full British Citizens, but not all are European Citizens. Any British citizen who applies for a passport in Jersey or Guernsey receives a passport bearing the words 'British Islands, Bailiwick of Jersey' or 'British Islands, Bailiwick of Guernsey'. Under the provisions of Protocol Three, Channel Islanders who do not have a close connection with the UK (no parent or grandparent from the UK, and have never been resident in Great Britain or Northern Ireland for any five-year period) do not automatically benefit from the EU provisions on free movement within the EU and consequently their passports receive an endorsement to that effect. This only affects a minority of Islanders. Under the Interpretation Act 1978 of the United Kingdom, the term British Islands refers to the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, together with the Crown Dependencies: the Bailiwicks of Jersey and of Guernsey (which in turn includes the smaller islands of Alderney, Herm and Sark) in the... Under the Interpretation Act 1978 of the United Kingdom, the term British Islands refers to the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, together with the Crown Dependencies: the Bailiwicks of Jersey and of Guernsey (which in turn includes the smaller islands of Alderney, Herm and Sark) in the...


Under the Interpretation Act 1978, the Channel Islands are deemed to be part of the British Islands, not to be confused with the British Isles. Under the Interpretation Act 1978 of the United Kingdom, the term British Islands refers to the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, together with the Crown Dependencies: the Bailiwicks of Jersey and of Guernsey (which in turn includes the smaller islands of Alderney, Herm and Sark) in the... Location of the British Isles The British Isles are a group of islands off the north west coast of continental Europe comprising Great Britain, Ireland and a number of smaller islands. ...


Both Bailiwicks are members of the British-Irish Council, and Jèrriais and Dgèrnésiais are recognised regional languages of the Isles. The British–Irish Council (sometimes known as the Council of the Isles) is a body created by the Belfast Agreement (also known as the Good Friday Agreement). ... Jèrriais is the form of the Norman language spoken in Jersey, in the Channel Islands. ... Dgèrnésiais, also known as Guernésiais, Guernsey French, Guernsey Norman French, is the variety of Norman language spoken in Guernsey. ... A regional language is a language spoken in a part of a country - it may be a small area, a federal state or province, or a wider area. ...


The legal courts are separate (separate courts of appeal have been in place since 1961). Among the legal heritage from Norman law is the Clameur de Haro. The Clameur De Haro is an ancient legal injunction of restraint employed by a person that believes they are being wronged by another at that moment. ...


Economy

Tourism is the major industry in the smaller islands (with some agriculture). Jersey and Guernsey have, since the 1960s, relied on financial services. Guernsey's horticultural and glasshouse activities have been more significant than in Jersey, and Guernsey has maintained light industry as a higher proportion of its economy than Jersey. Jersey's economy since the 1980s has been substantially more reliant on finance.


Both Bailiwicks issue their own banknotes and coins, which circulate freely in all the islands alongside UK coinage and Bank of England and Scottish banknotes.


See: Guernsey pound and Jersey pound The Guernsey pound (currency code GGP) is the currency used in Guernsey. ... ISO 4217 Code none User(s) Jersey Inflation 5. ...


Transport and communications

Since 1969, Jersey and Guernsey have operated postal administrations independently of the UK's Royal Mail, with their own postage stamps, which can only be used for postage in their respective Bailiwicks. UK stamps are no longer valid, but mail to the Islands, and to the Isle of Man, is still treated as UK inland. However, it was not until the early 1990s that the Islands joined the UK's postcode system, Jersey postcodes using the initials JE and Guernsey using GY. Royal Mails logo Royal Mail is the national postal service of the United Kingdom. ... UK postal codes are known as postcodes. ...


Jersey always operated its own telephone services independently of the UK's General Post Office, but Guernsey did not establish its own telephone services until 1969. Both Islands still form part of the UK telephone numbering plan, but Ofcom in the UK does not have responsibility for regulatory and licensing issues on the Islands. The telephone is a telecommunications device which is used to transmit and receive sound (most commonly speech) across distance. ... The UK telephone numbering plan, also known as the National Numbering Plan, is regulated by the Office of Communications (Ofcom), which replaced the Office of Telecommunications (Oftel) in 2003. ... Ofcom is a regulator for communication industries in the United Kingdom. ...


The Channel Islands have their own country-code top-level-domains (ccTLDs) on the internet, managed by a Network Information Centre in Alderney. The ccTLDs are .gg for the Bailiwick of Guernsey (including Alderney and Sark) and .je for the Bailiwick of Jersey. The codes were established on the Internet in 1996, and were entered on to the official ISO-3166 list of country codes in 2006. A country code top-level domain (ccTLD) is a top-level domain used and reserved for a country or a dependent territory. ... .gg is the country code top-level domain for Guernsey. ... .je is the Internet country code top-level domain ( ccTLD) for Jersey. ...


Alderney has a large and growing internet gambling industry.


Each of the three largest islands has a distinct vehicle registration scheme:

  • Guernsey (GBG)- simply a number, up to five digits;
  • Jersey (GBJ) - J followed by up to seven digits (JSY vanity plates are also issued);
  • Alderney (GBA) - AY followed by up to five digits (four digits are the most that have been used, as redundant numbers are re-issued).

In Sark - where most motor traffic is prohibited - the few vehicles (nearly all tractors) on the island do not display plates. Flag of Sark The location of the Channel Islands in Europe An aerial view of Sark Sark (French: Sercq; Sercquiais: Sèr) is a small island in the English Channel. ...


Names used for the cross-channel ferries plying the mail route between the islands and Weymouth, southern England, in the 1960s were taken from the popular Latin names for the islands 'Caesarea' for Jersey, 'Sarnia' for Guernsey, 'Riduna' for Alderney. Weymouth is a town in Dorset, England, situated on a sheltered bay at the mouth of the River Wey on the English Channel coast. ...


Culture

Dgèrnésiais (Guernsey) being used to advertise a sea festival

Culturally, the Norman language predominated in the Islands until the 19th century, when increasing influence from English-speaking settlers and easier transport links led to anglicisation. There are four main dialects/languages of Norman in the islands, Auregnais (Alderney, extinct in late 20th century), Dgèrnésiais (Guernsey), Jèrriais (Jersey) and Sercquiais (Sark, an offshoot of Jèrriais). Bilingual pub sign in English and Jèrriais. ... The Bailiwick of Guernsey (French: Bailliage de Guernesey) is a British crown dependency in the English Channel off the coast of Normandy. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Fête_d'la_Maïr_Guernesy. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Fête_d'la_Maïr_Guernesy. ... Dgèrnésiais, also known as Guernésiais, Guernsey French, Guernsey Norman French, is the variety of Norman language spoken in Guernsey. ... Norman is a Romance language and one of the Oïl languages. ... Auregnais or Aurignais was the Norman dialect of the Channel Island of Alderney (French:Aurigny, Auregnais:Aoeurgny/Auregny). ... Dgèrnésiais, also known as Guernésiais, Guernsey French, Guernsey Norman French, is the variety of Norman language spoken in Guernsey. ... Jèrriais is the form of the Norman language spoken in Jersey, in the Channel Islands. ... Sercquiais also known as Sarkese or Sark-French is the Norman dialect of the Channel Island of Sark. ...


Victor Hugo spent many years in exile, first in Jersey and then in Guernsey where he wrote Les Misérables. Guernsey is also the setting of Hugo's later novel, Les Travailleurs De La Mer (The Toilers of the Sea). A 'Guernsey-man' also makes an appearance in Herman Melville's Moby Dick. Victor-Marie Hugo (pronounced in French) (26 February 1802 — 22 May 1885) was a French poet, novelist, playwright, essayist, visual artist, statesman, human rights campaigner, and perhaps the most influential exponent of the Romantic movement in France. ... Toilers of the Sea (French: Les Travailleurs de la mer), is a novel by Victor Hugo. ... This article is under construction. ... Moby-Dick[1] is an 1851 novel by Herman Melville. ...


The annual 'Muratti', the inter-Island football match, is considered the sporting event of the year - although, thanks to broadcast coverage, it no longer attracts the crowds of spectators, travelling between the islands, that occurred during the 20th century. The Muratti is an annual football match, begun in 1905, between the Channel Islands of Guernsey, Jersey and Alderney for a trophy called the Muratti Vase. ... Football (soccer) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ...


Channel Island sportsmen and women compete in the Commonwealth Games for their respective Islands, and the Islands have been enthusiastic supporters of the Island Games. Shooting is a popular sport - islanders have won Commonwealth medals in this discipline. Current flag of the Commonwealth Games Federation Locations of the games, and participating countries British Commonwealth Games seal Commonwealth Games Federation seal, adopted in 2001 The Commonwealth Games is a multinational, multi-sport event. ... The International Island Games Associations (IGA) main role is to organise the Island Games, which is held every two years where the members came to compete in a friendly competition in various sports. ...


Guernsey's traditional colour for sporting and other purposes is green, and Jersey's is red. Mossy, green fountain in Wattens, Austria. ... Red is any of a number of similar colors evoked by light consisting predominantly of the longest wavelengths of light discernible by the human eye, in the wavelength range of roughly 625–750 nm. ...

This statue of a crapaud in St. Helier represents the traditional nickname for Jersey people
This statue of a crapaud in St. Helier represents the traditional nickname for Jersey people

The main islanders have traditional animal nicknames: Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1038x720, 410 KB) en: Statue of toad in St. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1038x720, 410 KB) en: Statue of toad in St. ... The true toads are amphibians in the Bufonidae family. ...

  • Guernsey: les ânes ('donkeys' in French and Jèrriais) - the steepness of St. Peter Port streets required beasts of burden, but Guernsey people also claim it is a symbol of their strength of character - which Jersey people traditionally interpret as stubbornness.
  • Jersey: crapauds ('toads' in French and Jèrriais) - Jersey has toads and snakes that Guernsey lacks.
  • Sark: corbins ('crows' in Sercquiais, Dgèrnésiais and Jèrriais) - crows could be seen from sea on the island's coasts.
  • Alderney: lapins ('rabbits') - The island is noted for its warrens.

Christianity was brought to the islands around the 6th century; according to tradition, Jersey was evangelized by Saint Helier, Guernsey by Saint Samson of Dol and other smaller islands were occupied at various times by monastic communities representing strands of Celtic Christianity. At the Reformation, the islands turned Calvinist under the influence of an influx of French-language pamphlets published in Geneva. Anglicanism was imposed in the 17th century, but the non-conformist tendency re-emerged with a strong adoption of Methodism. The presence of long-term Catholic communities from France and seasonal workers from Brittany and Normandy added to the mix of denominations among the population. Sercquiais also known as Sarkese or Sark-French is the Norman dialect of the Channel Island of Sark. ... Dgèrnésiais, also known as Guernésiais, Guernsey French, Guernsey Norman French, is the variety of Norman language spoken in Guernsey. ... Jèrriais is the form of the Norman language spoken in Jersey, in the Channel Islands. ... Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... The face of Saint Helier is sculpted on the 1978 monument La Croix de la Reine in St. ... Samson of Dol (born 486?) was a Christian religious figure of the fifth century. ... Celtic Christianity, or Insular Christianity (sometimes commonly called the Celtic Church) broadly refers to the Early Medieval Christian practice that developed around the Irish Sea in the fifth and sixth centuries, that is among “Celtic”/“British” peoples such as the Irish, Scottish, Welsh, Cornish, Manx, etc. ... The Protestant Reformation was a movement which began in the 16th century as a series of attempts to reform the Roman Catholic Church, but ended in division and the establishment of new institutions, most importantly Lutheranism, Reformed churches, and Anabaptists. ... Calvinism is a theological system and an approach to the Christian life that emphasizes Gods sovereignty in all things. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      Anglicanism is the term used to encapsulate... For school of ancient Greek medicine, see Methodism (history of medicine). ...


See also Music of the Channel Islands The Channel Islands are located in the English Channel, by Normandy, France. ...


Other islands in the English Channel

There are other islands in other stretches of the English Channel that are not traditionally included within the grouping of Channel Islands. Among these are Ouessant/Ushant, Bréhat, Île de Batz, and Îles Saint-Marcouf (under French jurisdiction), and the Isle of Wight, and Isles of Scilly (under UK jurisdiction). Ushant (in French Ouessant, in Breton Enez Eusa) is an island in the English Channel which marks the north-westernmost point of European France. ... ÃŽle-de-Bréhat (Breton: Enez Vriad) is an island located near Paimpol, a mile off the northern coast of Bretagne. ... The ÃŽle de Batz (Enez Vaz in Breton) is an island off Roscoff in Brittany, France. ... ÃŽles Saint-Marcouf are a group of two small uninhabited islands off the coast of Normandy, France. ... The Isle of Wight is an English island and county, off the southern English coast, to the south of the county of Hampshire. ... St Martins taken from the helicopter to Penzance View from Tresco, the second largest member of the Isles of Scilly For the area of Surrey, see Scilly Isles, Surrey. ...


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  Results from FactBites:
 
Channel Islands National Park (U.S. National Park Service) (507 words)
Channel Islands National Park and Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary celebrated their 25th anniversary during 2005.
Although Anacapa and Santa Barbara Islands became a National Monument in 1938, it was not until March 5, 1980 that Congress designated the four northern islands, Santa Barbara Island, and the waters for one nautical mile around each as our 40th national park.
Island foxes are the smallest North American canids and occur only on the Channel Islands.
Channel Islands Travel: Province of Channel Islands Tourism Directory & Vacation Guide (202 words)
The Channel Islands lie off the coast of France, but have been British since 1066, though officially they are not a part of the United Kingdom.
The island of Herm is only a 20 minute boat ride from Guernsey, and along with the island of Sark is popular for day trips.
Alderney is the quietest of the Channel Islands and has great white sands and cliff footpaths.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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