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Encyclopedia > Chancellor of the Exchequer
United Kingdom

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Politics and government of
the United Kingdom
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The Chancellor of the Exchequer is the title held by the British Cabinet minister responsible for all economic and financial matters. Often simply called The Chancellor, the office-holder controls HM Treasury and plays a role akin to the posts of Minister of Finance or Secretary of the Treasury in other nations. The position is considered one of the four Great Offices of State and in recent times has come to be the most powerful office in British politics after the Prime Minister. The British monarch or Sovereign is the head of state of the United Kingdom and in the British overseas territories. ... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ... The Houses of Parliament, as seen over Westminster Bridge The Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is the supreme legislative body in the United Kingdom and British overseas territories. ... In the United Kingdom, the State Opening of Parliament is an annual event held usually in October or November that marks the commencement of a session of Parliament. ... The House of Lords is the upper house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom and is also commonly referred to as the Lords. The Sovereign, the House of Commons (which is the lower house of Parliament and referred to as the Commons), and the Lords together comprise the Parliament. ... The Lord Speaker (or Lady Speaker) will be a new position in the British Parliament created once the Constitutional Reform Acts provisions about the Speakership of the House of Lords comes into effect. ... Hélène Valerie Hayman, Baroness Hayman, PC, née Middleweek (born 26 March 1949) is a Labour policitian. ... The House of Commons is the lower house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... In the United Kingdom, the Speaker of the House of Commons is the presiding officer of the House of Commons, and is seen historically as the First Commoner of the Land. ... Michael John Martin MP (born 3 July 1945) is the current Speaker of the House of Commons in the United Kingdom. ... Tony Blair at PMQs Prime Ministers Questions (officially Questions to the Prime Minister) is a constitutional convention in the United Kingdom, where every Wednesday when the House of Commons is sitting the Prime Minister spends half an hour answering questions from Members of Parliament (MPs). In Canada this convention... Her Majestys Government, or when the Sovereign is male, His Majestys Government, abbreviated HMG or HM Government, is the formal title used by the Government of the United Kingdom. ... Her Majestys Most Honourable Privy Council is a body of advisors to the British Sovereign. ... In the Politics of the United Kingdom, the Cabinet is a formal body comprised of government officials chosen by the Prime Minister. ... The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is, in practice, the political leader of the United Kingdom. ... James Gordon Brown (born 20 February 1951) is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, Member of Parliament for Kirkcaldy and Cowdenbeath in the Parliament of the United Kingdom and the Leader of the Labour Party. ... The Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain, or Lord Chancellor and prior to the Union the Chancellor of England and the Lord Chancellor of Scotland, is a senior and important functionary in the government of the United Kingdom, and its predecessor states. ... John Whitaker Straw (born August 3, 1946) is a British Labour Party politician. ... Alistair Maclean Darling (born November 28, 1953) is a British politician. ... The Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs (commonly referred to as Foreign Secretary) is a member of the British Government responsible for relations with foreign countries, heading the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (often called simply the Foreign Office). ... David Wright Miliband (born London, 15 July 1965) is a British politician, Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs and Labour Member of Parliament for the Tyne and Wear constituency of South Shields. ... The Secretary of State for the Home Department, commonly known as the Home Secretary, is the minister in charge of the United Kingdom Home Office and is responsible for internal affairs in England and Wales, and for immigration and citizenship for the whole United Kingdom (including Scotland and Northern Ireland). ... The Rt Hon. ... In the Politics of the United Kingdom, the Cabinet is a formal body comprised of government officials chosen by the Prime Minister. ... Her Majestys Government of the United Kingdom contains a number of Ministers and Secretaries of State. ... The British civil service is the permanent bureaucracy that supports the Government Ministers responsible to the Sovereign and Parliament in administering the United Kingdom. ... Her Majestys Loyal Opposition, or the Official Opposition in the United Kingdom is the largest opposition party in the House of Commons. ... The Leader of the Opposition in the United Kingdom is the politician who leads Her Majestys Most Loyal Opposition. ... David William Donald Cameron (born 9 October 1966) is the Leader of the Conservative Party and Leader of the Opposition in the United Kingdom, positions he has occupied since December 2005. ... The Official Loyal Opposition Shadow Cabinet (normally referred to simply as The Shadow Cabinet) is, in British parliamentary practice, a group of members from Her Majestys Loyal Opposition whose job it is to scrutinise their opposite numbers in government and come up with alternative policies. ... The United Kingdom does not have a single unified judicial system: England and Wales have one system, Scotland another, and Northern Ireland another. ... Schematic of court system for England and Wales The United Kingdom does not have a single unified judicial system—England and Wales have one system, Scotland another, and Northern Ireland a third. ... The United Kingdom does not have a single unified judicial system — England and Wales have one system, Scotland another, and Northern Ireland a third. ... The Courts of Scotland are the civil, criminal and heraldic courts responsible for the administration of justice in Scotland. ... The factual accuracy of this article is disputed. ... For the national legislative body up to 1707, see Parliament of Scotland. ... The Executives logo, shown with English and Scottish Gaelic caption The term Scottish Executive is used in two different, but closely-related senses: to denote the executive arm of Scotlands national legislature (i. ... The National Assembly for Wales (Welsh: ) is a devolved assembly with power to make legislation in Wales. ... Official logo of the Welsh Assembly Government The Welsh Assembly Government (WAG) (Welsh: , LlCC) was firstly an executive body of the National Assembly for Wales, consisting of the First Minister and his Cabinet from 1999 to 2007. ... The logo of the Northern Ireland Assembly, a six flowered linen or flax plant. ... The Northern Ireland Executive as established by the Northern Ireland Act 1998 is the (currently suspended) executive body for Northern Ireland, answerable to the Northern Ireland Assembly. ... Regional Assembly is a title which has universally been adopted by the English bodies established as regional chambers under the Regional Development Agencies Act 1998. ... In Scotland reserved matters, also referred to as reserved powers, are those subjects over which power to legislate is retained by Westminster, as explicitly stated in the Scotland Act 1998. ... There is no single system of local government in the United Kingdom. ... The Greater London Authority (GLA) administers the 1579 km² (610 sq. ... The United Kingdom has five distinct types of elections: general, local, regional, European and mayoral. ... Tony Blair William Hague Charles Kennedy The UK general election, 2001 was held on 7 June 2001 and was dubbed the quiet landslide by the media. ... The United Kingdom general election of 2005 was held on Thursday, 5 May 2005. ... Under the provisions of the Parliament Acts of 1911 and 1949, the next United Kingdom general election must be held on or before 3 June 2010. ... The United Kingdom House of Commons is made up of Members of Parliament (MPs). ... This is a list of political parties in the United Kingdom. ... The United Kingdom has a long and established tradition of respect for its citizens human rights. ... British Prime Minister Tony Blair (left) conducting diplomacy, hosted by the President of the United States, George W. Bush at Camp David in March 2003. ... The European Union or EU is a supranational and international organization of 27 member states. ... Information on politics by country is available for every country, including both de jure and de facto independent states, inhabited dependent territories, as well as areas of special sovereignty. ... In the Politics of the United Kingdom, the Cabinet is a formal body comprised of government officials chosen by the Prime Minister. ... A minister or a secretary is a politician who holds significant public office in a national or regional government. ... Economics (deriving from the Greek words οίκω [okos], house, and νέμω [nemo], rules hence household management) is the social science that studies the allocation of scarce resources to satisfy unlimited wants. ... Finance addresses the ways in which individuals, business entities and other organizations allocate and use monetary resources over time. ... The new eastern entrance to HM Treasury HM Treasury, in full Her Majestys Treasury, informally The Treasury, is the United Kingdom government department responsible for developing and executing the UK Governments financial and economic policy. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is, in practice, the political leader of the United Kingdom. ...


The Chancellor is the third oldest major state office in English and British history, one which originally carried responsibility for the Exchequer, the medieval English institution for the collection of royal revenues. Until recently, the Chancellor controlled monetary policy as well as fiscal policy, but this ended when the Bank of England was granted independent control of its interest rates in 1997. The Chancellor also has oversight of public spending across Government departments. England is the largest and most populous of the constituent countries of the United Kingdom (the United Kingdom is a nation which was created by the bonding of the four succsessor states). ... The Exchequer was (and in some cases still is) a part of the governments of England (latterly to include Wales, Scotland and Ireland) that was responsible for the management and collection of revenues. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem - the  United Kingdom anthem God Save the Queen is commonly used England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto) Unified  -  by Athelstan 927 AD  Area  -  Total 130... Monetary policy is the process by which the government, central bank, or monetary authority manages the money supply to achieve specific goals—such as constraining inflation or deflation, maintaining an exchange rate, achieving full employment or economic growth. ... Headquarters London Governor Mervyn King Central Bank of United Kingdom Currency Pound Sterling ISO 4217 Code GBP Base borrowing rate 5. ...


The office should not be confused with those of the Lord Chancellor or the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster, both Cabinet posts, the Chancellor of the High Court, a senior judge, or the Lord Chief Baron of the Exchequer, a defunct judicial office. The Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain, or Lord Chancellor and prior to the Union the Chancellor of England and the Lord Chancellor of Scotland, is a senior and important functionary in the government of the United Kingdom, and its predecessor states. ... The Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster is, in modern times, a sinecure office in the British government. ... The Chancellor of the High Court is the head of the Chancery Division of the High Court of Justice of England and Wales. ... Lord Chief Baron of the Exchequer is the first baron of the Exchequer. ...


The current Chancellor of the Exchequer is Alistair Darling. Alistair Maclean Darling (born November 28, 1953) is a British politician. ...

Contents

Roles and responsibilities

The Treasury, Whitehall
The Treasury, Whitehall

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1800x1309, 616 KB) The Treasury seen from Parliament Square (Whitehall, London, England). ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1800x1309, 616 KB) The Treasury seen from Parliament Square (Whitehall, London, England). ...

Fiscal Policy

The Chancellor has considerable control over other departments as it is the Treasury which sets departmental expenditure limits. The amount of power this gives to an individual Chancellor depends on his personal forcefulness, his status with his party and his relationship with the Prime Minister. Gordon Brown, who became Chancellor when Labour came into Government in 1997, had a large personal power base in the party. Perhaps as a result, Tony Blair chose to keep him in his job throughout his ten years as Prime Minister, making Brown an unusually dominant figure. This situation has strengthened a pre-existing trend towards the Chancellorship moving into a clear second among government offices, elevated above its traditional peers, the Foreign Secretaryship and Home Secretaryship. suck my doodle ... James Gordon Brown (born 20 February 1951) is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, Member of Parliament for Kirkcaldy and Cowdenbeath in the Parliament of the United Kingdom and the Leader of the Labour Party. ... For other people of the same name, see Tony Blair (disambiguation) Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born May 6, 1953)[1] is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, Leader of the Labour Party, and Member of Parliament for the constituency... The title of Foreign Secretary has been traditionally used to refer to the British Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs. ... The Secretary of State for the Home Department, commonly known as the Home Secretary, is the minister in charge of the United Kingdom Home Office and is responsible for internal affairs in England and Wales, and for immigration and citizenship for the whole United Kingdom (including Scotland and Northern Ireland). ...


One part of the Chancellor's key roles involves the framing of the annual "Budget", which is summarised in a speech to the House of Commons. Traditionally the budget speech was delivered on a Tuesday (although not always) in March, as Britain's tax year follows the Julian Calendar. From 1993, the Budget was preceded by an annual 'Autumn Statement', now called the Pre-Budget Report, which forecasts government spending in the next year and usually takes place in November or December. This preview of the next year's Budget is also referred to as the "mini-Budget". The 1997, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2006 and 2007 Budgets were all delivered on a Wednesday. Look up budget in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The House of Commons is the lower house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... A fiscal year or financial year is a 12-month period used for calculating annual (yearly) financial reports in businesses and other organizations. ... The Julian calendar was introduced in 46 BC by Julius Caesar and came into force in 45 BC (709 ab urbe condita). ... In the United Kingdom, the Pre-Budget Report (PBR) is one of the two economic forecasts that HM Treasury is required to deliver to Parliament each year, the other being the annual Budget. ... In the United Kingdom, the Pre-Budget Report (PBR) is one of the two economic forecasts that HM Treasury is required to deliver to Parliament each year, the other being the annual Budget. ...


Monetary Policy

Although the Bank of England is responsible for setting interest rates, the Chancellor also plays an important part in the monetary policy structure. He sets the inflation target which the Bank must set interest rates to meet. Under the Bank of England Act 1998 the Chancellor has the power of appointment of four out of nine members of the Bank's Monetary Policy Committee - the so-called 'external' members. He also has a high level of influence over the appointment of the Bank's Governor and Deputy Governors, and has the right of consultation over the appointment of the two remaining MPC members from within the Bank. [1] The Act also provides that the Government has the power to give instructions to the Bank on interest rates for a limited period in extreme circumstances. This power has never been used. Headquarters London Governor Mervyn King Central Bank of United Kingdom Currency Pound Sterling ISO 4217 Code GBP Base borrowing rate 5. ... The Monetary Policy Committee (MPC) is a committee of the Bank of England, which meets every month to decide the official interest rate in the United Kingdom. ...


Ministerial arrangements

At HM Treasury the Chancellor is supported by a political team of four junior ministers and by permanent civil servants. The most important junior minister is the Chief Secretary to the Treasury, a member of the Cabinet, to whom the negotiations with other government departments on the details of government spending are delegated, followed by the Paymaster General, the Financial Secretary to the Treasury and the Economic Secretary to the Treasury. Two other officials are given the title of a Secretary to the Treasury, although neither is a government minister in the Treasury: the Parliamentary Secretary to the Treasury is the Government Chief Whip in the House of Commons; the Permanent Secretary to the Treasury is not a minister but the senior civil servant in the Treasury. The new eastern entrance to HM Treasury HM Treasury, in full Her Majestys Treasury, informally The Treasury, is the United Kingdom government department responsible for developing and executing the UK Governments financial and economic policy. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... The Chief Secretary to the Treasury is a junior position in the British Cabinet. ... Paymaster-General is a ministerial position in the UK. The portfolio consists of the workings of HM Revenue and Customs, formerly HM Inland Revenue and HM Customs and Excise, and reports to the Chancellor of the Exchequer. ... Financial Secretary to the Treasury is a junior Ministerial post in the UK Treasury. ... This article is about various offices in the government of the United Kingdom. ... In the United Kingdom, there are at least five Secretaries to the Treasury, officials officially acting as secretaries to the Treasury board. ... This article is about various offices in the government of the United Kingdom. ... The Chief Whip is a political office in some legislatures assigned to an elected member whose task is to administer the whipping system that ensures that members of the party attend and vote as the party leadership desires. ... The House of Commons is the lower house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... A minister or a secretary is a politician who heads a government ministry or department (e. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ...


The holder of the office of Chancellor is ex-officio Second Lord of the Treasury. As Second Lord, his official residence is Number 11 Downing Street in London, next door to the residence of the First Lord of the Treasury (a post usually, though not always, held by the Prime Minister), who resides in 10 Downing Street. While in the past both houses were private residences, today they serve as interlinked offices, with the occupant living in a small apartment made from attic rooms previously resided in by servants. This page includes English translations of several Latin phrases and abbreviations such as . ... 11 Downing Street (commonly known as Number 11), is the official residence of the Second Lord of the Treasury, who in modern times has always been the British Chancellor of the Exchequer. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The First Lord of the Treasury is the head of the commission exercising the ancient office of Lord High Treasurer in the United Kingdom, usually but not always the Prime Minister. ... In the United Kingdom, the Prime Minister is the head of government, exercising many of the executive functions nominally vested in the Sovereign, who is head of state. ... Prime Minister Tony Blair and U.S. Vice President Dick Cheney stand in front of the famous main door to Number 10. ...


The Chancellor is obliged to be a member of the Privy Council, and thus is styled the Right Honourable (Rt. Hon.). Because the House of Lords is excluded from Finance bills, the office is effectively limited to members of the House of Commons. Her Majestys Most Honourable Privy Council is a body of advisors to the British Sovereign. ... A style of office, or honorific, is a form of address which by tradition or law precedes a reference to a person who holds a title or post, or to the political office itself. ... The Right Honourable (abbreviated The Rt Hon. ... The House of Lords is the upper house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom and is also commonly referred to as the Lords. The Sovereign, the House of Commons (which is the lower house of Parliament and referred to as the Commons), and the Lords together comprise the Parliament. ...


Accoutrements of Office

Official Residence

The Chancellor's official residence is No. 11 Downing Street. In 1997, the then First and Second Lords, Tony Blair and Gordon Brown respectively, swapped apartments, as the Chancellor's apartment in No. 11 was bigger and thus better suited to the needs of Blair (who had children) than Brown who was at that stage unmarried. So although No. 11 was still officially Brown's residence, he actually resided in the apartment in the attic of No. 10 (he has since moved on to another home), and Blair — although officially residing in No. 10 — actually lived in the attic apartment of No. 11. For other people of the same name, see Tony Blair (disambiguation) Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born May 6, 1953)[1] is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, Leader of the Labour Party, and Member of Parliament for the constituency... James Gordon Brown (born 20 February 1951) is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, Member of Parliament for Kirkcaldy and Cowdenbeath in the Parliament of the United Kingdom and the Leader of the Labour Party. ...


Budget Box

The original 'Budget Box'

The Chancellor traditionally carries his Budget speech to the House of Commons in a particular red briefcase. The Chancellor's red briefcase is identical to the briefcases used by all other government ministers (known as ministerial boxes or "red boxes") to transport their official papers but is better known because the Chancellor traditionally displays the briefcase, containing the Budget speech, to the press in the morning before delivering the speech. Image File history File links Old_Budget_Box. ... Image File history File links Old_Budget_Box. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The original Budget Box A red box is a red, wooden briefcase used by the British government to pass important information from one department (or person) to another. ...


The original Budget briefcase was first used by William Gladstone in 1860 and continued in use until 1965 when James Callaghan was the first Chancellor to break with tradition when he used a newer box. Prior to Gladstone, a generic red briefcase of varying design and specification was used. The practice is said to have begun in the late 16th century, when Queen Elizabeth I's representative Francis Throckmorton presented the Spanish Ambassador, Bernardino de Mendoza, with a specially constructed red briefcase filled with black puddings. William Ewart Gladstone (December 29, 1809 - May 19, 1898) was a British Liberal politician and Prime Minister (1868-1874, 1880-1885, 1886 and 1892-1894). ... Leonard James Callaghan, Baron Callaghan of Cardiff, KG, PC (27 March 1912 – 26 March 2005), was Labour Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1976 to 1979. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ... Elizabeth I Queen of England and Ireland Queen of France, nominal title Elizabeth I (September 7, 1533–March 24, 1603) was Queen of England and Queen of Ireland from November 17, 1558 until her death. ... Francis Throckmorton (1554—1584) was a conspirator against Queen Elizabeth I of England. ... Bernardino de Mendoza (c. ... Black pudding or blood pudding is a sausage made by cooking blood with a filler until it is thick enough to congeal when cooled. ...


In July 1997, Gordon Brown became the second Chancellor to use a new box for the Budget. Made by industrial trainees at Babcock Rosyth Defence Ltd ship and submarine dockyard in Fife, the new box is made of yellow pine, with a brass handle and lock, covered in scarlet leather and embossed with the Royal initials and crest and the Chancellor's title.


Trivia

  • A previous Chancellor, Robert Lowe, described the office in the following terms in the House of Commons, on 11 April 1870: "The Chancellor of the Exchequer is a man whose duties make him more or less of a taxing machine. He is entrusted with a certain amount of misery which it is his duty to distribute as fairly as he can."
  • The Townshend Acts were named after Charles Townshend, an 18th-century Chancellor who encouraged taxes to earn revenue from the colonies after the French and Indian or Seven Years War.

A sketch portrait of Robert Lowe Robert Lowe, 1st Viscount Sherbrooke (December 4, 1811 - July 27, 1892), British statesman, was born at Bingham, Nottinghamshire, where his father was the rector. ... is the 101st day of the year (102nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1870 (MDCCCLXX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Townsend Acts are the mainly used name for two Acts of the Parliament of Great Britain passed in 1767 having been proposed by Charles Townshend, Chancellor of the Exchequer, just before his death. ... Charles Townshend (August 29, 1725 – September 4, 1767), was born in Raynham Hall, Norfolk, England. ...

List of holders of the office since 1559

Chancellors of the Exchequer of England

See Parliament of England.
For the equivalent Scottish post, see Treasurer of Scotland.
Name Period
Hervey de Stanton 1316 – 1327
Sir John Baker unknown
Sir Walter Mildmay 1559 – 1589
Sir John Fortescue 1589 – 1603
The Earl of Dunbar 1603 – 1606
Sir Julius Caesar 1606 – 1614
Sir Fulke Greville 1614 – 1621
Sir Richard Weston 1621 – 1628
The Lord Barrett of Newburgh 1628 – 1629
The Lord Cottington 1629 – 1642
Sir John Colepeper 1642 – 1643
Sir Edward Hyde 19 July 16421646
The Earl of Shaftesbury 13 May 166122 November 1672
Sir John Duncombe 22 November 16722 May 1676
Sir John Ernle 2 May 16769 April 1689
The Lord Delamere 9 April 168918 March 1690
Richard Hampden 18 March 169010 May 1694
Charles Montagu 10 May 16942 June 1699
John Smith 2 June 169927 March 1701
Henry Boyle 27 March 170122 April 1708

English parliament in front of the king c. ... The Treasurer was was a senior post in the pre-Union government of Scotland. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 512 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (540 × 632 pixel, file size: 49 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Faithful reproductions of two-dimensional original works cannot attract copyright in the U.S. according to the rule in Bridgeman Art Library v. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 512 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (540 × 632 pixel, file size: 49 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Faithful reproductions of two-dimensional original works cannot attract copyright in the U.S. according to the rule in Bridgeman Art Library v. ... John Fortescue Sir John Fortescue of Salden (c. ... Elizabeth I Queen of England and Ireland Queen of France, nominal title Elizabeth I (September 7, 1533–March 24, 1603) was Queen of England and Queen of Ireland from November 17, 1558 until her death. ... James VI of Scotland and I of England (Charles James) (19 June 1566–27 March 1625) was a King who ruled over England, Scotland and Ireland, and was the first Sovereign to reign in the three realms simultaneously. ... Hervey de Stanton (12??-13??) was a Chancellor of the Exechequer to King Edward II. He also was a founder of Michaelhouse College at the University of Cambridge, one of the predecessors to Trinity College, Cambridge. ... John Baker was the first Chancellor of the Exchequer. ... Sir Walter Mildmay was Chancellor of the Exchequer under Queen Elizabeth I of England. ... John Fortescue Sir John Fortescue of Salden (c. ... George Home, 1st Earl of Dunbar, Knight of the Garter (died 1612). ... Sir Julius Caesar (1557/58 - 18 April 1636), was an English judge and politician. ... Sir Fulke Greville, 1st Baron Brooke (October 3, 1554-September 30, 1628) was a minor Elizabethan poet, dramatist, and statesman. ... Richard Weston, 1st Earl of Portland, was born in 1577, at Roxwell in Essex, England, eldest son and heir of Sir Hierome Weston, High Sheriff of Essex, and Mary Cave. ... Edward Barrett, 1st Lord Barrett of Newburgh, PC (21 June 1581-buried 2 January 1645) was an English politician. ... Francis Cottington, 1st Baron Cottington (ca. ... John Colepeper, 1st Baron Colepeper (d. ... Edward Hyde, 1st Earl of Clarendon (18 February 1609–9 December 1674) was an English historian, statesman and grandfather of two queens regnant, Mary II and Anne. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 4 - Charles I attempts to arrest five leading members of the Long Parliament, but they escape. ... 1646 (MDCXLVI) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... A rough picture of Lord Anthony Ashley Cooper Lord Anthony Ashley Cooper, 1st Earl of Shaftesbury (July 22, 1621 – January 21, 1683) was a prominent English politician of the Interregnum and during the reign of King Charles II. Cooper, born in the county of Dorset, suffered the death of both... May 13 is the 133rd day of the year (134th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1661 (MDCLXI) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... November 22 is the 326th day (327th on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events England, France, Munster and Cologne invade the United Provinces, therefore this name is know as ´het rampjaar´ (the disaster year) in the Netherlands. ... Sir John Duncombe (1622-1687) was the Chancellor of the Exchequer from 22 November 1672 - 2 May 1676. ... November 22 is the 326th day (327th on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events England, France, Munster and Cologne invade the United Provinces, therefore this name is know as ´het rampjaar´ (the disaster year) in the Netherlands. ... May 2 is the 122nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (123rd in leap years). ... Events January 29 - Feodor III becomes Tsar of Russia First measurement of the speed of light, by Ole Rømer Bacons Rebellion Russo-Turkish Wars commence. ... Sir John Ernle (1620 –1697) was Chancellor of the Exchequer of England from May 2, 1676 - April 9, 1689. ... May 2 is the 122nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (123rd in leap years). ... Events January 29 - Feodor III becomes Tsar of Russia First measurement of the speed of light, by Ole Rømer Bacons Rebellion Russo-Turkish Wars commence. ... April 9 is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Louis XIV of France passed the Code Noir, allowing the full use of slaves in the French colonies. ... Henry Booth (January 13, 1651—January 2, 1694) was the son of George Booth, Baron Delamer. ... April 9 is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Louis XIV of France passed the Code Noir, allowing the full use of slaves in the French colonies. ... is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Giovanni Domenico Cassini observes differential rotation within Jupiters atmosphere. ... Richard Hampden (1631 - 1695) was an English Whig politician and son John Hampden. ... is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Giovanni Domenico Cassini observes differential rotation within Jupiters atmosphere. ... is the 130th day of the year (131st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events February 6 - The colony Quilombo dos Palmares is destroyed. ... Charles Montagu, 1st Earl of Halifax (April 16, 1661 - May 19, 1715) was Chancellor of the Exchequer, poet, statesman, and Earl of Halifax. ... is the 130th day of the year (131st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events February 6 - The colony Quilombo dos Palmares is destroyed. ... June 2 is the 153rd day of the year (154th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 26 - Treaty of Karlowitz signed March 30 - the tenth Sikh Master, Guru Gobind Singh created the Khalsa. ... John Smith (1655/6 - 1723) was an English politician, twice serving as Chancellor of the Exchequer. ... June 2 is the 153rd day of the year (154th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 26 - Treaty of Karlowitz signed March 30 - the tenth Sikh Master, Guru Gobind Singh created the Khalsa. ... March 27 is the 86th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (87th in leap years). ... Events January 18 - Frederick I becomes King of Prussia. ... Henry Boyle, 1st Baron Carleton (12 July 1669 - 31 March 1725) was a British politician of the early eighteenth century. ... March 27 is the 86th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (87th in leap years). ... Events January 18 - Frederick I becomes King of Prussia. ... is the 112th day of the year (113th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events March 23 - James Francis Edward Stuart lands at the Firth of Forth July 1 - Tewoflos becomes Emperor of Ethiopia September 28 - Peter the Great defeats the Swedes at the Battle of Lesnaya Kandahar conquered by Mir Wais In Masuria one third of the population die during the plague J...

Chancellors of the Exchequer of Great Britain

See Kingdom of Great Britain.
Robert Walpole, de facto first Prime Minister who also served as Chancellor of the Exchequer for more than 22 years
William Pitt the Younger, Chancellor of the Exchequer for 19 years and 9 months, all but 9 months as Prime Minister simultaneously, and who introduced Britain's first income tax to pay for the Napoleonic Wars.
William Pitt the Younger, Chancellor of the Exchequer for 19 years and 9 months, all but 9 months as Prime Minister simultaneously, and who introduced Britain's first income tax to pay for the Napoleonic Wars.
Name Period
Sir John Smith 22 April 170811 August 1710
Robert Harley 11 August 17104 June 1711
Robert Benson 4 June 171121 August 1713
Sir William Wyndham 21 August 171313 October 1714
Sir Richard Onslow 13 October 171412 October 1715
Robert Walpole[1] 12 October 171515 April 1717
The Viscount Stanhope 15 April 171720 March 1718
John Aislabie 20 March 171823 January 1721
Sir John Pratt 2 February3 April 1721
Sir Robert Walpole[2] 3 April 172112 February 1742
Samuel Sandys 12 February 174212 December 1743
Henry Pelham[2] 12 December 17438 March 1754
Sir William Lee 8 March6 April 1754
Henry Bilson Legge April 6, 1754 - November 25, 1755
Sir George Lyttelton 25 November 175516 November 1756
Henry Bilson Legge 16 November 175613 April 1757
The Baron Mansfield 13 April2 July 1757
Henry Bilson Legge 2 July 175719 March 1761
The Viscount Barrington 19 March 176129 May 1762
Sir Francis Dashwood 29 May 176216 April 1763
George Grenville[2] 16 April 176316 July 1765
William Dowdeswell 16 July 17652 August 1766
Charles Townshend[3] 2 August 17664 September 1767
Lord North[2] 11 September 176727 March 1782
Lord John Cavendish 27 March10 July 1782
William Pitt[1] 10 July 178231 March 1783
Lord John Cavendish 2 April19 December 1783
William Pitt[2] 19 December 178314 March 1801

Scotland, England, (Great) Britain and United Kingdom see British Isles (terminology). ... Download high resolution version (434x601, 26 KB)Robert Walpole This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Download high resolution version (434x601, 26 KB)Robert Walpole This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... The Right Honourable Robert Walpole, 1st Earl of Orford, KG, KB, PC (26 August 1676 – 18 March 1745), usually known as Sir Robert Walpole, was a British statesman who is generally regarded as having been the first Prime Minister of Great Britain. ... The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is, in practice, the political leader of the United Kingdom. ... Download high resolution version (421x721, 84 KB)William Pitt the Younger (May 28, 1759 - January 23, 1806) This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Download high resolution version (421x721, 84 KB)William Pitt the Younger (May 28, 1759 - January 23, 1806) This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... William Pitt the Younger (28 May 1759 – 23 January 1806) was a British politician of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. ... The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is, in practice, the political leader of the United Kingdom. ... Tax rates around the world Tax revenue as % of GDP Economic policy Monetary policy Central bank   Money supply Fiscal policy Spending   Deficit   Debt Trade policy Tariff   Trade agreement Finance Financial market Financial market participants Corporate   Personal Public   Banking   Regulation        An income tax is a tax levied on the financial income... Combatants Austria[1] Portugal Prussia[1] Russia[2] Spain[3] Sweden United Kingdom[4] Ottoman Empire[5] Holy Roman Empire[6] French Empire Holland Kingdom of Italy Kingdom of Naples Duchy of Warsaw Bavaria[7] Saxony[8] Denmark [9] Commanders Archduke Charles Prince Schwarzenberg Karl Mack von Leiberich Gebhard von... John Smith (1655/6 - 1723) was an English politician, twice serving as Chancellor of the Exchequer. ... is the 112th day of the year (113th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events March 23 - James Francis Edward Stuart lands at the Firth of Forth July 1 - Tewoflos becomes Emperor of Ethiopia September 28 - Peter the Great defeats the Swedes at the Battle of Lesnaya Kandahar conquered by Mir Wais In Masuria one third of the population die during the plague J... August 11 is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events April 10 - The worlds first copyright legislation became effective, Britains Statute of Anne Ongoing events Great Northern War (1700-1721) War of the Spanish Succession (1702-1713) Births January 3 - Richard Gridley, American Revolutionary soldier (d. ... Lord Oxford Robert Harley, 1st Earl of Oxford and Earl Mortimer (5 December 1661 – 21 May 1724), was an English statesman of the Stuart and early Georgian periods. ... August 11 is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events April 10 - The worlds first copyright legislation became effective, Britains Statute of Anne Ongoing events Great Northern War (1700-1721) War of the Spanish Succession (1702-1713) Births January 3 - Richard Gridley, American Revolutionary soldier (d. ... June 4 is the 155th day of the year (156th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1711 (MDCCXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Robert Benson, later Baron Bingley (circa 1676 — April 9, 1731) was an English politician of the 18th century. ... June 4 is the 155th day of the year (156th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1711 (MDCCXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... August 21 is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1713 (MDCCXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Sir William Wyndham, Bart. ... August 21 is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1713 (MDCCXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... October 13 is the 286th day of the year (287th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Battle of Gangut, by Maurice Baquoi, 1724-27. ... Sir Richard Onslow, (June 23, 1654 – December 5, 1717), was a British Whig member of parliament. ... October 13 is the 286th day of the year (287th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Battle of Gangut, by Maurice Baquoi, 1724-27. ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1715 (MDCCXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Right Honourable Robert Walpole, 1st Earl of Orford, KG, KB, PC (26 August 1676 – 18 March 1745), usually known as Sir Robert Walpole, was a British statesman who is generally regarded as having been the first Prime Minister of Great Britain. ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1715 (MDCCXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... April 15 is the 105th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (106th in leap years). ... // Events January 4 — The Netherlands, Britain & France sign Triple Alliance February 26-March 6 What is now the northeastern United States was paralyzed by a series of blizzards that buried the region. ... James Stanhope, 1st Earl Stanhope (c. ... April 15 is the 105th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (106th in leap years). ... // Events January 4 — The Netherlands, Britain & France sign Triple Alliance February 26-March 6 What is now the northeastern United States was paralyzed by a series of blizzards that buried the region. ... March 20 is the 79th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (80th in leap years). ... // The Funj warrior aristocracy deposes the reigning mek and places one of their own ranks on the throne of Sennar. ... John Aislabie (December 4, 1670- June 18, 1742) was a British politician, notable for his involvement in the South Sea Bubble and for creating the water garden at Studley Royal. ... March 20 is the 79th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (80th in leap years). ... // The Funj warrior aristocracy deposes the reigning mek and places one of their own ranks on the throne of Sennar. ... January 23 is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events Pope Innocent XIII becomes pope Johann Sebastian Bach composes the Brandenburg Concertos April 4 - Robert Walpole becomes the first prime minister of Britain September 10 - Treaty of Nystad is signed, bringing an end to the Great Northern War November 2 - Peter I is proclaimed Emperor of All the Russias... Sir John Pratt (1657 - 1725) was a British judge and politician. ... February 2 is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events Pope Innocent XIII becomes pope Johann Sebastian Bach composes the Brandenburg Concertos April 4 - Robert Walpole becomes the first prime minister of Britain September 10 - Treaty of Nystad is signed, bringing an end to the Great Northern War November 2 - Peter I is proclaimed Emperor of All the Russias... The Right Honourable Robert Walpole, 1st Earl of Orford, KG, KB, PC (26 August 1676 – 18 March 1745), usually known as Sir Robert Walpole, was a British statesman who is generally regarded as having been the first Prime Minister of Great Britain. ... is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events Pope Innocent XIII becomes pope Johann Sebastian Bach composes the Brandenburg Concertos April 4 - Robert Walpole becomes the first prime minister of Britain September 10 - Treaty of Nystad is signed, bringing an end to the Great Northern War November 2 - Peter I is proclaimed Emperor of All the Russias... February 12 is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events January 24 - Charles VII Albert becomes Holy Roman Emperor. ... Samuel Sandys, 1st Baron Sandys (1695-1770) was a British politician in the 18th century. ... February 12 is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events January 24 - Charles VII Albert becomes Holy Roman Emperor. ... December 12 is the 346th day (347th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 19 days remaining. ... // Events February 14 - Henry Pelham becomes British Prime Minister February 21 - - The premiere in London of George Frideric Handels oratorio, Samson. ... The Right Honourable Henry Pelham (25 September 1694–6 March 1754) was a British Whig statesman, who served as Prime Minister of Great Britain from 27 August 1743 to his death about ten years later. ... December 12 is the 346th day (347th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 19 days remaining. ... // Events February 14 - Henry Pelham becomes British Prime Minister February 21 - - The premiere in London of George Frideric Handels oratorio, Samson. ... is the 67th day of the year (68th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1754 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Sir William Lee (1688 - 1754-04-08) was a British jurist and politician. ... is the 67th day of the year (68th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1754 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Henry Bilson-Legge (29 May 1708 - 23 August 1764) was an English statesman. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1754 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... is the 329th day of the year (330th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1755 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... George Lyttelton (1709—1773), created first Baron Lyttelton, was a British politician and statesman and a patron of the arts. ... is the 329th day of the year (330th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1755 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... November 16 is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 45 days remaining. ... 1756 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Henry Bilson-Legge (29 May 1708 - 23 August 1764) was an English statesman. ... November 16 is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 45 days remaining. ... 1756 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... April 13 is the 103rd day of the year (104th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1757 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... William Murray, 1st Earl of Mansfield (March 2, 1705 - March 20, 1793), was a British judge and politician who reached high office in the House of Lords. ... April 13 is the 103rd day of the year (104th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... July 2 is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1757 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Henry Bilson-Legge (29 May 1708 - 23 August 1764) was an English statesman. ... July 2 is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1757 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... March 19 is the 78th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (79th in leap years). ... 1761 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... William Wildman Shute Barrington, 2nd Viscount Barrington (January 5, 1717 – February 1, 1793), eldest son of the 1st Viscount Barrington. ... March 19 is the 78th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (79th in leap years). ... 1761 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... May 29 is the 149th day of the year (150th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1762 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Francis Dashwood, 15th Baron le Despencer (December, 1708 - December 11, 1781) was an English rake and politician, Chancellor of the Exchequer (1762-1763) and founder of The Hellfire Club. ... May 29 is the 149th day of the year (150th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1762 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... April 16 is the 106th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (107th in leap years). ... 1763 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... George Grenville (14 October 1712 – 13 November 1770) was a British Whig statesman who served in government for the relatively short period of seven years, reaching the position of Prime Minister of Great Britain. ... April 16 is the 106th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (107th in leap years). ... 1763 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... July 16 is the 197th day (198th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 168 days remaining. ... 1765 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... William Dowdeswell (1721 - February 6, 1775) was an English politician. ... July 16 is the 197th day (198th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 168 days remaining. ... 1765 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... August 2 is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1766 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Charles Townshend (August 29, 1725 – September 4, 1767), was born in Raynham Hall, Norfolk, England. ... August 2 is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1766 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... is the 247th day of the year (248th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1767 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Frederick North, 2nd Earl of Guilford, KG, PC (13 April 1732 – 5 August 1792), more often known by his courtesy title, Lord North, which he used from 1752 until 1790, was Prime Minister of Great Britain from 1770 to 1782, and a major actor in the American Revolution. ... September 11 is the 254th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (255th in leap years). ... 1767 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... March 27 is the 86th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (87th in leap years). ... 1782 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Lord John Cavendish (1734-1796) was an English politician. ... March 27 is the 86th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (87th in leap years). ... is the 191st day of the year (192nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1782 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... William Pitt the Younger (28 May 1759 – 23 January 1806) was a British politician of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. ... is the 191st day of the year (192nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1782 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... March 31 is the 90th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (91st in leap years), with 275 days remaining. ... 1783 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Lord John Cavendish (1734-1796) was an English politician. ... April 2 is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... December 19 is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1783 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... William Pitt the Younger (28 May 1759 – 23 January 1806) was a British politician of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. ... December 19 is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1783 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... March 14 is the 73rd day of the year (74th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Union Jack, flag of the newly formed United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ...

Chancellors of the Exchequer of the United Kingdom

William Gladstone, four times Chancellor of the Exchequer
William Gladstone, four times Chancellor of the Exchequer
Philip Snowden, first Labour Chancellor.
Geoffrey Howe, Margaret Thatcher's first Chancellor from 1979-1983.
Gordon Brown, Chancellor of the Exchequer 1997-2007, current Prime Minister
Name Party Period
Henry Addington[2] Tory 14 March 180110 May 1804
William Pitt [2][3] Tory 10 May 180423 January 1806
Lord Henry Petty Whig 5 February 180626 March 1807
Spencer Perceval [1][2][3] Tory 26 March 180712 May 1812
Nicholas Vansittart Tory 12 May 181231 January 1823
Frederick John Robinson[1] Tory 31 January 182320 April 1827
George Canning [1][2][3] Tory 20 April8 August 1827
The Lord Tenterden Tory 8 August3 September 1827
John Charles Herries Tory 3 September 182726 January 1828
Henry Goulburn Tory 26 January 182822 November 1830
Viscount Althorp Whig 22 November 183014 November 1834
The Lord Denman Tory 15 November15 December 1834
Sir Robert Peel, Bt.[2] Conservative 2 December 18348 April 1835
Thomas Spring Rice Whig 18 April 183526 August 1839
Sir Francis Baring Whig 26 August 183930 August 1841
Henry Goulburn Conservative 3 September 184127 June 1846
Sir Charles Wood Liberal 6 July 184621 February 1852
Benjamin Disraeli[1] Conservative 27 February17 December 1852
William Gladstone[1] Liberal 28 December 185228 February 1855
Sir George Cornewall Lewis, Bt. Liberal 28 February 185521 February 1858
Benjamin Disraeli[1] Conservative 26 February 185811 June 1859
William Gladstone[1] Liberal 18 June 185926 June 1866
Benjamin Disraeli[1] Conservative 6 July 186629 February 1868
George Ward Hunt Conservative 29 February1 December 1868
Robert Lowe Liberal 9 December 186811 August 1873
William Gladstone[2] Liberal 11 August 187317 February 1874
Sir Stafford Northcote, Bt. Conservative 21 February 187421 April 1880
William Gladstone[2] Liberal 28 April 188016 December 1882
Hugh Childers Liberal 16 December 18829 June 1885
Sir Michael Hicks Beach, Bt. Conservative 24 June 188528 January 1886
Sir William Vernon Harcourt Liberal 6 February20 July 1886
Lord Randolph Churchill Conservative 3 August22 December 1886
George Goschen Liberal Unionist 14 January 188711 August 1892
Sir William Vernon Harcourt Liberal 18 August 189221 June 1895
Sir Michael Hicks Beach, Bt. Conservative 29 June 189511 August 1902
Charles Ritchie Conservative 11 August 19029 October 1903
Austen Chamberlain Liberal Unionist 9 October 19034 December 1905
H. H. Asquith Liberal 10 December 190512 April 1908
David Lloyd George[1] Liberal 12 April 190825 May 1915
Reginald McKenna Liberal 25 May 191510 December 1916
Andrew Bonar Law[1] Conservative 10 December 191610 January 1919
Austen Chamberlain Conservative 10 January 19191 April 1921
Sir Robert Horne Conservative 1 April 192119 October 1922
Stanley Baldwin [1][2] Conservative 27 October 192227 August 1923
Neville Chamberlain[1] Conservative 27 August 192322 January 1924
Philip Snowden Labour 22 January3 November 1924
Winston Churchill[1] Conservative 6 November 19244 June 1929
Philip Snowden Labour (1929-31)
National Labour (1931)
7 June 19295 November 1931
Neville Chamberlain[1] Conservative 5 November 193128 May 1937
Sir John Simon Liberal National 28 May 193712 May 1940
Sir Kingsley Wood Conservative 12 May 194021 September 1943
Sir John Anderson National Government 24 September 194326 July 1945
Hugh Dalton Labour 27 July 194513 November 1947
Sir Stafford Cripps Labour 13 November 194719 October 1950
Hugh Gaitskell Labour 19 October 195026 October 1951
Rab Butler Conservative 28 October 195120 December 1955
Harold Macmillan[1] Conservative 20 December 195513 January 1957
Peter Thorneycroft Conservative 13 January 19576 January 1958
Derick Heathcoat Amory Conservative 6 January 195827 July 1960
Selwyn Lloyd Conservative 27 July 196013 July 1962
Reginald Maudling Conservative 13 July 196216 October 1964
James Callaghan[1] Labour 16 October 196430 November 1967
Roy Jenkins Labour 30 November 196719 June 1970
Iain Macleod[3] Conservative 20 June20 July 1970
Anthony Barber Conservative 25 July 19704 March 1974
Denis Healey Labour 5 March 19744 May 1979
Sir Geoffrey Howe Conservative 5 May 197911 June 1983
Nigel Lawson Conservative 11 June 198326 October 1989
John Major[1] Conservative 26 October 198928 November 1990
Norman Lamont Conservative 28 November 199027 May 1993
Kenneth Clarke Conservative 27 May 19932 May 1997
Gordon Brown[1] Labour 2 May 199727 June 2007
Alistair Darling Labour 28 June 2007

William Ewart Gladstone This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... William Ewart Gladstone This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... William Ewart Gladstone (December 29, 1809 - May 19, 1898) was a British Liberal politician and Prime Minister (1868-1874, 1880-1885, 1886 and 1892-1894). ... Philip Snowden, 1st Viscount Snowden File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Philip Snowden, 1st Viscount Snowden File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Philip Snowden, 1st Viscount Snowden (July 18, 1864 - May 15, 1937) was a British politician, and the first Labour Chancellor of the Exchequer. ... Sir Geoffrey Howe presents his first budget, July 1979 This work is copyrighted. ... Sir Geoffrey Howe presents his first budget, July 1979 This work is copyrighted. ... Richard Edward Geoffrey Howe, Baron Howe of Aberavon, CH, PC, QC (born 20 December 1926), known until 1992 as Sir Geoffrey Howe, is a senior British Conservative politician. ... Download high resolution version (1128x1500, 149 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (1128x1500, 149 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... James Gordon Brown (born 20 February 1951) is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, Member of Parliament for Kirkcaldy and Cowdenbeath in the Parliament of the United Kingdom and the Leader of the Labour Party. ... The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is, in practice, the political leader of the United Kingdom. ... The Right Honourable Henry Addington, 1st Viscount Sidmouth, PC (30 May 1757–15 February 1844) was a British statesman, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1801 to 1804. ... For other uses, see Tory (disambiguation). ... March 14 is the 73rd day of the year (74th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Union Jack, flag of the newly formed United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... is the 130th day of the year (131st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1804 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... William Pitt the Younger (28 May 1759 – 23 January 1806) was a British politician of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. ... For other uses, see Tory (disambiguation). ... is the 130th day of the year (131st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1804 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... January 23 is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1806 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Henry Petty-Fitzmaurice, 3rd Marquess of Lansdowne (1780-1863), Son of the 1st Marquess by his second marriage, was born on 2 July 1780 and educated at Edinburgh University and at Trinity College, Cambridge. ... The Whigs (with the Tories) are often described as one of two political parties in England and later the United Kingdom from the late 17th to the mid 19th centuries. ... February 5 is the 36th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1806 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... March 26 is the 85th day of the year (86th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1807 (MDCCCVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar). ... Spencer Perceval (1 November 1762 – 11 May 1812) was a British statesman and Prime Minister. ... For other uses, see Tory (disambiguation). ... March 26 is the 85th day of the year (86th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1807 (MDCCCVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar). ... May 12 is the 132nd day of the year (133rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the overture by Tchaikovsky, see 1812 Overture; For the wars, see War of 1812 (USA - United Kingdom) or Patriotic War of 1812 (France - Russia) For the Siberia Airlines plane crashed over the Black Sea on October 4, 2001, see Siberia Airlines Flight 1812 1812 was a leap year starting... Nicholas Vansittart, 1st Baron Bexley (29 April 1766-8 February 1851), English politician, was the fifth son of Henry Vansittart (d. ... For other uses, see Tory (disambiguation). ... May 12 is the 132nd day of the year (133rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the overture by Tchaikovsky, see 1812 Overture; For the wars, see War of 1812 (USA - United Kingdom) or Patriotic War of 1812 (France - Russia) For the Siberia Airlines plane crashed over the Black Sea on October 4, 2001, see Siberia Airlines Flight 1812 1812 was a leap year starting... January 31 is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1823 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The Right Honourable Frederick John Robinson, 1st Earl of Ripon PC (November 1, 1782 – January 28, 1859), Frederick John Robinson until 1827, The Viscount Goderich 1827–1833, and The Earl of Ripon 1833 onwards, was a British statesman and Prime Minister (when he was known as Lord Goderich). ... For other uses, see Tory (disambiguation). ... January 31 is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1823 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... April 20 is the 110th day of the year (111th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1827 (MDCCCXXVII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... George Canning (11 April 1770-8 August 1827) was a British statesman and politician who served as Foreign Secretary and, briefly, Prime Minister. ... For other uses, see Tory (disambiguation). ... April 20 is the 110th day of the year (111th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 220th day of the year (221st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1827 (MDCCCXXVII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Charles Abbot, 1st Baron Tenterden (7 October 1762 - 4 November 1832), Lord Chief Justice, Kings Bench, was born at Canterbury, his father having been a hairdresser and wigmaker of the town. ... For other uses, see Tory (disambiguation). ... is the 220th day of the year (221st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... September 3 is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1827 (MDCCCXXVII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... John Charles Herries (1778 - 1855) was an English politician and financier and a frequent member of Tory and Conservative cabinets in the early to mid 19th century. ... For other uses, see Tory (disambiguation). ... September 3 is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1827 (MDCCCXXVII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... January 26 is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1828 (MDCCCXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Henry Goulburn (1784–1856) was an English statesman and a member of the Peelite faction after 1846. ... For other uses, see Tory (disambiguation). ... January 26 is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1828 (MDCCCXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... November 22 is the 326th day (327th on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Liberty Leading the People by Eugène Delacroix commemorates the July Revolution 1830 (MDCCCXXX) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... John Charles Spencer, 3rd Earl Spencer (1782-1845), known during his fathers lifetime by his courtesy title Viscount Althorp, was an English statesman. ... The Whigs (with the Tories) are often described as one of two political parties in England and later the United Kingdom from the late 17th to the mid 19th centuries. ... November 22 is the 326th day (327th on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Liberty Leading the People by Eugène Delacroix commemorates the July Revolution 1830 (MDCCCXXX) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... November 14 is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1834 (MDCCCXXXIV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Thomas Denman, 1st Baron Denman (23 July 1779 - 26 September 1854), English judge, was born in London, the son of a well-known physician. ... For other uses, see Tory (disambiguation). ... November 15 is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... December 15 is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1834 (MDCCCXXXIV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Sir Robert Peel, 2nd Baronet (5 February 1788 – 2 July 1850) was the Conservative Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from December 10, 1834 to April 8, 1835, and again from August 30, 1841 to June 29, 1846. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and is the second oldest extant political party in the world. ... December 2 is the 336th day of the year (337th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1834 (MDCCCXXXIV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... April 8 is the 98th day of the year (99th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... | Come and take it, slogan of the Texas Revolution 1835 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Thomas Spring Rice, 1st Baron Monteagle of Brandon, PC, FRS (8 February 1790-7 February 1866) was a British Whig politician. ... The Whigs (with the Tories) are often described as one of two political parties in England and later the United Kingdom from the late 17th to the mid 19th centuries. ... April 18 is the 108th day of the year (109th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... | Come and take it, slogan of the Texas Revolution 1835 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... August 26 is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1839 (MDCCCXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Francis Thornhill Baring, 1st Baron Northbrook (1796–1866) was a British Whig politician who served in the governments of Lord Melbourne and Lord John Russell. ... The Whigs (with the Tories) are often described as one of two political parties in England and later the United Kingdom from the late 17th to the mid 19th centuries. ... August 26 is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1839 (MDCCCXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... August 30 is the 242nd day of the year (243rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1841 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... Henry Goulburn (1784–1856) was an English statesman and a member of the Peelite faction after 1846. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and is the second oldest extant political party in the world. ... September 3 is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1841 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... June 27 is the 178th day of the year (179th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1846 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Charles Wood, 1st Viscount Halifax (1800–1885), known between 1846 and 1866 as Sir Charles Wood, Bt, was an English politician. ... This article is about the historic Liberal Party. ... July 6 is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 178 days remaining. ... 1846 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... February 21 is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1852 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Benjamin Disraeli, 1st Earl of Beaconsfield (December 21, 1804 - April 24, British Conservative Prime Minister of the United Kingdom and author. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and is the second oldest extant political party in the world. ... February 27 is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1852 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... William Ewart Gladstone (December 29, 1809 - May 19, 1898) was a British Liberal politician and Prime Minister (1868-1874, 1880-1885, 1886 and 1892-1894). ... This article is about the historic Liberal Party. ... December 28 is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 3 days remaining. ... 1852 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... February 28 is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1855 (MDCCCLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Sir George Cornewall Lewis, 2nd Baronet (1806-1863), British statesman and man of letters, was born in London on 21 April 1806. ... This article is about the historic Liberal Party. ... February 28 is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1855 (MDCCCLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... February 21 is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1858 (MDCCCLVIII) is a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Benjamin Disraeli, 1st Earl of Beaconsfield (December 21, 1804 - April 24, British Conservative Prime Minister of the United Kingdom and author. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and is the second oldest extant political party in the world. ... February 26 is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1858 (MDCCCLVIII) is a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... June 11 is the 162nd day of the year (163rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1859 (MDCCCLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... William Ewart Gladstone (December 29, 1809 - May 19, 1898) was a British Liberal politician and Prime Minister (1868-1874, 1880-1885, 1886 and 1892-1894). ... This article is about the historic Liberal Party. ... June 18 is the 169th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (170th in leap years), with 196 days remaining. ... Year 1859 (MDCCCLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1866 (MDCCCLXVI) is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... Benjamin Disraeli, 1st Earl of Beaconsfield (December 21, 1804 - April 24, British Conservative Prime Minister of the United Kingdom and author. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and is the second oldest extant political party in the world. ... July 6 is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 178 days remaining. ... 1866 (MDCCCLXVI) is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... February 29th, or bissextile day, is the 60th day of a leap year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 306 days remaining. ... Media:Example. ... The Rt Hon. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and is the second oldest extant political party in the world. ... February 29th, or bissextile day, is the 60th day of a leap year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 306 days remaining. ... December 1 is the 335th (in leap years the 336th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Media:Example. ... A sketch portrait of Robert Lowe Robert Lowe, 1st Viscount Sherbrooke (December 4, 1811 - July 27, 1892), British statesman, was born at Bingham, Nottinghamshire, where his father was the rector. ... This article is about the historic Liberal Party. ... December 9 is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Media:Example. ... August 11 is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1873 (MDCCCLXXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... William Ewart Gladstone (December 29, 1809 - May 19, 1898) was a British Liberal politician and Prime Minister (1868-1874, 1880-1885, 1886 and 1892-1894). ... This article is about the historic Liberal Party. ... August 11 is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1873 (MDCCCLXXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... February 17 is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1874 (MDCCCLXXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link with display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Rt Hon. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and is the second oldest extant political party in the world. ... February 21 is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1874 (MDCCCLXXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link with display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... April 21 is the 111th day of the year (112th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1880 (MDCCCLXXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar). ... William Ewart Gladstone (December 29, 1809 - May 19, 1898) was a British Liberal politician and Prime Minister (1868-1874, 1880-1885, 1886 and 1892-1894). ... This article is about the historic Liberal Party. ... April 28 is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1880 (MDCCCLXXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar). ... December 16 is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1882 (MDCCCLXXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Caricature from Punch, 1882 Hugh Culling Eardley Childers (June 25, 1827 - January 29, 1896) was a British and Australian Liberal statesman of the nineteenth century. ... This article is about the historic Liberal Party. ... December 16 is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1882 (MDCCCLXXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... June 9 is the 160th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (161st in leap years), with 205 days remaining. ... 1885 (MDCCCLXXXV) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Rt Hon. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and is the second oldest extant political party in the world. ... June 24 is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 190 days remaining. ... 1885 (MDCCCLXXXV) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... January 28 is the 28th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1886 (MDCCCLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Sir William Harcourt Sir William George Granville Venables Vernon Harcourt (October 14, 1827 - October 1, 1904) was a British Liberal statesman. ... This article is about the historic Liberal Party. ... February 6 is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... July 20 is the 201st day (202nd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 164 days remaining. ... Year 1886 (MDCCCLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Lord Randolph Henry Spencer Churchill Lord Randolph Henry Spencer Churchill (13 February 1849 – 24 January 1895) was a British statesman. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and is the second oldest extant political party in the world. ... August 3 is the 215th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (216th in leap years), with 150 days remaining. ... December 22 is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1886 (MDCCCLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... George Joachim Goschen, 1st Viscount Goschen (10 August 1831 – 7 February 1907) was a British statesman and businessman ironically best remembered for being forgotten by Lord Randolph Churchill. ... The Liberal Unionists were a British political party which split away from the Liberals in 1886, and had effectively merged with the Conservatives by the turn of the century, the formal merger being completed in 1912. ... January 14 is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1887 (MDCCCLXXXVII) is a common year starting on Saturday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. ... August 11 is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1892 (MDCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Sir William Harcourt Sir William George Granville Venables Vernon Harcourt (October 14, 1827 - October 1, 1904) was a British Liberal statesman. ... This article is about the historic Liberal Party. ... August 18 is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1892 (MDCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1895 (MDCCCXCV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The Rt Hon. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and is the second oldest extant political party in the world. ... is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1895 (MDCCCXCV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... August 11 is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1902 (MCMII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Charles Thomson Ritchie, by Carlo Pellegrini, 1885. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and is the second oldest extant political party in the world. ... August 11 is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1902 (MCMII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... October 9 is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1900 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Friday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... The Rt. ... The Liberal Unionists were a British political party which split away from the Liberals in 1886, and had effectively merged with the Conservatives by the turn of the century, the formal merger being completed in 1912. ... October 9 is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1900 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Friday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... December 4th redirects here. ... 1905 (MCMV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar). ... Herbert Henry Asquith, 1st Earl of Oxford and Asquith, KG, PC (12 September 1852 – 15 February 1928) served as the Liberal Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1908 to 1916. ... This article is about the historic Liberal Party. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... 1905 (MCMV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar). ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... David Lloyd George, 1st Earl Lloyd George of Dwyfor, OM, PC (17 January 1863 – 26 March 1945) was a British statesman who guided Britain and the British Empire through World War I and the postwar settlement as the Liberal Party Prime Minister, 1916-1922. ... This article is about the historic Liberal Party. ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... is the 145th day of the year (146th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar). ... Cover of Time Magazine (March 3, 1924) Reginald McKenna (1863-1943) was a Liberal British statesman who has recently achieved a limmited amount of noteriety following a recent biography by disgraced heart-throb and former Tory MP Martin Farr. ... This article is about the historic Liberal Party. ... is the 145th day of the year (146th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar). ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... Andrew Bonar Law (16 September 1858 – 30 October 1923) was a Conservative Party British statesman and Prime Minister. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and is the second oldest extant political party in the world. ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... January 10 is the 10th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... The Rt. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and is the second oldest extant political party in the world. ... January 10 is the 10th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... April 1 is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... Half Measures Sir Robert Horne, President of the Board of Trade, and Sir Eric Geddes, Minister of Transport (speaking together). ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and is the second oldest extant political party in the world. ... April 1 is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... October 19 is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar). ... Stanley Baldwin, 1st Earl Baldwin of Bewdley, KG, PC (3 August 1867 – 14 December 1947) was a British statesman and thrice Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and is the second oldest extant political party in the world. ... is the 300th day of the year (301st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar). ... August 27 is the 239th day of the year (240th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Arthur Neville Chamberlain (18 March 1869 – 9 November 1940), known as Neville Chamberlain, was a British Conservative politician and Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1937 to 1940. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and is the second oldest extant political party in the world. ... August 27 is the 239th day of the year (240th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... January 22 is the 22nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1924 (MCMXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Philip Snowden, 1st Viscount Snowden (July 18, 1864 - May 15, 1937) was a British politician, and the first Labour Chancellor of the Exchequer. ... The Labour Party has been, since its founding in the early 20th century, the principal political party of the left in England, Scotland and Wales. ... January 22 is the 22nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... November 3 is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 58 days remaining. ... 1924 (MCMXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill, KG, OM, CH, TD, FRS, PC (Can) (30 November 1874 – 24 January 1965) was a British politician, soldier in the British Army, orator, and strategist, and is studied as part of the modern British and world history. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and is the second oldest extant political party in the world. ... November 6 is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1924 (MCMXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar). ... June 4 is the 155th day of the year (156th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Philip Snowden, 1st Viscount Snowden (July 18, 1864 - May 15, 1937) was a British politician, and the first Labour Chancellor of the Exchequer. ... The Labour Party has been, since its founding in the early 20th century, the principal political party of the left in England, Scotland and Wales. ... National Labor Party (Australia) National Labour Party (Brazil) National Labour Party (Ireland) National Labour Party (UK 1930s) National Labour Party (UK 1950s) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... June 7 is the 158th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (159th in leap years), with 207 days remaining. ... Year 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... November 5 is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 56 days remaining. ... Year 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1931 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Arthur Neville Chamberlain (18 March 1869 – 9 November 1940), known as Neville Chamberlain, was a British Conservative politician and Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1937 to 1940. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and is the second oldest extant political party in the world. ... November 5 is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 56 days remaining. ... Year 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1931 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 28 is the 148th day of the year (149th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... John Allsebrook Simon, 1st Viscount Simon GCSI GCVO OBE PC (1873-1954) was a British politician and statesman. ... National Liberal Party was a name used by two groups of politicians, who had formerly been associated with the Liberal Party. ... May 28 is the 148th day of the year (149th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... May 12 is the 132nd day of the year (133rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Sir Howard Kingsley Wood (19 August 1891 - 21 September 1943) was a Conservative British politician. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and is the second oldest extant political party in the world. ... May 12 is the 132nd day of the year (133rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... September 21 is the 264th day of the year (265th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... John Anderson, 1st Viscount Waverley of Westdean (8 July 1882 – 4 January 1958) was a British statesman. ... National governments or national unity governments are broad coalition governments consisting of all parties (or all major parties) in the legislature and are often formed during times of war or national emergency. ... September 24 is the 267th day of the year (268th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... July 26 is the 207th day of the year (208th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1945and died 2007 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... Edward Hugh John Neale Dalton, Baron Dalton, generally known as Hugh Dalton (1887-1962) was a British Labour Party politician, and Chancellor of the Exchequer from 1945 to 1947. ... The Labour Party has been, since its founding in the early 20th century, the principal political party of the left in England, Scotland and Wales. ... July 27 is the 208th day of the year (209th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1945and died 2007 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1947 calendar). ... Sir Richard Stafford Cripps, known as Stafford Cripps, (April 24, 1889 - April 21, 1952) was a British Labour politician and Chancellor of the Exchequer for several years following World War II. // Cripps was born in London. ... The Labour Party has been, since its founding in the early 20th century, the principal political party of the left in England, Scotland and Wales. ... is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1947 calendar). ... October 19 is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Hugh Todd Naylor Gaitskell (April 9, 1906 – January 18, 1963) was a British politician, leader of the Labour Party from 1955 until his death in 1963. ... The Labour Party has been, since its founding in the early 20th century, the principal political party of the left in England, Scotland and Wales. ... October 19 is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... October 26 is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday; see its calendar. ... Richard Austen Butler, Baron Butler of Saffron Walden, KG, CH, PC, DL (9 December 1902 – 8 March 1982), who invariably signed his name R. A. Butler and was familiarly known as Rab, was a British Conservative politician. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and is the second oldest extant political party in the world. ... October 28 is the 301st day of the year (302nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 64 days remaining. ... 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday; see its calendar. ... December 20 is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Maurice Harold Macmillan, 1st Earl of Stockton, OM, PC (10 February 1894 – 29 December 1986), was a British Conservative politician and Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1957 to 1963. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and is the second oldest extant political party in the world. ... December 20 is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... January 13 is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... George Edward Peter Thorneycroft, Baron Thorneycroft CH PC (26 July 1909–4 June 1994), was a British Conservative politician. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and is the second oldest extant political party in the world. ... January 13 is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... January 6 is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 359 days (360 in leap years) remaining. ... Year 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Right Honourable Derick Heathcoat Amory, 1st Viscount Amory (26 December 1899–20 January 1981) was a British Conservative politician. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and is the second oldest extant political party in the world. ... January 6 is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 359 days (360 in leap years) remaining. ... Year 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... July 27 is the 208th day of the year (209th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1960 calendar). ... John Selwyn Brooke Lloyd, Baron Selwyn-Lloyd (28 July 1904 - 18 May 1978), known for most of his career as Selwyn Lloyd, was a British Conservative politician. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and is the second oldest extant political party in the world. ... July 27 is the 208th day of the year (209th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1960 calendar). ... July 13 is the 194th day of the year (195th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Rt. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and is the second oldest extant political party in the world. ... July 13 is the 194th day of the year (195th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... October 16 is the 289th day of the year (290th in leap years). ... 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ... Leonard James Callaghan, Baron Callaghan of Cardiff, KG, PC (27 March 1912 – 26 March 2005), was Labour Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1976 to 1979. ... The Labour Party has been, since its founding in the early 20th century, the principal political party of the left in England, Scotland and Wales. ... October 16 is the 289th day of the year (290th in leap years). ... 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ... November 30 is the 334th day of the year (335th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar (the link is to a full 1967 calendar). ... Roy Harris Jenkins, Baron Jenkins of Hillhead, OM, PC (November 11, 1920 – January 5, 2003) was a British politician and a prominent Labour Member of Parliament in the 1960s and 1970s, and founding member of the Social Democratic Party (SDP). ... The Labour Party has been, since its founding in the early 20th century, the principal political party of the left in England, Scotland and Wales. ... November 30 is the 334th day of the year (335th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar (the link is to a full 1967 calendar). ... is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... The Right Honourable Iain Macleod, PC (1913 – 1970) was a UK Conservative politician. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and is the second oldest extant political party in the world. ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... July 20 is the 201st day (202nd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 164 days remaining. ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... Anthony Barber, interviewed as the results of the 1970 general election are declared The Right Honourable Anthony Perrinott Lysberg Barber, Baron Barber, PC (4 July 1920 – 16 December 2005), was a British Conservative politician who served as a member of both the House of Commons and the House of Lords. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and is the second oldest extant political party in the world. ... July 25 is the 206th day of the year (207th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... March 4 is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... Denis Winston Healey, Baron Healey, CH, MBE, PC (born 30 August 1917), is a British Labour politician, regarded by some (especially in the Labour Party) as the best Prime Minister we never had.[1] Denis Healey was born in Mottingham in Kent but in 1922 at the age of five... The Labour Party has been, since its founding in the early 20th century, the principal political party of the left in England, Scotland and Wales. ... This article is about the day. ... 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... May 4 is the 124th day of the year (125th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... Richard Edward Geoffrey Howe, Baron Howe of Aberavon, CH, PC, QC (born 20 December 1926), known until 1992 as Sir Geoffrey Howe, is a senior British Conservative politician. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and is the second oldest extant political party in the world. ... May 5 is the 125th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (126th in leap years). ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... June 11 is the 162nd day of the year (163rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ... Nigel Lawson, Baron Lawson of Blaby, PC (born March 11, 1932), was a British politician, Chancellor of the Exchequer between June 1983 and October 1989. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and is the second oldest extant political party in the world. ... June 11 is the 162nd day of the year (163rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ... October 26 is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... Sir John Major, KG, CH, PC (born 29 March 1943) was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom and leader of the British Conservative Party from 1990 to 1997. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and is the second oldest extant political party in the world. ... October 26 is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... November 28 is the 332nd day (333rd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ... Norman Stewart Hughson Lamont, Baron Lamont of Lerwick, PC (born 8 May 1942) was Conservative Member of Parliament for Kingston-upon-Thames, England from 1972 until 1997. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and is the second oldest extant political party in the world. ... November 28 is the 332nd day (333rd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 147th day of the year (148th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... Kenneth Harry Clarke, QC, MP, (born 2 July 1940) is a leading Conservative Party politician in the United Kingdom. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and is the second oldest extant political party in the world. ... is the 147th day of the year (148th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... May 2 is the 122nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (123rd in leap years). ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... James Gordon Brown (born 20 February 1951) is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, Member of Parliament for Kirkcaldy and Cowdenbeath in the Parliament of the United Kingdom and the Leader of the Labour Party. ... The Labour Party has been, since its founding in the early 20th century, the principal political party of the left in England, Scotland and Wales. ... May 2 is the 122nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (123rd in leap years). ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... June 27 is the 178th day of the year (179th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... Alistair Maclean Darling (born November 28, 1953) is a British politician. ... The Labour Party has been, since its founding in the early 20th century, the principal political party of the left in England, Scotland and Wales. ... June 28 is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ...

See also

Look up budget in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Lord High Treasurers and Commissioners of the Treasury of England and later the Kingdom of Great Britain, 1126-1714 c. ... The Shadow Chancellor of the Exchequer in the British Parliamentary system is the member of the Shadow Cabinet who is primarily responsible for marking the Chancellor of the Exchequer. ... This is a list of topics related to the United Kingdom. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...

Notes and references

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t Served as Prime Minister after their Chancellorship.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m Also served as Prime Minister for some or all of their Chancellorship.
  3. ^ a b c d e Died in office.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Chancellor of the Exchequer - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1733 words)
The Chancellor of the Exchequer is the title held by the British cabinet minister responsible for all financial matters.
The Chancellor holds third oldest major state office in English and United Kingdom history, one which originally carried responsibility for the Exchequer, the medieval institution for the collection of royal revenues.
One of the Chancellor's key roles involves the framing of the annual "Budget", which is summarised in a speech to the House of Commons.
Chancellor - Simple English Wikipedia (139 words)
In Germany or Austria, the Chancellor is the leader of the government.
In the United Kingdom, the Chancellor means the Chancellor of the Exchequer, the man in charge of the country's finances (taxes and spending).
Chancellor is also a title given to public officials in some other countries.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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