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Encyclopedia > Chain shot

In artillery, chain-shot is a type of ammunition formed of two balls, or half-balls, chained together. It was used in naval warfare to shoot down yards, masts, or to cut the shrouds, or any other rigging of a ship.[1] It was invented around 1665.[2] Historically, artillery refers to any engine used for the discharge of projectiles during war. ... Naval warfare is combat in and on seas and oceans. ...


References

  1. ^ This article incorporates content from the 1728 Cyclopaedia, a publication in the public domain.
  2. ^ "Chain-shot". Probert Encyclopaedia. URL accessed 2006-06-02.

  Results from FactBites:
 
chain - definition by dict.die.net (998 words)
Chain plate (Shipbuilding), one of the iron plates or bands, on a vessel's side, to which the standing rigging is fastened.
Chain rule (Arith.), a theorem for solving numerical problems by composition of ratios, or compound proportion, by which, when several ratios of equality are given, the consequent of each being the same as the antecedent of the next, the relation between the first antecedent and the last consequent is discovered.
Chain shot (Mil.), two cannon balls united by a shot chain, formerly used in naval warfare on account of their destructive effect on a ship's rigging.
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