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Encyclopedia > Ceremonial Deism

Ceremonial deism is a legal term used in the United States for nominally religious statements and practices deemed to be merely ritual and nonreligious through long customary usage.


Examples include reference to God in the Pledge of Allegiance, and In God We Trust on U.S. money. Dorothea Lange photograph of Japanese-American students reciting the Pledge of Allegiance The Pledge of Allegiance is a promise or oath of allegiance to the United States, and to its national flag. ... For other uses, see United States (disambiguation) and US (disambiguation). ...


The term was coined in 1962 by the then Dean of Yale Law School, Eugene Rostow, and has been used since 1963 by the Supreme Court of the United States to assess exemptions from the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. 1962 was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... Yale Law School is one of the professional schools of Yale University, based in New Haven, Connecticut. ... 1963 was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Seal of the Supreme Court The Supreme Court of the United States is the highest federal court in the United States of America. ... The Establishment Clause of the First Amendment to the United States Constitution states that: Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof Frequently, the Establishment Clause is used to refer to the entire clause referring to religion, but the term is more... The first ten Amendments to the U.S. Constitution make up the Bill of Rights. ... Page I of the Constitution of the United States of America Page II of the United States Constitution Page III of the United States Constitution Page IV of the United States Constitution The Syng inkstand, with which the Constitution was signed The Constitution of the United States is the supreme...


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