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Encyclopedia > Cerebral hemorrhage
Cerebral hemorrhage
Classification & external resources
ICD-10 I60.-I62.
ICD-9 430431
DiseasesDB 29320
MeSH D002543

A intracranial hemorrhage is a bleed into the substance of the cerebrum.[1] Cerebral hemorrhages can lead to hemorrhagic strokes and are medical emergencies The International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (most commonly known by the abbreviation ICD) provides codes to classify diseases and a wide variety of signs, symptoms, abnormal findings, complaints, social circumstances and external causes of injury or disease. ... The International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems 10th Revision (ICD-10) is a coding of diseases and signs, symptoms, abnormal findings, complaints, social circumstances and external causes of injury or diseases, as classified by the World Health Organization (WHO). ... // I00-I99 - Diseases of the circulatory system (I00-I02) Acute rheumatic fever (I00) Rheumatic fever without mention of heart involvement (I01) Rheumatic fever with heart involvement (I02) Rheumatic chorea (I05-I09) Chronic rheumatic heart diseases (I05) Rheumatic mitral valve diseases (I050) Mitral stenosis (I051) Rheumatic mitral insufficiency (I06) Rheumatic aortic... // I00-I99 - Diseases of the circulatory system (I00-I02) Acute rheumatic fever (I00) Rheumatic fever without mention of heart involvement (I01) Rheumatic fever with heart involvement (I02) Rheumatic chorea (I05-I09) Chronic rheumatic heart diseases (I05) Rheumatic mitral valve diseases (I050) Mitral stenosis (I051) Rheumatic mitral insufficiency (I06) Rheumatic aortic... The International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (most commonly known by the abbreviation ICD) provides codes to classify diseases and a wide variety of signs, symptoms, abnormal findings, complaints, social circumstances and external causes of injury or disease. ... The following is a list of codes for International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems. ... The Disease Bold textDatabase is a free website that provides information about the relationships between medical conditions, symptoms, and medications. ... Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) is a huge controlled vocabulary (or metadata system) for the purpose of indexing journal articles and books in the life sciences. ... For other uses, see Bleeding (disambiguation). ... The telencephalon (IPA: ) is the name for the forebrain, a large region within the brain to which many functions are attributed. ... Hemorrhagic stroke, or cerebral hemorrhage is a form of stroke that occurs when a blood vessel in the brain ruptures. ...



Intracranial hemorrhages can result from

Contents

Epidural or extradural hematoma is a buildup of blood occurring between the dura mater (the brains tough outer membrane) and the skull. ... A subdural hematoma, also called a subdural hemorrhage, is a collection of blood between the dura (the outer protective covering of the brain) and the arachnoid (the middle layer of the meninges). ... Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is bleeding into the subarachnoid space surrounding the brain, i. ... ...

Intracerebral hemorrhage

Intracerebral hemorrhage, or ICH, accounts for 10 to 15 percent of all strokes (Weibers 2001). It most frequently results from high blood pressure as found in people with hypertension, eclampsia, and abuse of some drugs (Liebeskind, 2004). A third of intracerebral bleeds result in intraventricular haemorrhage, or bleeding within the brain's ventricles (Liebeskind, 2004). ICH has a mortality rate of 44 percent after 30 days, higher than ischemic stroke or even the very deadly subarachnoid hemorrhage (Liebeskind, 2004). The symptoms of intracerebral hemorrhage include a headache, nausea and vomiting, alertness changes, deficiencies in verbal skills, balance, swallowing, coordination, and focusing the eyes. ... For other forms of hypertension, see Hypertension (disambiguation). ... Comparison of the perceived harm for various psychoactive drugs from a poll among medical psychiatrists specialized in addiction treatment[1] This article is an overview of the nontherapeutic use of alcohol and drugs of abuse. ... The ventricular system is a set of structures in the brain continuous with the central canal of the spinal cord. ... Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is bleeding into the subarachnoid space surrounding the brain, i. ...


Subarachnoid hemorrhage

Subarachnoid hemorrhage, which accounts for 5 to 10 percent of strokes, is one of the deadliest type of strokes. While ischemic strokes have a 30-day mortality rate of 20 percent, subarachnoid bleeds kill 40% of their victims in the same time, disabling half the survivors. When a vessel in the arachnoid layer of the meninges bursts, blood enters the subarachnoid space where cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) bathes the brain, contaminating it. Since the brain is quite sensitive to changes in pH, extensive damage can result when the chemical balance of the CSF is disturbed by the blood. Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is bleeding into the subarachnoid space surrounding the brain, i. ... The Arachnoid mater is one of the three layers of the meninges, interposed between the dura mater and the pia mater and separated from the pia mater by the subarachnoid space. ... The meninges (singular meninx) are the system of membranes that envelop the central nervous system. ... The meninges (singular meninx) are the system of membranes that contain the brain. ... Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), Liquor cerebrospinalis, is a clear bodily fluid that occupies the subarachnoid space in the brain (the space between the skull and the cerebral cortex—more specifically, between the arachnoid and pia layers of the meninges). ... For other uses, see PH (disambiguation). ...


Symptoms of cerebral hemorrhage

A sudden, severe headache is common in hemorrhagic stroke, and is especially indicative of that if accompanied by stiff neck, facial pain, pain between the eyes, vomiting, psychic visions, supernatural powers, or altered consciousness (Weibers, 2001). Other signs of hemorrhagic stroke include those that indicate increased intracranial pressure, caused by swelling or collection of blood. These include increased blood pressure, unequal pupils, especially when one pupil is dilated and does not react to light, headache, vomiting, visual disturbances, and decorticate or decerebrate posturing (Yamamoto, 1996). Intracranial pressure, (ICP), is the pressure exerted by the cranium on the brain tissue, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and the brains circulating blood volume. ... A sphygmomanometer, a device used for measuring arterial pressure. ... A headache (cephalalgia in medical terminology) is a condition of pain in the head; sometimes neck or upper back pain may also be interpreted as a headache. ... Emesis redirects here. ... A woman with malaria displaying decerebrate posturing, with arms extended at her sides. ...


Pathophysiology

Urine carries plasma proteins, leukocytes and other molecules which damage brain cells when they flood the area. Also, a rise in intracranial pressure exacerbates ischemia by compressing blood vessels and requiring higher blood pressures to force blood into tissues. A positive feedback loop is created: hypoxic tissue swells, and swelling tissue becomes hypoxic . Blood plasma is the liquid component of blood, in which the blood cells are suspended. ... A representation of the 3D structure of myoglobin, showing coloured alpha helices. ... White Blood Cells is also the name of a White Stripes album. ... Intracranial pressure, (ICP), is the pressure exerted by the cranium on the brain tissue, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and the brains circulating blood volume. ... Hypoxia is a pathological condition in which the body as a whole (generalised hypoxia) or region of the body (tissue hypoxia) is deprived of adequate oxygen supply. ...


Treatment

Due to their life-threatening nature, cerebral hemorrhages require immediate neurosurgical evaluation and intervention. Neurosurgeons use specialized examinations for cerebral hemorrhage patients, such as the Hunt and Hess scale, that can help determine the appropriate treatment. Strategies to protect the brain during this type of stroke include blood sugar and blood pressure control, adequate oxygen and intravenous fluids, detection and treatment of the cause of bleeding, and constant monitoring (usually with the Glasgow Coma Scale) and immediate treatment for complications from bleeding into or around the brain. To meet Wikipedias quality standards and make it more accessible to a general audience, this article may require cleanup. ... Glycemia is the concentration of glucose in the blood. ... The Glasgow Coma Scale is a neurological scale which seems to give a reliable, objective way of recording the conscious state of a person, for initial as well as continuing assessment. ...


Cerebral arteriography may be used to determine the cause for bleeding, since some causes may be surgically corrected to reduce the risk of future bleeding. Selected patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage due to a ruptured aneurysm require emergency surgery to "clip" the aneurysm off from the normal brain blood circulation, and they receive nimodipine, a drug shown to reduce incidence of vasospasm, a complication of this type of stroke. A cerebral aneurysm or brain aneurysm is a cerebrovascular disorder in which weakness in the wall of a cerebral artery or vein causes a localized dilation or ballooning of the blood vessel. ... Nimodipine (marketed by Bayer as Nimotop®) is a dihydropyridine calcium channel blocker originally developed for the treatment of high blood pressure. ... Vasospasm refers to a condition in which blood vessels spasm, leading to constriction. ...


Risk factors

Like ischemic stroke, risk factors for hemorrhagic stroke include inflammation of the heart, hypertension, and arteritis. Atherosclerosis, the main risk factor for ischemic stroke (Cicala 1999), also causes heart disease and arterial rupture, so the presence of arterial fatty deposits is a major risk factor for hemorrhagic stroke as well. Factors that pose a risk for hemorrhagic stroke and not ischemic stroke include anticoagulant or thrombolytic therapy, bleeding disorders like hemophilia and thrombocytopenic purpura, arterial dissection, and cocaine use (Weibers 2001). In medicine (cardiology), myocarditis is inflammation of the myocardium, the muscular part of the heart. ... For other forms of hypertension, see Hypertension (disambiguation). ... Arteritis is inflammation of the walls of arteries, usually as a result of infection or auto-immune response. ... Heart disease is an umbrella term for a number of different diseases which affect the heart and as of 2007 it is the leading cause of death in the United States,[1] and England and Wales. ... An anticoagulant is a substance that prevents coagulation; that is, it stops blood from clotting. ... Thrombolysis is the breakdown (lysis) by pharmacological means, of blood clots. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Haemophilia or hemophilia is the name of any of several hereditary genetic illnesses that impair the bodys ability to control bleeding. ... Thrombocytopenic purpura are purpura associated with a reduction in circulating blood platelets which can result from a variety of causes. ... Cocaine is a crystalline tropane alkaloid that is obtained from the leaves of the coca plant. ...


Intracerebral hemorrhages may be caused by burst aneurysms or arteriovenous malformations, but are most often caused by hypertension, which can cause the delicate blood vessels in the brain to burst. Post surgical photo of brain aneurysm survivor. ... Arteriovenous malformation or AVM is a congenital disorder of the veins and arteries that make up the vascular system . ...


Aneurysm, a weakening and ballooning in the wall of one of the brain's arteries, causes 75-90% of subarachnoid bleeds (Weibers, 2001). Aneurysms may put pressure on the brain tissue, but the real trouble occurs when the weakened wall bursts. The area near the Circle of Willis is a common spot for aneurysms: Small branches off the middle cerebral artery are so prone to burst that they are commonly known as "stroke arteries". Post surgical photo of brain aneurysm survivor. ... Section of an artery For other uses, see Artery (disambiguation). ... The circle of Willis (also called the cerebral arterial circle or arterial circle of Willis) is a circle of arteries that supply blood to the brain. ... The middle cerebral artery (MCA) is one of the three major arteries that supplies blood to the brain. ...


Vascular malformations such as arteriovenous malformation (AVM) are another cause of hemorrhagic stroke. AVM is a congenital condition that consists of a tangle of deformed blood vessels and capillaries with thin walls that can rupture (These malformations can cause subarachnoid hemorrhage but more commonly responsible for intracerebral bleeding (Weibers 2001). Vascular malformations and aneurysms usually cause no symptoms and can lie undetected until they cause a stroke. On occasion, they can cause "warning leaks" without actually bursting, causing symptoms like seizure, migraine, or one-sided numbness In moyamoya disease, small blood vessels in a network replace normal blood vessels around base of brain because of stenosis or blockage of large arteries surrounding the brain These blood vessels are delicate and more likely than normal blood vessels to break and cause hemorrhagic stroke. Arteriovenous malformation or AVM is a congenital disorder of the veins and arteries that make up the vascular system . ... Blood flows from digestive system heart to arteries, which narrow into arterioles, and then narrow further still into capillaries. ... This article is about epileptic seizures. ... Hemiparesis is the partial paralysis of one side of the body. ... Moyamoya disease is an extremely rare disorder in most parts of the world except in Japan. ...


Unfortunately, some treatments for ischemic stroke aimed at dissolving the occluding blood clot can increase the likelihood of cerebral hemorrhage. Hemorrhagic transformation is the phenomenon in which blood vessels weakened by ischemic stroke rupture to cause hemorrhage in addition (Hemorrhagic transformation can occur without antithrombotics, but they increase the risk (Jauch, 2003).


For poorly understood reasons, pregnancy increases hemorrhagic stroke risk, and women who have just given birth are more than 28 times more likely to suffer hemorrhagic strokes than the average person.


Epidemiology

Though ischemic strokes are more common, the young, though only a small percentage of stroke sufferers, are more likely to have hemorrhagic strokes than ischemic strokes (NINDS 1999).


References

  1. Cicala, Roger. The Brain Disorders Sourcebook. Los Angeles, CA: Lowell House, 1999. Electronic reproduction. Boulder, Colo.: NetLibrary, 2000.
  2. Jauch, Edward C. 2005. “Acute Stroke Management.” eMedicine.com, Inc. Available.
  3. Kapitt W and Lawrence M. The Anatomy Coloring Book. New York, NY: Harper & Row, 1977.
  4. Liebeskind, 2004. Intracranial Hemorrhage. Emedicine.com. Available.
  5. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS). National Institutes of Health., Stroke: Hope Through Research. June 1999. Available.
  6. Nurse-Anesthesia.com. 2002.
  7. Stroke Center. 1997-2003. Available.
  8. Weibers, D. Stroke-Free for Life: The Complete Guide to Stroke Prevention and Treatment. Harper Collins, New York NY, 2001.
  9. Yamamoto, LG. 1996. “Intracranial Hypertension and Brain Herniation Syndromes: Radiology Cases in Pediatric Emergency Medicine" Volume 5, Case 6. Kapiolani Medical Center for Women and Children; University of Hawaii; John A. Burns School of Medicine. Available.

External links

Brain Haemorrhage

For transport in plants, see Vascular tissue. ... A renal cell carcinoma (chromophobe type) viewed on a hematoxylin & eosin stained slide Pathologist redirects here. ... For other forms of hypertension, see Hypertension (disambiguation). ... In kidney, as a result of benign arterial hypertension, hyaline (pink, amorphous, homogeneous material) accumulates in the wall of small arteries and arterioles, producing the thickening of their walls and the narrowing of the lumens - hyaline arteriolosclerosis. ... While most forms of hypertension have no known underlying cause (and are thus known as essential hypertension or primary hypertension), in about 10% of the cases, there is a known cause, and thus the hypertension is secondary hypertension (or, less commonly, inessential hypertension). ... Renovascular hypertension (or renal hypertension) is a form of secondary hypertension. ... Ischaemic (or ischemic) heart disease is a disease characterized by reduced blood supply to the heart. ... Prinzmetals angina, also known as variant angina or angina inversa, is a syndrome typically consisting of angina (cardiac chest pain) at rest that occurs in cycles. ... Heart attack redirects here. ... Dresslers syndrome is a form of pericarditis that occurs in the setting of injury to the heart or the pericardium (the outer lining of the heart). ... Pulmonary circulation is the portion of the cardiovascular system which carries oxygen-depleted blood away from the heart, to the lungs, and returns oxygenated blood back to the heart. ... Cor pulmonale, also known as right heart failure, is a medical term used to describe a change in structure and function of the right ventricle of the heart as a result of a respiratory disorder. ... The pericardium is a double-walled sac that contains the heart and the roots of the great vessels. ... Pericarditis is inflammation of the sac surrounding the heart, the pericardium. ... Pericardial effusion is an abnormal accumulation of fluid in the pericardial cavity. ... Cardiac tamponade, also known as pericardial tamponade, is a medical emergency condition where liquid accumulates in the pericardium in a relatively short time. ... In the heart, the endocardium is the innermost layer of tissue that lines the chambers of the heart. ... Grays Fig. ... Endocarditis is an inflammation of the inner layer of the heart, the endocardium. ... The mitral valve (also known as the bicuspid valve or left atrioventricular valve), is a dual flap (bi = 2) valve in the heart that lies between the left atrium (LA) and the left ventricle (LV). ... Mitral regurgitation (MR), also known as mitral insufficiency, is the abnormal leaking of blood through the mitral valve, from the left ventricle into the left atrium of the heart. ... Mitral valve prolapse (MVP) is a heart valve condition marked by the displacement of an abnormally thickened mitral valve leaflet into the left atrium during systole. ... Mitral stenosis is a narrowing of the orifice of the mitral valve of the heart. ... The aortic valve is one of the valves of the heart. ... Aortic valve stenosis (AS) is a heart condition caused by the incomplete opening of the aortic valve. ... Aortic insufficiency (AI), also known as aortic regurgitation (AR), is the leaking of the aortic valve of the heart that causes blood to flow in the reverse direction during ventricular diastole, from the aorta into the left ventricle. ... The pulmonary valve, also known as pulmonic valve, is the semilunar valve of the heart that lies between the right ventricle and the pulmonary artery and has three cusps. ... Pulmonary valve stenosis is a medical condition in which outflow of blood from the right ventricle of the heart is obstructed at the level of the pulmonic valve. ... Pulmonary valve insufficiency (or incompetence, or regurgitation) is a condition where the pulmonary valve is not strong enough to prevent backflow into the right ventricle. ... The tricuspid valve is on the right side of the heart, between the right atrium and the right ventricle. ... Tricuspid valve stenosis is a valvular heart disease which results in the narrowing of the orifice of the tricuspid valve of the heart. ... Tricuspid insufficiency, also termed Tricuspid regurgitation, refers to the failure of the hearts tricuspid valve to close properly during systole. ... Myocardium is the muscular tissue of the heart. ... In medicine (cardiology), myocarditis is inflammation of the myocardium, the muscular part of the heart. ... Dilated cardiomyopathy or DCM (also known as congestive cardiomyopathy), is a disease of the myocardium (the muscle of the heart) in which a portion of the myocardium is dilated, often without any obvious cause. ... Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, or HCM, is a disease of the myocardium (the muscle of the heart) in which a portion of the myocardium is hypertrophied (thickened) without any obvious cause. ... This article is considered orphaned, since there are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM) is the least common cardiomyopathy. ... Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia (ARVD, also known as arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy or ARVC) is a type of nonischemic cardiomyopathy that involves primarily the right ventricle. ... The normal electrical conduction in the heart allows the impulse that is generated by the sinoatrial node (SA node) of the heart to be propagated to (and stimulate) the myocardium (Cardiac muscle). ... A heart block is a disease in the electrical system of the heart. ... A heart block denotes a disease in the electrical system of the heart. ... First degree AV block or PR prolongation is a disease of the electrical conduction system of the heart in which the PR interval is lengthened. ... Second degree AV block is a disease of the electrical conduction system of the heart. ... Third degree AV block, also known as complete heart block, is a defect of the electrical system of the heart, in which the impulse generated in the atria (typically the SA node on top of the right atrium) does not propagate to the ventricles. ... Bundle branch block refers to a disorder of the hearts electrical conducting system. ... ECG characteristics of a typical LBBB showing wide QRS complexes with abnormal morphology in leads V1 and V6. ... Right bundle branch block (RBBB) is a cardiac conduction abnormality seen on electrocardiogram (EKG). ... Bifascicular block is a conduction abnormality in the heart where two of the three main fascicles of the His/Purkinje system are blocked. ... Trifascicular heart block is the triad of first degree heart block, right bundle branch block, and either left anterior or left posterior hemi block seen on an electrocardiogram (EKG). ... Pre-excitation syndrome is a condition where the the ventricles of the heart become depolarized too early, which leads to their premature contraction, causing arrhythmia. ... Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome (WPW) is a syndrome of pre-excitation of the ventricles of the heart due to an accessory pathway known as the Bundle of Kent. ... Lown-Ganong-Levine syndrome (LGL) is a syndrome of pre-excitation of the ventricles due to an accessory pathway providing an abnormal electrical communication from the atria to the ventricles. ... The long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a heart disease in which there is an abnormally long delay between the electrical excitation (or depolarization) and relaxation (repolarization) of the ventricles of the heart. ... The term Stokes-Adams Attack refers to a sudden, transient episode of syncope, occasionally featuring seizures. ... Cardiac arrhythmia is any of a group of conditions in which the electrical activity of the heart is irregular or is faster or slower than normal. ... A supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) is a rapid rhythm of the heart in which the origin of the electrical signal is either the atria or the AV node. ... AV nodal reentrant tachycardia (AVNRT) is a type of reentrant tachycardia (fast rhythm) of the heart. ... Ventricular tachycardia (V-tach or VT) is a fast rhythm that originates in one of the ventricles of the heart. ... Atrial flutter is an abnormal fast heart rhythm that occurs in the atria of the heart. ... Atrial fibrillation (AF or afib) is a cardiac arrhythmia (abnormal heart rhythm) that involves the two upper chambers (atria) of the heart. ... Ventricular fibrillation (V-fib or VF) is a cardiac condition which consists of a lack of coordination of the contraction of the muscle tissue of the large chambers of the heart that eventually leads to the heart stopping altogether. ... pac This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... An ectopic pacemaker or ectopic focus is an excitable group of cells that causes a premature heart beat outside the normally functioning SA node of the human heart. ... Sick sinus syndrome, also called Bradycardia-tachycardia syndrome is a group of abnormal heartbeats (arrhythmias) presumably caused by a malfunction of the sinus node, the hearts natural pacemaker. ... Cardiovascular disease refers to the class of diseases that involve the heart or blood vessels (arteries and veins). ... Cardiomegaly is a medical condition wherein the heart is enlarged. ... Although ventricular hypertrophy may occur in either the left or right or both ventricles of the heart , left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is more commonly encountered. ... Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is the thickening of the myocardium (muscle) of the left ventricle of the heart. ... Right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH) is a form of ventricular hypertrophy affecting the right ventricle. ... Cerebrovascular disease is damage to the blood vessels in the brain, resulting in a stroke. ... This article needs cleanup. ... Extra-axial hematoma, or extra-axial hemorrhage is a subtype of intracranial hemorrhage, or bleeding within the intracranial space, that occurs within the skull but outside of the brain tissue itself. ... Nontraumatic epidural hematoma in a young woman. ... A subdural hematoma (SDH) is a form of traumatic brain injury in which blood collects between the dura (the outer protective covering of the brain) and the arachnoid (the middle layer of the meninges). ... Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is bleeding into the subarachnoid space surrounding the brain, i. ... Intra-axial hemorrhages, or intra-axial hematomas, are a subtype of intracranial hemorrhage that occur within the brain tissue itself. ... Intraventricular hemorrhage (or IVH) is a bleeding of the ventricles, where the cerebrospinal fluid is produced and circulates through towards the subarachnoid space. ... Intra-axial hemorrhages, or intra-axial hematomas, are a subtype of intracranial hemorrhage that occur within the brain tissue itself. ... Ischemia or infarction of the spinal cord in the distribution of the anterior spinal artery, which supplies the ventral two-thirds of the spinal cord and Medulla. ... Binswangers disease is a rare form of multi-infarct dementia caused by damage to deep white brain matter. ... Moyamoya disease is an extremely rare disorder in most parts of the world except in Japan. ... Section of an artery An artery or arterial is also a class of highway. ... An arteriole is a blood vessel that extends and branchs out from an artery and leads to capillaries. ... The word capillary is used to describe any very narrow tube or channel through which a fluid can pass. ... Renal artery stenosis is the narrowing of the renal artery. ... Aortic dissection is a tear in the wall of the aorta (the largest artery of the body). ... An aortic aneurysm is a general term for any swelling (dilatation or aneurysm) of the aorta, usually representing an underlying weakness in the wall of the aorta at that location. ... A plate from Grays Anatomy with yellow lines depicting the most common infrarenal location of the AAA. Abdominal aortic aneurysm, also written as AAA and often pronounced triple-A, is a localized dilatation of the abdominal aorta, that exceeds the normal diameter by more than 50%. The normal diameter... Post surgical photo of brain aneurysm survivor. ... Raynauds phenomenon (RAY-noz), in medicine, is a vasospastic disorder causing discoloration of the fingers, toes, and occasionally other extremities, named for French physician Maurice Raynaud (1834 - 1881). ... Raynauds disease (RAY-noz) is a condition that affects blood flow to the extremities which include the fingers, toes, nose and ears when exposed to temperature changes or stress. ... Buergers disease (also known as thromboangiitis obliterans) is an acute inflammation and thrombosis (clotting) of arteries and veins of the hands and feet. ... Arteritis is inflammation of the walls of arteries, usually as a result of infection or auto-immune response. ... Aortitis is the inflammation of the aorta. ... Intermittent claudication is a cramping sensation in the legs that is present during exercise or walking and occurs as a result of decreased oxygen supply. ... An arteriovenous fistula is an abnormal connection or passageway between an artery and a vein. ... In medicine, hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT), also known as Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome, is a genetic disorder that leads to vascular malformations. ... A spider angioma (also known as a nevus araneus, spider nevus, or vascular spider) is a type of angioma found slightly below the skins surface, often containing a central red spot and reddish extensions which radiate outwards like a spiders web. ... In the circulatory system, a vein is a blood vessel that carries blood toward the heart. ... Lymph originates as blood plasma lost from the circulatory system, which leaks out into the surrounding tissues. ... Lymph nodes are components of the lymphatic system. ... Thrombosis is the formation of a clot or thrombus inside a blood vessel, obstructing the flow of blood through the circulatory system. ... Phlebitis is an inflammation of a vein, usually in the legs. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into deep vein thrombosis. ... This article is about Deep-vein thrombosis. ... May-Thurner syndrome is deep vein thrombosis of the iliofemoral vein due to compression of the left common iliac vein by overlying right common iliac artery. ... A venous thrombosis is a blood clot that forms within a vein. ... In medicine (gastroenterology and hepatology), Budd-Chiari syndrome is the clinical picture caused by occlusion of the hepatic vein. ... Renal vein thrombosis (RVT) is the formation of a clot or thrombus obstructing the renal vein, leading to a reduction in drainage of the kidney. ... Paget-Schroetter disease (also Paget-von Schrötter disease) refers to deep vein thrombosis of an upper extremity vein, including the axillary vein or subclavian vein. ... Vein gymnastics in the barefoot park Dornstetten, Germany. ... A portacaval anastomosis is a specific type of anastomosis that occurs between the veins of portal circulation and those of systemic circulation. ... Hemorrhoids (AmE), haemorrhoids (BrE), emerods, or piles are varicosities or swelling and inflammation of veins in the rectum and anus. ... In medicine (gastroenterology), esophageal varices are extreme dilations of sub mucosal veins in the mucosa of the esophagus in diseases featuring portal hypertension, secondary to cirrhosis primarily. ... Cross section showing the pampiniform plexus Varicocele is an abnormal enlargement of the veins in the scrotum draining the testicles. ... Gastric varices are dilated submucosal veins in the stomach. ... Caput medusae means dilated veins around the umbilicus. ... Superior vena cava syndrome (SVCS) is a result of obstruction of the superior vena cava. ... Lymphadenopathy is a term meaning disease of the lymph nodes. ... Azskeptic 17:34, 10 July 2007 (UTC) Lymphedema, also spelled lymphoedema, also known as lymphatic obstruction, is a condition of localized fluid retention caused by a compromised lymphatic system. ... Lymphadenopathy is swelling of one or more lymph nodes. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Cerebral hemorrhage - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1132 words)
A cerebral hemorrhage or hemorrhagic stroke is a form of stroke that occurs when a blood vessel in the brain ruptures or bleeds.
Subarachnoid hemorrhage, which accounts for 5 to 10 percent of strokes (Weibers 2001) is one of the deadliest type of strokes.
Cerebral arteriography may be used to determine the cause for bleeding, since some causes may be surgically corrected to reduce the risk of future bleeding.
The Facts about Cerebral Aneurysm (1852 words)
A cerebral aneurysm (also known as an intracranial or intracerebral aneurysm) is a weak or thin spot on a blood vessel in the brain that balloons out and fills with blood.
Cerebral aneurysms can occur anywhere in the brain, but most are located along a loop of arteries that run between the underside of the brain and the base of the skull.
Cerebral aneurysms are also more common in people with certain genetic diseases, such as connective tissue disorders and polycystic kidney disease, and certain circulatory disorders, such as arteriovenous malformations - congenital malformations in which a snarled tangle of arteries and veins in the brain disrupts blood flow.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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