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Encyclopedia > Cephalic vein

This vein is located in the superficial fascia along the anterolateral surface of the biceps brachii muscle and is often visible through the skin. Superiorly the cephalic vein passes between the deltoid and pectoralis major muscles and through the deltopectoral triangle, where it empties into the axillary vein. Model of the layers of human skin In zootomy and dermatology, skin is an organ of the integumentary system; which is composed of a layer of tissues that protect underlying muscles and organs. ... Deltoid can refer to: deltoid muscle deltoid (curve) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... // Location The clavicular head of the pectoralis major takes its origin from the anterior surface of the medial half of the clavicle. ...


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Cephalic vein - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (409 words)
In human anatomy, the cephalic vein is a superficial vein of the upper limb.
It communicates with the basilic vein via the median cubital vein at the elbow and is located in the superficial fascia along the anterolateral surface of the biceps brachii muscle.
Superiorly the cephalic vein passes between the deltoid and pectoralis major muscles (deltopectoral groove) and through the deltopectoral triangle, where it empties into the axillary vein.
Vein - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (745 words)
As an exception, in the pulmonary circulation oxygenated blood from the lungs is taken to the left part of the heart by pulmonary veins.
The pulmonary veins carry relatively oxygenated blood from the lungs to the heart.
Veins are used medically as points of access to the blood stream, permitting the withdrawal of blood specimens (venipuncture) for testing purposes, and enabling the infusion of fluid, electrolytes, nutrition, and medications.
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