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Encyclopedia > Centre College



Image File history File links Centrecollegeseal. ...

Established January 21, 1819
School type Private undergraduate liberal arts
President John A. Roush
Motto Doctrina lux mentis
Education is the light of the mind
Location Danville, KY, USA
Enrollment 1,100
Faculty 145
Endowment US $158 Million
Campus National Register of Historic Places
115 acres
60 buildings
Mascot Colonel
Colors Old Gold, White
Athletics NCAA Division III
Southern Collegiate Athletic Conference
Website www.centre.edu

Centre College is an accredited, private, four-year liberal arts college located in Danville, Kentucky, USA, a community of about 15,000 in Boyle County, approximately 35 miles (56.3 km) south of Lexington, KY. Centre was founded by Presbyterian leaders in 1819, ranks 44th nationally[1] among top liberal arts schools in the 2007 US News & World Report list, and is the highest-ranking liberal arts college in Kentucky. In 2007, Centre ranked by Consumer Digest as best value among private, liberal arts schools in the nation [2]. The 115-acre campus has 60 buildings, 13 of which are included on the National Register of Historic Places. is the 21st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1819 common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Private schools, or independent schools, are schools not administered by local, state, or national government, which retain the right to select their student body and are funded in whole or in part by charging their students tuition rather than with public (state) funds. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... In the history of education, the seven liberal arts comprise two groups of studies, the trivium and the quadrivium. ... John Roush Dr. John A. Roush is a figure in American higher education and currently the president of Centre College. ... Danville is a city in Boyle County, Kentucky, United States. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... A typical plaque showing entry on the National Register of Historic Places. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Division III (or DIII) is a division of the National Collegiate Athletic Association of the United States. ... The Southern Collegiate Athletic Conference (SCAC) is an athletic conference which competes in the NCAAs Division III. Member institutions are located in Alabama, Arkansas, Colorado, Georgia, Indiana, Kentucky, Mississippi, Tennessee, and Texas. ... Liberal arts colleges in the United States are primarily liberal arts colleges with an emphasis upon undergraduate study in the liberal arts. ... Danville is a city in Boyle County, Kentucky, United States. ... Boyle County is a county located in the state of Kentucky. ... Lexington, Kentucky is the Horse Capital of the World, located in the heart of the Bluegrass. ... Presbyterianism is part of the Reformed churches family of denominations of Christian Protestantism based on the teachings of John Calvin which traces its institutional roots to the Scottish Reformation, especially as led by John Knox. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... A liberal arts college is an institution of higher education found in the United States, offering programs in the liberal arts at the post-secondary level. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... A typical plaque showing entry on the National Register of Historic Places. ...

Contents

History

2000 Vice Presidential Debate
See also: List of presidents of Centre College and List of commencement speakers at Centre College

Centre College received its charter from the Kentucky Legislature on January 21, 1819 and classes began in the fall of 1820 in Old Centre, the first building on campus and the oldest college administration building west of the Allegheny Mountains. The Greek Revival structure was built at the cost of $8,000 and has housed a grammar school, a law school, classrooms, a student dormitory, a hospital, a chapel, a dining hall, a library, and administrative offices. Old Centre served as a Civil War Hospital during the battle of Perryville, KY; this was also the last time Centre's classes were completely cancelled (1865). Download high resolution version (750x1050, 326 KB)Vice Presidential Debate 2000 File links The following pages link to this file: Centre College Categories: Images with unknown source ... Download high resolution version (750x1050, 326 KB)Vice Presidential Debate 2000 File links The following pages link to this file: Centre College Categories: Images with unknown source ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Centre College. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Centre College. ... The Kentucky State Capitol Building in Frankfort, KY The Kentucky General Assembly, also called the Kentucky Legislature, is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Kentucky. ... is the 21st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1819 common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Walhalla temple in Bavaria was completed in 1842. ...


Centre faced early financial hardships, disputes within and outside the Presbyterian Church, and six wars (including the occupation of Old Centre by both Confederate and Union troops during the Civil War), but in its years of growth that followed, Centre became affiliated with various institutions including the Kentucky School for the Deaf, also in Danville, which was originally controlled by the Centre board of trustees. In 1901, Central University in Richmond, Kentucky was consolidated with Centre, and the Kentucky College for Women merged with Centre in 1926. The Kentucky Asylum for the Tuition of the Deaf and Dumb was founded on April 10, 1823, becoming the first state supported school of its kind in the nation and in the western hemisphere. ... Richmond is the 6th largest city in Kentucky and the county seat of Madison County. ...


In 1921, Centre upset Harvard University's undefeated football team 6-0 which The New York Times later called "Football's Upset of the Century".[3] ESPN has called it one of the biggest upsets in sport during the twentieth century.[4] Today, "C6H0" remains a point of pride among students and alums and is the answer to "What is the formula for a winning football team?" See also: 1920 in sports, other events of 1921, 1922 in sports and the list of years in sports. // Football (American) Chicago Staleys later the Chicago Bears win the 1921 American Professional Football Association title. ... Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA and a member of the Ivy League. ... A college football game between Colorado State and Air Force. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... ESPN/ESPN-DT, formerly an acronym for Entertainment and Sports Programming Network, is an [[United States|Amer<nowiki>Insert non-formatted text here--68. ... Centre College is an accredited, private, four-year liberal arts college located in Danville, Kentucky, USA, a community of about 15,000 in Boyle County, approximately 35 miles (56. ...


During the 1960s the college's financial resources doubled. 11 new buildings were added to the campus and enrollment increased from 450 to 800. Today, enrollment hovers around 1,070, with just over 100 faculty members.


Dr. John A. Roush, who took office in 1998, is the college's 20th president. In 2000, Centre became the smallest college ever to host a national election debate.[5] Dick Cheney and Senator Joe Lieberman debated on October 5 at Centre's Norton Center for the Arts. The event was moderated by CNN's Bernard Shaw. John Roush Dr. John A. Roush is a figure in American higher education and currently the president of Centre College. ... Senator John F. Kennedy debates Vice President Richard M. Nixon in the first televised debates, 1960. ... Richard Bruce Dick Cheney (born January 30, 1941), is the 46th and current Vice President of the United States, serving under President George W. Bush. ... Joseph Isadore Joe Lieberman (born February 24, 1942) is an American politician from Connecticut. ... is the 278th day of the year (279th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Bernard Shaw was a leading news anchor for the Cable News Network from 1980 to his retirement in 2001. ...


In 2005, the College completed The College Centre,[6] a $22-million project to expand and renovate Suttcliffe Hall, the Crounse Academic Center and Grace Doherty Library, which was the largest construction project on campus since the Norton Center was built in 1973. See also: 1972 in architecture, other events of 1973, 1974 in architecture and the architecture timeline. ...


Campus

Old Centre

Old Centre
Old Centre

Built in 1820, Old Centre is a Greek Revival structure and was the College's first building. It has been used as a library, dormitory, and during the Civil War, a hospital. Today it houses the offices of the president, vice president for academic affairs, and vice president for college relations. Old Centre is a Kentucky Landmark, listed in the National Register of Historic Places, and included in the Smithsonian Guide to Historic Places. Download high resolution version (2240x1680, 782 KB)Old Centre, Centre College File links The following pages link to this file: Centre College Categories: Images with unknown source ... Download high resolution version (2240x1680, 782 KB)Old Centre, Centre College File links The following pages link to this file: Centre College Categories: Images with unknown source ... Personal residence of Catherine the Great Greek Revival was a style of classical architecture which became fashionable in Europe in the 18th century, and in the United Kingdom and United States in the early 19th century. ... A typical plaque showing entry on the National Register of Historic Places. ...

Old Carnegie

Built in 1913, Old Carnegie was the College library until 1966 and currently houses the Career Development Center and the Office of International Programs.


Norton Center for the Arts

Norton Center for the Arts

Centre's Norton Center for the Arts has hosted performers such as violinist Itzhak Perlman, dancers Mikhail Baryshnikov and Twyla Tharp, the Boston Pops, The Chieftains, Three Dog Night, David Copperfield, Dolly Parton, Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, Ben Folds, They Might Be Giants, and musicals such as Rent, Titanic, Annie Get Your Gun, and My Fair Lady. In October 2000, the Norton Center hosted the Vice-Presidential Debate with Dick Cheney and Senator Joe Lieberman. Norton Center for the Arts, Centre College This file has been listed on Wikipedia:Possibly unfree images, because it is missing information on its source or copyright status. ... Norton Center for the Arts, Centre College This file has been listed on Wikipedia:Possibly unfree images, because it is missing information on its source or copyright status. ... Itzhak Perlman playing during the entertainment portion of the White House State Dinner in honor on Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II on May 7, 2007 Itzhak Perlman (born August 31, 1945 in Jaffa) is an Israeli-American virtuoso violinist and teacher. ... Alexandra Danilova and Mikhail Baryshnikov, 1976 Mikhail Nikolaevitch Baryshnikov (Russian: ) (born January 28, 1948) is a Russian dancer, choreographer, and actor. ... Twyla Tharp (born July 1, 1941) is an American dancer and choreographer. ... The Boston Pops Orchestra was founded in 1885 as a subsection of the Boston Symphony Orchestra. ... The Chieftains are a Grammy-winning Irish musical group founded in 1963, known for performing and popularizing Irish traditional music. ... Three Dog Night is an American rock and roll band, best known for their work from 1968-1975 but still making live appearances as of 2007. ... David Copperfield is a quasi-autobiographical novel by Charles Dickens. ... Dolly Rebecca Parton (born January 19, 1946) is a Grammy-winning and Academy Award-nominated American country singer, songwriter, composer, author, actress, and philanthropist. ... The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band is an American country-folk-rock band that has existed in various forms since the original founding in California in 1965. ... Benjamin Scott Folds (born September 12, 1966, in Winston-Salem, North Carolina[1]) is an American singer-songwriter and the former frontman of the musical group Ben Folds Five. ... They Might Be Giants (commonly abbreviated to TMBG) is an American alternative rock duo consisting of John Linnell and John Flansburgh that formed in 1982. ... Richard Bruce Dick Cheney (born January 30, 1941), is the 46th and current Vice President of the United States, serving under President George W. Bush. ... Joseph Isadore Joe Lieberman (born February 24, 1942) is an American politician from Connecticut. ...


The Norton Center for the Arts was built in 1973 and originally named the Regional Arts Center (RAC). It was later renamed for Jane Morton Norton, a former trustee to Centre College. The 85,000 square foot (8,000 m²) complex was designed by architect William Wesley Peters of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation. William Wesley Peters (June 12, 1912 - July 17, 1991) was a noted architect and engineer, apprentice to and protegé of Frank Lloyd Wright. ... Frank Lloyd Wright (June 8, 1867 – April 9, 1959) was one of the worlds most prominent and influential architects. ...


The College Centre

Construction of the College Centre

Opened in the spring of 2005, the College Centre took center stage on campus, so to speak. The College Centre is composed of two buildings, Crounse Hall and Sutcliffe Hall, which both received multi-million dollar renovations. Crounse Hall now houses an expanded library, theater, and additional classrooms, while Sutcliffe Hall now has over 62,000 square feet in athletic space including several new gymnasiums and workout facilities. Image File history File linksMetadata Centrecollege-crounsehall. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Centrecollege-crounsehall. ...

The Old Bookstore

This building was the first chapter house of any fraternity in Kentucky, holding the brothers of the Epsilon Chapter of Beta Theta Pi. Before it came into Centre's hands, it was also used as a funeral home and as a shoe store. It was later converted to the Campus Bookstore, and in 2005 the bookstore moved to a new location, leaving the building empty. It is currently home to The Oasis, a foreign-language lounge and resource center, and is also student housing.


Craik House

Built in the 1850s and renovated in 1958, this is the president's home. Originally a private residence, it was first occupied by Robert L. McLeod, the 14th president of Centre. The Craik House is listed in the National Register of Historic Places.


Academics

Flame
Flame

97% of Centre professors have a Ph.D. or equivalent degree, and the student/faculty ratio is 11 to 1. The campus has active chapters of Phi Beta Kappa and Omicron Delta Kappa, and has produced two-thirds of Kentucky's Rhodes Scholars and 23 Fulbright Scholar winners in the last 10 years. It is among the smallest coeducational colleges to have a Phi Beta Kappa chapter, and is the only private institution in Kentucky with one. Image File history File links Centrecollegeflame. ... Image File history File links Centrecollegeflame. ... The Phi Beta Kappa Society is an honor society which considers its mission to be fostering and recognizing excellence in undergraduate liberal arts and sciences. ... Omicron Delta Kappa, or OΔK, is a national leadership honor society. ... Rhodes House in Oxford Rhodes Scholarships were created by Cecil John Rhodes. ... The Fulbright Program is program of educational grants (Fulbright Fellowships) sponsored by the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs of the United States Department of State. ...


Degrees Offered

In addition to the programs listed, Centre offers self-designed majors, as well as double-majors and dual-degree engineering programs with Columbia University, University of Kentucky, Vanderbilt University, and Washington University (St. Louis). Columbia University is a private research university in the United States and a member of the prestigious Ivy League. ... The University of Kentucky, also referred to as UK, is a public, co-educational university located in Lexington, Kentucky. ... Vanderbilt University is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university in Nashville, Tennessee. ... “Washington University” redirects here. ...

Majors/Minors

  • Anthropology/Sociology
  • Art/Art History
  • Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
  • Biology
  • Chemical Physics
  • Chemistry
  • Classical Studies
  • Computer Science
  • Dramatic Arts
  • Economics and Financial Economics
  • Education
  • English and Creative Writing
  • Environmental Studies
  • French
  • German Studies
  • Government
  • History
  • International Studies
  • Mathematics
  • Music
  • Philosophy
  • Physics
  • Political Economy
  • Psychobiology
  • Psychology
  • Religion
  • Spanish

Pre-Professional Preparation

  • Pre-Dentistry
  • Pre-Law
  • Pre-M.B.A.
  • Pre-Med
  • Pre-Optometry
  • Pre-Pharmacy
  • Pre-Physical Therapy
  • Pre-Veterinary
  • Teacher Certification

Complete descriptions


Study Abroad

The "Centre Commitment" guarantees students the option to study abroad during their time at Centre. The college maintains permanent, residential sites in England, France, Japan, and Latin America, and it has short-term study program locations in India, Vietnam, New Zealand, Greece, Indonesia, Australia, Cameroon, Russia, Turkey, and San Salvador Island. A recent study compiled by Milton Reigelman, director of Centre's international programs, shows that 86 percent of 2006 Centre graduates studied abroad. For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Latin America consists of the countries of South America and some of North America (including Central America and some the islands of the Caribbean) whose inhabitants mostly speak Romance languages, although Native American languages are also spoken. ... San Salvador Island, also known as Watling Island, is an island and district of the Bahamas. ...


Student life

About 96% of Centre's students live on campus and participate in athletics, academic organizations, student government, and volunteer work. There are about 100 clubs, societies, teams and other formal and informal groups with over 2,000 campus events each year. Centre has an active Greek life. The terms fraternity and sorority (from the Latin words and , meaning brother and sister respectively) may be used to describe many social and charitable organizations, for example the Lions Club, Epsilon Sigma Alpha, Rotary International, Optimist International, or the Shriners. ...


Clubs and Organizations

Greek Life

Greek Housing along West Walnut Street
Greek Housing along West Walnut Street

There are currently chapters of: Image File history File linksMetadata Centrecollege-greek. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Centrecollege-greek. ...

Centre was also home to now-defunct chapters of other national fraternities and sororities including Phi Delta Theta (ΦΔΘ) is an international fraternity founded in 1848 at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. ... ΦΚΤ (Phi Kappa Tau) is a U.S. national college fraternity. ... Sigma Alpha Epsilon (ΣΑΕ) is a secret letter, social college fraternity. ... Sigma Chi (ΣΧ) is one of the largest and oldest all-male, college, Greek-letter social fraternities. ... Alpha Delta Pi (ΑΔΠ) was founded May 15, 1851 at Wesleyan College in Macon, Georgia making it the first female fraternal organization. ... Delta Delta Delta (ΔΔΔ), also known as Tri Delta, is a national collegiate sorority founded on November 27, 1888. ... Kappa Alpha Theta (ΚΑΘ) is an international womens fraternity founded on January 27, 1870 at DePauw University. ... Kappa Kappa Gamma (ΚΚΓ) is a college womens fraternity, founded on October 13, 1870 at Monmouth College, Illinois. ...

  • Alpha Chi Phi, (1868 - 1870's, absorbed by Epsilon chapter of Beta Theta Pi)
  • Alpha Kappa Phi, Alpha chapter (1858 - 1876)
  • Alpha Kappa Pi, Beta Kappa chapter (1932 - 1936)
  • Beta Theta Pi, Epsilon Chapter (1848-2006, inactive 1862-1871)
  • Delta Kappa, (1850's - 1879, absorbed by Kentucky Alpha chapter of Phi Delta Theta)
  • Delta Kappa Epsilon, Iota Chapter (1854-2002, inactive 1860-1865)
  • Chi Omega (1988-1992)
  • Phi Gamma Delta, Iota Chapter (1855-1856)
  • Kappa Alpha Order, Omega Chapter (1883-1933)

Alpha Kappa Pi may refer to Alfa Kappa Pi ... Beta Theta Pi (ΒΘΠ) is a social collegiate fraternity that was founded at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, USA, where it is part of the Miami Triad which includes Phi Delta Theta and Sigma Chi. ... Delta Kappa Epsilon (ΔΚΕ; also pronounced D-K-E or Deke) is the oldest secret college mens fraternity of New England origin. ... Chi Omega (ΧΩ) is the largest womens fraternal organization in the National Panhellenic Conference. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Kappa Alpha Order (KA) is a secret collegiate Order of Knights. ...

Traditions

"Running the Flame"

Nearly 40 years ago a large metal sculpture named "The Flame" was installed at the center of campus. In the 1980s, students began a tradition of running from their dorm and today the fraternity houses to The Flame and back in the nude. "Running the flame" has become a tradition for most students on campus to complete prior to their graduation.


Kissing on the Seal

College tradition holds that if two students kiss over the Seal set in the sidewalk in front of Old Centre at the stroke of midnight, they will get married following graduation.


Athletics

Football

The Colonels won the Fort Worth Classic a postseason college football bowl game played only once, on January 1, 1921 in Fort Worth, Texas over Texas Christian University 63-7. The Fort Worth Classic was a post-season college football bowl game played only once, on January 1, 1921 in Ft. ... Nickname: Motto: Where the West Begins Location of Fort Worth in Tarrant County, Texas Coordinates: , Country State Counties Tarrant and Denton Government  - Mayor Michael J. Moncrief Area  - City  298. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

C6H0 Team
C6H0 Team

At the beginning of the Roaring '20s, Harvard University, the nation's dominant football power, was riding a five-year undefeated streak. Then the Crimson invited Centre College (enrollment: 264) up to Cambridge for what they thought would be a "warm-up" game, a light workout before facing Princeton the following week. Image File history File linksMetadata Centrecollegec6h0. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Centrecollegec6h0. ... Sometimes referred to as the Jazz Age or primarily in North America as the Roaring Twenties. // Events and trends Technology John T. Thompson invents Thompson submachine gun, also known as Tommy gun John Logie Baird invents the first working television system (1925) Charles Lindbergh becomes the first person to fly... Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA and a member of the Ivy League. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... Harvard Square, May 2000 Cambridge is a city in the greater Boston area in Massachusetts, United States. ... Princeton University is a private coeducational research university located in Princeton, New Jersey. ...


On October 29, 1921, before 45,000 stunned fans, the Colonels shocked mighty Harvard, becoming the first school ever from outside the East to beat one of the Ivy League's "Big Three" of Harvard, Yale, and Princeton. Star player Bo McMillin rushed in the lone touchdown of the game early in the third quarter, and the Praying Colonels' defense held off the Crimson's powerful offense from there for a 6-0 victory. Back in Danville, overjoyed students painted the "impossible formula" C6-H0 (Centre 6, Harvard 0) on everything in sight (including a few cows). At least one marking still remains, on the side of the town post office. [7] is the 302nd day of the year (303rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... Alvin Bo McMillin (January 12, 1895 - March 31, 1952) was a Hall-of-Fame college football player, and later successful head coach, who served at both the collegiate and professional levels but who achieved his greatest success at the college level. ...


The Centre victory was a shock, but perhaps not a fluke; the team went 10-1 in 1921 and defeated several other prominent schools including Virginia Tech, Auburn, Arizona, and Clemson. In fact up until their final game of the season, a 22-14 loss to powerful Texas A&M in Dallas on January 2, 1922, the Colonels outscored their opponents by a margin of 314 to 6. [8] Texas A&M University at College Station Texas A&M University, often Texas A&M, A&M or TAMU for short, is one of the flagship universities of Texas, and is the flagship institution of the Texas A&M University System. ... is the 2nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In 1950, the Associated Press named C6-H0 the greatest sports upset of the first half of the 20th century. [9]. In 2005, the New York Times called it "arguably the upset of the century in college football." [10]. In 2006, ESPN named it the third-biggest upset in the 138-year history of college football. [11] The Associated Press, or AP, is an American news agency, the worlds largest such organization. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... ESPN/ESPN-DT, formerly an acronym for Entertainment and Sports Programming Network, is an [[United States|Amer<nowiki>Insert non-formatted text here--68. ...


On the 75th anniversary of C6-H0, Centre challenged Harvard to a rematch. Harvard declined.


Alumni

Centre Alumni, 1999

Centre ranks first in the country for the percentage of former students making gifts, reaching 75.1% participation among the alumni contributing to the College's annual fund. Centre is thus known as the college with "America's Most Loyal Alumni." Centre alumni have figured prominently in U.S. history. They include two U.S. vice presidents, one Chief Justice of the United States, an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court, 13 U.S. Senators, 43 U.S. Representatives, 10 moderators of the General Assemblies of the Presbyterian Church, and 11 governors. Others have become leaders in teaching, business, medicine, law and journalism.[12] Among the most notable:
Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2402x1952, 3071 KB)Centre College Alumni in 1999. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2402x1952, 3071 KB)Centre College Alumni in 1999. ... Seal of the office of the Vice-President of the United States The Vice President of the United States is the first in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the President. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      The Chief Justice of the United States is the head of the judicial branch... Associate Justices of the Supreme Court of the United States are the members of the Supreme Court of the United States other than the Chief Justice of the United States. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries  Atlas  Politics Portal      The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the acronym... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Politics Portal      The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the bicameral United States Congress, the... The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress; the other is the Senate. ... Presbyterianism is part of the Reformed churches family of denominations of Christian Protestantism based on the teachings of John Calvin which traces its institutional roots to the Scottish Reformation, especially as led by John Knox. ... A governor is an official who heads the government of a colony, state or other sub-national state unit. ...

Joshua Fry Bell (November 26, 1811 &#8211; August 17, 1870) was a Kentucky political figure. ... Congress in Joint Session. ... Joseph Holt (January 6, 1807&#8211;August 1, 1894) was U.S. Secretary of War and a U.S. Postmaster General under James Buchanan. ... The United States Patent and Trademark Office (PTO or USPTO) is an agency in the United States Department of Commerce that provides patent and trademark protection to inventors and businesses for their inventions and corporate and product identification. ... The United States Postmaster General is the executive head of the United States Postal Service. ... The Secretary of War was a member of the United States Presidents Cabinet, beginning with George Washingtons administration. ... This article is in reference to the U.S. JAG Corps. ... The United States Army is the largest and oldest branch of the armed forces of the United States. ... Assassination of Abraham Lincoln From left to right: Major Henry Rathbone, Clara Harris, Mary Todd Lincoln, Abraham Lincoln, and John Wilkes Booth. ... John Cabell Breckinridge (January 16, 1821&#8211;May 17, 1875) was a U.S. Representative and a Senator from Kentucky and the fourteenth Vice President of the United States. ... Seal of the office of the Vice-President of the United States The Vice President of the United States is the first in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the President. ... James Buchanan (April 23, 1791 – June 1, 1868) was the 15th president of the United States (1857–1861). ... For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial) Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia (May 29, 1861–April 2, 1865) Danville, Virginia (from April 3, 1865) Language(s) English (de facto) Religion... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This is about the pre-World-War-I US Supreme Court justice; for his grandson, the mid-20th-century holder of the same position, see John Marshall Harlan II. John Marshall Harlan (June 1, 1833 – October 14, 1911) was an American Supreme Court associate justice. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries  Atlas  Politics Portal      The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the acronym... “Plessy” redirects here. ... Holding Segregation of students in public schools violates the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment, because separate facilities are inherently unequal. ... This article is about Grover Clevelands Vice-President. ... Stephen Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837 – June 24, 1908) was the 22nd and 24th President of the United States, and the only President to serve two non-consecutive terms (1885–1889 and 1893–1897). ... Frederick Moore Vinson (January 22, 1890&#8211;September 8, 1953) served the United States in all three branches of government. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      The Chief Justice of the United States is the head of the judicial branch... Cawood Ledford (April 24, 1926 – September 5, 2001) was the longtime play-by-play announcer for the University of Kentucky basketball and football teams, primarily on radio but sometimes on television as well. ... The University of Kentucky, also referred to as UK, is a public, co-educational university located in Lexington, Kentucky. ... The Kentucky Wildcats are the mens and womens athletic teams representing the University of Kentucky (UK), a founding member of the Southeastern Conference. ... James Sidney Rollins (April 19, 1812 – January 9, 1888) was a nineteenth century politician and lawyer from Missouri. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... Western Kentucky University (WKU) is a public university in Bowling Green, Kentucky. ... Basketball Hall of Fame Logo The Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame honors players who have shown exceptional skill at basketball, all-time great coaches and referees, and other major contributors to the game. ... All-American, a Broadway musical with book by Mel Brooks, music by Charles Strouse, and lyrics by Lee Adams, opened in New York on March 19, 1962, and played 80 performances. ... College Football Hall of Fame front. ... “GE” redirects here. ... Kentucky State logo Kentucky State University (KSU, or less commonly, KYSU, to differentiate from Kansas State University) is a four-year institution of higher learning, located in Frankfort, Kentucky, the states capital. ...

Trivia

  • Classes at Centre are rarely cancelled. Prior to the Vice Presidential Debate in 2000, the last time classes were officially cancelled was due to the Civil War, although in 1994 and 1998, when severe snow and ice storms shut down much of the state, classes were delayed by half a day. On March 7, 2006, classes were cut short due to a symposium honoring retiring Dean John Ward. Ironically, Dean John Ward had made the statement in 1997, following a large snow storm, "Centre didn't cancel classes during parts of the Civil War, we're not cancelling them now."
  • Centre College is listed in Loren Pope's, Colleges That Change Lives.

Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... is the 66th day of the year (67th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Loren Pope is a nationally renown college advisor with several national publicatons on colleges and universities in the United States. ... Colleges That Change Lives (Penguin, 2000) is a best-selling book by nationally renowned college advisor Loren Pope. ...

References

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Centre College, Danville Kentucky (405 words)
Centre's promise to its students is "personal education, extraordinary success." The College delivers on this pledge with one-to-one from day one career preparation; small classes taught exclusively by challenging, dedicated professors; and an all-learning, all-the-time campus environment that provides abundant opportunities for social interaction and leadership development.
Centre notable alumni include two U.S. vice presidents (John Cabell Breckinridge-Class of 1838 and Adlai Ewing Stevenson-Class of 1859), a chief justice of the U.S. Supreme Court (Frederick M. Vinson-Class of 1909 and Class of 1911-Law), a U.S. Chief Justice (John Marshall Harlan-Class of 1850), and a number of U.S. senators, representatives, and state governors.
Centre's strong connection with the past brings added meaning to the present, and provides inspiration for the tradition to be continued in the future.
CampusChamps.com - Centre College Athletics (413 words)
Centre College received its charter from the Kentucky Legislature on January 21, 1819.
Centre College's Men's Cross Country team finished the season well with their best regional finish ever, 6th out of 32 represented teams.
Centre College senior Ryan New broke a school record in the 400-meter dash in his bid to qualify for the Division III national championships.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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