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Encyclopedia > Central sulcus
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Central sulcus of the human brain.

The central sulcus is a fold in the cerebral cortex of brains in vertebrates. Also called the central fissure, it was originally called the fissure of Rolando or the Rolandic fissure.


The central sulcus is a prominent landmark of the brain, separating the parietal lobe from the frontal lobe. The central sulcus is the site of the primary motor area in mammals, a group of cells that controls voluntary movements of the body.


See also

List of human anatomical parts named after people.




  Results from FactBites:
 
Brain - Printer-friendly - MSN Encarta (1742 words)
The frontal lobe is the largest of the five and consists of all the cortex in front of the central sulcus.
The parietal lobe consists of the cortex behind the central sulcus to a sulcus near the back of the cerebrum known as the parieto-occipital sulcus.
The parieto-occipital sulcus, in turn, forms the front border of the occipital lobe, which is the rearmost part of the cerebrum.
Gray, Henry. 1918. Anatomy of the Human Body. Page 821 (441 words)
On the medial surface, it is separated from the cingulate gyrus by the cingulate sulcus; and on the inferior surface, it is bounded behind by the stem of the lateral fissure.
The precentral sulcus runs parallel to the central sulcus, and is usually divided into an upper and a lower part; between it and the central sulcus is the anterior central gyrus.
The anterior central gyrus (gyrus centralis anterior; ascending frontal convolution; precentral gyre) is bounded in front by the precentral sulcus, behind by the central sulcus; it extends from the supero-medial border of the hemisphere to the posterior ramus of the lateral fissure.
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