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Encyclopedia > Central Park
Central Park
A Central Park landscape
Type Municipal (New York City)
Location Manhattan
Coordinates 40°46′55″N, 73°57′58″W
Size 843 acres (3.4 km²) (1.32 mi²)
Opened 1859
Operated by Central Park Conservancy
Status Open all year

Central Park is a large public, urban park (843 acres, 3.41 km², 1.32 mi²; a rectangle 2.5 statute miles by 0.5 statute mile, or 4 km × 800 m) in the borough of Manhattan in New York City. With about twenty-five million visitors annually, Central Park is the most visited city park in the United States,[1] and its appearance in many movies and television shows has made it among the most famous city parks in the world. It is run by the Central Park Conservancy, a private, not-for-profit organization that manages the park under a contract with the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 559 pixelsFull resolution (4648 × 3248 pixel, file size: 5. ... The New York City Department of Parks and Recreation is the branch of government of the City of New York responsible for maintaining the citys parks system, preserving and maintaining the ecological diversity of the citys natural areas, and furnishing recreational opportunities for citys residents. ... Manhattan is a borough of New York City, New York, USA, coterminous with New York County. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ... A child running in a urban park An urban park, also known as a municipal park, is a park that is built in cities and other incorporated places to offer recreation and green space to residents of and visitors to the municipality. ... An acre is the name of a unit of area in a number of different systems, including Imperial units and United States customary units. ... To help compare sizes of different geographic regions, we list here areas between 1 km² (100 hectares) and 10 km² (1000 hectares). ... A mile is a unit of length, usually used to measure distance, in a number of different systems, including Imperial units, United States customary units and Norwegian/Swedish mil. ... Manhattan is a borough of New York City, New York, USA, coterminous with New York County. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... A nonprofit organization (sometimes abbreviated to not-for-profit, non-profit, or NPO) is an organization whose primary objective is to support some issue or matter of private interest or public concern for non-commercial purposes. ... The New York City Department of Parks and Recreation is the branch of government of the City of New York responsible for maintaining the citys parks system, preserving and maintaining the ecological diversity of the citys natural areas, and furnishing recreational opportunities for citys residents. ...


Central Park is bordered on the north by West 110th Street, on the west by Central Park West, on the south by West 59th Street, and on the east by Fifth Avenue. Along the park's borders, these streets are usually referred to as Central Park North, Central Park West, and Central Park South, respectively. (Fifth Avenue retains its name along the eastern border.) 110th street is a street in Manhattan, New York City, New York. ... Housing cooperatives on Central Park West. ... 59th st. ... Street sign at corner of Fifth Avenue and East 57th Street Fifth Avenue, early morning photograph, looking south from Thirty-eighth Street Fifth Avenue is a major thoroughfare in the center of the borough of Manhattan in New York City. ... 110th Street is a street in Manhattan, New York City, New York. ... Central Park West is an avenue in New York City. ... Central Park South is a street in Manhattan, New York City; it is a section of 59th Street. ...


The park was designed by landscape designer Frederick Law Olmsted and architect Calvert Vaux, who went on to collaborate on Brooklyn's Prospect Park. It has been a National Historic Landmark since 1963.[2] While much of the park looks natural, it is in fact almost entirely landscaped. It contains several natural-seeming lakes and ponds,[3] extensive walking tracks, two ice-skating rinks, the Central Park Zoo, the Central Park Conservatory Garden, a wildlife sanctuary, a large area of natural woods, a 106 acre billion gallon reservoir, an outdoor amphitheater which hosts the Shakespeare in the Park summer festival, and grassy areas used for informal or team sports or set aside as quiet areas, as well as playground enclosures for children. The park is an oasis for migrating birds, and thus is popular with bird watchers. The 6-miles (10 km) of drives circling the park are popular with joggers, bicyclists and inline skaters, especially on weekends and in the evenings after 7:00 p.m., when automobile traffic is banned. Frederick Law Olmsted (April 26, 1822 – August 28, 1903) was a United States landscape architect, famous for designing many well-known urban parks, including Central Park and Prospect Park in New York City. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article is about the borough of New York City. ... Prospect Park is a 585[1] acre (2. ... This article or section needs additional references or sources to improve its verifiability. ... A trail, in the most general sense, is any linear route for travel. ... Outdoor ice skating in Austria Ice skating is traveling on ice with skates, narrow (and sometimes parabolic) blade-like devices moulded into special boots (or, more primitively, without the boots, tied to regular footwear). ... The Central Park Zoo is located in Central Park in New York City and run by the Wildlife Conservation Society. ... The Vanderbilt Gate leads to the formal central section. ... Combination playground structure for small children; slides, climbers (stairs in this case), playhouse A playground is an area designed for children to play freely. ... Birding or birdwatching is a hobby concerned with the observation and study of birds (the study proper is termed American origin; birdwatching is (or more correctly, was) the commonly-used word in Great Britain and Ireland and by non-birders in the United States. ...

Contents

History

Early history

The park was not part of the Commissioners' Plan of 1811; however, between 1821 and 1855, New York City nearly quadrupled in population. As the city expanded, people were drawn to the few open spaces, mainly cemeteries, to get away from the noise and chaotic life in the city [citation needed]. Before long, however, New York City's need for a great public park was voiced by the poet and editor of the then-Evening Post (now the New York Post), William Cullen Bryant, and by the first American landscape architect, Andrew Jackson Downing, who began to publicize the city's need for a public park in 1844. A stylish place for open-air driving, like the Bois de Boulogne in Paris or London's Hyde Park, was felt to be needed by many influential New Yorkers, and in 1853 the New York legislature designated a 700 acre (2.8 km²) area from 59th to 106th Streets for the creation of the park, to a cost of more than US$5 million for the land alone. An 1807 version of the Commissioners Grid plan for Manhattan, a few years before it was adopted in 1811. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The New York Post is the 13th-oldest newspaper published in the United States and the oldest to have been published continually as a daily. ... William Cullen Bryant William Cullen Bryant (November 3, 1794 - June 12, 1878) an American Romantic poet, journalist, political adviser, and homeopath, was born in Cummington, Massachusetts, the second son of Peter Bryant, a doctor and later a state legislator, and Sarah Snell; the William Cullen Bryant Homestead, his boyhood home... Andrew Jackson Downing (born October 31, 1815 - died July 28, 1852) was an American landscape designer and writer from Newburgh, New York and the editor and publisher of The Horticulturist magazine. ... The upper lake, with rowboats The Bois de Boulogne is a park located along the western edge of the 16ème arrondissement of Paris, near the suburb of Boulogne-Billancourt. ... “Hyde Park” redirects here. ... ISO 4217 Code USD User(s) the United States, the British Indian Ocean Territory,[1] the British Virgin Islands, East Timor, Ecuador, El Salvador, the Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Palau, Panama, Caicos Islands, and the insular areas of the United States Inflation 2. ...


Initial development

The State appointed a Central Park Commission to oversee the development of the park, and in 1857 the commission held a landscape design contest. Writer Frederick Law Olmsted and English architect Calvert Vaux developed the so-called "Greensward Plan", which was selected as the winning design. According to Olmsted, the park was "of great importance as the first real Park made in this century—a democratic development of the highest significance…", a view probably inspired by his stay, and various trips in Europe in 1850.[4] During that trip he visited several parks, and was in particular impressed by Birkenhead Park near Liverpool, England, which opened in 1847 as the first publicly funded park in the world. 1857 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Frederick Law Olmsted (April 26, 1822 – August 28, 1903) was a United States landscape architect, famous for designing many well-known urban parks, including Central Park and Prospect Park in New York City. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... birkenhead park smell ov poo ... Location within England Coordinates: , Sovereign state United Kingdom Constituent country England Region North West England Ceremonial county Historic county Merseyside Lancashire Admin HQ Liverpool City Centre Founded 1207 City Status 1880 Government  - Type Metropolitan borough, City  - Governing body Liverpool City Council Area  - Borough & City 43. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem - the United Kingdom anthem God Save the Queen is commonly used England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto)1 Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Monarch Queen Elizabeth II...

Victor Prevost, The Terrace, Central Park, NY, Albumen Print, September 10th, 1862.

Several influences came together in the design. Landscaped cemeteries, such as Mount Auburn (Cambridge, Massachusetts) and Green-Wood (Brooklyn, New York) had set an example of idyllic, naturalistic landscapes. The most influential innovations in the Central Park design were the "separate circulation systems" for pedestrians, horseback riders, and pleasure vehicles. The "crosstown" commercial traffic was entirely concealed in sunken roadways screened with densely planted shrub belts, so as not to disturb the impression of a rustic scene. The Greensward plan called for some 36 bridges, all designed by Vaux, ranging from rugged spans of Manhattan schist or granite, to lacy neo-gothic cast iron, no two alike. The ensemble of the formal line of the Mall's doubled allées of elms culminating at Bethesda Terrace, with a composed view beyond of lake and woodland was at the heart of the larger design. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (695x700, 89 KB) Victor Prevost, Central Park, 1862 The two-dimensional work of art depicted in this image is in the public domain in the United States and in those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (695x700, 89 KB) Victor Prevost, Central Park, 1862 The two-dimensional work of art depicted in this image is in the public domain in the United States and in those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus... Mount Auburn Cemetery Mount Auburn Cemetery Hunnewell family obelisk Civil War memorial Founded in 1831 as Americas first garden cemetery, Mount Auburn Cemetery is an Elysium where, traditionally, chaste classical monuments were set in rolling landscaped terrain. ... Location in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country United States State Massachusetts County Middlesex County Settled 1630 Incorporated 1636 Government  - Type Mayor-council city  - Mayor Kenneth Reeves (D) Area  - City  7. ... The Chapel at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn NY Green-Wood Cemetery was founded in 1838 as a rural cemetery in Brooklyn, New York, it was granted National Historic Landmark status in 2006 by the U.S. Department of the Interior. ... This article is about the borough of New York City. ... Sample of Manhattan schist The Manhattan schist is a formation of mica schist rock that underlies much of the island of Manhattan in New York City. ... Close-up of granite from Yosemite National Park, valley of the Merced River Quarrying granite for the Mormon Temple, Utah Territory. ...


Before the construction of the park could start, the area had to be cleared of its inhabitants, most of whom were quite poor and either free African-Americans or immigrants of either German or Irish origin. Most of them lived in smaller villages, such as Seneca Village, Harsenville, the Piggery District or the Convent of the Sisters of Charity. The roughly 1,600 working-class residents occupying the area at the time were evicted under the rule of eminent domain during 1857, and Seneca Village and parts of the other communities were torn down and removed in order to make room for the park. The person responsible for carrying out the evictions was the great-great grandfather of future New York Yankee Joe Pepitone. Look up Free in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Languages Predominantly American English Religions Predominantly Christianity and Islam Related ethnic groups Sub-Saharan Africans and other African groups, some with Native American groups. ... Seneca Village was a small village on the island of Manhattan, New York founded by free blacks in 1825. ... Eminent domain (U.S.), compulsory purchase (United Kingdom, New Zealand, Ireland), resumption/compulsory acquisition (Australia) or expropriation (Canada, South Africa) in common law legal systems is the inherent power of the state to seize a citizens private property, expropriate private property, or rights in private property, without the owner... 1857 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... Joseph Anthony Pepitone (born October 9, 1940 in Brooklyn, New York) is a former Major League Baseball first baseman and outfielder for the New York Yankees (1962-1969), Houston Astros (1970), Chicago Cubs (1970-1973) and the Atlanta Braves (1973). ...

Central-Park, Winter: The Skating Pond, 1862

During the construction of the park, Olmsted fought constant battles with the Park Commissioners, many of whom were appointees of the city's Democratic machine. In 1860, he was forced out for the first of many times as Central Park's Superintendent, and was replaced by Andrew Haswell Green, the former president of New York City's Board of Education took over as the chairman of the commission. Despite the fact that he had relatively little experience, he still managed to accelerate the construction, as well as to finalize the negotiations for the purchase of an additional 65 acres (26 ha) at the north end of the park between 106th and 110th Streets, which would be used as the 'rugged' part of the park, its swampy northeast corner dredged and reconstructed as the Harlem Meer. Image File history File links NSAPINY9_EXTR.jpg‎ http://www. ... Image File history File links NSAPINY9_EXTR.jpg‎ http://www. ... Andrew Haswell Green or Andrew H. Green (1820 - November 13, 1903) was an U.S. civic leader and major player in the development of New York City. ... Harlem Meer (Dutch for Harlem Lake) is 1. ...


Between 1860 and 1873, the construction of the park had come a long way, and most of the major hurdles had been overcome. During this period, more than 500,000 cubic feet (14,000 m³) of topsoil had been transported in from New Jersey, as the original soil wasn't good enough to sustain the various trees, shrubs and the plants the Greensward Plan called for. When the park was officially completed in 1873, more than ten million cartloads of material, including soil and rocks which were to be removed from the area had been manually dug up, and transported out of the park. Also included were the more than four million trees, shrubs and plants representing the approximately 1,500 species which were to lay the foundation for today's park. It has been suggested that Thousand Cubic Feet be merged into this article or section. ... Official language(s) English de facto Capital Trenton Largest city Newark Area  Ranked 47th  - Total 8,729 sq mi (22,608 km²)  - Width 70 miles (110 km)  - Length 150 miles (240 km)  - % water 14. ...

Central Park, New York City.

Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (427x1403, 229 KB) A map of Central Park, in New York City. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (427x1403, 229 KB) A map of Central Park, in New York City. ...

20th Century

Following the completion of the park, it quickly slipped into decline. One of the major reasons for this was the disinterest of Tammany Hall, the political machine which was the largest political force in New York at the time. Tammany Hall was the Democratic Party political machine that played a major role in controlling New York City politics from the 1790s to the 1960s. ... In this 1899 cartoon from Puck, all of New York City politics revolves around boss Richard Croker A political machine is an unofficial system of a political organization based on patronage, the spoils system, behind-the-scenes control, and longstanding political ties within the structure of a representative democracy. ... NY redirects here. ...

Around the turn of the century, the park faced several new challenges. Cars had been invented and were becoming commonplace, bringing with them their burden of pollution. Also, the general mental view of the people was beginning to change. No longer were parks to be used only for walks and picnics in an idyllic environment, but now also for sports, and similar recreation. Following the dissolution of the Central Park Commission in 1870 and Andrew Green's departure from the project and the death of Vaux in 1895, the maintenance effort gradually declined, and there were few or no attempts to replace dead trees, bushes and plants or worn-out lawn. For several decades, authorities did little or nothing to prevent vandalism and the littering of the park. Image File history File links Version of image:BelvedereCastle. ... Image File history File links Version of image:BelvedereCastle. ... Belvedere Castle Belvedere Castle sits upon Vista Rock in Central Park, New York City. ...


All of this changed in 1934, when Fiorello LaGuardia was elected mayor of New York City and unified the five park-related departments then in existence, and gave Robert Moses the job of cleaning up. Moses, then about to become one of the mightiest men in New York City, took over what was essentially a relic, a leftover from a bygone era. Fiorello Henry LaGuardia (December 11, 1882–September 20, 1947) was the Mayor of New York from 1934 to 1945. ... The Mayor of New York City is the chief executive of the government of New York City, as stipulated by the Charter of the City of New York. ... Robert Moses with a model of his proposed Battery Bridge Robert Moses (December 18, 1888–July 29, 1981) was the master builder of mid-20th century New York City, Long Island, and Westchester County. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ...


According to historian Robert Caro in his 1974 book The Power Broker, Robert Allan Caro (born October 30, 1935) is a biographer most noted for his studies of United States political figures Robert Moses and Lyndon B. Johnson. ... The Power Broker is a 1973 biography of Robert Moses, New York Citys Master Builder, by Robert Caro. ...

Lawns, unseeded, were expanses of bare earth, decorated with scraggly patches of grass and weeds, that became dust holes in dry weather and mud holes in wet…. The once beautiful Mall looked like a scene of a wild party the morning after. Benches lay on their backs, their legs jabbing at the sky….

In a single year, Moses managed to clean up not only Central Park, but also other parks in New York City; lawns and flowers were replanted, dead trees and bushes replaced, walls were sandblasted and bridges repaired. Major redesigning and construction was also carried out; for instance, the existing Croton Lower Reservoir was filled-in so the Great Lawn could be created. The Greensward Plan's intention of creating an idyllic landscape was combined with Moses' vision of a park to be used for recreational purposes—nineteen playgrounds, twelve ballfields, and handball courts were constructed. Moses also managed to secure funds from the New Deal program, as well as donations from the public, thus ensuring that the park got a new lease of life, prospering under the wings of a powerful and new defender. The Great Lawn and Turtle Pond, Central Park, occupy the almost flat site of the intractably rectangular, thirty-five-acre Lower Reservoir,[1] constructed in 1842, which was an unalterable fixture of the location of Central Park as it was first designed by Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux. ... The New Deal was the title President Franklin D. Roosevelt gave to the series of programs he initiated between 1933 and 1938 with the goal of providing relief, recovery, and reform (3 Rs) to the people and economy of the United States during the Great Depression. ...


1960–1980

The 1960s marked the beginning of an “Events Era” in Central Park that reflected the widespread cultural and political trends of the period. The Public Theater's annual Shakespeare in the Park festival was introduced in this period, as were summer performances on the Great Lawn by the New York Philharmonic Orchestra and the Metropolitan Opera. Increasingly through the 1970s, the Park became a venue for events of unprecedented scale, including political rallies and demonstrations, festivals, and massive concerts. Shakespeare in the Park is a concept used across the world, as a form of free public presentation of William Shakespeares works. ... The New York Philharmonic is an American orchestra based in New York City. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, the lead section of this article may need to be expanded. ...

Looking South West, Jan. 2007

At the time, the City of New York was in the throes of economic and social crisis. Residents were fleeing the City and moving to the suburbs. Morale was low and crime was high. The Parks Department, suffering from budget cuts and a lack of skilled management that rendered its workforce virtually ineffective, responded by opening the Park to any and all activities that would bring people into it—regardless of their impact and without adequate management oversight or maintenance follow-up. Some of these events became important milestones in the social history of the Park and the cultural history of the City. Many were positive experiences fondly remembered by the individuals who participated. But without essential management and enforcement of reasonable limitations, and combined with a total lack of park maintenance and repair, they also did an incredible amount of damage. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2576 × 1932 pixel, file size: 960 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I took this picture in Central Park in January of 2007. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2576 × 1932 pixel, file size: 960 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I took this picture in Central Park in January of 2007. ...


By the mid-1970s, New York’s fiscal and social crisis had contributed to the severe management neglect that transformed Central Park’s lawns and meadows into barren dustbowls, hastened the deterioration its infrastructure and architecture, and ushered in an era of vandalism, territorial use, and illicit activity.


Several citizen groups had emerged intent upon reclaiming the park by fundraising and organizing volunteer initiatives. One of these groups, the Central Park Community Fund, commissioned a study of the park’s management that concluded by calling for the establishment of a single position within the Parks Department responsible for overseeing the planning and management of Central Park, and for a board of guardians to provide citizen oversight. The Koch administration was receptive, and in 1979 Parks Commissioner Gordon Davis established the office of Central Park Administrator, appointing to the position the executive director of another citizen organization, the Central Park Task Force. The Central Park Conservancy was founded the following year to support the office and initiatives of the Administrator and to provide consistent leadership through a self-perpetuating, citizen-based board that would also include as ex-officio trustees the Parks Commissioner, Central Park Administrator, and mayoral appointees.

From Central Park South
From Central Park South

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2048x490, 804 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Central Park Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2048x490, 804 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Central Park Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to...

1980–present

Central Park

The Park's transformation under the leadership of the Central Park Conservancy began with modest but highly significant first steps toward reclaiming the Park, addressing needs that could not be met within the existing structure and resources of the Parks Department. These included an initial focus on hiring interns and establishing a small restoration staff to reconstruct and repair unique rustic structures, undertake horticultural projects, and remove graffiti. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2848x2136, 3064 KB) View of the Plaza from Central Park, October 2006. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2848x2136, 3064 KB) View of the Plaza from Central Park, October 2006. ...


By the early 1980s the Conservancy was engaged in design efforts and long-term restoration planning, using a combination of its own staff and consultants. Through this work, the Conservancy provided the impetus and leadership for several early restoration projects funded by the City, while at the same time preparing a comprehensive plan for rebuilding the Park. With the completion of this plan in 1985, the Conservancy launched its first capital campaign. Through the campaign, the Conservancy assumed increasing responsibility for funding the comprehensive restoration of the Park, and full responsibility for designing, bidding, and supervising all capital projects in the Park.


The restoration of Central Park has been accompanied by a crucial transformation of its management. As the Conservancy rebuilt the Park beginning in the mid-1980s, it provided dedicated staff to maintain restored zones; and as citywide budget cuts in the early 1990s resulted in attrition of the Parks Department staff responsible for routine maintenance, the Conservancy began to hire staff to replace these workers. Management of the restored landscapes by the Conservancy’s "zone gardeners" proved so successful that core maintenance and operations staff were reorganized in 1996 and a zone-based system of management implemented throughout the Park. Consequently, every zone of the Park now has a specific individual accountable for its day-to-day maintenance. Zone gardeners supervise the volunteers assigned to them (who commit to a consistent work schedule), and are supported by specialized crews in areas of maintenance requiring specific expertise or equipment, or more effectively conducted on a parkwide basis. Today the Conservancy employs four out of five maintenance and operations staff in the Park, and effectively oversees the work of both the private and public employees under the authority of the Central Park Administrator (a publicly appointed position reporting to the Parks Commissioner) who is also the President of the Conservancy. As of 2007, the Conservancy had invested approximately $350 million in the restoration and management of the Park; the organization presently contributes approximately 85 percent of Central Park’s annual operating budget of over $25 million.

The park in 2004.

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1000x229, 208 KB) Description: Central Park, Manhattan, New York, USA Source: Own work Date: 2004 Author: Fritz Geller-Grimm Permission: CC-By-SA-2. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1000x229, 208 KB) Description: Central Park, Manhattan, New York, USA Source: Own work Date: 2004 Author: Fritz Geller-Grimm Permission: CC-By-SA-2. ...

Activities in the park

One of the many carriage horses present throughout the park.

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2848x2136, 2985 KB) Carriage Horse on Central Park West, NYC. I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2848x2136, 2985 KB) Carriage Horse on Central Park West, NYC. I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ...

Sports

Central Park is perhaps cherished most by athletes. The Park Drive, just over 6 miles long, is a haven for runners, joggers, bicyclists, and inline skaters. Nearly every weekend, races take place in the park, many of which are organized by the New York Road Runners. The New York City Marathon finishes in Central Park outside Tavern on the Green. Many other professional races are run in the park, including the recent USA Men's 8k Championships. A long tradition of horseback riding in the park was kept alive by the one remaining stable nearby, Claremont Riding Academy until it closed in 2007. At the northern part of Central Park between 106th and 108th streets Lasker Rink and Pool is a large ice skating rink which converts to an outdoor swimming pool in Summer and serves the neighboring communities. Founded in 1958 with 47 members, New York Road Runners (NYRR) has grown into the foremost running organization, with a membership of 40,000. ... The New York City Marathon is an annual marathon foot-race run over a 42,195 m (26. ... Tavern on the Green is a restaurant located in Central Park, New York City. ... Claremont Riding Academy, the last riding stable in Manhattan, is located at 175 West 89th Street in New York City. ...


Entertainment

Each summer, the Public Theater presents free open-air theatre productions, often starring well-known stage and screen actors, in the Delacorte Theater. Most, though not all, of the plays presented are by William Shakespeare, and the performances are generally regarded as being of high quality since the start in 1962. The Delacorte Theater is located in Central Park in New York City. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ...

Summerstage features free musical concerts throughout the summer.

The New York Philharmonic gives an open-air concert every summer on the Great Lawn and the Metropolitan Opera presents two operas. Many concerts have been given in the park including the Simon and Garfunkel reunion; Diana Ross, 1983; Dave Matthews Band, 2003. Since 1992, local Singer-songwriter David Ippolito has performed almost every summer weekend to large crowds of passers-by and regulars, including visitors from around the world, and has become a New York icon. Often he is simply referred to as "That guitar man from Central Park." Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 531 pixelsFull resolution (4288 × 2848 pixel, file size: 6. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 531 pixelsFull resolution (4288 × 2848 pixel, file size: 6. ... Summerstage now in its 20th season is New Yorks Premiere outdoor concert stage in Central Park (New York City, USA) that provides a series of free and paid performances of music, dance, performance art,reading and spoken word throughout the summer months . ... The New York Philharmonic is the oldest active symphony orchestra in the United States, organized during 1842. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, the lead section of this article may need to be expanded. ... On 19 September 1981 the folk-rock duo Simon and Garfunkel gave a concert in New Yorks Central Park attended by more than 500,000 people. ... Diana Ross (born Diane Ernestine Earle Ross[1] on March 26, 1944) is an American singer and actress, whose musical repertoire spans R&B, soul, disco, jazz, and pop. ... Dave Matthews Band (also known by the initialism DMB) is a United States rock band, originally formed in Charlottesville, Virginia, in 1991 by singer, songwriter, and guitarist Dave Matthews. ... The term singer-songwriter refers to performers who both write and sing their own material. ... David Ippolito is an American singer/songwriter who lives in New York City. ...


Also each summer, City Parks Foundation offers Central Park Summerstage, a series of free performances including music, dance, spoken word, and film presentations. SummerStage celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2005, having welcomed emerging artists and world renowned artists over two decades, including Celia Cruz, David Byrne, Curtis Mayfield, Ladysmith Black Mambazo, and Nobel Laureate and Pulitzer winner Toni Morrison. City Parks Foundation is a New York City-based non-profit dedicated to the enrichment of urban parks and neighborhoods through programming in parks, including athletic instruction for youth and seniors, performing arts, and education programs, all offered free of charge. ... Summerstage now in its 20th season is New Yorks Premiere outdoor concert stage in Central Park (New York City, USA) that provides a series of free and paid performances of music, dance, performance art,reading and spoken word throughout the summer months . ... Celia Cruz (October 21, 1925 – July 16, 2003) was a three-time Grammy Award and four-time Latin Grammy winning Cuban-American salsa singer who spent most of her career living in New Jersey, and working in the United States and several Latin American countries. ... David Byrne may be: David Byrne (politician) (born 1947), Irish & European official David Byrne (musician) (born 1952), musician and former Talking Heads frontman David Byrnes self-titled album David Byrne (footballer) (born 1961), football player David Byrne (web designer) (born 1981), Australian Web / Graphic Designer David Byrne (soccer), (born... Curtis Mayfield (June 3, 1942 – December 26, 1999) was an American soul, funk and R&B singer, songwriter and guitarist best known for his anthemic music with The Impressions and composing the soundtrack to the blaxploitation film Superfly. ... Ladysmith Black Mambazo is a Grammy Award-winning male group from South Africa that sings in the vocal style of isicathamiya and mbube. ... For the Louisiana politician, see deLesseps Morrison, Jr. ...


The numerous portrait artists who work in Central Park have been interviewed and documented by Zina Saunders as part of her Overlooked New York project. Zina Saunders Native Americans trading cards (1995) Zina Saunders (born August 30, 1953) is an artist-writer best known for Overlooked New York, [1] a collection of interviews, profiles and portraits of diverse New York subcultures and hobbyists. ...


Children

In addition to its 21 unique playgrounds, Central Park offers dozens of activities for children, including performances by master puppeteers at the historic Swedish Cottage Marionette Theatre. The famous Central Park Carousel has thrilled children since the original one was built in 1870. Original hand-made puppets presented by master puppeteers entertain children and adults alike at the enchanting Swedish Cottage Marionette Theatre in New York Citys Central Park. ...


Sculptures

Generations of children have rubbed Balto's nose to a shine.
Generations of children have rubbed Balto's nose to a shine.
Bronze statue of Christopher Columbus at Central Park, New York by Jeronimo Suñol, 1894

Though Olmsted disapproved of the clutter of sculptures in the park, a total of twenty-nine sculptures have crept in over the years, most of which have been donated by individuals or organizations (and not the city itself). Much of the first statuary to appear in the park was of authors and poets, clustered along a section of the Mall that became known as Literary Walk. The better-known sculptors represented in Central Park include Augustus Saint-Gaudens and John Quincy Adams Ward. The "Angel of the Waters" at Bethesda Terrace by Emma Stebbins (1873), was the first large public sculpture commission for an American woman. The 1925 statue of the sled dog Balto who became famous during the 1925 serum run to Nome, Alaska is very popular among tourists, reflected in its near polished appearance as the result of being patted by countless visitors. The oldest sculpture is "Cleopatra's Needle," actually an Egyptian obelisk of Tutmose III much older than Cleopatra, which was donated to New York by the Khedive of Egypt. The largest and most impressive is equestrian King Jagiello bronze monument on the east end of Turtle Pond. North of Conservatory Water, the sailboat pond, there is a larger-than-life statue of Alice, sitting on a huge mushroom, playing with her cat, while the Hatter and the March Hare look on. A large memorial to Duke Ellington created by sculptor Robert Graham was dedicated in 1997 near Fifth Avenue and 110th Street, in the Duke Ellington Circle. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Statues and Sculptures in New York City. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1932x2580, 1711 KB)Statue of Balto in Central Park (New York City, New York). ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1932x2580, 1711 KB)Statue of Balto in Central Park (New York City, New York). ... Statue of Balto in Central Park (New York City) Balto (c. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (576x767, 620 KB) Summary Bronze sculpture of Christopher Columbus at Central Park New York by Jeronimo Suñol, 1894. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (576x767, 620 KB) Summary Bronze sculpture of Christopher Columbus at Central Park New York by Jeronimo Suñol, 1894. ... Christopher Columbus (1451 – May 20, 1506) was a navigator and maritime explorer credited as the discoverer of the Americas. ... Jeronimo Suñol y Pujol (Barcelona 1840 - Madrid 16 October 1902) was a Catalan/Spanish sculptor whose early training was in the Valmitjana atelier, perfecting his art at Rome where he maintained a studio for many years. ... Augustus Saint Gaudens, 1905 Augustus Saint-Gaudens (Dublin, March 1, 1848 - Cornish, New Hampshire, August 3, 1907), was the Irish-born American sculptor of the Beaux-Arts generation who most embodied the ideals of the American Renaissance. ... J.Q.A. Wards statue of George Washington (1882) in front of Federal Hall, New York John Quincy Adams Ward ( June 29, 1830 – 1910) was an American sculptor, who is most familiar for his colossal standing statue of Washington (illustration, right) on the steps of Federal Hall in... Bethesda Fountain Cherubs against a stem modelled with cattails supporting the upper basin Bethesda Fountain is the central feature on the lower level of Bethesda Terrace in Central Park, New York. ... Biography Emma Stebbins, Amreican sculptor [born September 1, 1815 - died October 25, 1882 ]. Born and raised in a wealthy New York family Stebbins was encouraged in her pursuit of art at an early age by her family. ... 1873 (MDCCCLXXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Statue of Balto in Central Park (New York City) Balto (c. ... During the 1925 serum run to Nome, also known as the Great Race of Mercy, 20 mushers and about 150 sled dogs relayed diphtheria antitoxin 674 miles (1,085 km) by dog sled across the U.S. territory of Alaska in a record-breaking five and a half days, saving... Close up of Cleopatras Needle (London) Cleopatras Needle in Paris at the Place de la Concorde. ... The Luxor obelisk in the Place de la Concorde in Paris For other uses, see Obelisk (disambiguation). ... Thutmose III (also written as Tuthmosis III; called Manahpi(r)ya in the Amarna letters) (? - 1426 BC), was Pharaoh of Egypt in the Eighteenth Dynasty. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The statue. ... The Great Lawn and Turtle Pond, Central Park, occupy the almost flat site of the intractably rectangular, thirty-five-acre Lower Reservoir,[1] constructed in 1842, which was an unalterable fixture of the location of Central Park as it was first designed by Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Hatter as depicted by Tenniel The Hatter, popularly known as The Mad Hatter (though he is never actually given that name in the book) is a fictional character encountered at a tea party and later as a witness at a trial in Lewis Carrolls Alices Adventures in... The March Hare, often called the Mad March Hare, is a character from the tea party scene in Lewis Carrolls Alices Adventures in Wonderland. ... Edward Kennedy “Duke” Ellington (April 29, 1899–May 24, 1974) was an American jazz composer, pianist, and band leader who has been one of the most influential figures in jazz, if not in all American music. ... Robert Graham (born August 19, 1938, in Mexico City) is a sculptor based in the state of California in the United States of America. ... Year 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1997 Gregorian calendar). ...


For 16 days in 2005 (February 1227), Central Park was the setting for Christo and Jeanne-Claude's installation, The Gates. Though the project was the subject of very mixed reactions (and it took many years for Christo and Jeanne-Claude to get the necessary approvals), it was nevertheless a major, if temporary, draw for the park. [5] Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... February 12 is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Christo and Jeanne-Claude. ... A section of The Gates between the Great Lawn oval and the 86th Street Transverse (Feb. ...


Crime

Although often regarded as a kind of oasis of tranquility inside a "city that never sleeps," Central Park was once a very dangerous place — especially after dark — as measured by crime statistics. The park, like most of New York City, is considerably safer today, though during prior periods it was the site of numerous muggings and rapes. Well-publicized incidents of sexual and confiscatory violence, such as the notorious 1989 "Central Park Jogger" case, dissuaded many from visiting one of Manhattan's most scenic areas. Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... Trisha Meili (b. ...


As crime has declined in the Park and in the rest of New York City, many negative perceptions have waned, and the use of common sense is enough to reasonably protect visitors from harm. The park has its own New York City Police Department precinct (Central Park Precinct), which employs both regular police and volunteer citizens, although patrols are non-existent and the precinct closes at 9pm. In 2005, such safety measures held the number of crimes in the park—which has more than 25 million visitors annually—to fewer than one hundred per year (down from approximately 1,000 in the early 1980s); this very low crime rate has made Central Park one of the safest urban parks in the world. The New York City Police Department (NYPD) was created in 1845 and currently is the largest municipal police force in the world with primary responsibilities in law enforcement and investigation within the five boroughs of New York City. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Other issues

An unobtrusive bridge in Central Park, designed by Calvert Vaux, separates pedestrians from the carriage drive. No two bridges in the Park are identical.

Permission to hold issue-centered rallies in Central Park has been increasingly stiffly resisted by the city. In 2004, the organization United for Peace and Justice wanted to hold a rally on the Great Lawn during the Republican National Convention, in opposition to the continued occupation of Iraq. The City denied UFPJ's application for a permit, stating that such a mass gathering would be harmful to the grass, and that such damage would make it harder to collect private donations to maintain the Park. Courts upheld the refusal. Download high resolution version (1504x1000, 506 KB)Two people walk under a bridge in central park. ... Download high resolution version (1504x1000, 506 KB)Two people walk under a bridge in central park. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... United for Peace and Justice (UFPJ) is a coalition of more than 1,300[1] international and U.S.-based organizations opposed to what they describe as our governments policy of permanent warfare and empire-building. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ...


Since the 1960s, there has been a grassroots campaign to restore the park's loop drives to their original car-free state. Over the years, the number of car-free hours has increased, though a full closure is currently resisted by the New York City Department of Transportation. Venice (J.H. Crawford) Auto-free zones are also known as car-free zones and pedestrianised zones. ...


The Central Park Medical Unit is an all-volunteer ambulance service that provides completely free emergency medical service to patrons of Central Park and the surrounding streets. CPMU also operates a rapid-response bike patrol, particularly during major events such as the New York City Marathon, the 1998 Goodwill Games, and concerts in the park. The Central Park Medical Unit (CPMU) is an all- volunteer ambulance service that provides completely free emergency medical service to patrons of Central Park and the surrounding streets, in Manhattan, New York City. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... An ambulance in San Jose del Cabo, Mexico A Helicopter used as an Ambulance. ... {{Otheruses4|the medical term|the Australian television series|Medical Emergenc an immediate threat to a persons life or long term health. ... “Velo” redirects here. ... The New York City Marathon is an annual marathon foot-race run over a 42,195 m (26. ... Logo of the 2nd Games in Seattle The Goodwill Games were an international sports competition, created by Ted Turner in reaction to the political troubles surrounding the Olympic Games of the 1980s. ... A classical music concert in the Rod Laver Arena, Melbourne 2005 Kasia Kowalska concert in Warsaw A concert is a live performance, usually of music, before an audience. ...


Central Park has one of the largest remaining stands of American Elms in the northeastern U.S., 1700 of them, protected by their very isolation from Dutch Elm Disease. Central Park was the site of the unfortunate unleashing of starlings in North America (cf. Invasive species). Central Park is a popular birding spot during spring and fall migration, when birds flying over Manhattan are attracted to the prominent oasis. Over a quarter of all the bird species found in the United States have been seen in Central Park. The Red-tailed hawk known as Pale Male was the object of much attention by the media, the ornithologist-author Marie Winn and other Central Park birdwatchers. There are 215 bird species in New York City's Central Park.[6] Binomial name Ulmus americana L. The American Elm Ulmus americana is a species of elm native to eastern North America, occurring from Nova Scotia west to southeast Saskatchewan, and south to Florida and central Texas. ... Branch death, or Flagging, at multiple locations in the crown of a diseased elm. ... Genera Aplonis Mino Basilornis Sarcops Streptocitta Enodes Scissirostrum Sarroglossa Ampeliceps Gracula Acridotheres Leucopsar Sturnia Sturnus Creatophora Fregilupus (extinct) Necropsar (extinct) Coccycolius Lamprotornis Cinnyricinclus Spreo Cosmoparus Onychognathus Poeoptera Grafisia Speculipastor Neochicla Buphagus See also: Myna, Oxpecker Starlings are small to medium-sized passerine birds in the family Sturnidae. ... Lantana invasion of abandoned citrus plantation; Moshav Sdey Hemed, Israel The term invasive species refers to a subset of introduced species or non-indigenous species that are rapidly expanding outside of their native range. ... Birding or birdwatching is a hobby concerned with the observation and study of birds (the study proper is termed American origin; birdwatching is (or more correctly, was) the commonly-used word in Great Britain and Ireland and by non-birders in the United States. ... Manhattan is a borough of New York City, New York, USA, coterminous with New York County. ... Pale Male is a male Red-tailed Hawk (Buteo jamaicensis) who is watched by New York City birders and who has attracted widespread notice in the press. ... Marie Winn, a journalist, author and birdwatcher, is known for her books and articles on the birds of Central Park and also for her critical coverage of television. ...

Statue of King Jagiello, from the Polish pavilion at the 1939 New York World's Fair.
Statue of King Jagiello, from the Polish pavilion at the 1939 New York World's Fair.

In 2002 a new genus and species of centipede was discovered in Central Park. The centipede is about four-tenths of an inch (10 mm) long, making it one of the smallest in the world. It is named Nannarrup hoffmani (after the man who discovered it) and lives in the park's leaf litter, the crumbling organic debris that accumulates under the trees. Ladislaus II Jagiello of Poland File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Ladislaus II Jagiello of Poland File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Jogaila, or Władysław II Jagiełło[1] (ca 1362–1434), was a Grand Duke of Lithuania and King of Poland. ... Trylon, Perisphere and Helicline photo by Sam Gottscho The 1939-40 New York Worlds Fair, located on the current site of Flushing Meadows-Corona Park (also the location of the 1964-1965 New York Worlds Fair), was one of the largest worlds fairs of all time. ... Orders and Families See text Centipedes (Class Chilopoda) are fast-moving venomous, predatory, terrestrial arthropods that have long bodies and many jointed legs. ...


Since the late 1990s, the Central Park Conservancy, the United States Department of Agriculture, and several city and state agencies have been fighting an infestation of the Asian long-horned beetle, which has been reported in Brooklyn, Queens, and Manhattan, including some parts of Central Park. The beetle, which likely was accidentally shipped from its native China in an untreated shipping crate, has no natural predators in the United States and the fight to contain its infestation has been very expensive. The beetle infests trees by boring a hole in them to deposit its eggs, at which point the only way to end the infestation is to destroy the tree. The United States Department of Agriculture (also called the Agriculture Department, or USDA) is a United States Federal Executive Department (or Cabinet Department). ... Binomial name Cano, 1894 [1] Synonyms Anthonomus aeneotinctus Champion, 1903 Wikispecies has information related to: Asian long-horned beetle The Asian long-horned beetle or pepper weevil [2] (Anoplophora glabripennis), sometimes called Starry Sky (Sky Oxen in China) beetle, is native to China and where it causes widespread mortality of...


On June 11, 2000, following the Puerto Rican Day Parade, gangs of drunken men groped and sexually assaulted women in the park. Several arrests were made shortly after the attacks, but it was not until 2006 that a civil suit against the city for failing to provide police protection was finally settled. [3], [4], [5] is the 162nd day of the year (163rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Puerto Rican Day Parade in New York City (2006). ...


Trivia

  • Central Park is larger than two of the world's smallest nations. It is almost twice as large as Monaco and nearly eight times as large as Vatican City.
  • The Central Park constitutes its own United States census tract, number 143. According to Census 2000, the park's population is eighteen persons, twelve male and six female, with a median age of 38.5 years.[7]
  • Legendary entertainer Diana Ross has a playground named after her in Central Park, the Diana Ross Playground.
  • On Saturday, February 8, 1964, as part of the Beatles first visit to America, John Lennon, Paul McCartney and Ringo Starr visited Central Park while entertaining photographers and members of the press. George Harrison stayed back at the group's suite at the Plaza Hotel, due to a bout with tonsillitis. On Lennon's birthday, October 9, 1985, Yoko Ono helped inaugurate the Strawberry Fields memorial, created as a tribute to him following his murder on December 8, 1980.[8]
  • Sheep actually grazed on the Sheep Meadow from the 1860s until 1934, when they were moved upstate since it was feared they would be used for food by impoverished depression-era New Yorkers.[9]
  • Fairmount Park in Philadelphia is actually more than 10 times as large as Central Park. Despite this, Central Park has 2.5 times as many visitors.
  • The real-estate value of Central Park is estimated to be $528,783,552,000 according to the property-appraisal firm Miller Samuel.[10]
  • Charles Ives wrote a piece called 'Central Park in the Dark'. Tunes of the day are included, such as 'Hello, My Baby', and music to represent a passing fire engine and a horse going through the fence.

2000 US Census logo The Twenty-Second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ... Diana Ross (born Diane Ernestine Earle Ross[1] on March 26, 1944) is an American singer and actress, whose musical repertoire spans R&B, soul, disco, jazz, and pop. ... The Diana Ross Playground is located in New York Citys Central Park, near the corner of West 81st Street and Central Park West. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... John Winston Ono Lennon, MBE (October 9, 1940 – December 8, 1980), (born John Winston Lennon, known as John Ono Lennon) was an iconic English 20th century rock and roll songwriter and singer, best known as the founding member of The Beatles. ... Sir James Paul McCartney, MBE (born 18 June 1942) is an Academy Award and Grammy Award winning English singer, songwriter and multi-instrumentalist who first gained worldwide fame as one of the founding members of The Beatles. ... Richard Starkey Jr, MBE (born 7 July 1940), known by his stage name Ringo Starr, is an Academy Award and Grammy Award winning English musician, singer, songwriter and actor, best known as the drummer of The Beatles. ... George Harrison, MBE (25 February 1943[1][2] – 29 November 2001[3]) was an Academy Award and Grammy Award-winning English rock guitarist, singer, songwriter, author and sitarist best known as the lead guitarist of The Beatles. ... Categories: Stub | Hotels of the United States | Manhattan | Landmarks ... Yoko Ono Lennon (小野 洋子 Ono Yōko (ONO Yōko), born February 18, 1933) is a Japanese-American artist and musician. ... Flowers and a card left at the Strawberry Fields Memorial in Central Park, NYC The Strawberry Fields memorial is the name given to a garden in New Yorks Central Park, dedicated to the memory of musician John Lennon, and named after one of his songs, Strawberry Fields Forever. ... Depending upon the criteria, Fairmount Park in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania is the largest municipal public park in the world at over 9,100 acres (37 km²). This figure includes all parkland within the city limits, as all 65 city parks are considered part of Fairmount Park and overseen by the Fairmount... Nickname: City of Brotherly Love, Philly, the Quaker City Motto: Philadelphia maneto (Let brotherly love continue) Location in Pennsylvania Coordinates: Country United States State Pennsylvania County Philadelphia Founded October 27, 1682 Incorporated October 25, 1701 Mayor John F. Street (D) Area    - City 369. ... Charles Edward Ives (October 20, 1874 – May 19, 1954) was an American composer of classical music. ...

Central Park in media

Literature

  • In the second half of J. D. Salinger's famous novel, The Catcher in the Rye, Holden Caulfield spends much time in Central Park. This includes skipping stones on the lagoon, visiting museums, ice skating and watching the carousel.
  • In the The Punisher comics, the protagonist's family are killed in the crossfire of a mob hit while on a picnic in Central Park.
  • Stephen Peter's novel The Park is Mine is about a war veteran who takes over Central Park to generate sympathy for the forgotten soldiers of the Vietnam War.

Jerome David Salinger (born January 1, 1919) is an American author best known for his 1951 novel The Catcher in the Rye, as well as his reclusive nature; he has not published any new work since 1965 and has not granted a formal interview since 1980. ... The Catcher in the Rye is a novel by J. D. Salinger. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article contains a trivia section. ... The Punisher (Frank Castle) is a Marvel Comics anti-hero. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000...

Television

  • The animated television series Tupu is set mainly in Central Park.

Tupu is an American childrens show based around the adventures of the mayors son with a redheaded girl named Tupu in Central Park. ...

Film

  • The 1973 James Bond film Live and Let Die features a chase scene in which Bond tails Dr. Kananga's car in a taxi and follows him through Central Park.
  • Al Pacino's office is located next to Central Park in The Devil's Advocate
  • Central Park plays a significant role in the 2004 film Immortel: Ad Vitam. There is a strange pyramid floating above the park, causing suspicious authorities to block off the park and kill anyone who enters the park.
  • In Home Alone 2: Lost in New York, Kevin McCallister meets a supporting character in Central Park.

For the musician, see Tommy Lee. ... A television movie (also TV movie, TV-movie, made-for-TV movie, etc. ... // April 12 - Actor Morgan Mason marries The Go-Gos Belinda Carlisle Actor Arnold Schwarzenegger marries television journalist Maria Shriver. ... // Events The Marx Brothers Zeppo Marx divorces his second wife, Barbara Blakely. ... Flemings image of James Bond; commissioned to aid the Daily Express comic strip artists. ... Live and Let Die is the 8th film in the British James Bond series and the first to star Roger Moore as MI6 agent James Bond. ... Alfredo James Pacino (born April 25, 1940) is an Academy Award, Golden Globe, AFI, Bafta, Emmy Award, and Tony Award-winning American stage and film actor who played such iconic roles as Michael Corleone in The Godfather Trilogy and Tony Montana in the 1983 film Scarface. ... This page is about the movie. ... The year 2004 in film involved some significant events. ... This article is about the film studio. ... This article contains a plot summary that is overly long or excessively detailed compared to the rest of the article. ... Benjamin Edward Stiller (born November 30, 1965) is an Emmy-winning American comedian, actor, film producer and director. ... Home Alone 2: Lost in New York (1992) is the sequel to the film Home Alone. ... Cruel Intentions is a 1999 American feature film starring Ryan Phillippe, Sarah Michelle Gellar, Reese Witherspoon, and Selma Blair. ... Sarah Michelle Gellar at the Dubai International Film Festival 2004 Sarah Michelle Gellar (born April 14, 1977) is an American actress, best known for her role in the television series Buffy the Vampire Slayer. ... Selma Blair (born June 23, 1972) is an American actress. ...

Plays

Edward Albee, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1961 Edward Franklin Albee III (born March 12, 1928) is an American playwright known for works including Whos Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, The Zoo Story, and The Sandbox. ... The Zoo Story is American playwright Edward Albees first play; written in 1958 and completed in just three weeks. ... Angels in America: A Gay Fantasia on National Themes is an award winning play in two parts by American playwright Tony Kushner. ... Tony Kushner (born July 16, 1956) is an award-winning American playwright most famous for his play Angels in America, for which he was awarded the Pulitzer Prize. ...

Music

  • Indie singer Jordan Galland has a song called "Central Park", " I feel like an 'Italian movie star', wandering through Central Park."
  • British Rock n' Roll band The Rolling Stones reference Central Park in their song Miss You
  • New York Rock band The Strokes mention Central Park in their song, 'Hawaii', "The grass is kind of green, you know, like Central Park"

Jordan Galland, is a 27 year old filmmaker, writer and musician. ... The Rolling Stones are an English band whose blues, rhythm and blues and rock and roll-infused music became popular during the British Invasion in the early 1960s. ... Miss You is a 1978 hit song by the Rolling Stones, from their album Some Girls. ... The Strokes are an American rock band formed in 1998 that rose to fame in the early 2000s as a leading group in the garage rock revival. ...

Video Games

  • The video game Alone in the Dark: Near Death Investigation takes place in Central Park.
  • There is a Central Park level in the 2005 game The Punisher.
  • A Central Park level exists in the Commodore 64 game The Last Ninja 2.
  • Several Spider-Man games, including Spider-Man 2 (console version), Ultimate Spider-Man and Spider-Man 3, feature scaled down versions of Central Park (and the rest of Manhattan) which may be freely explored.
  • In the 2006 video game Driver: Parallel Lines (where the player plays in 1978 and 2006 New York) the player can go through Central Park, although it does not have as many trees.

This article is about the sport of golf. ... Tiger Woods PGA Tour 2006 is a golf video game in the Tiger Woods PGA Tour series available for PSP, PlayStation 2, Xbox, Xbox 360, and PC. The game features several types of play, including the development of your own golfer in a simulated PGA Tour environment. ... Tiger Woods PGA Tour is a series of video games developed and published by Electronic Arts featuring professional golfer Tiger Woods. ... The Punisher is a violent action game which stars the Marvel Comics anti-hero the Punisher. ... The Commodore 64 is the best-selling single personal computer model of all time. ... The Sony PlayStation ) is a video game console of the 32/64-bit era, first produced by Sony Computer Entertainment in the mid-1990s. ... Parasite Eve ) is a survival horror console role-playing game developed and published by Square (now Square Enix). ... Spider-Man swinging around his hometown, New York City. ... Spider-Man 2 is the name of several computer and video games based on the Spider-Man universe and particularly the Spider-Man 2 movie. ... Ultimate Spider-Man is a video game based on the comic book of the same name by Brian Michael Bendis and Mark Bagley. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Grand Theft Auto IV (GTA IV) is the upcoming ninth installment of the Grand Theft Auto video game franchise, announced for release by Rockstar Games on October 16, 2007 for PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360. ... Grand Theft Auto III (sometimes abbreviated as GTA III or GTA3) is an action computer and video game developed by DMA Design (now Rockstar North), published by Rockstar Games in October 2001 for the PlayStation 2 video game console, May 2002 for Windows-based personal computers, and in November 2003... This article may contain excessive or improper use of copyrighted images and/or audio files. ... NY redirects here. ... True Crime: New York City is an urban adventure video game published by Activision and developed by Luxoflux for the Xbox, PlayStation 2,and GameCube consoles. ... NY redirects here. ...

See also

A section of The Gates between the Great Lawn oval and the 86th Street Transverse (Feb. ... The Spiral Jetty from atop Rozel Point, in mid-April 2005. ... Christo Yavasheff (born June 13, 1935) is an artist popularly known as Christo. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... An illustration from Walter Cranes 1906 book, Flowers from Shakespeares Garden: a Posy from the Plays A Shakespeare garden is a themed garden that cultivates plants mentioned in the works of William Shakespeare. ... The Vanderbilt Gate leads to the formal central section. ... The Great Lawn and Turtle Pond, Central Park, occupy the almost flat site of the intractably rectangular, thirty-five-acre Lower Reservoir,[1] constructed in 1842, which was an unalterable fixture of the location of Central Park as it was first designed by Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux. ... Harlem Meer (Dutch for Harlem Lake) is 1. ... The Central Park West Historic District is located in Manhattan, New York City, United States along historic Central Park West, between 61st and 97th Streets. ... Subsequent to San Franciscos Human Be-In, and a prelude to the Summer of Love, thousands gathered in Central Parks Sheep Meadow on Easter Sunday, March 26, 1967. ...

Notes

  1. ^ America's Most Visited City Parks (PDF). The Trust for Public Land (June 2006). Retrieved on 2006-07-11.
  2. ^ National Park Service, National Historic Landmark survey (New York), retrieved May 27, 2007.
  3. ^ All the present bodies of water in the parkhave been created by damming natural seeps and flows.
  4. ^ Central Park's history 1800-1858 [1]
  5. ^ February 25, 2005 CNN story about Christo and Jeanne-Claude's The Gates Central Park's 'Gates' to close
  6. ^ New York City Economic Development Corporation. [2]
  7. ^ Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved on 2006-07-11.
  8. ^ See Strawberry Fields official site
  9. ^ pbs.orgNew York: A Documentary Film
  10. ^ http://nymag.com/nymetro/news/reasonstoloveny/15362/index.html

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The National Park Service (NPS) is the United States federal agency that manages all National Parks, many National Monuments, and other conservation and historical properties with various title designations. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... New York: A Documentary Film is a seven-part American documentary on the history of New York City produced by Ric Burns that originally aired in the U.S. on PBS. The first four two-hour installments, which covered the history of the city from its founding to the turn...

References

  • Kelly, Bruce, Gail T. Guillet, and Mary Ellen W. Hern. Art of the Olmsted Landscape. New York: City Landmarks Preservation Commission: Arts Publisher, 1981. ISBN 0-941302-00-8.
  • Kinkead, Eugene. Central Park, 1857-1995: The Birth, Decline, and Reneal of a National Treasure. New York: Norton, 1990. ISBN 0-393-02531-4.
  • Miller, Sara Cedar. Central Park, An American Masterpiece: A Comprehensive History of the Nation's First Urban Park. New York: Abrams, 2003. ISBN 0-8109-3946-0.
  • Rosenzweig, Roy, and Elizabeth Blackmar. The Park and the People: A History of Central Park. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1992. ISBN 0-8014-9751-5.

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ...

Official websites

Additional information

Coordinates: 40.782° N 73.966° W Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...




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Central Park - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3552 words)
Central Park (40°46′59″N, 73°58′20″W) is a large public, urban park (843 acres or 3.41 km²; a rectangle 2.5 statute miles by one-half statute mile, or 4 km × 800 m) in the borough of Manhattan in New York City.
Central Park is bordered on the north by West 110th Street, on the west by Eighth Avenue, on the south by West 59th Street, and on the east by Fifth Avenue.
Central Park is a popular birding spot during spring and fall migration, when birds flying over Manhattan are attracted to the prominent oasis.
Central Park Zoo - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (553 words)
Now the Central Park Zoo is home to an indoor rainforest, a leafcutter ant colony, a chilled penguin house and Polar Bear pool.
When the Central Park Menagerie was officially founded, it was the United States's second publicly-owned zoo, after the Philadelphia Zoo (founded in 1859).
By 1980, the zoo, like Central Park itself, was sadly dilapidated; in that year, responsibility for its management was assumed by the New York Zoological Society.
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