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Encyclopedia > Central African Republic
République Centrafricaine
Ködörösêse tî Bêafrîka
Central African Republic
Flag of Central African Republic
Flag Emblem
Motto
"Unité, Dignité, Travail"  (French)
"Unity, Dignity, Work"
Anthem
La Renaissance  (French)
E Zingo  (Sango)
Capital
(and largest city)
Bangui
4°22′N, 18°35′E
Official languages Sango, French
Government Republic
 -  President François Bozizé
 -  Prime Minister Élie Doté
Independence from France 
 -  Date August 13, 1960 
Area
 -  Total 622,984 km² (43rd)
240,534 sq mi 
 -  Water (%) 0
Population
 -  2007 estimate 4,216,666 (124th)
 -  2003 census 3,895,150 
 -  Density 6.77 /km² (191st)
17.53 /sq mi
GDP (PPP) 2006 estimate
 -  Total $5.015 billion (153rd)
 -  Per capita $1,198 (167th)
GDP (nominal) 2006 estimate
 -  Total $1,488 billion (153rd)
 -  Per capita $355 (160th)
HDI (2004) 0.353 (low) (172nd)
Currency CFA franc (XAF)
Time zone WAT (UTC+1)
 -  Summer (DST) not observed (UTC+1)
Internet TLD .cf
Calling code +236

The Central African Republic (CAR, French: République Centrafricaine IPA: /ʀepyblik sɑ̃tʀafʀikɛn/ or Centrafrique /sɑ̃tʀafʀik/) is a landlocked country in Central Africa. It borders Chad in the north, Sudan in the east, the Republic of the Congo and the Democratic Republic of the Congo in the south, and Cameroon in the west. Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Central_African_Republic. ... Image File history File links Central_african_coa. ... Flag ratio: 3:5 The flag of the Central African Republic was adopted on December 1, 1958. ... The Coat of Arms of the Central African Republic consists of a shield in the center, with two flags on its edges, and with a sun rising over the shield. ... A motto (from Italian) is a phrase or a short list of words meant formally to describe the general motivation or intention of an entity, social group, or organization. ... A national anthem is a generally patriotic musical composition that is evoking and eulogizing the history, traditions and struggles of its people, recognized either by a nations government as the official national song, or by convention through use by the people. ... La Renaissance is the national anthem of the Central African Republic. ... Sango, shown at left in her yōkai exterminator uniform, and at right in her more casual clothing that she usually wears in the anime series. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... This article is about a city that serves as a center of government and politics. ... Demographics of Central African Republic, Data of FAO, year 2005 ; Number of inhabitants in thousands. ... Bangui is the capital of and the largest city in the Central African Republic. ... An official language is a language that is given a unique legal status in the countries, states, and other territories. ... Sango, shown at left in her yōkai exterminator uniform, and at right in her more casual clothing that she usually wears in the anime series. ... in particular, for the archaizing senses of republic, as a translation of politeia or res publica Forms of government Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A republic is a form of government maintained by a state or country whose sovereignty is based on popular consent and whose... List of Heads of State of Central African Republic and Central African Empire (Dates in italics indicate de facto continuation of office) Affiliations:- See also:- Central African Republic Central African Empire Heads of Government of the Central African Republic (and Central African Empire) Colonial Heads of Central Africa Lists of... François Bozizé Yangouvonda (born October 14, 1946) is the current President of the Central African Republic. ... List of Heads of Government of the Central African Republic (and Central African Empire) Affiliations:- See also:- Central African Republic Central African Empire Heads of State of the Central African Republic (and Central African Empire) Colonial Heads of Central Africa Lists of Incumbents Categories: Lists of office-holders | Central African... Élie Doté (born 1947?) is the current Prime Minister of the Central African Republic. ... is the 225th day of the year (226th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Area is a physical quantity expressing the size of a part of a surface. ... To help compare orders of magnitude of different geographical regions, we list here surface areas between 100,000 km² and 1,000,000 km². See also areas of other orders of magnitude. ... This is a list of the countries of the world sorted by area. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Impact from a water drop causes an upward rebound jet surrounded by circular capillary waves. ... A percentage is a way of expressing a proportion, a ratio or a fraction as a whole number, by using 100 as the denominator. ... This is a list of countries ordered according to population. ... Population density by country, 2006 Population density is a measurement of population per unit area or unit volume. ... Population density by country, 2006 List of countries and dependencies by population density in inhabitants/km². The list includes sovereign states and self-governing dependent territories that are recognized by the United Nations. ... Gross domestic product (by purchasing power parity) in 2006 The Purchasing power parity (PPP) theory was developed by Gustav Cassel in 1920. ... Gross domestic product (by purchasing power parity) in 2006 There are three lists of countries of the world sorted by their gross domestic product (GDP) (the value of all final goods and services produced within a nation in a given year). ... Per capita is a Latin phrase meaning for each head. ... Map of countries by GDP (PPP) per capita for the year 2006. ... Countries by nominal GDP. Source: IMF (2005) This article includes a list of countries of the world sorted by their gross domestic product (GDP), the value of all final goods and services produced within a nation in a given year. ... Per capita is a Latin phrase meaning for each head. ... Map of countries by GDP (nominal) per capita. ... World map indicating Human Development Index (2004). ... Image File history File links Red_Arrow_Down. ... Coloured world map indicating Human Development Index (2004) (colour-blind compliant map) This is a list of countries by Human Development Index as included in the United Nations Development Programmes Human Development Report 2006, compiled on the basis of 2004 data. ... now. ... ISO 4217 is the international standard describing three letter codes (also known as the currency code) to define the names of currencies established by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). ... A time zone is a region of the Earth that has adopted the same standard time, usually referred to as the local time. ... Time zones of Africa: Striped colours indicate countries observing daylight saving West Africa Time, or WAT, is a time zone used in western and west-central Africa (though not in countries west of Benin, which instead use GMT). ... Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) is a high-precision atomic time standard. ... Though DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) is a high-precision atomic time standard. ... A country code top-level domain (ccTLD) is a top-level domain used and reserved for a country or a dependent territory. ... .cf is the Internet country code top-level domain (ccTLD) for the Central African Republic. ... A telephone number is a sequence of decimal digits (0-9) that is used for identifying a destination telephone line in a telephone network. ... Articles with similar titles include the NATO phonetic alphabet, which has also informally been called the “International Phonetic Alphabet”. For information on how to read IPA transcriptions of English words, see IPA chart for English. ... A landlocked country is one that has no coastline. ...


Most of the CAR consists of Sudano-Guinean savannas but it also includes a Sahelo-Sudanese zone in the north and an equatorial forest zone in the south. Two thirds of the country lie in the basins of the Ubangi river, which flows south into the Congo River, while the remaining third lies in the basin of the Shari river, which flows north into Lake Chad. The Ubangi River (also Oubangi) is a major tributary of the Congo River in Central Africa. ... The Congo River (for a time known as Zaire River) is the largest river in Western Central Africa. ... The Chari or Shari River is a 949-kilometer-long river of central Africa, flowing from the Central African Republic through Chad into Lake Chad. ... Lake Chad (in French: Lac Tchad) is a large, shallow lake in Africa. ...


Since most of the territory is located in the Ubangi and Shari river basins, the French called the colony it carved out in this region Ubangi-Shari, or Oubangui-Chari in French. This French colony of Ubangi-Shari became a semi-autonomous territory of the French Community in 1958 and then an independent nation on 13 August 1960. For over three decades since independence the CAR was ruled by presidents who were not chosen in truly democratic elections or who took power by force. Local discontent was eventually reinforced by international pressure, following the end of the Cold War. Oubangui-Chari, or Ubangi-Shari, was a French territory in central Africa which later became the independent country of the Central African Republic on August 13, 1960. ... Oubangui-Chari, or Ubangi-Shari, was a French territory in central Africa which later became the independent country of the Central African Republic on August 13, 1960. ... The French Community was the political entity which replaced the French Union, which in turn was the descendant of the French Empire following the Second World War. ... is the 225th day of the year (226th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ...


The first fair democratic elections were held in 1993 with resources provided by the country's donors and help from the UN Office for Electoral Affairs. They brought Ange-Félix Patassé to power, but President Patassé lost popular support and was overthrown by General François Bozizé in 2003. General Bozizé won a democratic election in May 2005 and remains in power today. Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... Patassé with Bozizé in the background Ange-Félix Patassé (born January 25, 1937) was President of the Central African Republic from 1993 until 2003, when he was deposed by the rebel leader François Bozizé. Patassé was born in Paoua. ... // A coup dÉtat (pronounced ), or simply coup, is the sudden overthrow of a government, often through illegal means by a part of the state establishment — mostly replacing just the high-level figures. ... François Bozizé Yangouvonda (born October 14, 1946) is the current President of the Central African Republic. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Presidential and parliamentary elections were held in the Central African Republic on March 13, 2005 (first round) and May 8, 2005 (second round), marking the end of the transitional process that began with the seizure of power by François Bozizé in a March 2003 coup. ... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Wikimedia Commons has media related to: May 2005 Deaths in May May 26: Eddie Albert May 25: Ismail Merchant May 25: Sunil Dutt May 25: Graham Kennedy May 22: Thurl Ravenscroft May 21: Howard Morris May 21...


The Central African Republic is one of the poorest countries in the world and among the ten poorest countries in Africa.


In 2001 The Ecologist magazine estimated that Central African Republic is the world's leading country in sustainable development.[1] Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... The Ecologist is a monthly British magazine that broadly focuses on promoting an ecological agenda in its news stories, opinion and debate. ... Sustainable development is defined as balancing the fulfillment of human needs with the protection of the natural environment so that these needs can be met not only in the present, but in the indefinite future. ...

Contents

History

Main article: History of the Central African Republic

The Central African Republic is believed to have been settled from at least the 7th century on by overlapping empires, including the Kanem-Bornu, Ouaddai, Baguirmi, and Dafour groups based around Lake Chad region and along Upper Nile. ...

Pre-history

Between about 1000 BCE and 1000 CE, Adamawa-Eastern-speaking peoples spread eastward from Cameroon to Sudan and settled in most of the territory of the CAR. During the same period, a much smaller number of Bantu-speaking immigrants settled in Southwestern CAR and some Central Sudanic-speaking populations settled along the Oubangi. The majority of the CAR's inhabitants thus speak Adamawa-Eastern languages or Bantu languages belonging to the Niger-Congo family. A minority speak Central Sudanic languages of the Nilo-Saharan family. More recent immigrants include many Muslim merchants who most often speak Arabic or Hausa. The Adamawa-Ubangi languages are spoken in Nigeria, Cameroon, Chad, southern Central African Republic, by a total of about 12 million people. ... Map showing the approximate distribution of Bantu (dull yellow) vs. ... Central Sudanic is a grouping of about thirty languages of the Nilo-Saharan language family. ... Map showing the distribution of Niger-Congo languages The Niger-Congo languages constitute one of the worlds major language families, and Africas largest in terms of geographical area, number of speakers, and number of distinct languages. ... Map showing the distribution of the Nilo-Saharan languages. ...


Exposure to the outside world

Until the early 1800s, the peoples of the CAR lived beyond the expanding Islamic frontier in the Sudanic zone of Africa and thus had relatively little contact with Abrahamic religions or northern economies. During the first decades of the nineteenth century, however, Muslim traders began increasingly to penetrate the region of the CAR and to cultivate special relations with local leaders in order to facilitate their trade and settlement in the region. The initial arrival of Muslim traders in the early 1800s was relatively peaceful and depended upon the support of local peoples, but after about 1850, slave traders with well-armed soldiers began to penetrate the region. Between c. 1860 and 1910, slave traders from Sudan, Chad, Cameroon, Dar al-Kuti in Northern CAR and Nzakara and Zande states in Southeastern CAR exported much of the population of Eastern CAR, a region with very few inhabitants today. map showing the prevalence of Abrahamic (purple) and Dharmic (yellow) religions in each country. ... The Azande (plural, Zande in singular) are a tribe of north central Africa. ...


French colonialism

European penetration of Central African territory began in the late nineteenth century during the so-called Scramble for Africa (c. 1875-1900). Count Savorgnan de Brazza took the lead in establishing the French Congo with headquarters in the city named after him, Brazzaville, and sent expeditions up the Ubangi river in an effort to expand France's claims to territory in Central Africa. King Leopold II of Belgium, Germany and the United Kingdom also competed to establish their claims to territory in the Central African region. In 1889 the French established a post on the Ubangi river at Bangui, the future capital of Ubangi-Shari and the CAR. De Brazza then sent expeditions in 1890-91 up the Sangha River in what is now Southwestern CAR, up the center of the Ubangi basin toward Lake Chad, and eastward along the Ubangi river toward the Nile. De Brazza and the procolonial in France wished to expand the borders of the French Congo to link up with French territories in West Africa, North Africa and East Africa. In 1894, the French Congo's borders with Leopold II's Congo Free State and German Cameroon were fixed by diplomatic agreements. Then, in 1899, the French Congo's border with Sudan was fixed along the Congo-Nile watershed, leaving France without her much coveted outlet on the Nile and turning Southeastern Ubangi-Shari into a cul-de-sac. Cecil Rhodes: Cape-Cairo railway project. ... Pierre Paul François Camille Savorgnan de Brazza (January 26, 1852 - September 14, 1905) was an explorer of Italian nationality. ... French Congo was the original French colony established in the present-day area of the Republic of the Congo, Gabon, and the Central African Republic. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... King Leopold II Leopold II, King of the Belgians (Louis Philippe Marie Victor) (April 9, 1835–December 17, 1909), succeeded his father, Leopold I of Belgium, to the Belgian throne in 1865 and remained king until his death. ... Bangui is the capital of and the largest city in the Central African Republic. ... Oubangui-Chari, or Ubangi-Shari, was a French territory in central Africa which later became the independent country of the Central African Republic on August 13, 1960. ... The Sangha River, a river in central Africa, is a tributary of the Congo River. ... Lake Chad (in French: Lac Tchad) is a large, shallow lake in Africa. ... The Nile (Arabic: , transliteration: , Ancient Egyptian iteru, Coptic piaro or phiaro) is a major north-flowing river in Africa, generally regarded as the longest river in the world. ...  Western Africa (UN subregion)  Maghreb[1] West Africa or Western Africa is the westernmost region of the African continent. ... North Africa is the Mediterranean, northernmost region of the African continent, separated by the Sahara from Sub-Saharan Africa. ...  Eastern Africa (UN subregion)  East African Community  Central African Federation (defunct)  geographic, including above East Africa or Eastern Africa is the easternmost region of the African continent, variably defined by geography or geopolitics. ... Flag Capital Boma Government Monarchy Ruler and owner Leopold II of Belgium Historical era New Imperialism  - Established 1885  - Annexation by Belgium 15 November, 1908 The Congo Free State was a corporate state privately owned by King Leopold II of Belgium (not in his role as monarch) that included the entire...


Once European negotiators agreed upon the borders of the French Congo, France had to decide how to pay for the costly occupation, administration, and development of the territory. The reported financial successes of Leopold II's concessionary companies in the Congo Free State convinced the French government in 1899 to grant 17 private companies large concessions in the Ubangi-Shari region. In return for the right to exploit these lands by buying local products and selling European goods, the companies promised to pay rent to the colonial state and to promote the development of their concessions. The companies employed European and African agents who frequently used extremely brutal and atrocious methods to force Central Africans to work for them. At the same time, the French colonial administration began to force Central Africans to pay taxes and to provide the state with free labor. The companies and French administration often collaborated in their efforts to force Central Africans to work for their benefit, but they also often found themselves at odds. Some French officials reported abuses committed by private company militias and even by their own colonial colleagues and troops, but efforts to bring these criminals to justice almost always failed. When news of terrible atrocities committed against Central Africans by concessionary company employees and colonial officials or troops reached France and caused an outcry, there were investigations and some feeble attempts at reform, but the situation on the ground in Ubangi-Shari remained essentially the same.


In the meantime, during the first decade of French colonial rule (c. 1900-1910), the rulers of African states in the Ubangi-Shari region increased their slave raiding activities and also their sale of local products to European companies and the colonial state. They took advantage of their treaties with the French to procure more weapons which were used to capture more slaves and so much of the eastern half of Ubangi-Shari was depopulated as a result of the export of Central Africans by local rulers during the first decade of colonial rule. Those who had power, Africans and Europeans, often made life miserable for those who did not have the power to resist. Year 1900 (MCM) was an exceptional common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar, but a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar. ... Year 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


During the second decade of colonial rule (c. 1910-1920), armed employees of private companies and the colonial state continued to use brutal methods to deal with local populations who resisted forced labor but the power of local African rulers was destroyed and so slave raiding was greatly diminished. In 1911, the Sangha and Lobaye basins were ceded to Germany as part of an agreement which gave France a free-hand in Morocco and so Western Ubangi-Shari came under German rule until World War I, during which France reconquered this territory by using Central African troops. 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ...


The third decade of colonial rule (1920-1930) was a period of transition during which a network of roads was built, cash crops were promoted, mobile health services were formed to combat sleeping sickness, and Protestant missions established stations in different parts of the country. New forms of forced labor were also introduced, however, as the French conscripted large numbers of Ubangians to work on the Congo-Ocean Railway and many of these recruits died of exhaustion and illness. In 1925 the French writer André Gide published Voyage au Congo in which he described the alarming consequences of conscription for the Congo-Ocean railroad and exposed the continuing atrocities committed against Central Africans in Western Ubangi-Shari by employees of the Forestry Company of Sangha-Ubangi, for example. In 1928 a major insurrection, the Kongo-Wara 'war of the hoe handle' broke out in Western Ubangi-Shari and continued for several years. The extent of this insurrection, perhaps the largest anticolonial rebellion in Africa during the interwar years, was carefully hidden from the French public because it provided evidence, once again, of strong opposition to French colonial rule and forced labor. Year 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display 1930 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Sleeping sickness or African trypanosomiasis is a parasitic disease in people and animals, caused by protozoa of genus Trypanosoma and transmitted by the tsetse fly. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... The Congo-Ocean Railway (COR, or CFCO) links the Atlantic port of Pointe-Noire (now in the Republic of Congo) with Brazzaville. ... André Gide in 1893 Gide redirects here, for other people named Gide, see Gide (disambiguation) André Paul Guillaume Gide (November 22, 1869 – February 19, 1951) was a French author and winner of the Nobel Prize in literature in 1947. ...


During the fourth decade of colonial rule (c. 1930-1940), cotton, tea, and coffee emerged as important cash crops in Ubangi-Shari and the mining of diamonds and gold began in earnest. Several cotton companies were granted purchasing monopolies over large areas of cotton production and were thus able to fix the prices paid to cultivators in order to assure profits for their shareholders. Europeans established coffee plantations and Central Africans also began to cultivate coffee. This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Cotton ready for harvest. ... Tea leaves in a Chinese gaiwan. ... A cup of coffee Workers sorting and pulping coffee beans in Guatemala Mature coffee fruit still on the plant Coffee is a widely consumed beverage prepared from the roasted seeds — commonly referred to as beans — of the coffee plant. ... This article is about the gemstone. ... General Name, Symbol, Number gold, Au, 79 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 11, 6, d Appearance metallic yellow Standard atomic weight 196. ...


The fifth decade of colonial rule (c. 1940-1950) was shaped by the Second World War and the political reforms which followed in its wake. In September 1940 pro-Gaullist French officers took control of Ubangi-Shari. Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


Independence

On 1 December 1958 the colony of Ubangi-Shari became an autonomous territory within the French Community and took the name Central African Republic. The founding father and president of the Conseil de Gouvernement, Barthélémy Boganda, died in a mysterious plane accident in 1959, just eight days before the last elections of the colonial era. On 13 August 1960 the Central African Republic gained its independence and two of Boganda's closest aides, Abel Goumba and David Dacko, became involved in a power struggle. With the backing of the French, Dacko took power and soon had Goumba arrested. By 1962 President Dacko had established a one-party state. is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The French Community was the political entity which replaced the French Union, which in turn was the descendant of the French Empire following the Second World War. ... Barthélemy Boganda (4 April 1910 – 29 March 1959) was the leading pre-independence nationalist in the Central African Republic. ... is the 225th day of the year (226th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Abel Goumba (born 1927) is the Vice President of the Central African Republic under François Bozizé. He was Prime Minister in the 1950s, and was appointed prime minister again in 2003 after a coup ousted the previous government. ... Image:DavidDacko. ...


On 31 December 1965 Dacko was overthrown by Colonel Jean-Bédel Bokassa, who suspended the constitution and dissolved the National Assembly. President Bokassa declared himself President for life in 1972, and named himself Emperor Bokassa I of the Central African Empire on 4 December 1976. A year later, Emperor Bokassa crowned himself in a lavish and expensive ceremony that was ridiculed by much of the world. In 1979 France carried out a coup against Bokassa and "restored" Dacko to power. Dacko, in turn, was overthrown in a coup by General André Kolingba on 1 September 1981. is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1965 calendar). ... Emperor Bokassa I, also known as Salah Eddine Ahmed Bokassa and Jean-Bédel Bokassa (IPA: , (February 22, 1921–November 3, 1996), was the military ruler of the Central African Republic from January 1, 1966 and the emperor of the Central African Empire from December 4, 1976, until his overthrow... The Central African Empire was the name of the Central African Republic when president Jean-Bédel Bokassa declared himself Emperor Bokassa in 1977. ... December 4th redirects here. ... Year 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... André Diuedonne Kolingba (born August 12, 1935) was president of the Central African Republic from 1981 to 1993. ... September 1 is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years). ... Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ...


Kolingba suspended the constitution and ruled with a military junta until 1985. He introduced a new constitution in 1986 which was adopted by a nationwide referendum. Membership in his new party, the Rassemblement Démocratique Centrafricain (RDC) was voluntary. In 1987, semi-competitive elections to parliament were held and municipal elections were held in 1988. Kolingba's two major political opponents, Abel Goumba and Ange-Félix Patassé, boycotted these elections because their parties were not allowed to compete. The Central African Democratic Rally (French: Rassemblement Démocratique Centrafricain) is a political party in the Central African Republic. ... Patassé with Bozizé in the background Ange-Félix Patassé (born January 25, 1937) was President of the Central African Republic from 1993 until 2003, when he was deposed by the rebel leader François Bozizé. Patassé was born in Paoua. ...


By 1990, after the fall of the Berlin Wall, a pro-democracy movement became very active. In May 1990 a letter signed by 253 prominent citizens asked for the convocation of a National Conference but Kolingba refused this request and detained several opponents. Pressure from the United States, more reluctantly, from France, and from a group of locally represented countries and agencies called GIBAFOR (France, USA, Germany, Japan, EU, World Bank and UN) finally led Kolingba to agree, in principle, to hold free elections in October 1992, with help from the UN Office of Electoral Affairs. After using the excuse of alleged irregularities to suspend the results of the elections as a pretext for holding on to power, President Kolingba came under intense pressure from GIBAFOR to establish a "Conseil National Politique Provisoire de la République" (Provisional National Political Council) (CNPPR) and to set up a "Mixed Electoral Commission" which included representatives from all political parties.


When elections were finally held in 1993, again with the help of the international community, Ange-Félix Patassé came in first in the first round and Kolingba came in fourth after Abel Goumba and David Dacko. In the second round, Patassé won 53 percent of the vote while Goumba won 45.6 percent. Most of Patassé's support came from Gbaya, Kare and Kaba voters in seven heavily-populated prefectures in the northwest while Goumba's support came largely from ten less-populated prefectures in the south and east. Furthermore, Patassé's party, the Mouvement pour la Libération du Peuple Centrafricain (MLPC) or Movement for the Liberation of the Central African People gained a simple but not an absolute majority of seats in parliament, which meant Patassé needed coalition partners.


Patassé relieved former President Kolingba of his military rank of general in March of 1994 and then charged several former ministers with various crimes. Patassé also removed many Yakoma from important, lucrative posts in the government. Two hundred mostly Yakoma members of the presidential guard were also dismissed or reassigned to the army. Kolingba's RDC loudly proclaimed that Patassé's government was conducting a "witch hunt" against the Yakoma.


A new constitution was approved on 28 December 1994 and promulgated on 14 January 1995, but this constitution, like those before it, did not have much impact on the practice of politics. In 1996-1997, reflecting steadily decreasing public confidence in its erratic behaviour, three mutinies against Patassé's government were accompanied by widespread destruction of property and heightened ethnic tension. On 25 January 1997, the Bangui Peace Accords were signed which provided for the deployment of an inter-African military mission, the Mission Interafricaine de Surveillance des Accords de Bangui (MISAB). Mali's former president, Amadou Touré, served as chief mediator and brokered the entry of ex-mutineers into the government on 7 April 1997. The MISAB mission was later replaced by a U.N. peacekeeping force, the Mission des Nations Unis en RCA (MINURCA). is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full 1994 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1997 Gregorian calendar). ... Amadou Toumani Touré Amadou Toumani Touré (b. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... Year 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1997 Gregorian calendar). ...


In 1998 parliamentary elections resulted in Kolingba' RDC winning 20 out of 109 seats, which constituted a comeback, but in 1999, notwithstanding widespread public anger in urban centers with his corrupt rule, Patassé won free elections to become president for a second term. On 28 May 2001 rebels stormed strategic buildings in Bangui in an unsuccessful coup attempt. The army chief of staff, Abel Abrou, and General Francois N'Djadder Bedaya were shot, but Patassé regained the upper hand by bringing in at least 300 troops of the rebel leader Jean-Pierre Bemba from over the river in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and by Libyan soldiers. May 28 is the 148th day of the year (149th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... Jean-Pierre Bemba (4 November 1962) is one of four vice-presidents in the transitional government of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. ...


In the aftermath of this failed coup, militias loyal to Patassé sought revenge against rebels in many neighborhoods of the capital, Bangui, that resulted the destruction of many homes as well as the torture and murder of many opponents. Eventually Patassé came to suspect that General François Bozizé was involved in another coup attempt against him and so Bozizé fled with loyal troops to Chad. On 25 October 2002 Bozizé launched a surprise attack against Patassé, who was out of the country. Libyan troops and some 1,000 soldiers of Bemba's Congolese rebel organization failed to stop the rebels, who took control of the country and thus succeeded in overthrowing Patassé. François Bozizé Yangouvonda (born October 14, 1946) is the current President of the Central African Republic. ... October 25 is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ...


François Bozizé suspended the constitution and named a new cabinet which included most opposition parties. Abel Goumba, "Mr. Clean", was named vice-president, which gave Bozizé's new government a positive image. Bozizé established a broad-based National Transition Council to draft a new constitution and announced that he would step down and run for office once the new constitution was approved. A national dialogue was held from 15 September to 27 October 2003, and Bozizé won a fair election that excluded Patassé, to be elected president on a second ballot, in May 2005. is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 300th day of the year (301st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Politics

The country is currently under the rule of François Bozizé. A new constitution was approved by voters in a referendum held on December 5, 2004. Full multiparty presidential and parliamentary elections were held in March 2005,[2] with a second round in May. Bozizé was declared the winner after a run-off vote.[3] Politics of the Central African Republic takes place in a framework of a presidential republic, whereby the President is both head of state and head of government (with an executive Prime Minister. ... François Bozizé Yangouvonda (born October 14, 1946) is the current President of the Central African Republic. ... December 5 is the 339th day (340th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... shelby was here 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Presidential and parliamentary elections were held in the Central African Republic on March 13, 2005 (first round) and May 8, 2005 (second round), marking the end of the transitional process that began with the seizure of power by François Bozizé in a March 2003 coup. ... An example of runoff voting. ...


In February 2006, there were reports of widespread violence in the northern part of the CAR.[4] Thousands of refugees fled their homes, caught in the crossfire of battles between government troops and rebel forces. More than 7,000 people fled to neighboring Chad. Those who remained in the CAR told of government troops systematically killing men and boys suspected of cooperating with rebels.[5]


Prefectures and sub-prefectures

Prefectures of the Central African Republic
Main articles: Prefectures of the Central African Republic and Sub-prefectures of the Central African Republic

The Central African Republic is divided into 14 administrative prefectures (préfectures), along with 2 economic prefectures (préfectures economique) and one autonomous commune. The prefectures are further divided into 71 sub-prefectures (sous-préfectures). Image File history File links CAR_prefectures. ... Image File history File links CAR_prefectures. ... There are also two economic prefectures: The national capital, Bangui, comprises a commune. ... Sub-Prefectures of the Central African Republic The prefectures of the Central African Republic are divided into 71 sub-prefectures (sous-préfectures). ... The term prefecture (from the Latin Praefectura) indicates the office, seat, territorial circonscription of a Prefect. ... A commune is an administrative subdivision of various European and African countries, including Belgium, France, Germany, Luxembourg, Poland, Romania, Senegal, and the Scandinavian countries. ...


The prefectures include: There are also two economic prefectures: The national capital, Bangui, comprises a commune. ...

  • Bamingui-Bangoran
  • Basse-Kotto
  • Haute-Kotto
  • Haut-Mbomou
  • Kémo
  • Lobaye
  • Mambéré-Kadéï

the two economic prefectures are Nana-Grébizi and Sangha-Mbaéré; the commune is Bangui. Bamingui-Bangoran is one of the 14 prefectures of the Central African Republic. ... Basse-Kotto is one of the 14 prefectures of the Central African Republic. ... Haute-Kotto is one of the 14 prefectures of the Central African Republic. ... Haut-Mbomou is one of the 14 prefectures of the Central African Republic. ... Kémo is one of the 14 prefectures of the Central African Republic. ... Lobaye is one of the 14 prefectures of the Central African Republic. ... Mambéré-Kadéï is one of the 14 prefectures of the Central African Republic. ... Mbomou is one of the 14 prefectures of the Central African Republic. ... Nana-Mambéré is one of the 14 prefectures of the Central African Republic. ... Ombella-MPoko is one of the 14 prefectures of the Central African Republic. ... Ouaka is one of the 14 prefectures of the Central African Republic. ... Ouham-Pendé is one of the 14 prefectures of the Central African Republic. ... Vakaga is one of the 14 prefectures of the Central African Republic. ... Nana-Grébizi is one of the 2 economic prefectures of the Central African Republic. ... Sangha-Mbaéré is one of the 2 economic prefectures of the Central African Republic. ... Bangui is the capital of and the largest city in the Central African Republic. ...


Geography

Satellite image of Central African Republic, generated from raster graphics data supplied by The Map Library
Satellite image of Central African Republic, generated from raster graphics data supplied by The Map Library
Map of the Central African Republic

The Central African Republic is an entirely land-locked nation within the interior of the African continent. Much of the country consists of flat, or rolling plateau savanna, typically about 1,640 feet (500 m) above sea level. In the northeast are the Fertit Hills, and there are scattered hills in southwest part of the country. To the northwest is the Yade Massif, a granite plateau with an altitude of 3,750 feet (1,143 m). Location: Central Africa, north of Democratic Republic of the Congo Geographic coordinates: 7 00 N, 21 00 E Map references: Africa Area: total: 622,984 km² land: 622,984 km² water: 0 km² Area - comparative: slightly smaller than Texas Land boundaries: total: 5,203 km border countries: Cameroon 797 km... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1566x1055, 1763 KB) ECW to TIFF to PNG (compression level 9). ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1566x1055, 1763 KB) ECW to TIFF to PNG (compression level 9). ... Suppose the smiley face in the top left corner is an RGB bitmap image. ... Satellite image of Congo, generated from raster graphics data supplied by The Map Library. ... from [1] File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... from [1] File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Savanna at Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Tanzania. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... Close-up of granite from Yosemite National Park, valley of the Merced River Quarrying granite for the Mormon Temple, Utah Territory. ...


At 240,519 mi² (622,984 km²), the Central African Republic is the world's 43rd-largest country (after Somalia). It is comparable in size to Ukraine, and is somewhat smaller than the US state of Texas. This article is about the unit of measure. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... Official language(s) No Official Language See languages of Texas Capital Austin Largest city Houston Area  Ranked 2nd  - Total 261,797 sq mi (678,051 km²)  - Width 773 miles (1,244 km)  - Length 790 miles (1,270 km)  - % water 2. ...


Much of the southern border is formed by tributaries of the Congo River, with the Mbomou River in the east merging with the Uele River to form the Ubangi River. In the west, the Sangha River flows through part of the country. The eastern border lies along the edge of the Nile river watershed. The Congo River (for a time known as Zaire River) is the largest river in Western Central Africa. ... The Mbomou River (sometimes transliterated Bomu) is a river that forms part of the boundary between the Central African Republic (CAR) and the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). ... The Uele River is a river in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. ... The Ubangi River (also Oubangi) is a major tributary of the Congo River in central Africa. ... The Sangha River, a river in central Africa, is a tributary of the Congo River. ... There is also Nile, a death metal band from South Carolina, USA. The Nile in Egypt Length 6 695 km Elevation of the source 1 134 m Average discharge 2 830 m³/s Area watershed 3 400 000 km² Origin Africa Mouth the Mediterranean Basin countries Uganda - Sudan - Egypt The... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ...


Estimates of the amount of the country covered by forest ranges up to 8%, with the densest parts in the south. The forest is highly diverse, and includes commercially important species of Ayous, Sapelli and Sipo. [6] The current deforestation rate is 0.4% per annum, and lumber poaching is commonplace. Triplochiton scleroxylon is a tropical tree of Africa. ... Sapele Jorge Sapelli Camila Canabal Sapelli Domingo Sapelli, Argentine actor Category: ... Species See text. ...


The climate of the C.A.R. is generally tropical. The northern areas are subject to harmattan winds, which are hot, dry, and carry dust. The northern regions have been subject to desertification, and the northeast is desert. The remainder of the country is prone to flooding from nearby rivers. A tropic is either of two circles of latitude: Tropic of Cancer, at 23½°N Tropic of Capricorn, at 23½°S Tropic is also the name of a town in Utah, United States. ... The Harmattan is a dry and dusty wind blowing northeast and west off the Sahara into the Gulf of Guinea between November and March (winter). ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ...


Economy

The economy of the CAR is dominated by the cultivation and sale of food crops such as cassava, peanuts, maize, sorghum, millet, sesame and plantains. The importance of foodcrops over exported cash crops is indicated by the fact that the total production of cassava, the staple food of most Central Africans, ranges between 200,000 and 300,000 tons a year, while the production of cotton, the principal exported cash crop, ranges from 25,000 to 45,000 tons a year. Foodcrops are not exported in large quantities but they still constitute the principal cash crops of the country because Central Africans derive far more income from the periodic sale of surplus foodcrops than from exported cash crops such as cotton or coffee. Many rural and urban women also transform some foodcrops into alcoholic drinks such as sorghum beer or hard liquor and derive considerable income from the sale of these drinks. Much of the income derived from the sale of foods and alcohol is not "on the books" and thus is not considered in calculating per capita income, which is one reason why official figures for per capita income are not accurate in the case of the CAR. The per capita income of the CAR is often listed as being around $300 a year, said to be one of the lowest in the world, but this figure is based mostly on reported sales of exports and largely ignores the more important but unregistered sale of foods, locally-produced alcohol, diamonds, ivory, bushmeat, and traditional medicine, for example. The informal economy of the CAR is more important than the formal economy for most Central Africans. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require rewriting and/or reformatting. ... Binomial name Manihot esculenta Crantz The cassava, casava, or manioc (Manihot esculenta) is a woody shrub of the Euphorbiaceae (spurge family) native to South America that is extensively cultivated as an annual crop in tropical and subtropical regions for its edible starchy tuberous root, a major source of carbohydrate. ... Binomial name L. This article is about the legume. ... “Corn” redirects here. ... Species About 30 species, see text Sorghum is a genus of numerous species of grasses, some of which are raised for grain and many of which are utilised as fodder plants either cultivated or as part of pasture. ... Pearl millet in the field The millets are a group of small-seeded species of cereal crops, widely grown around the world for food and fodder. ... Binomial name Sesamum indicum L. Sesame (Sesamum indicum) is a flowering plant in the genus Sesamum. ... Species Musa × paradisiaca A big load of plantains in Masaya, Nicaragua Cooking plantains (pronounced plan-TENZ or plan-TAINZ) are a kind of plantains that are generally used for cooking, as contrasted with the soft, sweet banana varieties (which are sometimes called dessert bananas). ... In agriculture, a cash crop is a crop which is sold for money. ... Look up ton in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Cotton ready for harvest. ... A cup of coffee Workers sorting and pulping coffee beans in Guatemala Mature coffee fruit still on the plant Coffee is a widely consumed beverage prepared from the roasted seeds — commonly referred to as beans — of the coffee plant. ... The per capita income for a group of people may be defined as their total personal income, divided by the total population. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the gemstone. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The term describes medical knowledge systems, which developed over centuries within various societies before the era of modern medicine; traditional medicines include medicines such as herbal medicine, Ayurvedic medicine, Unani medicine, Acupuncture, Traditional Chinese medicine, Traditional Ayurvedic Medicine, South African Muti, Yoruba Ifá, as well as other medical knowledge and...


Diamonds constitute the most important export of the CAR, frequently accounting for 40-55% of export revenues, but an estimated 30-50% of the diamonds produced each year leave the country clandestinely.


The CAR is heavily dependent upon multilateral foreign aid and the presence of numerous NGO's which provide numerous services which the government fails to provide. As one UNDP official put it, the CAR is a country "sous serum," or a country hooked up to an IV. (Mehler 2005:150) The very presence of numerous foreign personnel and organizations in the country, including peacekeepers and even refugee camps, provides an important source of revenue for many Central Africans. NGO is an abbreviation or code for: Non-governmental organization Nagoya Airport (IATA code) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) is the largest multilateral source of grant technical assistance in the world. ...


The country is self-sufficient in food crops, but much of the population lives at a subsistence level. Livestock development is hindered by the presence of the tsetse fly. Sheep are commonly bred as livestock. ... Binomial name Glossina morsitans The tsetse fly, Glossina morsitans, is a fly (order Diptera) that eats blood from animals, including humans. ...


Export trade is hindered by poor economic development, and the location of this country far from the coast.


The natural wilderness regions of this country had good potential as ecotourist destinations. The country is noted for its population of forest elephants. In the southwest, the Dzanga-Sangha National Park is a rain forest area. To the north, the Manovo-Gounda St Floris National Park has been well-populated with wildlife, including leopards, lions, and rhinos. To the northeast the Bamingui-Bangoran National Park. However the population of wildlife in these parks has severely diminished over the past 20 years due to poaching, particularly from the neighboring Sudan. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Binomial name Loxodonta cyclotis Matschie, 1900 Until recently, it was thought that the so-called Forest Elephant (Loxodonta cyclotis) was simply a subspecies of the African Savannah Elephant (Loxodonta africana). ... Manovo-Gounda St. ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 Synonyms Felis pardus Linnaeus, 1758 The Leopard (Panthera pardus) is is an Old World mammal of the Felidae family and one of the four big cats of the genus Panthera, along with the tiger, the lion and the jaguar. ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) Distribution of Lions in Africa Synonyms Felis leo (Linnaeus, 1758) The lion (Panthera leo) is a member of the family Felidae and one of four big cats in the genus Panthera. ... Black Rhino from Howletts Wild Animal Park For other uses, see Rhinoceros (disambiguation). ...


Demographics

The population has tripled since independence. In 1960 the population was 1,232,000. The current population is at 4,303,356. (Note: estimates for this country explicitly take into account the effects of excess mortality due to AIDS; this can result in lower life expectancy, higher infant mortality and death rates, lower population and growth rates, and changes in the distribution of population by age and sex than would otherwise be expected (July 2006 est.) ) Demographics of Central African Republic, Data of FAO, year 2005 ; Number of inhabitants in thousands. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The United Nations estimates that approximately 11% of the population ages 15 - 49 is HIV positive.[7] Only 3% of the country has antiretroviral therapy available, compared to 17% coverage in neighbouring countries of Chad and the Republic of the Congo.[8] The foundation of the U.N. The United Nations (UN) is an international organization whose stated aims are to facilitate co-operation in international law, international security, economic development, social progress and human rights issues. ... Species Human immunodeficiency virus 1 Human immunodeficiency virus 2 Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a retrovirus that causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS, a condition in humans in which the immune system begins to fail, leading to life-threatening opportunistic infections). ... The term antiretroviral drugs is used to describe drugs used against HIV infection (HIV is an RNA retrovirus). ...


The nation is divided into over 80 ethnic groups, each having its own language. The largest ethnic groups are the Baya 33%, Banda 27%, Mandjia 13%, Sara 10%, Mboum 7%, M'Baka 4%, and Yakoma 4%, with 2% others, including Europeans. Religiously, about 35% of the population follows indigenous beliefs, 25% is Protestant, 25% is Roman Catholic, and 15% is Muslim. The Baya (also called Baya-Mandjia) is the largest ethnic group in the Central African Republic. ... A people of the Central African Republic, some of whom also live in Congo (Kinshasa) and Cameroon and possibly in The Sudan. ... The Mandja (also: Mandjia, Mandija, Manja) are an ethnic group in the Central African Republic. ... a Sara woman about 1900 The Sara are an ethnic group in Central Africa. ... The Mbaka are a minority tribe in the Central African Republic. ... World map showing the location of Europe. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... There is also a collection of Hadith called Sahih Muslim A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Persian: Mosalman or Mosalmon Urdu: مسلمان, Turkish: Müslüman, Albanian: Mysliman, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of the religion of Islam. ...


Culture

Main article: Culture of the Central African Republic

See also:

African Writers (by country): This is a list of prominent and notable literary figures from the African continent, listed by country, including poets, novelists, childrens writers, essayists, and scholars, listed by country. ... The Central African Republic includes many different cultures and musical forms. ... Holidays in the Central African Republic: Categories: Central African Republic ...

Miscellaneous topics

Telephone Network: The national network for fixed phones consists of some Panaftel microwave radio relay links (from Bangui to Bossembele, Baoro, Carnot, Berberati and on to Gamboula on the border with Cameroon). ... The Central African Republic is an active member in several Central African organizations, including the Economic and Monetary Union (CEMAC), the Economic Community of Central African States (CEEAC), the Central African Peace and Security Council (COPAX--still under formation), and the Central Bank of Central African States (BEAC). ... The military of the Central African Republic (Forces armées centrafricaines or FACA), currently numbers at approximately 2,000, and military expenditures amount to 1. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require rewriting and/or reformatting. ... Bill Clinton and Socks on a Central African Republic stamp set This is a list of people on postage stamps of the Central African Republic. ... The Central African Republic is one of 35 countries where Scouting exists (be it embryonic or widespread) but where there is no National Scout Organization which is a member of the World Organization of the Scout Movement at the present time. ... First international Mali 4 - 3 Central African Republic (Madagascar; June 1, 1960) Biggest win Central African Republic 4 - 1 Chad (Libreville, Gabon; November 8, 1999) Central African Republic 3 - 0 ST&P (Libreville, Gabon; November 13, 1999) Biggest defeat Cameroon 7 - 1 Central African Republic (Congo; December 17, 1984) The...

See also

  • List of Central African Republic-related topics

This is a list of topics related to Central African Republic. ...

References

  • Maria Petringa, Brazza, A Life for Africa (2006) ISBN 9781-4259-11980

Notes

  1. ^ http://www2.hs.fi/english/archive/news.asp?id=20010424IE1
  2. ^ http://www.alertnet.org/thenews/newsdesk/IRIN/87ba6e292f78b0bc6dbbaeb9c2ef6bd9.htm
  3. ^ http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/africa/country_profiles/1067615.stm
  4. ^ http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/africa/4747772.stm
  5. ^ http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/africa/4844664.stm
  6. ^ http://www.forestsmonitor.org/reports/solddownriver/car.htm
  7. ^ http://www.unaids.org/en/Regions_Countries/Countries/central_african_republic.asp
  8. ^ http://data.unaids.org/pub/GlobalReport/2006/2006_GR_ANN3_en.pdf

External links

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Humanitarian Situation
  • The Humanitarian Community in CAR - Central African Republic
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  • allAfrica - Central African Republic news headline links
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Overviews
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Ethnic groups
  • African Pygmies Culture and music of the first inhabitants of the Central African Republic, with photos and ethnographic notes
Tourism
  • Central African Republic travel guide from Wikitravel
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  Results from FactBites:
 
central african republic map and information page (611 words)
The Central African Republic is famed worldwide for its lowland gorilla population, Pygmy culture, and fabulous national parks.
Landforms The Central African Republic is in essence an undulating plateau.
Central and south is a series of forested, rolling hills, with some topping 2000 ft. A dense tropical rainforest in the southeast fronts the Ubangi River, and in the north, the land flattens into a treeless, desert-like savanna grassland.
Central African Republic travel guide (196 words)
Although the Central African Republic has seen a bit of political turmoil in recent year, the situation now seems relatively stable again.
The south of Central Africa is muddy and dominated by tropical rainforest.
The Oubangui river separates the republic form Congo Kinshasa and is the life wire of the country.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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