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Encyclopedia > Centennial Park (Nashville)

Centennial Park (Nashville) is a large urban park located approximately two miles (three km) west of downtown Nashville, Tennessee, across West End Avenue (U.S. Highway 70S) from the campus of Vanderbilt University and adjacent to the headquarters campus of the Hospital Corporation of America. Urban is in or having to do with cities, as distinct from rural areas. ... For the Korean family name Park, see Korean name. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Downtown Nashville at dusk, viewed from the Gateway Bridge Nashville is the capital of the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... United States Highway 70 is an east-west United States highway that runs for 2,385 miles from eastern North Carolina to east-central Arizona. ... Campus is Latin for field or open space. English gets the words camp and campus from this origin. ... Vanderbilt University Vanderbilt University (colloquially known as Vandy) is a private, non-sectarian university located in Nashville, Tennessee. ... The Hospital Corporation of America (HCA) (NYSE: HCA) is the largest private operator of health care facilities in the world. ...

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Lake Watauga, a small artificial lake in Centennial Park

It was the site of the Tennessee Centennial and International Exposition of 1897 and was named after this event. After the exposition ended, most of the building and exhibits (with the exception of a full-scale model of the Athenian Parthenon) were dismantled, leaving in its place a landscaped open area with a small artificial lake (named "Lake Watauga" after the region in western North Carolina where many of Nashville's early settlers moved from), sunken gardens, and a bandshell. This area became an important recreation site for white Nashvillians; "Jim Crow" laws forbade its use by blacks until the 1960s, which resulted in disagreements which led to the closure of the park's swimming pool and its subsequent reopening as an arts center. 1897 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... The Parthenon seen from the hill of the Pnyx to the west The Parthenon (Greek: Παρθενων) is the most famous surviving building of Ancient Greece and one of the most famous buildings in the world. ... A lake is a body of water surrounded by land. ... State nickname: Tar Heel State Other U.S. States Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Governor Michael Easley Official languages English Area 139,509 km² (28th)  - Land 126,256 km²  - Water 13,227 km² (9. ... Part of a garden in Bristol, England A flower bed in the gardens of Bristol Zoo, England. ... Caucasian is originally a geographical term, meaning relative or pertaining to the Caucasus region of Eastern Europe and West Asia. ... A depiction of T.D. Rices Jim Crow In the United States, the so-called Jim Crow laws were made to enforce racial segregation, and included laws that would prevent African Americans from doing things that a white person could do. ... African Americans, also known as Afro-Americans or black Americans, are an ethnic group in the United States of America whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Sub-Saharan and West Africa. ... Events and trends The 1960s was a turbulent decade of change around the world. ... 50 meter indoor swimming pool A swimming pool, swimming bath, or wading pool is an artificially enclosed body of water intended for recreational or competitive swimming, or for other bathing activities that do not involve swimming, i. ... Although today the word art usually refers to the visual arts, the concept of what art is has continuously changed over centuries. ...

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The Parthenon in Centennial Park is a full-scale replica of the original Greek Parthenon.

The Parthenon replica, built largely out of plaster as a temporary exhibit building (the Nashville pavilion of the Centennial Exposition) began to fall into disrepair and was proposed for demolition on several occasions, but public sentiment in favor of this symbol of Nashville as the "Athens of the South" precluded this. Finally, in the 1920s it was agreed to replace the temporary plaster building with a permanent, concrete and steel replacement which remains today and has been refurbished on several occasions; it functions today primarily as an art gallery. It contains a statue of Pallas Athena which is said to be the largest indoor sculpture in the Western world which was commissioned by the city and accomplished by renowned Nashville sculptor Alan LeQuire. The Parthenon seen from the hill of the Pnyx to the west The Parthenon (Greek: Παρθενων) is the most famous surviving building of Ancient Greece and one of the most famous buildings in the world. ... Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century Decades: 1870s 1880s 1890s 1900s 1910s - 1920s - 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s Years: 1920 1921 1922 1923 1924 1925 1926 1927 1928 1929 Referred to as the Roaring 20s. ... This article is about the construction material. ... Steel framework Steel is a metal alloy whose major component is iron, with carbon being the primary alloying material. ... An art gallery or art museum is a space for the exhibition of art, usually visual art, and usually primarily paintings and sculpture. ... Athena from the east pediment of the Afea temple in Aegina After a sculpture of Athena at the Louvre. ... For alternative meanings for The West in the United States, see the U.S. West and American West. ... Sculptor redirects here. ...


The park also contains a recreation center. There were many mature shade trees in the park until the Nashville Tornado of 1998; most of them were damaged or destroyed in the storm. The park was also the site of the storm's sole fatality, a Vanderbilt ROTC cadet. (Since then the park and other areas of outdoor gathering in the Nashville area have been equipped with storm-warning sirens.) The Nashville Tornado of 1998 is the tornado event that occurred on April 16, 1998. ... The Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) is a training program of the United States armed forces present on college campuses to recruit and educate commissioned officers. ...


The park is also the home of the administrative offices of the city's Department of Parks and Recreation.



Nashville landmarks
Bicentennial Mall State Park | Centennial Park | Cheekwood Botanical Garden and Museum | Country Music Hall of Fame | Fort Nashborough | Fort Negley | Frist Center for the Visual Arts | Gaylord Entertainment Center | Marathon Motor Works | Nashville City Cemetery | Nashville International Airport | Nashville Zoo at Grassmere | Opryland Hotel | Ryman Auditorium | Schermerhorn Symphony Center | Tennessee Performing Arts Center | Tennessee State Capitol | Tennessee State Museum | The Coliseum | The Hermitage | Union Station
Former: Opryland USA
Downtown Nashville at dusk, viewed from the Gateway Bridge Nashville is the capital of the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... For the group sometimes known as Landmark, see Landmark Education Originally, a landmark literally meant a geographic feature, used by explorers and others to find their way back through an area on a return trip. ... Bicentennial Mall State Park is a state park is located in the shadow of the State Capitol in downtown Nashville, TN. The 19-acre park is designed to complement the Tennessee Capitol Building, give visitors a taste of Tennessees history and natural wonder, and to serve as a lasting... The Country Music Hall of Fame is a museum at 222 Fifth Avenue South in Nashville, Tennessee, United States. ... The Gaylord Entertainment Center is a sports venue in downtown Nashville, Tennessee which was completed in 1996. ... Marathon Motor Works was a an early automobile manufacturer, based in Tennessee. ... Nashville International Airport is an airport in Nashville, Tennessee. ... The Nashville Zoo at Grassmere is the newest zoo in the United States and is located six miles from downtown Nashville, Tennessee. ... The Ryman Auditorium first opened its doors in 1892 as a vision of Captain Thomas G. Ryman. ... See Coliseum for the structure in Rome, or Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum for the structure in Los Angeles. ... For other places with similar names, see Hermitage. ... Opryland USA was a theme park located in suburban Nashville, Tennessee. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
History&Genealogy - Postcards - Nashville, Part 2 (1849 words)
THE PARTHENON, CENTENNIAL PARK, NASHVILLE, TENN. Narrative on reverse.
THE PARTHENON - CENTENNIAL PARK - NASHVILLE - TENN. Narrative on reverse.
PERGOLA, CENTENNIAL PARK, NASHVILLE, TENN. Narrative on reverse.
Centennial Park (Nashville) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (642 words)
Centennial Park (Nashville) is a large urban park located approximately two miles (three km) west of downtown Nashville, Tennessee, across West End Avenue (U.S. Highway 70S) from the campus of Vanderbilt University and adjacent to the headquarters campus of the Hospital Corporation of America.
The Parthenon replica, built largely out of plaster as a temporary exhibit building (the Nashville pavilion of the Centennial Exposition) began to fall into disrepair and was proposed for demolition on several occasions, but public sentiment in favor of this symbol of Nashville as the "Athens of the South" precluded this.
Centennial Park is the site of the climactic scene in Robert Altman's Nashville, a picture beloved of many film critics.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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